For those that have applied the GG pivot

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Comments

  • RichieHuntRichieHunt Members Posts: 3,692 ✭✭
    airjammer wrote:


    RH,



    Do you think you will ever be competent getting the match ups correct without being able to get a lesson from him frequently?




    That's the question.



    I would be willing to go out and see him once a year if I really think legitimate progress can be made.



    I will also have to see how my swing has progressed. After I sent him videos of my swing, I actually made some adjustments based on videos from his old site. The results were much improved, but I haven't seen a video of my swing since (my camera broke).



    I think the big thing I'm hoping for is since I have gone to him for 1 lesson already and I understand the stuff he's talking about that I can make some legitimate progress thru the online lessons. And I hope that I only get stuck on 1-2 pieces in the future and if I can't get past those roadblocks I can go to see him in person, again.



    I have friends that have progressed quite a bit just thru online lessons. But some people just happen to get things to click thru online lessons. Others do not.











    RH
  • Buckets2Buckets2 Members Posts: 2,432 ✭✭
    RichieHunt wrote:

    airjammer wrote:


    RH,



    Do you think you will ever be competent getting the match ups correct without being able to get a lesson from him frequently?




    That's the question.



    I would be willing to go out and see him once a year if I really think legitimate progress can be made.



    I will also have to see how my swing has progressed. After I sent him videos of my swing, I actually made some adjustments based on videos from his old site. The results were much improved, but I haven't seen a video of my swing since (my camera broke).



    I think the big thing I'm hoping for is since I have gone to him for 1 lesson already and I understand the stuff he's talking about that I can make some legitimate progress thru the online lessons. And I hope that I only get stuck on 1-2 pieces in the future and if I can't get past those roadblocks I can go to see him in person, again.



    I have friends that have progressed quite a bit just thru online lessons. But some people just happen to get things to click thru online lessons. Others do not.











    RH




    Do you think the $ was well spent? I've been considering it but the cost is quite steep. Understand his time is valuable and is probably worth that much, but other established coaches charge a lot less. I like you would also be willing to travel and see him if necessary but am curious about online in the meantime.
  • pusb365pusb365 Members Posts: 642 ✭✭
    Richie, can you expand on the online lesson a little?



    Eg how detailed was it? Was it just a few minutes worth of stuff or very comprehensive?



    Also what was the turnaround time?
  • RichieHuntRichieHunt Members Posts: 3,692 ✭✭
    Go_Time wrote:

    RichieHunt wrote:

    airjammer wrote:


    RH,



    Do you think you will ever be competent getting the match ups correct without being able to get a lesson from him frequently?




    That's the question.



    I would be willing to go out and see him once a year if I really think legitimate progress can be made.



    I will also have to see how my swing has progressed. After I sent him videos of my swing, I actually made some adjustments based on videos from his old site. The results were much improved, but I haven't seen a video of my swing since (my camera broke).



    I think the big thing I'm hoping for is since I have gone to him for 1 lesson already and I understand the stuff he's talking about that I can make some legitimate progress thru the online lessons. And I hope that I only get stuck on 1-2 pieces in the future and if I can't get past those roadblocks I can go to see him in person, again.



    I have friends that have progressed quite a bit just thru online lessons. But some people just happen to get things to click thru online lessons. Others do not.











    RH




    Do you think the $ was well spent? I've been considering it but the cost is quite steep. Understand his time is valuable and is probably worth that much, but other established coaches charge a lot less. I like you would also be willing to travel and see him if necessary but am curious about online in the meantime.




    We will have to wait and see. I just got the response from him yesterday and I was out traveling. There were some things he pointed out that I didn't know of so that's a positive. Now I have to see if I can integrate them.













    RH
  • Buckets2Buckets2 Members Posts: 2,432 ✭✭
    RichieHunt wrote:

    Go_Time wrote:

    RichieHunt wrote:

    airjammer wrote:


    RH,



    Do you think you will ever be competent getting the match ups correct without being able to get a lesson from him frequently?




    That's the question.



    I would be willing to go out and see him once a year if I really think legitimate progress can be made.



    I will also have to see how my swing has progressed. After I sent him videos of my swing, I actually made some adjustments based on videos from his old site. The results were much improved, but I haven't seen a video of my swing since (my camera broke).



    I think the big thing I'm hoping for is since I have gone to him for 1 lesson already and I understand the stuff he's talking about that I can make some legitimate progress thru the online lessons. And I hope that I only get stuck on 1-2 pieces in the future and if I can't get past those roadblocks I can go to see him in person, again.



    I have friends that have progressed quite a bit just thru online lessons. But some people just happen to get things to click thru online lessons. Others do not.











    RH




    Do you think the $ was well spent? I've been considering it but the cost is quite steep. Understand his time is valuable and is probably worth that much, but other established coaches charge a lot less. I like you would also be willing to travel and see him if necessary but am curious about online in the meantime.




    We will have to wait and see. I just got the response from him yesterday and I was out traveling. There were some things he pointed out that I didn't know of so that's a positive. Now I have to see if I can integrate them.













    RH




    But for return on your initial investment in simple terms of material provided back to you? IE He sent you 15 2-minute vids and a paragraph of explanation, or he sent you 15 videos, details descriptions of each as they relate to you, voice commentary over your video submission and a lot of other material, etc etc?
  • RichieHuntRichieHunt Members Posts: 3,692 ✭✭
    pusb365 wrote:


    Richie, can you expand on the online lesson a little?



    Eg how detailed was it? Was it just a few minutes worth of stuff or very comprehensive?



    Also what was the turnaround time?




    The turnaround time was 2 weeks. I figured it would take about that amount of time. It also didn't bother me because I wasn't in desperate need of a lesson. Particularly as I had made some changes on my own between the time I sent him the videos and when he gave me a response.



