side saddle putters - what putter are you using?

1212224262731

Comments

  • bluedotbluedot Members Posts: 3,483 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @deman77 said:

    @BigEx44 said:
    I have the F22 with the AK shaft and mine is definitely face balanced.

    Bobby explained that AK shaft fit of F22 is CG balanced which is a free turning design (with typical face balanced mallets the CG is severely behind the face balance point) - it may end up hanging different statically due to tolerances and very low resistance to turning but how it hangs is not important as it will not resist being turned with the shaft. The advantage of shaft going through CG is a more efficient energy transfer and better roll.
    I am still trying to get him to explain the disadvantages but my view it is less yip resistant to hand induced face twist than the face shafted model.

    I mean this with no disrespect whatsoever, but if you yip putting face on, you'll be the first I ever heard of. There just isn't much way to yip using one hand and with that hand behind the shaft with no wrist action. I'm sure it can be done, but...

  • LightBearerLightBearer Members Posts: 155 ✭✭

    I extended my Seemore putter to 40", wanted it to be an arm lock putter, but didnt like the lack of feel. Well, I saw an older gentleman at a local course putting face on. I subsequently experimented with it and had great success from 15 feet and in. I think on long putts/lags I'll employ the arm lock. Or something else. The distance control is a difficulty of this putting method, as Randy Haag and others have stated.

    Clubs gripped with Pure DTX Midsize

    Long Clubs: Wilson Staff D100, 10.5* loft, Srixon Z 355 15* Fairway, Srixon Z H65 2H, 16*
    Middle Clubs: Cobra Baffler XL Irons 5-PW Lite Flex
    Short Clubs: Cobra S3 Max Gap Wedge 49*, Nike Engage Toe Sweep 54*
    :D
    Ball: Snell MTB (Primary), Srixon Q Star (Secondary)
    Seemore FGP Bronze Putter, Left-Handed, 35.5"
  • deman77deman77 Members Posts: 189 ✭✭✭

    @bluedot said:

    @deman77 said:

    @BigEx44 said:
    I have the F22 with the AK shaft and mine is definitely face balanced.

    Bobby explained that AK shaft fit of F22 is CG balanced which is a free turning design (with typical face balanced mallets the CG is severely behind the face balance point) - it may end up hanging different statically due to tolerances and very low resistance to turning but how it hangs is not important as it will not resist being turned with the shaft. The advantage of shaft going through CG is a more efficient energy transfer and better roll.
    I am still trying to get him to explain the disadvantages but my view it is less yip resistant to hand induced face twist than the face shafted model.

    I mean this with no disrespect whatsoever, but if you yip putting face on, you'll be the first I ever heard of. There just isn't much way to yip using one hand and with that hand behind the shaft with no wrist action. I'm sure it can be done, but...

    You are right it’s not a yip- my left arm was pushing right one off line (I move both - not the same stroke as yours) - it just was almost random (once every 5 strokes or so). That’s why I thought yips. The difference was the more bent over position of the normal putter with rib cage out of the way so both arms rock freely that works a lot better for my method. Currently practicing f22 holding left hand at the top of the bottom grip and right hand at the bottom to accommodate bent over stance. I will be cutting it down to about 34-33inches. Just deciding on grips.
    It is definitely easier to twist the head of this putter for me - when I go conventional with this putter where I have poor technique my line is a lot more inconsistent than with 2ball and remember it has the advantage of twisting less from offcentre strike. You definitely need solid mechanics for AK not to hurt you, but side saddle does give that

  • J-TizzleJ-Tizzle Hello Members Posts: 3,430 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @deman77 said:

    @bluedot said:

    @deman77 said:

    @BigEx44 said:
    I have the F22 with the AK shaft and mine is definitely face balanced.

    Bobby explained that AK shaft fit of F22 is CG balanced which is a free turning design (with typical face balanced mallets the CG is severely behind the face balance point) - it may end up hanging different statically due to tolerances and very low resistance to turning but how it hangs is not important as it will not resist being turned with the shaft. The advantage of shaft going through CG is a more efficient energy transfer and better roll.
    I am still trying to get him to explain the disadvantages but my view it is less yip resistant to hand induced face twist than the face shafted model.

    I mean this with no disrespect whatsoever, but if you yip putting face on, you'll be the first I ever heard of. There just isn't much way to yip using one hand and with that hand behind the shaft with no wrist action. I'm sure it can be done, but...

    You are right it’s not a yip- my left arm was pushing right one off line (I move both - not the same stroke as yours) - it just was almost random (once every 5 strokes or so). That’s why I thought yips. The difference was the more bent over position of the normal putter with rib cage out of the way so both arms rock freely that works a lot better for my method. Currently practicing f22 holding left hand at the top of the bottom grip and right hand at the bottom to accommodate bent over stance. I will be cutting it down to about 34-33inches. Just deciding on grips.
    It is definitely easier to twist the head of this putter for me - when I go conventional with this putter where I have poor technique my line is a lot more inconsistent than with 2ball and remember it has the advantage of twisting less from offcentre strike. You definitely need solid mechanics for AK not to hurt you, but side saddle does give that

    If you're side saddling and moving both arms, I kinda feel like you're missing the point.

    The biggest benefit I've seen from side saddling is really ALMOST having a fixed point and letting the putter doe the work. I can't tell if from your approach if you are keeping that fixed point or if the top of the grip is moving, but that might be something worth considering.

    G410 10.5* - F8+ 15* - F6 18* - G410 23* - i500 5-U - Hi Toe 54* & 60* - BG F22
  • BigEx44BigEx44 Members Posts: 308 ✭✭✭✭

    @J-Tizzle said:

    @deman77 said:

    @bluedot said:

    @deman77 said:

    @BigEx44 said:
    I have the F22 with the AK shaft and mine is definitely face balanced.

    Bobby explained that AK shaft fit of F22 is CG balanced which is a free turning design (with typical face balanced mallets the CG is severely behind the face balance point) - it may end up hanging different statically due to tolerances and very low resistance to turning but how it hangs is not important as it will not resist being turned with the shaft. The advantage of shaft going through CG is a more efficient energy transfer and better roll.
    I am still trying to get him to explain the disadvantages but my view it is less yip resistant to hand induced face twist than the face shafted model.

    I mean this with no disrespect whatsoever, but if you yip putting face on, you'll be the first I ever heard of. There just isn't much way to yip using one hand and with that hand behind the shaft with no wrist action. I'm sure it can be done, but...

