Club champion fitting

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  • jcoltonjcolton Members Posts: 22 ✭✭
    edited Feb 7, 2019 12:48pm #122
    Here's my experience at my local Club Champion here in Los Angeles, which might help people on decide whether or not they should get fitted. My biggest question was should I go get an "official" fitting, or should I go to my local Roger Dunn and hit different combinations until I find something I like.



    First I went for my irons. Being somewhat new, I wasn't very educated at the time in everything involved in a fitting, so naturally I was interested in learning and asked a lot of questions. I simply wanted to know what I was hitting and why, but my fitter acted like he didn't want to tell me anything because it makes people change their swing, which I also understand but still I’m paying for a fitting and I was just as interested in learning as I was finding the right irons. I left satisfied with irons we chose, but as others have said, their price was much higher than everywhere else so I ordered directly through the manufacturer.



    Just last week I decided It was time to upgrade my driver. I go in for the appointment and the first thing I tell him is I am not looking to spend $1000 on a driver, I'm just a weekend golfer and I can't justify spending that kind of money on one club and I simply want the peace of mind that the driver I use is the best option in my price range for me and my swing. He then gets a little attitude with me and tells me that they don't carry stock option shafts and only offer premium shafts. We go back and forth for a minute because I don't want to waste either of our time if he feels fitting me with that they have is pointless. He says he will even waive the cancelation fee because he cannot fit me to something that I can get from the manufacturer in my price range (which I told him was $500-$700). I decide to continue with the fitting and he said he would try to fit me into something that best resembled something in my price range, but it would not be the exact same club. I took a few swings with two different shafts, then rotated 4 different heads for 45 minutes until we found one that I hit the most consistent, again with not much explanation or dialogue between us, which was a bummer to me.



    I wasn't very pleased with my driver fitting, but maybe that's more about me not understanding what level of golfer club champion caters to. I was under the impression that with so many head options and companies offering a variety of shafts, that there was still a lot to be fitted for in a driver, even for people like myself that don't want to spend $800+ on tour level shafts. I think there is a big market for people like me that can't justify spending the cost of tour level shafts, but still want to get fit for the best available stock option since there are so many different head and shaft options available through the 6+ different manufacturers. But unfortunately, the way it was explained to me is that they don't have any stock option driver shafts available to hit.



    That being said, their customer service is top notch and they will go out of the way to make sure you're satisfied with your fitting.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • DeeBee30DeeBee30 Members Posts: 336 ✭✭
    edited Feb 6, 2019 4:36pm #123
    Yeah, I've already found quite a few Evo II pulls online. I'm thinking about getting one, along with a Titleist SureFit adapter, so I can try it in my 913D3. Step 2 would then be to buy a TM M5 head and get the TM adapter. Might need to step up my club building game this year (and by that I mean develop a club building game).
  • FrakesFrakes Members Posts: 159 ✭✭
    I also recently completed a full bag fitting at Club Champion. I have been fit for various items over the years for everything except the putter. Overall a very good experience and can echo what others have said. I was just ready for new irons/wedges and had never really done a putter fitting. I play to a 3-5 index with a 6 iron swing speed in the low to mid 90s (at +1 inch over standard)



    I had a similar experience as others. We spent most of the time on the irons hitting different shafts, then working on the right head. When I hit a few drivers with my gamer, the fitter just asked if there was anything I wanted to hit as he didn't feel like he could beat it. I hit a few combos just for fun. 3 wood was similar. I hit mine well off the tee, but have some challenges off the deck with it. The biggest issue was the gap between my irons and the 3 wood. I have a 790 UDI with the Hzrdus black shaft that was good off the tee but not great off the deck. We played around with different combos and found the Atmos Blue HB 8S was a much better fit. I was launching it 2 degrees higher and was getting the gap I was looking for.



    We hit wedges, but I do struggle with fitting wedges in that environment so it is what it is. The putter fitting was good. Found out that I was kind of in the middle of a couple options (blade/mallet) with low to medium toe hang. Adjusted the loft with my current putter.