    I'm still a member of his old GGSwingTips Web site and I find that extremely helpful. It's a great reference. Until he gets videos up for his new Web site, I'll still be a member of the old Web site. This is where I was able to make some changes on my own and most of those changes jived with what he mentioned in the online lesson response.



    GG sent me an e-mail and he shows camera stills of each position (P1, P2, P3, etc) and gives his comments along with what drills to use. Then he gives you access to a bunch of videos in Dropbox that apply to your lesson. He basically gave me something like 15 different videos that apply to my lesson. And many of those videos have things I have not seen mentioned by him before on YouTube or his old Web site.



    He seemed to be open to me giving back a video of any updates and him giving back a response if I was on the right track or not, free of charge (don't quote me on that, he just seemed to respond that way).



    The big thing we've been working on is my tilts which are terrible. I had difficulty moving 1-ball off with my pelvis in the backswing. I started to add some upper thoracic spine extension which worked for a little while. But then I started to not move 1-ball off with my pelvis even though I had upper thoracic spine extension. So I watched a video where GG talked about foot pressure throughout the swing and found that I had more weight on my right foot at address and it should be the exact opposite. One of Kelvin Miyahira's tips was that your left hip should be slightly lower than your right hip at address. Once I started to do that I was able to move 1-ball off with my right hip in the backswing more consistently and the ballstriking greatly improved.



    I will try and look at my swing on video tonight. Judge the changes that I made and see if they fit within the parameters that GG set. Those mechanics that still need work, I will take GG's instruction on how to change them.













    RH
  • RichieHuntRichieHunt Members Posts: 3,692 ✭✭
    Go_Time wrote:


    But for return on your initial investment in simple terms of material provided back to you? IE He sent you 15 2-minute vids and a paragraph of explanation, or he sent you 15 videos, details descriptions of each as they relate to you, voice commentary over your video submission and a lot of other material, etc etc?




    The videos are stock videos that he has. He chose the videos that applied to my lesson.



    He gave more than a paragraph explanation in the e-mail. He basically went thru each position and explained his thoughts as to what was going on and where I could improve and how to improve that position.



    Many of the videos that he attached I couldn't find anywhere else. So they were stock videos, but it wasn't like I could just pick up all of those videos from his Web site or YouTube. Personally, I was pleased with what he gave me.















    RH
  • Buckets2Buckets2 Members Posts: 2,432 ✭✭
    RichieHunt wrote:

    pusb365 wrote:


    Richie, can you expand on the online lesson a little?



    Eg how detailed was it? Was it just a few minutes worth of stuff or very comprehensive?



    Also what was the turnaround time?




    The turnaround time was 2 weeks. I figured it would take about that amount of time. It also didn't bother me because I wasn't in desperate need of a lesson. Particularly as I had made some changes on my own between the time I sent him the videos and when he gave me a response.



    I'm still a member of his old GGSwingTips Web site and I find that extremely helpful. It's a great reference. Until he gets videos up for his new Web site, I'll still be a member of the old Web site. This is where I was able to make some changes on my own and most of those changes jived with what he mentioned in the online lesson response.



    GG sent me an e-mail and he shows camera stills of each position (P1, P2, P3, etc) and gives his comments along with what drills to use. Then he gives you access to a bunch of videos in Dropbox that apply to your lesson. He basically gave me something like 15 different videos that apply to my lesson. And many of those videos have things I have not seen mentioned by him before on YouTube or his old Web site.



    He seemed to be open to me giving back a video of any updates and him giving back a response if I was on the right track or not, free of charge (don't quote me on that, he just seemed to respond that way).



    The big thing we've been working on is my tilts which are terrible. I had difficulty moving 1-ball off with my pelvis in the backswing. I started to add some upper thoracic spine extension which worked for a little while. But then I started to not move 1-ball off with my pelvis even though I had upper thoracic spine extension. So I watched a video where GG talked about foot pressure throughout the swing and found that I had more weight on my right foot at address and it should be the exact opposite. One of Kelvin Miyahira's tips was that your left hip should be slightly lower than your right hip at address. Once I started to do that I was able to move 1-ball off with my right hip in the backswing more consistently and the ballstriking greatly improved.



    I will try and look at my swing on video tonight. Judge the changes that I made and see if they fit within the parameters that GG set. Those mechanics that still need work, I will take GG's instruction on how to change them.













    RH

    RichieHunt wrote:

    Go_Time wrote:


    But for return on your initial investment in simple terms of material provided back to you? IE He sent you 15 2-minute vids and a paragraph of explanation, or he sent you 15 videos, details descriptions of each as they relate to you, voice commentary over your video submission and a lot of other material, etc etc?




    The videos are stock videos that he has. He chose the videos that applied to my lesson.



    He gave more than a paragraph explanation in the e-mail. He basically went thru each position and explained his thoughts as to what was going on and where I could improve and how to improve that position.



    Many of the videos that he attached I couldn't find anywhere else. So they were stock videos, but it wasn't like I could just pick up all of those videos from his Web site or YouTube. Personally, I was pleased with what he gave me.















    RH




    Thanks, good info.



    Anyone know how much his in-person lessons are?
  • Redjeep83Redjeep83 Members Posts: 5,256 ✭✭
    Go_Time wrote:

    RichieHunt wrote:

    Go_Time wrote:

    RichieHunt wrote:

    airjammer wrote:


    RH,



    Do you think you will ever be competent getting the match ups correct without being able to get a lesson from him frequently?




    That's the question.



    I would be willing to go out and see him once a year if I really think legitimate progress can be made.



    I will also have to see how my swing has progressed. After I sent him videos of my swing, I actually made some adjustments based on videos from his old site. The results were much improved, but I haven't seen a video of my swing since (my camera broke).