    You are right it’s not a yip- my left arm was pushing right one off line (I move both - not the same stroke as yours) - it just was almost random (once every 5 strokes or so). That’s why I thought yips. The difference was the more bent over position of the normal putter with rib cage out of the way so both arms rock freely that works a lot better for my method. Currently practicing f22 holding left hand at the top of the bottom grip and right hand at the bottom to accommodate bent over stance. I will be cutting it down to about 34-33inches. Just deciding on grips.
    It is definitely easier to twist the head of this putter for me - when I go conventional with this putter where I have poor technique my line is a lot more inconsistent than with 2ball and remember it has the advantage of twisting less from offcentre strike. You definitely need solid mechanics for AK not to hurt you, but side saddle does give that

    If you're side saddling and moving both arms, I kinda feel like you're missing the point.

    The biggest benefit I've seen from side saddling is really ALMOST having a fixed point and letting the putter doe the work. I can't tell if from your approach if you are keeping that fixed point or if the top of the grip is moving, but that might be something worth considering.

    I figured he might be doing something like this:

    I couldn't do it. But if it works, it works.....

  • deman77deman77 Members Posts: 189 ✭✭✭

    @BigEx44 said:

    @J-Tizzle said:

    @deman77 said:

    @bluedot said:

    @deman77 said:

    @BigEx44 said:
    I have the F22 with the AK shaft and mine is definitely face balanced.

    Bobby explained that AK shaft fit of F22 is CG balanced which is a free turning design (with typical face balanced mallets the CG is severely behind the face balance point) - it may end up hanging different statically due to tolerances and very low resistance to turning but how it hangs is not important as it will not resist being turned with the shaft. The advantage of shaft going through CG is a more efficient energy transfer and better roll.
    I am still trying to get him to explain the disadvantages but my view it is less yip resistant to hand induced face twist than the face shafted model.

    I mean this with no disrespect whatsoever, but if you yip putting face on, you'll be the first I ever heard of. There just isn't much way to yip using one hand and with that hand behind the shaft with no wrist action. I'm sure it can be done, but...

    You are right it’s not a yip- my left arm was pushing right one off line (I move both - not the same stroke as yours) - it just was almost random (once every 5 strokes or so). That’s why I thought yips. The difference was the more bent over position of the normal putter with rib cage out of the way so both arms rock freely that works a lot better for my method. Currently practicing f22 holding left hand at the top of the bottom grip and right hand at the bottom to accommodate bent over stance. I will be cutting it down to about 34-33inches. Just deciding on grips.
    It is definitely easier to twist the head of this putter for me - when I go conventional with this putter where I have poor technique my line is a lot more inconsistent than with 2ball and remember it has the advantage of twisting less from offcentre strike. You definitely need solid mechanics for AK not to hurt you, but side saddle does give that

    If you're side saddling and moving both arms, I kinda feel like you're missing the point.

    The biggest benefit I've seen from side saddling is really ALMOST having a fixed point and letting the putter doe the work. I can't tell if from your approach if you are keeping that fixed point or if the top of the grip is moving, but that might be something worth considering.

    I figured he might be doing something like this:

    I couldn't do it. But if it works, it works.....

    Correct. I knew someone must already be doing that. That was how I did it naturally before I knew side saddle style existed.
    I am experimenting with different stances and grip. Just rolling tons on the mat and writing down line and roll scores trying to pick up the themes. So far a lot more bent over works better especially on longer putts because upper arms are less likely to run into the rib cage. I also must have hands a lot more farther apart not to feel like I am going to flip it. But that could be the very heavy f22 head.
    I’m planning to stick a Flatso xl with flat bit facing the hole and that will let me mess around with counterweights.

  • J-TizzleJ-Tizzle Hello Members Posts: 3,430 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @deman77 said:

    @BigEx44 said:

    @J-Tizzle said:

    @deman77 said:

    @bluedot said:

    @deman77 said:

    @BigEx44 said:
    I have the F22 with the AK shaft and mine is definitely face balanced.

    Bobby explained that AK shaft fit of F22 is CG balanced which is a free turning design (with typical face balanced mallets the CG is severely behind the face balance point) - it may end up hanging different statically due to tolerances and very low resistance to turning but how it hangs is not important as it will not resist being turned with the shaft. The advantage of shaft going through CG is a more efficient energy transfer and better roll.
    I am still trying to get him to explain the disadvantages but my view it is less yip resistant to hand induced face twist than the face shafted model.

    I mean this with no disrespect whatsoever, but if you yip putting face on, you'll be the first I ever heard of. There just isn't much way to yip using one hand and with that hand behind the shaft with no wrist action. I'm sure it can be done, but...

    You are right it’s not a yip- my left arm was pushing right one off line (I move both - not the same stroke as yours) - it just was almost random (once every 5 strokes or so). That’s why I thought yips. The difference was the more bent over position of the normal putter with rib cage out of the way so both arms rock freely that works a lot better for my method. Currently practicing f22 holding left hand at the top of the bottom grip and right hand at the bottom to accommodate bent over stance. I will be cutting it down to about 34-33inches. Just deciding on grips.
    It is definitely easier to twist the head of this putter for me - when I go conventional with this putter where I have poor technique my line is a lot more inconsistent than with 2ball and remember it has the advantage of twisting less from offcentre strike. You definitely need solid mechanics for AK not to hurt you, but side saddle does give that

    If you're side saddling and moving both arms, I kinda feel like you're missing the point.

    The biggest benefit I've seen from side saddling is really ALMOST having a fixed point and letting the putter doe the work. I can't tell if from your approach if you are keeping that fixed point or if the top of the grip is moving, but that might be something worth considering.

    I figured he might be doing something like this:

    I couldn't do it. But if it works, it works.....

    Correct. I knew someone must already be doing that. That was how I did it naturally before I knew side saddle style existed.
    I am experimenting with different stances and grip. Just rolling tons on the mat and writing down line and roll scores trying to pick up the themes. So far a lot more bent over works better especially on longer putts because upper arms are less likely to run into the rib cage. I also must have hands a lot more farther apart not to feel like I am going to flip it. But that could be the very heavy f22 head.
    I’m planning to stick a Flatso xl with flat bit facing the hole and that will let me mess around with counterweights.

    Yuck...

    But to each is own.