    My biggest surprise was the actual charges that were articulated by a previous poster. I thought they may have component contracts with the companies, therefore, they could give you the total club for something less than retail + reshaft if they are buying the heads separately. I am all for someone making money but that was a bit more than I was willing to spend. I do say that it saved me from buying the Miura 501s as I just didn't hit them well.
  • KMeloneyKMeloney Members Posts: 4,755 ✭✭
    jcolton wrote:


    I wasn't very pleased with my driver fitting, but maybe that's more about me not understanding what level of golfer club champion caters to. I was under the impression that with so many head options and companies offering a variety of shafts, that there was still a lot to be fitted for in a driver, even for people like myself that don't want to spend $800+ on tour level shafts. I think there is a big market for people like me that can't justify spending the cost of tour level shafts, but still want to get fit for the best available stock option since there are so many different head and shaft options available through the 6+ different manufacturers. But unfortunately, the way it was explained to me is that they don't have any stock option driver shafts available to hit.




    That market for "people like [you]" exists at the big box stores that have hitting bays.



    CC is for everyone else who has some flexibility in his budget who wants to find the best price-performance ratio beyond the stock offerings (to say nothing of the folks who have no budget constraints).



    I think it's really that simple.
  • carreracarrera Members Posts: 2,548 ✭✭
    CC just got bought by a private equity firm, so my expectation is that that many more stores will be opened over the next 3+ years.
    Cobra F9 Tour Length - Hzrdus Smoke 70 stiff
    Cobra F9 14.5 - Atmos Blue Stiff
    Callaway Epic Hybrid - Recoil 780 stiff
    Cobra King 3/4 Utility - Recoil 780 Smacwrap F4
    Cobra King Forged TEC Black - Recoil 95 F4 5-PW
    Cobra King Black wedges 54/58 versatile grinds - Recoil 110 F4
    Odyssey 2Ball
    TM TP5X
  • DeeBee30DeeBee30 Members Posts: 336 ✭✭
    KMeloney, I think it's dismissive - and maybe a bit elitist - to insinuate that golfers who don't want to pay $800+ on tour-level shafts should be relegated to figuring it out through trial-and-error in a big-box store hitting bay. While I'd concede that many of CC's happiest customers are probably those with higher budgets, there's an addressable market that's somewhere between them and the "off-the-shelf" buyers (and I'm confident CC wold agree).



    Many of us want the best performance from our equipment but prefer to keep the spending a little more in check. That may mean we opt for a lower cost shaft that provides a large percentage of the performance that the costlier one does. The result might then be something like buying a $550 driver and installing a $350 shaft. Although $900 is still a decent investment in a driver when compared to retail with stock shaft offerings, it leaves more room in the budget to address other parts of the bag, either today or somewhere down the line.
  • chrisf60526chrisf60526 Members Posts: 149 ✭✭
    jcolton wrote:


    Here's my experience at my local Club Champion here in Los Angeles, which might help people on decide whether or not they should get fitted. My biggest question was should I go get an "official" fitting, or should I go to my local Roger Dunn and hit different combinations until I find something I like.



    First I went for my irons. Being somewhat new, I wasn't very educated at the time in everything involved in a fitting, so naturally I was interested in learning and asked a lot of questions. I simply wanted to know what I was hitting and why, but my fitter acted like he didn't want to tell me anything because it makes people change their swing, which I also understand but still I’m paying for a fitting and I was just as interested in learning as I was finding the right irons. I left satisfied with irons we chose, but as others have said, their price was much higher than everywhere else so I ordered directly through the manufacturer.



    Just last week I decided It was time to upgrade my driver. I go in for the appointment and the first thing I tell him is I am not looking to spend $1000 on a driver, I'm just a weekend golfer and I can't justify spending that kind of money on one club and I simply want the peace of mind that the driver I use is the best option in my price range for me and my swing. He then gets a little attitude with me and tells me that they don't carry stock option shafts and only offer premium shafts. We go back and forth for a minute because I don't want to waste either of our time if he feels fitting me with that they have is pointless. He says he will even waive the cancelation fee because he cannot fit me to something that I can get from the manufacturer in my price range (which I told him was $500-$700). I decide to continue with the fitting and he said he would try to fit me into something that best resembled something in my price range, but it would not be the exact same club. I took a few swings with two different shafts, then rotated 4 different heads for 45 minutes until we found one that I hit the most consistent, again with not much explanation or dialogue between us, which was a bummer to me.



    I wasn't very pleased with my driver fitting, but maybe that's more about me not understanding what level of golfer club champion caters to. I was under the impression that with so many head options and companies offering a variety of shafts, that there was still a lot to be fitted for in a driver, even for people like myself that don't want to spend $800+ on tour level shafts. I think there is a big market for people like me that can't justify spending the cost of tour level shafts, but still want to get fit for the best available stock option since there are so many different head and shaft options available through the 6+ different manufacturers. But unfortunately, the way it was explained to me is that they don't have any stock option driver shafts available to hit.