    I think the big thing I'm hoping for is since I have gone to him for 1 lesson already and I understand the stuff he's talking about that I can make some legitimate progress thru the online lessons. And I hope that I only get stuck on 1-2 pieces in the future and if I can't get past those roadblocks I can go to see him in person, again.



    I have friends that have progressed quite a bit just thru online lessons. But some people just happen to get things to click thru online lessons. Others do not.











    RH




    Do you think the $ was well spent? I've been considering it but the cost is quite steep. Understand his time is valuable and is probably worth that much, but other established coaches charge a lot less. I like you would also be willing to travel and see him if necessary but am curious about online in the meantime.




    We will have to wait and see. I just got the response from him yesterday and I was out traveling. There were some things he pointed out that I didn't know of so that's a positive. Now I have to see if I can integrate them.













    RH




    But for return on your initial investment in simple terms of material provided back to you? IE He sent you 15 2-minute vids and a paragraph of explanation, or he sent you 15 videos, details descriptions of each as they relate to you, voice commentary over your video submission and a lot of other material, etc etc?




    I did an online lesson back when he had the membership site and he was doing something like $60 for an online lesson if you were a member, $150 if you weren't. Figured I'd give it a try since was fairly reasonably priced. It was the same format that Richie got back, sends email with still frames and text below each frame explaining what he wants you to do, he also sent about 7 short videos that were just general videos covering things like setup, rotation etc. basically videos he can send to multiple people, he's not making specific videos just for you. For $60 I thought this format is fine, although I didn't get much out of it if I'm being honest. I knew what I needed to do, I need in person guidance helping.



    For $200 I wouldn't pay for that same format, way overpriced for what you get but George is very busy and that is the only reason why it cost that much. If he was doing a voice over video of your swing and sending video clips specifically made for you then I would say the 200 is justified.
  • RichieHuntRichieHunt Members Posts: 3,692 ✭✭
    Go_Time wrote:

    RichieHunt wrote:

    pusb365 wrote:


    Richie, can you expand on the online lesson a little?



    Eg how detailed was it? Was it just a few minutes worth of stuff or very comprehensive?



    Also what was the turnaround time?




    The turnaround time was 2 weeks. I figured it would take about that amount of time. It also didn't bother me because I wasn't in desperate need of a lesson. Particularly as I had made some changes on my own between the time I sent him the videos and when he gave me a response.



    I'm still a member of his old GGSwingTips Web site and I find that extremely helpful. It's a great reference. Until he gets videos up for his new Web site, I'll still be a member of the old Web site. This is where I was able to make some changes on my own and most of those changes jived with what he mentioned in the online lesson response.



    GG sent me an e-mail and he shows camera stills of each position (P1, P2, P3, etc) and gives his comments along with what drills to use. Then he gives you access to a bunch of videos in Dropbox that apply to your lesson. He basically gave me something like 15 different videos that apply to my lesson. And many of those videos have things I have not seen mentioned by him before on YouTube or his old Web site.



    He seemed to be open to me giving back a video of any updates and him giving back a response if I was on the right track or not, free of charge (don't quote me on that, he just seemed to respond that way).



    The big thing we've been working on is my tilts which are terrible. I had difficulty moving 1-ball off with my pelvis in the backswing. I started to add some upper thoracic spine extension which worked for a little while. But then I started to not move 1-ball off with my pelvis even though I had upper thoracic spine extension. So I watched a video where GG talked about foot pressure throughout the swing and found that I had more weight on my right foot at address and it should be the exact opposite. One of Kelvin Miyahira's tips was that your left hip should be slightly lower than your right hip at address. Once I started to do that I was able to move 1-ball off with my right hip in the backswing more consistently and the ballstriking greatly improved.



    I will try and look at my swing on video tonight. Judge the changes that I made and see if they fit within the parameters that GG set. Those mechanics that still need work, I will take GG's instruction on how to change them.













    RH

    RichieHunt wrote:

    Go_Time wrote:


    But for return on your initial investment in simple terms of material provided back to you? IE He sent you 15 2-minute vids and a paragraph of explanation, or he sent you 15 videos, details descriptions of each as they relate to you, voice commentary over your video submission and a lot of other material, etc etc?




    The videos are stock videos that he has. He chose the videos that applied to my lesson.



    He gave more than a paragraph explanation in the e-mail. He basically went thru each position and explained his thoughts as to what was going on and where I could improve and how to improve that position.



    Many of the videos that he attached I couldn't find anywhere else. So they were stock videos, but it wasn't like I could just pick up all of those videos from his Web site or YouTube. Personally, I was pleased with what he gave me.















    RH




    Thanks, good info.



    Anyone know how much his in-person lessons are?




    $350/hr













    RH
  • BB28403BB28403 Members Posts: 3,734 ✭✭
    His pivot is definitely cool. It’s hard to get your body to do it at first. But once you do, it’s definitely genius. Kind of like going around a hill instead of over it.
  • gators78gators78 ClubWRX Posts: 3,942 ClubWRX
    I've seen this off and on but never explicitly stated, is it more beneficial to almost be looking at the target at impact? I know Snedeker said in one interview Butch wanted him doing that (a la Dustin) and he picked up speed, seems like some of GG players do that as well, does that start to fall into the modern fundamentals bucket?
    G400 Max
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  • RichieHuntRichieHunt Members Posts: 3,692 ✭✭
    gators78 wrote:


    I've seen this off and on but never explicitly stated, is it more beneficial to almost be looking at the target at impact? I know Snedeker said in one interview Butch wanted him doing that (a la Dustin) and he picked up speed, seems like some of GG players do that as well, does that start to fall into the modern fundamentals bucket?




    As with anything in the golf swing, it's about *how* you're doing it instead of just doing it. And it's never as simple as just doing it. You have to move other parts of your body to do it.