    G410 10.5* - F8+ 15* - F6 18* - G410 23* - i500 5-U - Hi Toe 54* & 60* - BG F22
  • deman77deman77 Members Posts: 189 ✭✭✭

    @J-Tizzle said:

    @deman77 said:

    @BigEx44 said:

    @J-Tizzle said:

    @deman77 said:

    @bluedot said:

    @deman77 said:

    @BigEx44 said:
    I have the F22 with the AK shaft and mine is definitely face balanced.

    Bobby explained that AK shaft fit of F22 is CG balanced which is a free turning design (with typical face balanced mallets the CG is severely behind the face balance point) - it may end up hanging different statically due to tolerances and very low resistance to turning but how it hangs is not important as it will not resist being turned with the shaft. The advantage of shaft going through CG is a more efficient energy transfer and better roll.
    I am still trying to get him to explain the disadvantages but my view it is less yip resistant to hand induced face twist than the face shafted model.

    I mean this with no disrespect whatsoever, but if you yip putting face on, you'll be the first I ever heard of. There just isn't much way to yip using one hand and with that hand behind the shaft with no wrist action. I'm sure it can be done, but...

    You are right it’s not a yip- my left arm was pushing right one off line (I move both - not the same stroke as yours) - it just was almost random (once every 5 strokes or so). That’s why I thought yips. The difference was the more bent over position of the normal putter with rib cage out of the way so both arms rock freely that works a lot better for my method. Currently practicing f22 holding left hand at the top of the bottom grip and right hand at the bottom to accommodate bent over stance. I will be cutting it down to about 34-33inches. Just deciding on grips.
    It is definitely easier to twist the head of this putter for me - when I go conventional with this putter where I have poor technique my line is a lot more inconsistent than with 2ball and remember it has the advantage of twisting less from offcentre strike. You definitely need solid mechanics for AK not to hurt you, but side saddle does give that

    If you're side saddling and moving both arms, I kinda feel like you're missing the point.

    The biggest benefit I've seen from side saddling is really ALMOST having a fixed point and letting the putter doe the work. I can't tell if from your approach if you are keeping that fixed point or if the top of the grip is moving, but that might be something worth considering.

    I figured he might be doing something like this:

    I couldn't do it. But if it works, it works.....

    Correct. I knew someone must already be doing that. That was how I did it naturally before I knew side saddle style existed.
    I am experimenting with different stances and grip. Just rolling tons on the mat and writing down line and roll scores trying to pick up the themes. So far a lot more bent over works better especially on longer putts because upper arms are less likely to run into the rib cage. I also must have hands a lot more farther apart not to feel like I am going to flip it. But that could be the very heavy f22 head.
    I’m planning to stick a Flatso xl with flat bit facing the hole and that will let me mess around with counterweights.

    Yuck...

    But to each is own.

    I don’t disagree. It’s purely a functional choice.

  • BigEx44BigEx44 Members Posts: 308 ✭✭✭✭

    @deman77 said:

    @J-Tizzle said:

    @deman77 said:

    @BigEx44 said:

    @J-Tizzle said:

    @deman77 said:

    @bluedot said:

    @deman77 said:

    @BigEx44 said:
    I have the F22 with the AK shaft and mine is definitely face balanced.

    Bobby explained that AK shaft fit of F22 is CG balanced which is a free turning design (with typical face balanced mallets the CG is severely behind the face balance point) - it may end up hanging different statically due to tolerances and very low resistance to turning but how it hangs is not important as it will not resist being turned with the shaft. The advantage of shaft going through CG is a more efficient energy transfer and better roll.
    I am still trying to get him to explain the disadvantages but my view it is less yip resistant to hand induced face twist than the face shafted model.

    I mean this with no disrespect whatsoever, but if you yip putting face on, you'll be the first I ever heard of. There just isn't much way to yip using one hand and with that hand behind the shaft with no wrist action. I'm sure it can be done, but...

    You are right it’s not a yip- my left arm was pushing right one off line (I move both - not the same stroke as yours) - it just was almost random (once every 5 strokes or so). That’s why I thought yips. The difference was the more bent over position of the normal putter with rib cage out of the way so both arms rock freely that works a lot better for my method. Currently practicing f22 holding left hand at the top of the bottom grip and right hand at the bottom to accommodate bent over stance. I will be cutting it down to about 34-33inches. Just deciding on grips.
    It is definitely easier to twist the head of this putter for me - when I go conventional with this putter where I have poor technique my line is a lot more inconsistent than with 2ball and remember it has the advantage of twisting less from offcentre strike. You definitely need solid mechanics for AK not to hurt you, but side saddle does give that

    If you're side saddling and moving both arms, I kinda feel like you're missing the point.

    The biggest benefit I've seen from side saddling is really ALMOST having a fixed point and letting the putter doe the work. I can't tell if from your approach if you are keeping that fixed point or if the top of the grip is moving, but that might be something worth considering.

    I figured he might be doing something like this:

    I couldn't do it. But if it works, it works.....

    Correct. I knew someone must already be doing that. That was how I did it naturally before I knew side saddle style existed.
    I am experimenting with different stances and grip. Just rolling tons on the mat and writing down line and roll scores trying to pick up the themes. So far a lot more bent over works better especially on longer putts because upper arms are less likely to run into the rib cage. I also must have hands a lot more farther apart not to feel like I am going to flip it. But that could be the very heavy f22 head.
    I’m planning to stick a Flatso xl with flat bit facing the hole and that will let me mess around with counterweights.

    Yuck...

    But to each is own.

    I don’t disagree. It’s purely a functional choice.

    I say if it works for you....go for it! Even that style has the advantage of binocular vision (facing the hole) and a stroke that seems easier to make straight back and straight through. You may discover after a while the advantages of a fixed left hand. But if not, no big deal.

  • brentflogbrentflog Members Posts: 89 ✭✭✭
    edited Apr 26, 2019 2:21am #701

    @deman77 said:
    I got mine with a-kicker position. There is a slight toe hang (probably a 22degrees). Is that expected?

    Mine had a slight toe hang and as I started to compare it to my Juanputt I noticed that it was more upright. In fact it was not conforming and the lie angle was greater than 80*. Anyway I noticed that the epoxy was loose and I was able to get it back 80*.

    Having said all of that I am not a fan of the forward press in the shaft. If you try to really keep the top hand stable it will promote a descending blow to the ball. In order to flatten out the bottom of the stroke you have to move that top hand. It is not a big manipulation but I am probably going to take it to my club dr. And see if he can put a slight bend in there to remove the forward press. I wish Bobby would make these details known on the website.