    That being said, their customer service is top notch and they will go out of the way to make sure you're satisfied with your fitting.




    That was my experience a few years ago as well with CC. I know that CC is a 'premium fitter' but i had nothing but issues with them and didnt feel it was worth it for me. I did however find the putting fitting valuable.



    I had to follow up with them for my data and they flat out really didnt do anything that i thought was of value beside the putter fitting. I had to call them multiple times to get the PDF of my fitting and they claimed that the computers were broken.



    @KMeloney . I am sure that CC and their business model is not totally catering to what you describe above. If all they targeted was "who has some flexibility in his budget who wants to find the best price-performance ratio beyond the stock offerings" they would not be in business for too long.
  • Krt22Krt22 Members Posts: 6,504 ✭✭
    edited Feb 8, 2019 4:06pm #129

    jcolton wrote:


    Here's my experience at my local Club Champion here in Los Angeles, which might help people on decide whether or not they should get fitted. My biggest question was should I go get an "official" fitting, or should I go to my local Roger Dunn and hit different combinations until I find something I like.



    First I went for my irons. Being somewhat new, I wasn't very educated at the time in everything involved in a fitting, so naturally I was interested in learning and asked a lot of questions. I simply wanted to know what I was hitting and why, but my fitter acted like he didn't want to tell me anything because it makes people change their swing, which I also understand but still I’m paying for a fitting and I was just as interested in learning as I was finding the right irons. I left satisfied with irons we chose, but as others have said, their price was much higher than everywhere else so I ordered directly through the manufacturer.



    Just last week I decided It was time to upgrade my driver. I go in for the appointment and the first thing I tell him is I am not looking to spend $1000 on a driver, I'm just a weekend golfer and I can't justify spending that kind of money on one club and I simply want the peace of mind that the driver I use is the best option in my price range for me and my swing. He then gets a little attitude with me and tells me that they don't carry stock option shafts and only offer premium shafts. We go back and forth for a minute because I don't want to waste either of our time if he feels fitting me with that they have is pointless. He says he will even waive the cancelation fee because he cannot fit me to something that I can get from the manufacturer in my price range (which I told him was $500-$700). I decide to continue with the fitting and he said he would try to fit me into something that best resembled something in my price range, but it would not be the exact same club. I took a few swings with two different shafts, then rotated 4 different heads for 45 minutes until we found one that I hit the most consistent, again with not much explanation or dialogue between us, which was a bummer to me.



    I wasn't very pleased with my driver fitting, but maybe that's more about me not understanding what level of golfer club champion caters to. I was under the impression that with so many head options and companies offering a variety of shafts, that there was still a lot to be fitted for in a driver, even for people like myself that don't want to spend $800+ on tour level shafts. I think there is a big market for people like me that can't justify spending the cost of tour level shafts, but still want to get fit for the best available stock option since there are so many different head and shaft options available through the 6+ different manufacturers. But unfortunately, the way it was explained to me is that they don't have any stock option driver shafts available to hit.



    That being said, their customer service is top notch and they will go out of the way to make sure you're satisfied with your fitting.




    That was my experience a few years ago as well with CC. I know that CC is a 'premium fitter' but i had nothing but issues with them and didnt feel it was worth it for me. I did however find the putting fitting valuable.



    I had to follow up with them for my data and they flat out really didnt do anything that i thought was of value beside the putter fitting. I had to call them multiple times to get the PDF of my fitting and they claimed that the computers were broken.



    @KMeloney . I am sure that CC and their business model is not totally catering to what you describe above. If all they targeted was "who has some flexibility in his budget who wants to find the best price-performance ratio beyond the stock offerings" they would not be in business for too long.




    I think it's hard to cast a blanket on all of CC, as it seems like there is quite a bit of variance from location to location (or even fitter to fitter within the same location). I was quite pleased with my fitting. I told them about my game, about my clubs (ie I'm a club ho and built my entire bag), and my goal of the fitting. The fitting was a mix of me wanting to try things and them steering me in the general direction of where I needed to be, as well as a few recommendations from them that clearly just didn't work. My ultimate goal was to tighten up dispersion, tame the big miss, which for the longest time I thought was purely my swing. But the shafts/heads I was fit into definitely showed compelling change (at least on the LM). Full disclosure, their build price was a bit too much for me to swallow, but I did for the most part build the entire bag going by their recommendations. If their recommendations are a bit too steep, a diligent customer can find second hand options or even lower rung offerings that offer similar performance. The most important part is understanding how your swing reacts to the equipment and vice versa. I was a bit skeptical at first, but the proof was in the pudding.