    For instance, having a ton of lag can be a good thing or bad thing. Depends on how the golfer is doing it. Hogan had a ton of lag and did it well. Paul Ellerbe had a massive amount of lag and it was really an inefficient way to swing the club.



    Looking at the target at impact like Annika or Allenby or Duval is great and all, but they were also likely very right eye dominant. I don't think eye dominance is as important as some make it out to be due to your peripheral vision, but to get to the point where those players did, I think they had to be right eye dominant to do so.



    GG doesn't teach looking at the target at impact. He teaches players to rotate their lead leg, knee and hip around while slowing down their arms from pulling down on the downswing. Getting the shaft parallel to the shaft plane created at address by the time the player hits p5. The backswing stuff all depends on the player and what they are comfortable with and what they can execute the most consistently and trying to find pieces in the backswing that are compatible with each other.













    RH
  • QManyQMany #TheWRX ClubWRX Posts: 9,089 ClubWRX
    edited Oct 18, 2018 #2055
    No Laying UpVerified account @NoLayingUp 5h5 hours ago



    NLU Podcast, Episode 172: George Gankas on his instructing career, his technique, the cult following he’s garnered on Instagram, and how he ended up coaching some of the top players in the world. https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/no-laying-up-golf-podcast/id880837011?mt=2…
    Currently in #TheWRX...

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    Ping Glide 2.0 (50° & 54°) DG S400 TI
    Artisan MT Grind (58°) DG S400
    Odyssey O Works R-Line
    Taylormade TP5X


    QMany's Swing/Sticks / Instagram
  • chigolfer1chigolfer1 Members Posts: 1,028 ✭✭
    QMany wrote:


    No Laying UpVerified account @NoLayingUp 5h5 hours ago



    NLU Podcast, Episode 172: George Gankas on his instructing career, his technique, the cult following he’s garnered on Instagram, and how he ended up coaching some of the top players in the world. https://itunes.apple...11?mt=2…




    Also, an article in the latest Golf magazine.
  • RichieHuntRichieHunt Members Posts: 3,692 ✭✭
    Just an update on my progress.



    I’m into month 5 of working with GG. I did an in-person lesson in late April and then 2 more online lessons. I plan on sending him another video pretty soon.



    The first month after my in-person lesson, I hit the ball really well. It seemed darn easy to do. But, it rained so much that month that I was unable to get much practice time in and then my swing collaped. Month 2 was practically a disaster. I sent GG a video and it took him 2 weeks to respond (I knew it was going to take him some time to get to, so I was fine with that).



    Funny thing happened, while I was waiting for him to get back to me, I went back onto his old site to get some clarification and my swing started improving before he got back to me. But when he got back to me, he did help me with a few other things and Month 3 was really good. In fact, it was better than Month 1.



    Then Month 4 I was in a slump, but not anywhere near as bad as Month 2.



    The inconsistency is really from just not executing the mechanics. I have had issues with the posture since I’m so used to standing further away from the ball with the butt out more. I also tend to close my stance way too much and that causes a myriad of issues. And then when I fix those issues, I will get into old, bad habits with my backswing (getting lazy and laid off with my arm structure, not enough upper thoracic spine extension, etc).



    I haven’t been on Trackman or used my FlightScope Mevo in a while, mainly because of the summer heat doesn’t work well with the Mevo and I haven’t had the time to set up something with a Trackman owner. However, I do feel that the distance is certainly improving…when I execute the move correctly. For instance, on the 16th hole at Orange Tree from the back tees I used to have difficulty getting home in 2 (par-5), but a few weeks ago I got there with a Driver and a 3-hybrid. And on the 1st hole, from the blue tees…almost nobody ever gets there in two (even from the blue tees) and I accidentally hit driver and 3-hybrid to the front of the green.



    As far as accuracy goes, generally I’m very good when executing the mechanics. I feel the issue here is that I used to have such a hook type setup (strong grip, very closed stance, open face at address) and now my setup is more ‘square’ or even a tad bit ‘open’ and the swing is more conducive to hitting a draw. Thus, in the process of learning the mechanics I can tend to hit a 2-way miss with over-draws/hooks and some cuts. And I always have that tendency to revert to my old swing habits and hit that lovely slight pull with a draw which may drive me into an insane asylum before I hit 50.




    ***




    Like with all teachers, I’ve found it very important to listen to what GG has to say instead of anticipating what he’s going to say.



    For some stupid reason, I got it into my head that you clear with the left side of the lower body and that will bring your right side of the lower body around. Despite GG continually telling me that my right hip is too far back at p5 and I’m opening up the shoulders too much and the pelvis is not opening enough, I continued to think that I need to keep the right hip back and let the left side bring the right side around.



    The shadow drill on the downswing has been EXTREMELY helpful. I could execute the lower body portion of the shadow drill, but saw that my head would move forward. That in essence helped me understand what was wrong and understand how…even if it didn’t look like it…I was pushing off with my right foot and sliding too much.



    Don’t ignore the drills he prescribes and be very aware of how you are executing the drill. If you’re not doing the drill correctly, therein lies your mechanical issues. You’ll just have to dig them out yourself…but they are there.



    For me, I found that I wasn’t using my feet enough in transition. GG prescribes a clockwise rotation of the right foot and a counterclockwise rotation of the left foot in the downswing.



    One day I was at a McDonald’s and I wanted to see what it would be like to just rotate the right foot continuously for as long as I could. What I found was the pelvis kept rotating and the right knee went outward towards the ball, but more in the direction of my right foot. I got home and practiced it and could see the shaft pitch much better and that’s when I realized that you can’t have the left side pull the right side around.



    I also started to feel a weird feeling of ‘reversing’ myself. That brought me back to something Kelvin Miyahira used to teach…getting the tailbone moving towards the target in the backswing, and then moving away from the target on the downswing. Sadlowski was the best Kelvin and I had ever seen at doing it:







    Anyway, I’ve been working on that since and the results have been good. I shot 74 at Ocala National (7,400+ yard course) and didn’t make a putt all day. I had a little regression at Orange Tree, but started to see that I’m not getting enough left foot rotation.