  • bluedotbluedot Members Posts: 3,483 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @deman77 said:

    @J-Tizzle said:

    @deman77 said:

    @BigEx44 said:

    @J-Tizzle said:

    @deman77 said:

    @bluedot said:

    @deman77 said:

    @BigEx44 said:
    I have the F22 with the AK shaft and mine is definitely face balanced.

    Bobby explained that AK shaft fit of F22 is CG balanced which is a free turning design (with typical face balanced mallets the CG is severely behind the face balance point) - it may end up hanging different statically due to tolerances and very low resistance to turning but how it hangs is not important as it will not resist being turned with the shaft. The advantage of shaft going through CG is a more efficient energy transfer and better roll.
    I am still trying to get him to explain the disadvantages but my view it is less yip resistant to hand induced face twist than the face shafted model.

    I mean this with no disrespect whatsoever, but if you yip putting face on, you'll be the first I ever heard of. There just isn't much way to yip using one hand and with that hand behind the shaft with no wrist action. I'm sure it can be done, but...

    You are right it’s not a yip- my left arm was pushing right one off line (I move both - not the same stroke as yours) - it just was almost random (once every 5 strokes or so). That’s why I thought yips. The difference was the more bent over position of the normal putter with rib cage out of the way so both arms rock freely that works a lot better for my method. Currently practicing f22 holding left hand at the top of the bottom grip and right hand at the bottom to accommodate bent over stance. I will be cutting it down to about 34-33inches. Just deciding on grips.
    It is definitely easier to twist the head of this putter for me - when I go conventional with this putter where I have poor technique my line is a lot more inconsistent than with 2ball and remember it has the advantage of twisting less from offcentre strike. You definitely need solid mechanics for AK not to hurt you, but side saddle does give that

    If you're side saddling and moving both arms, I kinda feel like you're missing the point.

    The biggest benefit I've seen from side saddling is really ALMOST having a fixed point and letting the putter doe the work. I can't tell if from your approach if you are keeping that fixed point or if the top of the grip is moving, but that might be something worth considering.

    I figured he might be doing something like this:

    I couldn't do it. But if it works, it works.....

    Correct. I knew someone must already be doing that. That was how I did it naturally before I knew side saddle style existed.
    I am experimenting with different stances and grip. Just rolling tons on the mat and writing down line and roll scores trying to pick up the themes. So far a lot more bent over works better especially on longer putts because upper arms are less likely to run into the rib cage. I also must have hands a lot more farther apart not to feel like I am going to flip it. But that could be the very heavy f22 head.
    I’m planning to stick a Flatso xl with flat bit facing the hole and that will let me mess around with counterweights.

    Yuck...

    But to each is own.

    I don’t disagree. It’s purely a functional choice.

    I'll disagree, at least a little. I think that bringing movement from both hands and arms back into the stroke gets rid of at least a third of the benefits of face on putting, maybe more. You're still facing the hole and using binocular vision, and you've eliminated all the stuff about keeping the head still and such, but there is NO way it isn't more complex to putt with both hands moving than with just one. It's far less complex than coordinating the two hands in a conventional stance because the wrists aren't involved in the same way, but still more complex than swinging one arm.

    Think of it this way; if you were going to roll a ball on the green without a club, would you EVER use two hands to to do it? Heck, you don't use two hands on a bowling ball, even as much as they weigh!

    I don't mean to say that this style can't work, and work well, just like there are great conventional putters. And the visual and biomechanical advantages of facing the hole are immense. But I just don't see any way that using two hands could be as good as only one, especially under pressure.

  • deman77deman77 Members Posts: 189 ✭✭✭

    I see your points but I am still convinced my method is both simpler and more pressure resistant.
    The summary is my method ( not mine but the one I use let’s call it face on or FO) is much more like a throw which is something you and I have been doing our whole lives. I was good at it pretty much from the instance I stumbled into it. The original side saddle (SS) is more like propelling a clock pendulum that is completely remote from your body and the arm movement is more like closing a drawer (swing and push) motion. The brain experience with it is limited only to your practice of SS method.
    FO distance control comes straight out of the box and for SS it is acquired through your practice of the method.
    I also do not agree that FO arm movement is more complex. I concede keeping left arm still is simpler than moving it. But with SS you are moving your right arm not only in shoulder socket but also in elbow and wrist - however little it’s geometrically necessary because the pivot of the putter arc is in left hand not in the shoulder socket like in FO. Also unless you stand up your putter to 90 degrees you have horizontal arc however slight which means you also have slight rotation in your shoulder socket to accommodate - you may not be aware of it as it is tiny.
    With FO both hands are travelling at the same rate which is quite simple and natural for the brain to handle (it’s lije pushing away from a wall) and no matter the putter lie it will move perfectly straight back and through - I know slight arc not a big problem for SS since left hand is fixed but what lack of horizontal arc gives me is my arms do not need to rotate sideways in shoulder sockets only rock back and forth. Critically, there is no need for movement in elbows and hands just rocking in the shoulders as centre of rotation is shoulder sockets. So provided you solved the problem of body getting in the way (for me leaning forward does it) you actually have a theoretical chance of perfect stroke with only rocking in two shoulder sockets which cannot exist by design in SS unless you stand it up. This perfect solution is if your shoulder sockets are on the same level and aligned perpendicular to the line of putt but even if they are not there are but minimal compensations that happen in shoulder sockets with them being able to rotate in all directions. The brain simply ensures that both hands and hands move at the same rate like pushing away from a wall whilst standing on a swing.
    I’m happy to debate and be convinced otherwise. If there is one thing I learned that works as a principle it is not holding on to your beliefs too much.
    I can’t argue about pressure yet - i only have minimal practical application of it and still messing around with stance and putter but what I have seen in play so far was in a different league to my regular putting performance. i am typically 6 strokes lost to scratch in putting (it should be worse but iron play and chipping is good so I have not much left to make errors) when I putt conventionally so arguably it’s quite easy to improve on - but the quality of roll I am observing almost all the time (that’s before f22 even) is the kind of stuff I would only occasionally marvel at even with a my local competing and regularly winning pro. The margins for error are quite good too - my state of mind is nowhere near as critical though it helps.