    I also benefited (perhaps the most) from the putter fitting. I would typically 3 putt 2-4 times a round. 4 days after the fitting I went out and had 0. I got all of the Trackman and Samlab data promptly as well



    YMMV
  • KMeloneyKMeloney Members Posts: 4,755 ✭✭
    edited Feb 8, 2019 5:51pm #130
    DeeBee30 wrote:


    KMeloney, I think it's dismissive - and maybe a bit elitist - to insinuate that golfers who don't want to pay $800+ on tour-level shafts should be relegated to figuring it out through trial-and-error in a big-box store hitting bay. While I'd concede that many of CC's happiest customers are probably those with higher budgets, there's an addressable market that's somewhere between them and the "off-the-shelf" buyers (and I'm confident CC wold agree).



    Many of us want the best performance from our equipment but prefer to keep the spending a little more in check. That may mean we opt for a lower cost shaft that provides a large percentage of the performance that the costlier one does. The result might then be something like buying a $550 driver and installing a $350 shaft. Although $900 is still a decent investment in a driver when compared to retail with stock shaft offerings, it leaves more room in the budget to address other parts of the bag, either today or somewhere down the line.




    You've completely misread or misunderstood my post. Don't start with the "elitist" nonsense, because you're just way off base.



    The poster I was responding most directly to 1) said he wanted to try STOCK offerings (which CC just doesn't carry), and 2) gave them a budget well below your example. He believed that there was a whole market out there for people like him [that CC doesn't satisfy]. I believe that one already exists -- and those are the big box stores that carry exactly what he's looking to try out. Now, that's a pretty low bar set there. Personally, I don't think the poster should relegate himself to that market. However, he did set his budget well below the example you gave, and said he wanted to try stock shafts that CC doesn't carry. (He even suggests that the fitter at CC should gear him toward something cheaper because of his "level" and how often he plays. Why should those things matter? How is a CC fitter supposed to assign a dollar amount to that?) I think the poster could be doing himself a disservice with his approach and criteria.



    If he is willing to adjust his budget AT ALL, and/or if he wants to compare his stock offering to other aftermarket head/shaft combos, then CC IS HIS MARKET. And with the bar being set so low to consider yourself banished to the big-box-stores-only market, it doesn't take much to find that CC really could be an appropriate market to be in. He only needs to decide what he's willing to pay for, or what performance he's willing to forgo by sticking to his budget. As soon as he does that, CC is THE MARKET between off-the-shelf and the-skies-the-limit. And what he'll likely find there is that most people are in the same exact camp, who "want the best performance from our equipment but prefer to keep the spending a little more in check."



    Now, if you think that CC doesn't actually cater to those people, or wish they charged less, or you don't like their business model, then that's another conversation.
  • KMeloneyKMeloney Members Posts: 4,755 ✭✭


    @KMeloney . I am sure that CC and their business model is not totally catering to what you describe above. If all they targeted was "who has some flexibility in his budget who wants to find the best price-performance ratio beyond the stock offerings" they would not be in business for too long.




    Who said anything about that being "all" they target? I didn't. Wow. I simply said that they cater to everyone beyond the big box stores. Knowing that you're going to spend SOMETHING more than at a big box store (even if it's only for the actual fitting), whether a CC fitting is "worth it" or not is going to be up to the individual to decide.
  • DeeBee30DeeBee30 Members Posts: 336 ✭✭
    KMeloney wrote:

    DeeBee30 wrote:


    KMeloney, I think it's dismissive - and maybe a bit elitist - to insinuate that golfers who don't want to pay $800+ on tour-level shafts should be relegated to figuring it out through trial-and-error in a big-box store hitting bay. While I'd concede that many of CC's happiest customers are probably those with higher budgets, there's an addressable market that's somewhere between them and the "off-the-shelf" buyers (and I'm confident CC wold agree).