    When I’m hitting it well, I basically feel like my feet are doing about 75% of the work. And that sawed off finish position disappears and looks more like Sergio or Duval in his prime.



    The shaft is getting shallower, but it’s not quite there. More of what I’m doing now is keeping the hands inside more at p5 without consciously trying to do it. My guess is that the shaft will get shallower with better use of my left foot in transition and getting my arm straighter at p5.



    But, the ballstriking is really starting to come around again and I would imagine Month 5 is going to be my best ballstriking, yet.











    RH
  • chigolfer1chigolfer1 Members Posts: 1,028 ✭✭
    RH, I've watched A LOT of his videos and instagrams and have never heard something referred to as the shadow drill. Could you elaborate? Sorry if you explained previously. If so, I will go back and look for it but I didn't see anything on the last few pages.



    Thanks!
  • mudgemudge Members Posts: 237 ✭✭
    chigolfer1 wrote:


    RH, I've watched A LOT of his videos and instagrams and have never heard something referred to as the shadow drill. Could you elaborate? Sorry if you explained previously. If so, I will go back and look for it but I didn't see anything on the last few pages.



    Thanks!








    The first part has the shadow drill.
  • chigolfer1chigolfer1 Members Posts: 1,028 ✭✭
    mudge wrote:

    chigolfer1 wrote:


    RH, I've watched A LOT of his videos and instagrams and have never heard something referred to as the shadow drill. Could you elaborate? Sorry if you explained previously. If so, I will go back and look for it but I didn't see anything on the last few pages.



    Thanks!




    https://www.youtube....h?v=qiIx9DWyawE



    The first part has the shadow drill.




    Thanks! And I do remember this now actually.



    I am definitely an amateur GG disciple, lol.
  • RichieHuntRichieHunt Members Posts: 3,692 ✭✭
    mudge wrote:

    chigolfer1 wrote:


    RH, I've watched A LOT of his videos and instagrams and have never heard something referred to as the shadow drill. Could you elaborate? Sorry if you explained previously. If so, I will go back and look for it but I didn't see anything on the last few pages.



    Thanks!




    https://www.youtube....h?v=qiIx9DWyawE



    The first part has the shadow drill.




    Yes, this is the exact video that I used.



    For the downswing, my head would move towards the target and that's when I started to make some progress.



    You really have to 'sit on the right' while the left clears. But, that right leg knee has to go out towards the ball. You can't just pull it around by simply clearing the left side.



    GG wants the right knee to go out at a 12 o'clock position. I found for me that my perspective it needs to appear like it's going out more towards 1 o'clock. Perhaps that is due to me being left-eye dominant.













    RH
  • PreppySlapCutPreppySlapCut This is just babytown frolics... Members Posts: 6,422 ✭✭
    RichieHunt wrote:




    For me, I found that I wasn’t using my feet enough in transition. GG prescribes a clockwise rotation of the right foot and a counterclockwise rotation of the left foot in the downswing.



    When I’m hitting it well, I basically feel like my feet are doing about 75% of the work. And that sawed off finish position disappears and looks more like Sergio or Duval in his prime.





    RH


    This is something I’ve noticed and have tried to convey to some of my students (mostly my better players). I’ve heard Dana talk about it while working with people on creating more speed (referring to creating chaos with the CoP trace). Watch GG talk about Matt Wolff literally moving range mats while hitting driver.



    I almost feel when I’m hitting driver now that I’m transition that I’m **** myself into the ground. Then as my weight loads and I pressure the ground, everything seems to rip through together. With literally no other changes or thoughts other than what I’m feeling with my weight and pressure, I picked up about 5 mph of clubhead speed this Summer.
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  • QManyQMany #TheWRX ClubWRX Posts: 9,089 ClubWRX
    edited Oct 23, 2018 #2063
    Introducing the hottest (and oddest) swing coach in golf, whose players swing it 130 mph

    8:51 | THE KNOCKDOWN

    Alan Shipnuck enters the Drop Zone

    Veteran golf writer Alan Shipnuck pulls up a cooler and talks about his first published story, Twitter and Phil Mickelson.

    ALAN SHIPNUCK Tuesday, October 23, 2018



    [font=Merriweather, Georgia, Times, serif]Johnny Ruiz is a young touring pro from Southern California patiently playing his way through golf’s minor leagues—the Canadian tour last year and the Web.com in 2018. Anonymity is part of the deal on these circuits, with sparse galleries and minimal media coverage. But Ruiz has discovered that wherever he goes a very specific kind of fan finds him. “Last year, my caddie and I always laughed about it,” says Ruiz, “because at every single tournament someone would send me a message saying, ‘I’ve been watching your swing on Instagram for so long, can you grab me a ticket so I can see

    it in person?'”

    Things got more intense when he qualified for the 2017 Canadian Open on the PGA Tour. His swing coach of five years flew north to caddie for Ruiz, and they were serenaded throughout the week. “On almost every hole,” he says, “people were yelling out George’s name. It was kind of crazy—he was getting more love than most of the actual players.”

    The guru in question is George Gankas, who inspires in his followers a fervor reserved for religious revivals. Gankas has more than 100,000 disciples on Instagram (@georgegankasgolf), and dozens of top young players treat his riffs as holy scripture. They flock to him because his ideas are at once simple and radical, and he preaches speed above all else. No one on the PGA Tour averages as much as 125 miles per hour of clubhead speed with their driver. (Dustin Johnson clocks in at 121.) Gankas has 20 players in his stable of collegians and mini-tour warriors swinging it 130 mph or above. But his appeal transcends mere mechanics.

    george-gankas-1.jpg

    Gankas has more than 100,000 Instagram followers, a huge portion of them infatuated with his unique teaching style.