  • J-TizzleJ-Tizzle Hello Members Posts: 3,430 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @deman77 said:
    I see your points but I am still convinced my method is both simpler and more pressure resistant.
    The summary is my method ( not mine but the one I use let’s call it face on or FO) is much more like a throw which is something you and I have been doing our whole lives. I was good at it pretty much from the instance I stumbled into it. The original side saddle (SS) is more like propelling a clock pendulum that is completely remote from your body and the arm movement is more like closing a drawer (swing and push) motion. The brain experience with it is limited only to your practice of SS method.
    FO distance control comes straight out of the box and for SS it is acquired through your practice of the method.
    I also do not agree that FO arm movement is more complex. I concede keeping left arm still is simpler than moving it. But with SS you are moving your right arm not only in shoulder socket but also in elbow and wrist - however little it’s geometrically necessary because the pivot of the putter arc is in left hand not in the shoulder socket like in FO. Also unless you stand up your putter to 90 degrees you have horizontal arc however slight which means you also have slight rotation in your shoulder socket to accommodate - you may not be aware of it as it is tiny.
    With FO both hands are travelling at the same rate which is quite simple and natural for the brain to handle (it’s lije pushing away from a wall) and no matter the putter lie it will move perfectly straight back and through - I know slight arc not a big problem for SS since left hand is fixed but what lack of horizontal arc gives me is my arms do not need to rotate sideways in shoulder sockets only rock back and forth. Critically, there is no need for movement in elbows and hands just rocking in the shoulders as centre of rotation is shoulder sockets. So provided you solved the problem of body getting in the way (for me leaning forward does it) you actually have a theoretical chance of perfect stroke with only rocking in two shoulder sockets which cannot exist by design in SS unless you stand it up. This perfect solution is if your shoulder sockets are on the same level and aligned perpendicular to the line of putt but even if they are not there are but minimal compensations that happen in shoulder sockets with them being able to rotate in all directions. The brain simply ensures that both hands and hands move at the same rate like pushing away from a wall whilst standing on a swing.
    I’m happy to debate and be convinced otherwise. If there is one thing I learned that works as a principle it is not holding on to your beliefs too much.
    I can’t argue about pressure yet - i only have minimal practical application of it and still messing around with stance and putter but what I have seen in play so far was in a different league to my regular putting performance. i am typically 6 strokes lost to scratch in putting (it should be worse but iron play and chipping is good so I have not much left to make errors) when I putt conventionally so arguably it’s quite easy to improve on - but the quality of roll I am observing almost all the time (that’s before f22 even) is the kind of stuff I would only occasionally marvel at even with a my local competing and regularly winning pro. The margins for error are quite good too - my state of mind is nowhere near as critical though it helps.

    To each is own for sure.

    I guess for me the difference is that the way you described everything above is how I used to approach my standard approach to putting. When I went side saddle, my thoughts when putting went from the above, to "pick line, line up ball, settle in, fixed left hand, strike putt". For me, the simplicity of side saddle was the biggest advantage.

    G410 10.5* - F8+ 15* - F6 18* - G410 23* - i500 5-U - Hi Toe 54* & 60* - BG F22
  • deman77deman77 Members Posts: 189 ✭✭✭

    Had a practice 9 yesterday holding it really low and decided it was the way to go - approved the chop. Incidentally, last putt with the original was a 25 footer for par with 2ft break that would have been inches past had it not dropped.
    Having no shaft excess on top to counterbalance it made me realise what was causing pulls and mental discomfort. The heavy head really wants to move faster than the handle - it became really obvious when I cut it. Putting counterweights definitely improved it but only marginally - not even to the same level as gripping down on original was - the cut away bit is about 60g but with extra leverage as it was above the hands so it was probably an equivalent of 150-200g counterweight in the left hand area - I don’t think it was enough. So I thought I needed extra heavy counterweight to really push the balance towards the hands. Conventional shaft counterweights max out at 100g and they go into the shaft so as they get longer they proportionally not as effective gram for gram.
    I went creative.
    £2.02+3.00 delivery for sash window lead weight cylinder. 452g - yes a pound of weight. The head is 500g so to move the balance up from 6in from the head where it is you need decent weight.

    £1.80 for m8 shield anchor bolt to fit 14mm concrete drill hole. The cut shaft is 14.01mm internal and the anchor design is so that it has a few mm wiggle room - you can tighten as needed. 56g - weight of anchor too. This thing is rated 90kg load so no concern heavy weight would get unstable.

    The finished thing is quite ugly at the moment. I will be swapping the bolt for button head one to make it less angular. I thought about shaving corners on lead cylinder but I don’t want to lose weight so I think I will just paint the lead. My cost will probably double to £15 or so.


    This is what 500g counterweight putter looks like.
    The thing feels super uncomfortable as you take it out of the bag - the total club weight is way over a kilo and balance is halfway down the shaft - it’s a strange feeling handling it - conventional putter feels like a straw in comparison. But the moment I take my stance (recall my stroke requires all parts of the putter to move at roughly the same rate) make a practice stroke it feels right - the balance point is now about 2in below the grip end and the whole things is much less prone to a pull - I do not feel a torque from the head in my right hand that I need to counter.
    The tests on the mat were much better for line but I did have to reduce the backstroke as I was hitting them way too far (3ft return from the target instead of 1-1.5 that I want) - more total weight. The longer putts - 15-25ft felt a lot better and it only took me 5min to get the hang of speed. It’s going into game practice and since I am getting into qualifying comps from next week, no more changes until probably August - only cosmetic - black paint and a button screw.
    The only change I can think of is an extra weight to push the balance point 3-4in higher right under my right hand but i think that’s is only needed if I was one hand putting - I need to leave some work for left hand so I am happy for now.

  • zeke013zeke013 Members Posts: 105 ✭✭

    Bought a Bobby Grace F22 - in 48" (I'm 6' and almost 1"). It arrived this week.

    At first, I thought it may be an inch or two too long. But once I got onto a green it seemed just fine.
    I had some difficulty with speed initially. Everything was long, and when it left the club I thought - "Well, THAT's plenty." But the lines were good.

    I putted for about 20 minutes before going out on the course.

    I had 21 putts in 11 holes. Barely slightly better than my normal putting - but these were the first sidesaddle putts I had ever struck in actual play. I am pretty happy.

    I didn't really miss more than one line, and I got to within a couple of inches on a couple of very long putts. Very pleased to see how I improve speed over the summer.