    Many of us want the best performance from our equipment but prefer to keep the spending a little more in check. That may mean we opt for a lower cost shaft that provides a large percentage of the performance that the costlier one does. The result might then be something like buying a $550 driver and installing a $350 shaft. Although $900 is still a decent investment in a driver when compared to retail with stock shaft offerings, it leaves more room in the budget to address other parts of the bag, either today or somewhere down the line.




    You've completely misread or misunderstood my post. Don't start with the "elitist" nonsense, because you're just way off base.



    The poster I was responding most directly to 1) said he wanted to try STOCK offerings (which CC just doesn't carry), and 2) gave them a budget well below your example. He believed that there was a whole market out there for people like him [that CC doesn't satisfy]. I believe that one already exists -- and those are the big box stores that carry exactly what he's looking to try out. Now, that's a pretty low bar set there. Personally, I don't think the poster should relegate himself to that market. However, he did set his budget well below the example you gave, and said he wanted to try stock shafts that CC doesn't carry. (He even suggests that the fitter at CC should gear him toward something cheaper because of his "level" and how often he plays. Why should those things matter? How is a CC fitter supposed to assign a dollar amount to that?) I think the poster could be doing himself a disservice with his approach and criteria.



    If he is willing to adjust his budget AT ALL, and/or if he wants to compare his stock offering to other aftermarket head/shaft combos, then CC IS HIS MARKET. And with the bar being set so low to consider yourself banished to the big-box-stores-only market, it doesn't take much to find that CC really could be an appropriate market to be in. He only needs to decide what he's willing to pay for, or what performance he's willing to forgo by sticking to his budget. As soon as he does that, CC is THE MARKET between off-the-shelf and the-skies-the-limit. And what he'll likely find there is that most people are in the same exact camp, who "want the best performance from our equipment but prefer to keep the spending a little more in check."



    Now, if you think that CC doesn't actually cater to those people, or wish they charged less, or you don't like their business model, then that's another conversation.




    Fair enough - sorry if I misinterpreted your post.
  • DeeBee30DeeBee30 Members Posts: 336 ✭✭
    So...I’m going through the grind of deciding what I’m gonna do with the specs from my CC fitting, and a light bulb-type question just went off in my head: how likely is it that the fitter avoided having me hit a shaft simply because it’s available as a custom option from the iron manufacturer?



    Background: my iron fitting specs call for Mizzy MP-18 SCs with KBS Tour V stiff shafts (110g). It recently hit me that my fitter never had me hit any heads with the “standard” KBS Tour shafts (120g for stiff). I’m currently in MP-52s with DG300 stiff (130g). 6i swing speed is 86mph, and the Tour V got my launch angle from about 21* to about 18*, while reducing backspin from ~5800 to ~5300. All this increased carry from 161 to 172 and tightened dispersion.



    Now I’m wondering what kind of results I’d get with the Tour shaft and if I could save considerable money on the iron shafts and spend it somewhere else (like the M5 w/custom shaft!). Guess I need to go hit some more!



  • KMeloneyKMeloney Members Posts: 4,755 ✭✭
    edited Feb 8, 2019 8:40pm #134
    DeeBee30 wrote:


    Fair enough - sorry if I misinterpreted your post.




    No worries. I just didn't want to have things go down some road that I never intended for, especially when it sounds like we're of the same mind regarding getting the most performance for the least amount of money.
  • Hambone1Hambone1 Members Posts: 901 ✭✭
    DeeBee30 wrote:


    So...I’m going through the grind of deciding what I’m gonna do with the specs from my CC fitting, and a light bulb-type question just went off in my head: how likely is it that the fitter avoided having me hit a shaft simply because it’s available as a custom option from the iron manufacturer?



    Background: my iron fitting specs call for Mizzy MP-18 SCs with KBS Tour V stiff shafts (110g). It recently hit me that my fitter never had me hit any heads with the “standard” KBS Tour shafts (120g for stiff). I’m currently in MP-52s with DG300 stiff (130g). 6i swing speed is 86mph, and the Tour V got my launch angle from about 21* to about 18*, while reducing backspin from ~5800 to ~5300. All this increased carry from 161 to 172 and tightened dispersion.



    Now I’m wondering what kind of results I’d get with the Tour shaft and if I could save considerable money on the iron shafts and spend it somewhere else (like the M5 w/custom shaft!). Guess I need to go hit some more!