    Gankas, 47, is the quintessence of California cool, usually teaching in flip-flops and baggy shorts. His patois is cribbed from both hip-hop and surf culture. His pupils are addressed as bro or dude, even if they’re female. They don’t have discussions about swing theory—they rap it out. Good strikes are celebrated as dope, mint or Purina. Make a particularly good swing and you might earn the ultimate honorific: That’s sick. Gankas’s unassuming vibe is reflected in his home base: Westlake Golf Course, a scruffy public track 30 miles north of Los Angeles. The hitting area is mats-only, but thanks to the countless videos Gankas has uploaded to YouTube and social-media channels, it has become some of golf’s most hallowed ground. Says Gankas, “This happens over and over: People show up here for the first time and they stop in their tracks and say, ‘Man, this is exactly how it looks on the ’Gram.’”

    Gankas has built his audience and his business—he charges $350 an hour and is booked out months in advance—with a tech-savvy willingness to put his ideas on display for the world to see. But his primary product is passion. No one believes more in what they’re teaching or imparts it with more gusto. “He is a golf tragic,” says 13-time Tour winner Adam Scott. “He loves the golf swing. Although he has that California vibe and seems a little out there for the traditional golfer, he has spent 20 years just looking at and thinking about the golf swing, and he knows a **** of a lot.”

    Scott, like many others, found Gankas through YouTube videos, and was so intrigued that he rang him up in February 2018 so they could work together. Scott immediately incorporated a new posture at address and a variety of other tweaks. Gankas rarely travels on Tour, so by the summer Scott had gone back to his old coach Brad Malone, but the 2013 Masters champ says Gankas “steered me in the right direction—I firmly believe that.” After a couple of years in the abyss, Scott reemerged at the 2018 PGA Championship, which he should have won but for a handful of missed short putts on the weekend. Padraig Harrington, one of golf’s most beautiful minds, continues to work with Gankas. So does Oklahoma State’s Matt Wolff, whose wonderfully quirky swing was the talk of the 2018 NCAAs even before he holed a putt to win the national championship for the Cowboys. Gankas also advises young studs Braden Thornberry of Ole Miss, the top-ranked amateur in the world; Akshay Bhatia, the top-ranked junior; and Bobby Holden, the Div. III NCAA champ. Seemingly every day another talented prospect or aimless Tour player reaches out for counsel. “It’s getting really crazy, bro,” he says.

    And very soon the brand will expand even further. After a dispute with a former business partner forced him to reorganize, Gankas is about to launch a groundbreaking website for the golf space. Instead of continuing to give away his teachings for free on the Internet, he is going to a subscription-based model in which his diehards will have unlimited access to countless hours of new videos, for around $30 a month. It will be a highly customizable experience in which subscribers can search for specific drills and/or have instruction delivered for their particular swing or tendencies. Gankas is considering offering, for an additional fee, personalized video lessons, and he is training certified deputies to help keep up with what will surely be the heavy demand. With this cult hero on the cusp of mainstream stardom, some basic questions need to be answered: Who exactly is George Gankas? What does he believe in? And is he the flat-brimmed, jive-talking future of golf instruction?

    * * * * *

    Gankas grew up in a testosterone-fueled home in Santa Barbara, Calif. His father, Frank, was a competitive bodybuilder, and so was his stepmom, Nikki. “She was even gnarlier than he was,” Gankas says with a laugh. He gravitated toward macho sports like football and wrestling. Gankas considered golf the province of “weenies” and didn’t try it until late in his senior year of high school, after making it to the state tournament in wrestling. He was instantly hooked. His love for the game became a kind of zealotry, and within a year he was shooting around par, good enough to earn a spot on the team at Ventura Community College, which led to a partial scholarship to Cal State Northridge.

    george-gankas-3.jpg

    In an early-September session at his Westlake home base, Gankas got hands-on with Chapman University golfer Ricky Hoefert.

    Gankas was entranced by golf’s mind-body connection, so he pursued a degree in psychology; at the same time he approached the swing as if he were a professor in a lab. Each weekend he would tape the Tour telecasts on his VCR, then watch them over and over. “I would slow down every swing and then pause it at impact, trying to guess which way the ball was going,” he says. “I was endlessly watching how the body moved, and what the club did at the bottom of the swing. But it was confusing, because every player did something different. So I had to sort out for myself what really worked.” He plunged deeper, studying the swings of golden oldies like Bobby Jones, Ben Hogan, Sam Snead and Gay Brewer, as well as the action of new-school speed icon Jamie Sadlowski. At nearby Westlake he became friendly with fellow obsessive Chris Como, who’d later earn renown as Tiger Woods’s swing coach. On Como’s advice, Gankas immersed himself in biomechanics and physiology.

    george-gankas-2-150x150.jpg



    INSTRUCTION

    George Gankas’s six steps for maximum speed and control



    Upon graduating, in 1995, Gankas made a go of it on the mini tours. To fund the dream, he caddied at swank Sherwood Country Club, one town over from Westlake Village. Gankas didn’t have much luck playing professionally, but his loops at Sherwood loved his swing tips and encouraged him to give proper lessons. And so he did, suddenly getting an array of supplicants on which to test his theories. For years Gankas bounced around driving ranges until one of his Sherwood loyalists, Janet (Mrs. Wayne) Gretzky, helped him establish a beachhead at Westlake in 2006.

    The stodgy world of swing instruction would never be the same.