  • deman77deman77 Members Posts: 189 ✭✭✭
    edited May 7, 2019 7:04am #707

    I managed to record two partial practice rounds this weekend. My subjective perception is supported by strokes gained. See my evolution - last two points are the new method with my super counterweight f22. My typical baseline had been 5-7 lost strokes per round to scratch putting with occasional really good round when my focus is brilliant. Our greens are in summer mode now so they are good couple strokes harder than winter mode. These last two rounds were average focus. Subjectively - I had a ton of zero stress tap ins with nothing left outside 3ft from long distance and sinking or scaring the hole from under 20ft a lot. Chipping this way has been awesome too (prone to slight pull this early on but ridiculous distance control) so I feel like chipping has robbed me of the chance to sink a few stressful leaves. I am basically have a ton of fun with learning the correct breaks now on our greens and mechanics is but a passing thought.

  • J-TizzleJ-Tizzle Hello Members Posts: 3,430 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @zeke013 said:
    Bought a Bobby Grace F22 - in 48" (I'm 6' and almost 1"). It arrived this week.

    At first, I thought it may be an inch or two too long. But once I got onto a green it seemed just fine.
    I had some difficulty with speed initially. Everything was long, and when it left the club I thought - "Well, THAT's plenty." But the lines were good.

    I putted for about 20 minutes before going out on the course.

    I had 21 putts in 11 holes. Barely slightly better than my normal putting - but these were the first sidesaddle putts I had ever struck in actual play. I am pretty happy.

    I didn't really miss more than one line, and I got to within a couple of inches on a couple of very long putts. Very pleased to see how I improve speed over the summer.

    The speed is the last thing that came along for me on the side saddle (I struggled mightily with it this weekend). Hitting my lines were always my biggest thing and thats the fastest improvement you'll see side saddling. Stick with it. One thing I do when I'm struggling with speed is focusing on accelerating the putter through the ball. With how long the putter is (especially on fast greens) I have a tendency to slow down at the ball and not hit it.

    G410 10.5* - F8+ 15* - F6 18* - G410 23* - i500 5-U - Hi Toe 54* & 60* - BG F22
  • zeke013zeke013 Members Posts: 105 ✭✭

    @J-Tizzle said:

    @zeke013 said:
    Bought a Bobby Grace F22 - in 48" (I'm 6' and almost 1"). It arrived this week.

    At first, I thought it may be an inch or two too long. But once I got onto a green it seemed just fine.
    I had some difficulty with speed initially. Everything was long, and when it left the club I thought - "Well, THAT's plenty." But the lines were good.

    I putted for about 20 minutes before going out on the course.

    I had 21 putts in 11 holes. Barely slightly better than my normal putting - but these were the first sidesaddle putts I had ever struck in actual play. I am pretty happy.

    I didn't really miss more than one line, and I got to within a couple of inches on a couple of very long putts. Very pleased to see how I improve speed over the summer.

    The speed is the last thing that came along for me on the side saddle (I struggled mightily with it this weekend). Hitting my lines were always my biggest thing and thats the fastest improvement you'll see side saddling. Stick with it. One thing I do when I'm struggling with speed is focusing on accelerating the putter through the ball. With how long the putter is (especially on fast greens) I have a tendency to slow down at the ball and not hit it.

    Thank you. Good advice.

    Quick question - the internet advice appears split on this, and I'd appreciate your feedback. Some folks say to not "push" the club forward at all, and sort of let gravity take it. Some say to push. You fall into that camp. What led you do conclude that was your better option? And do you push on all putts, long and short? Or do you change based on circumstances?

  • J-TizzleJ-Tizzle Hello Members Posts: 3,430 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @zeke013 said:

    @J-Tizzle said:

    @zeke013 said:
    Bought a Bobby Grace F22 - in 48" (I'm 6' and almost 1"). It arrived this week.

    At first, I thought it may be an inch or two too long. But once I got onto a green it seemed just fine.
    I had some difficulty with speed initially. Everything was long, and when it left the club I thought - "Well, THAT's plenty." But the lines were good.

    I putted for about 20 minutes before going out on the course.

    I had 21 putts in 11 holes. Barely slightly better than my normal putting - but these were the first sidesaddle putts I had ever struck in actual play. I am pretty happy.

    I didn't really miss more than one line, and I got to within a couple of inches on a couple of very long putts. Very pleased to see how I improve speed over the summer.

    The speed is the last thing that came along for me on the side saddle (I struggled mightily with it this weekend). Hitting my lines were always my biggest thing and thats the fastest improvement you'll see side saddling. Stick with it. One thing I do when I'm struggling with speed is focusing on accelerating the putter through the ball. With how long the putter is (especially on fast greens) I have a tendency to slow down at the ball and not hit it.

    Thank you. Good advice.

    Quick question - the internet advice appears split on this, and I'd appreciate your feedback. Some folks say to not "push" the club forward at all, and sort of let gravity take it. Some say to push. You fall into that camp. What led you do conclude that was your better option? And do you push on all putts, long and short? Or do you change based on circumstances?

    For me, I will let the putter "do the work" on fast and very touch-heavy putts. But I putt my best with it when I have a bit of acceleration through the ball. I just like hitting putts with more pace, as I have confidence if I hit my 5ft putt 3ft past the hole, that the next one is as good as made.

    G410 10.5* - F8+ 15* - F6 18* - G410 23* - i500 5-U - Hi Toe 54* & 60* - BG F22
  • hardpan1hardpan1 Members Posts: 42 ✭✭

    @J-Tizzle said:

    @zeke013 said:

    @J-Tizzle said:

    @zeke013 said:
    Bought a Bobby Grace F22 - in 48" (I'm 6' and almost 1"). It arrived this week.

    At first, I thought it may be an inch or two too long. But once I got onto a green it seemed just fine.
    I had some difficulty with speed initially. Everything was long, and when it left the club I thought - "Well, THAT's plenty." But the lines were good.

    I putted for about 20 minutes before going out on the course.

    I had 21 putts in 11 holes. Barely slightly better than my normal putting - but these were the first sidesaddle putts I had ever struck in actual play. I am pretty happy.

    I didn't really miss more than one line, and I got to within a couple of inches on a couple of very long putts. Very pleased to see how I improve speed over the summer.

    The speed is the last thing that came along for me on the side saddle (I struggled mightily with it this weekend). Hitting my lines were always my biggest thing and thats the fastest improvement you'll see side saddling. Stick with it. One thing I do when I'm struggling with speed is focusing on accelerating the putter through the ball. With how long the putter is (especially on fast greens) I have a tendency to slow down at the ball and not hit it.

    Thank you. Good advice.