    Those are two distinctly different shafts. Tour is heavier and different profile. Not to mention Tour V’s are stock in a ton of OEM’s.
    14 clubs
  • FrakesFrakes Members Posts: 159 ✭✭
    edited Feb 9, 2019 7:47pm #136
    DeeBee30 wrote:


    So...I’m going through the grind of deciding what I’m gonna do with the specs from my CC fitting, and a light bulb-type question just went off in my head: how likely is it that the fitter avoided having me hit a shaft simply because it’s available as a custom option from the iron manufacturer?



    Background: my iron fitting specs call for Mizzy MP-18 SCs with KBS Tour V stiff shafts (110g). It recently hit me that my fitter never had me hit any heads with the “standard” KBS Tour shafts (120g for stiff). I’m currently in MP-52s with DG300 stiff (130g). 6i swing speed is 86mph, and the Tour V got my launch angle from about 21* to about 18*, while reducing backspin from ~5800 to ~5300. All this increased carry from 161 to 172 and tightened dispersion.



    Now I’m wondering what kind of results I’d get with the Tour shaft and if I could save considerable money on the iron shafts and spend it somewhere else (like the M5 w/custom shaft!). Guess I need to go hit some more!




    Not likely....even if it is a stock option, they are selling you their build quality (for irons anyway).
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • jcoltonjcolton Members Posts: 22 ✭✭
    KMeloney wrote:




    You've completely misread or misunderstood my post. Don't start with the "elitist" nonsense, because you're just way off base.



    The poster I was responding most directly to 1) said he wanted to try STOCK offerings (which CC just doesn't carry), and 2) gave them a budget well below your example. He believed that there was a whole market out there for people like him [that CC doesn't satisfy]. I believe that one already exists -- and those are the big box stores that carry exactly what he's looking to try out. Now, that's a pretty low bar set there. Personally, I don't think the poster should relegate himself to that market. However, he did set his budget well below the example you gave, and said he wanted to try stock shafts that CC doesn't carry. (He even suggests that the fitter at CC should gear him toward something cheaper because of his "level" and how often he plays. Why should those things matter? How is a CC fitter supposed to assign a dollar amount to that?) I think the poster could be doing himself a disservice with his approach and criteria.



    If he is willing to adjust his budget AT ALL, and/or if he wants to compare his stock offering to other aftermarket head/shaft combos, then CC IS HIS MARKET. And with the bar being set so low to consider yourself banished to the big-box-stores-only market, it doesn't take much to find that CC really could be an appropriate market to be in. He only needs to decide what he's willing to pay for, or what performance he's willing to forgo by sticking to his budget. As soon as he does that, CC is THE MARKET between off-the-shelf and the-skies-the-limit. And what he'll likely find there is that most people are in the same exact camp, who "want the best performance from our equipment but prefer to keep the spending a little more in check."



    Now, if you think that CC doesn't actually cater to those people, or wish they charged less, or you don't like their business model, then that's another conversation.




    I never mentioned in my post or to him that I wanted to specifically try stock option shafts. I said I did not want to spend $1000 on one club and I suggested my budget being $500-$700, then I was told he can not fit me into a club that I can order from the manufacturer in that price range. Which my price range suggests that $100-$200 upgrade shafts that manufacturers offer are still in my price range. Maybe the phrase "stock option" wasn't the right one, by stock I meant ordered from the manufacturer. I also never expected the fitter put a dollar amount to my budget "because of my level and how often I play", which is why I told him my budget from the very beginning. I simply said I'm a weekend golfer and that was my personal reason as to why didn't want to spend $1000 on a driver. In my eyes the difference between a $700 driver (which you can order from the manufacturer and not through club champion) and a $1000 driver is not significant enough for me to justify spending the extra money. But what do I know, I've only been golfing for two years and have never even swung another driver besides the one I've been using the last two years from craigslist. Which bring ups a good point, as you said about comparing stock offerings to other aftermarket options. I was never asked or offered the chance to even think about adjusting my budget. I said I didn't want to spend $1000 on one club, gave him my budget, and was told I could not order anything from the manufacturer in that price range. I would have been more than happy to hit higher end shafts to try and change my mind. Isn't their job to sell and upgrade products just like any other retail store? I'm paying the cost of a fitting, wouldn't the best thing to do be hit stock options and higher end options to open my eyes to the difference between the two? Not steer me out the door because I said I didn't want to spend $1000 on one club.