    * * * * *

    To spend a day sitting on a bench under an umbrella at the Westlake range is to stumble upon a secret society. Gankas doesn’t teach so much as preside over community gatherings, with various folks hanging out and listening in. Those who take lessons might linger for the rest of the day, intermittently hitting balls and chopping it up with the assembled audience. On this day, Gankas’s lesson sheet included Thomas Bailey, a young pro who had flown from England in part because he credits Gankas with curing his persistent back pain; Annika Pieszankgoss, a 17-year-old who, thanks to Gankas’s enthusiasm, had given up dressage to pursue a college golf scholarship; Tristan Gretzky, Wayne and Janet’s 18-year-old son, who hits it as far as his frequent playing partner, Dustin Johnson; and a freshman at exclusive Oaks Christian High School, whose bejeweled mom dropped him at the range and announced she was repairing to the bar…at 3 p.m.



    Gankas is literally a hands-on teacher, frequently moving his pupils’ limbs through different positions. Every swing is monitored by a Flightscope launch monitor and a video camera, and Gankas races between his laptop and the mat, instantly processing information and applying it. His patter never stops. He teased Gretzky by saying, “You’re not using your legs, bro. You get one lesson from Butch and all of a sudden you’ve lost 30 yards.” He followed with the ultimate enticement: “Give me a good swing and I’ll put it on the ’Gram.”

    george-gankas-6.jpg

    Gankas monitors every swing with a Flightscope launch monitor and a video camera.

    Says PGA Tour veteran Parker McLachlin, who began working with Gankas early this year, “I always wonder how he has so much energy. He is en fuego at all times. But it comes down to him being so passionate about helping people. He has so much knowledge he’s eager to share. I’ve always struggled to find a coach who understands me, because I don’t do things traditionally. I went to a lot of big-name instructors, but they seemed more interested in collecting their $1,000-an-hour fee. The first time I met with George he said, ‘Bro, I’ve followed you for years, and I’ve always wanted to give you a lesson.’ For him to be so invested is a pretty amazing feeling.”

    Throughout the various lessons, Gankas’s phone never stopped bleating, and he checked every message and took every call, sometimes carrying on three conversations at once—with a student on the phone, with his pupil on the mat and with whomever was seated nearby. Wolff called to check in from his first collegiate event of the season, at Pebble Beach, where he had just opened with a 65. (He’d follow with rounds of 66-68 to win handily.) From Ireland, Harrington was sending a torrent of swing videos to be perused. Gankas’s scheduler checked in about offers for far-flung private lessons. (Clients in New York and Jackson Hole had recently dropped serious coin to fly in Gankas.) His old pal Como wanted to talk through the details of an upcoming joint appearance on Golf Channel.

    Gankas worked pretty much from sunrise to sunset, his only break being lunch at a nearby deli with a half-dozen apprentices. He paid for the whole table, as he always does. On the drive home he took a call from Florida State’s Cole Anderson, who was in sixth place midway through the Junior Players but described his action as “wipey.” His shoulders were outracing his hips on the downswing. Gankas diagnosed the problem while roaring around in his Audi A7, and promised to send a video of an impact drill to cure the problem, which he did upon reaching the course.

    lazy_placeholder.gif

    Matt Wolff, who helped Oklahoma State to an NCAA title last season, works with Gankas.

    Gankas has never met Anderson in person. Nor Thornberry. But his ability to demonstrate his own ideas on-camera has helped him connect with them and his legion of electronic constituents. Gankas takes a deep pride in still being able to play at a high level; his current index is +4. A treasured tale in his inner circle is that Sung Kang, a four-time winner in Korea, decided to go forward with a partnership after a get-to-know-you round in which he was beaten straight-up. (With a smile, Gankas offers this non-denial: “I can’t talk about that. I don’t want anyone’s feelings to get hurt.”)

    Gankas is toying with the idea of trying to play some Champions tour events when he turns 50. Because he still thinks like a player, he takes a more holistic approach to counseling his charges. “George does a really good job of understanding that golf is an emotional game, a mental game, and that not everything is as black-and-white as the Trackman data,” says McLachlin. “He understands our fears, our tendencies; he understands that stuff changes from driving range to the course, that it changes from Tuesday to Thursday, and it changes again from Thursday to Sunday. When we talk about a particular shot I hit, he’ll ask, ‘What did you do on the previous hole? Where was your head? Was there tension in your arms? How were you breathing?’ Most coaches look strictly at mechanics. S—, anybody can do that.”

    * * * * *

    Though Gankas has a core of bedrock tenets, flexibility is the hallmark of his teaching. “Every swing is different,” he says. “Everybody is built differently. For me to try to put all people into one little box would be an ego thing. You can hold the club however you want. You can take it back however you want—down the line, laid-off, crossed-up, I’m down with all of it. The key is matching up tendencies. If you do ‘x,’ then you gotta do ‘y’ to get back to a Hall-of-Fame impact position.”

    Wolff is a case in point. He was a serious jock growing up: quarterback, shortstop, shooting guard. His golf swing always had a ton of speed but very few traditional moves. “The teachers who wanted to work with me,” Wolff says, “all said the same thing: ‘I can make you a really good player.’ They all wanted to ‘fix’ me. It made me doubt my abilities. The first time I met George [at age 14], he said, ‘I love your move, don’t ever let anyone screw with it.’ He told me I could be the best player in the world. I couldn’t even really process that because my whole life I was told I had to change.”

    lazy_placeholder.gif

    Gankas is literally a hands-on teacher, often moving his pupils’ limbs through positions.

    Together they have perfected the most mind-blowing swing in big-time golf. On the way back, Wolff gets up on the toe of his left foot like a baseball slugger. At the top, the club is not parallel but waving at the sky and so far across the line that it’s pointing 45 degrees right of the target. But what follows is pure, blurry poetry. Wolff’s high-profile success has led to the misconception that Gankas is a mad-scientist cooking up crazy swings, but the opposite is true: He’s an open-minded pragmatist working with what he’s given. Arron Oberholser, the former Tour player and now Golf Channel analyst, recently visited Gankas to see what all the buzz is about. “I picked up 5 miles per hour in literally three swings,” he says. McLachlin adds, “I’ve seen him take weekend hackers and get them 10 more miles per hour in one lesson, which is crazy.”