    Quick question - the internet advice appears split on this, and I'd appreciate your feedback. Some folks say to not "push" the club forward at all, and sort of let gravity take it. Some say to push. You fall into that camp. What led you do conclude that was your better option? And do you push on all putts, long and short? Or do you change based on circumstances?

    For me, I will let the putter "do the work" on fast and very touch-heavy putts. But I putt my best with it when I have a bit of acceleration through the ball. I just like hitting putts with more pace, as I have confidence if I hit my 5ft putt 3ft past the hole, that the next one is as good as made.

    I agree 100% . When I follow thru the ball stays on line much better, I also get a better 'sense' of the speed/break as I'm being proactive :smile: with a certain firmness to match a certain line.

  • RohlioRohlio Members Posts: 2,423 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @deman77 said:
    Had a practice 9 yesterday holding it really low and decided it was the way to go - approved the chop. Incidentally, last putt with the original was a 25 footer for par with 2ft break that would have been inches past had it not dropped.
    Having no shaft excess on top to counterbalance it made me realise what was causing pulls and mental discomfort. The heavy head really wants to move faster than the handle - it became really obvious when I cut it. Putting counterweights definitely improved it but only marginally - not even to the same level as gripping down on original was - the cut away bit is about 60g but with extra leverage as it was above the hands so it was probably an equivalent of 150-200g counterweight in the left hand area - I don’t think it was enough. So I thought I needed extra heavy counterweight to really push the balance towards the hands. Conventional shaft counterweights max out at 100g and they go into the shaft so as they get longer they proportionally not as effective gram for gram.
    I went creative.
    £2.02+3.00 delivery for sash window lead weight cylinder. 452g - yes a pound of weight. The head is 500g so to move the balance up from 6in from the head where it is you need decent weight.

    £1.80 for m8 shield anchor bolt to fit 14mm concrete drill hole. The cut shaft is 14.01mm internal and the anchor design is so that it has a few mm wiggle room - you can tighten as needed. 56g - weight of anchor too. This thing is rated 90kg load so no concern heavy weight would get unstable.

    The finished thing is quite ugly at the moment. I will be swapping the bolt for button head one to make it less angular. I thought about shaving corners on lead cylinder but I don’t want to lose weight so I think I will just paint the lead. My cost will probably double to £15 or so.


    This is what 500g counterweight putter looks like.
    The thing feels super uncomfortable as you take it out of the bag - the total club weight is way over a kilo and balance is halfway down the shaft - it’s a strange feeling handling it - conventional putter feels like a straw in comparison. But the moment I take my stance (recall my stroke requires all parts of the putter to move at roughly the same rate) make a practice stroke it feels right - the balance point is now about 2in below the grip end and the whole things is much less prone to a pull - I do not feel a torque from the head in my right hand that I need to counter.
    The tests on the mat were much better for line but I did have to reduce the backstroke as I was hitting them way too far (3ft return from the target instead of 1-1.5 that I want) - more total weight. The longer putts - 15-25ft felt a lot better and it only took me 5min to get the hang of speed. It’s going into game practice and since I am getting into qualifying comps from next week, no more changes until probably August - only cosmetic - black paint and a button ****.
    The only change I can think of is an extra weight to push the balance point 3-4in higher right under my right hand but i think that’s is only needed if I was one hand putting - I need to leave some work for left hand so I am happy for now.

    Lol I made an ultra heavyweight putter that weighed in at just over 1Kg... I called it Mjolnir and was fond of tossing it to playing partners and watching them struggle to catch it, expecting it to weigh half the amount. Good times

    WITB:
    Driver: Ping G400 LST 8.5* Kuro Kage Silver TINI 70s
    FW: Ping G25 4 wood Kuro Kage Silver TINI 80s
    Utility: 20* King Forged Utility One Length C Taper Lite S
    Irons: King Forged One Length 4-PW C Taper Lite S
    Wedges: Cleveland 588 RTX 2.0 Black Satin 50, 54, 58
    Putter: Custom Directed Force Reno 2.0 48" 80* Lie Side Saddle
  • Joe DufferJoe Duffer Members Posts: 759 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Have there been any videos posted by forum members showing themselves putting side-saddle?
    If not, who's going to be the first?

    "Don't let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do" - John Wooden
  • BigEx44BigEx44 Members Posts: 308 ✭✭✭✭

    @Joe Duffer said:
    Have there been any videos posted by forum members showing themselves putting side-saddle?
    If not, who's going to be the first?

    I posted these last year:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/63r4wre6hmy88pa/VID_20180614_201330493.mp4?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/ymrk238rh0z3fod/VID_20180614_201721210.mp4?dl=0

  • Joe DufferJoe Duffer Members Posts: 759 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thanks, Big!
    What is your height?
    Brand of putter? - Length?
    Cheers! 😃

    "Don't let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do" - John Wooden
  • BigEx44BigEx44 Members Posts: 308 ✭✭✭✭

    @Joe Duffer said:
    Thanks, Big!
    What is your height?
    Brand of putter? - Length?
    Cheers! 😃

    Your welcome Joe Duffer!
    I'm 6'0". My putter is 46" in length. It's a Bobby Grace F22 with a "Kickass" shaft.
    Cheers to you too!

  • ncp10ncp10 Members Posts: 74 ✭✭
    edited Jul 12, 2019 9:09pm #717

    Bear with me folks I've got newbie questions!

    I've had trouble w/ the yips w/ any length of putt, right-handed, off and usually on for maybe 12-15y now. I switched to left-handed maybe 10y ago and putt OK and w/o yipping, but not great except on infrequent occasion, and that I attribute in part to having a worse time seeing the line, whereas right-handed it's easy to see I have the putter on the line I intend to hit it. I decided to look again at other ways of putting, mental changes to reduce yipping outcomes, etc. I took my old Ping Eye 2 putter with its fairly long shaft to the practice green and tried side-saddle putting for the first time. I did OK considering it was a first try, attempting to mimic what I've seen on videos from JuanPutting and GP Putter. The developer of the GP Putter certainly made it clear lag putting wasn't his strong suit and that his work around for this is to practice 10' on down putts mostly. Presumably it's real hard to get distance control out of the gate with this face-on putting. How good does one get with distance control over time? You can leave yourself a raft of longer putts for example on long breaking downhill putts if you have marginal distance control. Also, I think JuanPutt guy does his stroke while looking at the hole versus the down at the ball/stroke. What's worked well for you?
    **
    **If lag putting is particularly difficult to develop touch for, if it is, why not have a putter that you can also putt w/ a traditional putting stroke? ** Get out there to 45' and you simply do your normal stroke. Get 10' and in or what have you, then revert to side-saddle. **What model putters can do this well?
    I bought a Seemore 2-way putter about 7y ago and putt both left and right handed with it, which is great, especially when I'm not in a yipping mental space. I will putt right breaking putts left-handed, and left breaking putts right handed.

  • brentflogbrentflog Members Posts: 89 ✭✭✭

    @ncp10 said:
    Bear with me folks I've got newbie questions!

    I've had trouble w/ the yips w/ any length of putt, right-handed, off and usually on for maybe 12-15y now. I switched to left-handed maybe 10y ago and putt OK and w/o yipping, but not great except on infrequent occasion, and that I attribute in part to having a worse time seeing the line, whereas right-handed it's easy to see I have the putter on the line I intend to hit it. I decided to look again at other ways of putting, mental changes to reduce yipping outcomes, etc. I took my old Ping Eye 2 putter with its fairly long shaft to the practice green and tried side-saddle putting for the first time. I did OK considering it was a first try, attempting to mimic what I've seen on videos from JuanPutting and GP Putter. The developer of the GP Putter certainly made it clear lag putting wasn't his strong suit and that his work around for this is to practice 10' on down putts mostly. Presumably it's real hard to get distance control out of the gate with this face-on putting. How good does one get with distance control over time? You can leave yourself a raft of longer putts for example on long breaking downhill putts if you have marginal distance control. Also, I think JuanPutt guy does his stroke while looking at the hole versus the down at the ball/stroke. What's worked well for you?
    **
    **If lag putting is particularly difficult to develop touch for, if it is, why not have a putter that you can also putt w/ a traditional putting stroke? ** Get out there to 45' and you simply do your normal stroke. Get 10' and in or what have you, then revert to side-saddle. **What model putters can do this well?
    I bought a Seemore 2-way putter about 7y ago and putt both left and right handed with it, which is great, especially when I'm not in a yipping mental space. I will putt right breaking putts left-handed, and left breaking putts right handed.

    I don’t buy the fact that lag putting is any harder. It want for me and I feel like distance control is easier for me when putting side saddle. I am guessing when you putt long putts left handed it took some time to develop the feel. Just go hit a bunch of long putts on the putting clock. The feel doesn’t take too long

  • ncp10ncp10 Members Posts: 74 ✭✭

    Well there are a few comments to that effect here, plus corroborated by the GP Putter dev. What is the thinking on having a putter with the shaft inserting to the head in the middle of its face, versus out on the side? Is this issue exacerbated by SS putting orientation? Theoretically it sounds like it might help reduce face rotation as it would w/ a traditional putting stroke. I have a Seemore 2-way putter made that way. I don't want to purchase a putter to experiment w/ SS putting I have to think you ought to get in the ball park w/ a conventional putter provided you can make the ergonomics work, and if I'm encouraged I might pick up a putter made for SS putting.

  • ncp10ncp10 Members Posts: 74 ✭✭
    edited Jul 12, 2019 10:37pm #720

    @bluedot said:
    But it's a better way to putt; it just is.

    For you it is. The best players and of those the very best putters worldwide to play the game don't putt face-on. Occam's Razor suggests that very likely is because it has stood the test of a very long time, and works exceedingly well for those good at it. **** look at the likes of the old pros and their wristy styles and could putt lights out--they were great players and putters with serious talent. Moderns pros are not isolated from this information about face-on putting, nor are they afraid of what others' will think if they adopt it. It may have merit if one is yip-prone, or have other idiosyncrasies with regard to what style might work best for them and their particular neurophysiology. I'm intrigued for sure, but not enough to go buy equipment quite yet.

    I take it all back! Not really, though it is surprising it hasn't caught on to any serious degree. I read this article and it was intriguing enough to give it a serious try: https://www.golf.com/tour-and-news/sidesaddle-putting-why-sam-sneads-method-might-be-post-anchoing-future-putting

    Post edited by ncp10 on
  • RohlioRohlio Members Posts: 2,423 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @ncp10 said:
    Bear with me folks I've got newbie questions!

    I've had trouble w/ the yips w/ any length of putt, right-handed, off and usually on for maybe 12-15y now. I switched to left-handed maybe 10y ago and putt OK and w/o yipping, but not great except on infrequent occasion, and that I attribute in part to having a worse time seeing the line, whereas right-handed it's easy to see I have the putter on the line I intend to hit it. I decided to look again at other ways of putting, mental changes to reduce yipping outcomes, etc. I took my old Ping Eye 2 putter with its fairly long shaft to the practice green and tried side-saddle putting for the first time. I did OK considering it was a first try, attempting to mimic what I've seen on videos from JuanPutting and GP Putter. The developer of the GP Putter certainly made it clear lag putting wasn't his strong suit and that his work around for this is to practice 10' on down putts mostly. Presumably it's real hard to get distance control out of the gate with this face-on putting. How good does one get with distance control over time? You can leave yourself a raft of longer putts for example on long breaking downhill putts if you have marginal distance control. Also, I think JuanPutt guy does his stroke while looking at the hole versus the down at the ball/stroke. What's worked well for you?
    **
    **If lag putting is particularly difficult to develop touch for, if it is, why not have a putter that you can also putt w/ a traditional putting stroke? ** Get out there to 45' and you simply do your normal stroke. Get 10' and in or what have you, then revert to side-saddle. **What model putters can do this well?
    I bought a Seemore 2-way putter about 7y ago and putt both left and right handed with it, which is great, especially when I'm not in a yipping mental space. I will putt right breaking putts left-handed, and left breaking putts right handed.

    Lag distance control was the last bit that came around for me when I switched... But it almost didn't matter because I made more 6' putts side saddle than I made 2' putts conventional.

    I look at the a spot in front of the ball during the stroke.

    WITB:
    Driver: Ping G400 LST 8.5* Kuro Kage Silver TINI 70s
    FW: Ping G25 4 wood Kuro Kage Silver TINI 80s
    Utility: 20* King Forged Utility One Length C Taper Lite S
    Irons: King Forged One Length 4-PW C Taper Lite S
    Wedges: Cleveland 588 RTX 2.0 Black Satin 50, 54, 58
    Putter: Custom Directed Force Reno 2.0 48" 80* Lie Side Saddle

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file