    Gankas’s belief that he can improve anyone/anywhere is at the heart of his new business model. As much as he loves holding court at Westlake, there is only so much of him to go around. “What about the kid in China or India who wants to tap into what we’re doing?” he asks. “What about the kid in North Dakota? I like helping people, and I want to reach as many as I can.”

    Revolution Golf, a slick operation funded by cable behemoth Comcast by way of Golf Channel, has signed Como and a host of other big-name instructors in an attempt to take golf instruction deeper into the digital world. Gankas’s is more of a grassroots movement, and if he can capture a large audience it might ultimately lead to a revolution in which high-level golf instruction becomes more democratic.

    “You definitely feel special getting to work with George, now that he’s so Instragram-famous,” says Bhatia, who has won a number of top junior events in the last year. “How cool would it be if people everywhere could benefit from his knowledge? I’ve heard George talk about how much he wants to change the game. I’d be surprised if he doesn’t.”



    [/font]



    https://www.golf.com/the-knockdown/2018/10/10/george-gankas-hottest-oddest-instagram-swing-coach-golf/
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  • ZitlowZitlow Members Posts: 266 ✭✭
    How did Johnny Ruiz do on the Web.com tour this year?
  • RichieHuntRichieHunt Members Posts: 3,692 ✭✭
    Zitlow wrote:


    How did Johnny Ruiz do on the Web.com tour this year?




    Something like 150th on the Money List, only making $15k. Did have a t-10 finish earlier in the year.













    RH
  • chigolfer1chigolfer1 Members Posts: 1,028 ✭✭
    RichieHunt wrote:

    Zitlow wrote:


    How did Johnny Ruiz do on the Web.com tour this year?




    Something like 150th on the Money List, only making $15k. Did have a t-10 finish earlier in the year.













    RH




    Is he fully qualified for the web.com this year or not?
  • PreppySlapCutPreppySlapCut This is just babytown frolics... Members Posts: 6,422 ✭✭
    chigolfer1 wrote:

    RichieHunt wrote:

    Zitlow wrote:


    How did Johnny Ruiz do on the Web.com tour this year?




    Something like 150th on the Money List, only making $15k. Did have a t-10 finish earlier in the year.













    RH




    Is he fully qualified for the web.com this year or not?


    Negative. Q-School.
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    Scotty Cameron Toolbox
  • AugsterAugster Members Posts: 4,306 ✭✭
    I had never heard of this guy before the Shipnuck article today.



    Does anyone have an order to the videos to watch or videos to link to or email to figure this thing out from the ground up?



    It seems amazing. I tried a bit of what I can see from this and that videos and a podcast I listened to and everything he says, while revolutionary and anti-establishment, makes total sense.



    I’d just like to see what he says from the beginning without having to watch every single video. But I will if I have to.

  • smdykassmdykas Members Posts: 167 ✭✭
    I tried the gg pivot all summer with very inconsistent results due to lack of understanding. Ultimately, I had to make sure my arms drop like the stick drill gg does at the top of the back swing. I also had to pivot correctly on the BS, and realized I was swaying back.



    Once this sequence is correct, then you really can pivot hard.



    I don't think his teaching is different from what the great instructors are saying, but very much a different thought about teaching it. Many instructors I watch do not want a rigid set up, and all seem to say that the power is from the ground.



    I think ultimately it's another path to the top of the mountain.
  • fkim011fkim011 Official Club Whore Irvine, CaliforniaMembers Posts: 764 ✭✭
    edited Oct 24, 2018 #2070
    GG is the real deal.



    I was your typical weekend hack who loves this maddening game. I've been playing it for years tinkering with my swing from what I have read and seen online. I was tired of having those days where I shoot 100 and the good days when it would be 94. One morning round, I had enough.I wasn't improving with all the range time I was putting in so I reached out to GG in Feb 2018. I didn't think he would take a weekend hack on but he was more then enthusiastic about helping little guys like me improve and try to achieve greater enjoyment throughout a round.



    When I first met GG, I was quite intimidated since I have a homemade swing and I've never taken a lesson before. A couple warmup swings in, he stops me. Asks me my goal. I said if I can break 90 and be in the high 80's everytime I play....it would be a dream. GG reaction was" How come not scratch?".



    He might not recognize me if we were to cross paths in store because of the sheer volume of students he has now but this man has changed my game. I am 3 lessons in after 8 months and I have been dedicated to the drills, thoughts and direction he has given me. It hasn't been easy. There are times when I have become frustrated with not getting the results I wanted with the amount of time I put in. GG's swing is not easy. But it is worth it.



    In the last 5 rounds, I shot my best round ever playing from back tees. 82. Bad rounds are high 80's or low 90's. Scoring in the mid 80's no matter where I go. I know next time I see him he is going to put another little wrinkle in swing to work on that will put me a couple steps back but the journey has been worth it.
  • Santiago GolfSantiago Golf I Strive to make you Better Members Posts: 5,026 ✭✭
    smdykas wrote:


    I tried the gg pivot all summer with very inconsistent results due to lack of understanding. Ultimately, I had to make sure my arms drop like the stick drill gg does at the top of the back swing. I also had to pivot correctly on the BS, and realized I was swaying back.



    Once this sequence is correct, then you really can pivot hard.



    I don't think his teaching is different from what the great instructors are saying, but very much a different thought about teaching it. Many instructors I watch do not want a rigid set up, and all seem to say that the power is from the ground.



    I think ultimately it's another path to the top of the mountain.




    The key thing is having your backswing match up to the pivot. If most players try to just do the pivot in the forward swing and not have back swing to match, then you be inconsistent because you are trying to force a motion, not reacting naturally.
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