    Maybe it was just bad communication between us from the beginning I'm not sure. Either way, they have made it right and have proved they really care about their customer service.
  • JoeBloe777JoeBloe777 Members Posts: 8 ✭✭
    From past experiences, if you walk into club champion and tell them your budget, 99% of the time they will find something that works into your budget. I honestly think they should ask every customer what their budget is. I know they are there to sell you the best thing for you, regardless of budget, but if both the fitter and the customer were on the same level as far as what the expected price range was, it would be much better process for all involved. If I walk into CC and they fit me into a 1000.00 dollar driver, then I have wasted not only my time, but theirs as well, because there is no chance that I am paying that. We both would have gotten a lot more out of the fitting if I would have been upfront and told them "hey, my budget it 700 bucks, can we keep it right around that?"At least then they know what shafts are not even worth trying, no matter how much better they may be.



    Honestly, I think it really depends on the fitter you have. The fitters I have had at CC have done a great job trying cheap shafts, mid level shafts, and super expensive shafts and showing me the performance difference. Each time I have come away with a shaft that was in my price range that performs amazing. Not it may not be as well a the expensive, but the 3 yard difference is not worth the extra $$ to me. AND my fitter has been extremely upfront about that with me, which is why I have trusted them for several years. The guys in Chicago do a great job telling me when I don't need to upgrade, which proves they are not just there to sell me new stuff if I don't need it.
  • SpacklersEdgeSpacklersEdge Members Posts: 72 ✭✭
    I have read several times in this post that they do not carry stock shaft options. Does this apply to driver shafts only or also iron shafts? So you’re telling me they don’t carry your typical DG Regular and DG stiff etc?

    Also another question. With that it appears you are describing as far as pricing, should I assume a new set of 8 irons must be 2K+?
  • KMeloneyKMeloney Members Posts: 4,755 ✭✭
    jcolton wrote:


    I was never asked or offered the chance to even think about adjusting my budget. I said I didn't want to spend $1000 on one club, gave him my budget, and was told I could not order anything from the manufacturer in that price range. I would have been more than happy to hit higher end shafts to try and change my mind.




    This just got a little more confusing. If your budget was your budget, and you made that clear, then it sounds like the fitter did exactly what you asked him to do -- to only offer combos that were within your budget. When you wrote "In my eyes the difference between a $700 driver (which you can order from the manufacturer and not through club champion) and a $1000 driver is not significant enough for me to justify spending the extra money" along with your other budgetary concerns, it doesn't sound as though you were at all receptive to trying high(er)-end shafts. Either there was a huge communication issue, or he really did try to do what you were asking of him.



    Isn't their job to sell and upgrade products just like any other retail store? I'm paying the cost of a fitting, wouldn't the best thing to do be hit stock options and higher end options to open my eyes to the difference between the two? Not steer me out the door because I said I didn't want to spend $1000 on one club.




    No. At least I don't think so. I've posted this experience here before, but I've been in one bay for a fitting at my local CC when a local college player was being fitted in the other bay, and the fitter couldn't improve upon the player's results with any different equipment. The fitter said that as much as he'd love to sell him new gear, it just wouldn't make any sense. Granted, this guy was apparently a really good player who already hits the ball well and is in equipment that works for him, but it was refreshing to see that no, these guys aren't all snake oil salesmen trying to up-sell the unsuspecting masses on anything. I'm sure there ARE fitters like that out there, but I also know there are good guys, too.



    Regarding the idea of trying high-end shafts to see the difference (even if none exists) between them and stock/"inexpensive," yes, I think that's a great idea, and would imagine it's one of the reasons (or THE reason?) why anyone would go for a fitting in the first place. The idea should be to try to find out how much you can improve on your results. Sometimes you might get the best results with what turns out to be an extremely expensive shaft. Whereas you may never be willing to pay anything beyond a set budget, some folks have no budget ceiling, and some start with one but are willing to go past it if the results from something outside of their initial budget is "worth" the extra money to them. It sounds like -- only from what you've written here -- that you didn't communicate to the fitter that you were in that last camp.



    I'm guessing that the ideal scenario for CC is fitting someone with no budget cap into top-end equipment that actually works best for him. I'm also guessing that the idea scenario for anyone being fitted is to get the best results from stock/the least expensive combo gear. But I think that those scenarios are extremes, and that CC is successful in part because it mostly operates in the space between those extremes.
  • KMeloneyKMeloney Members Posts: 4,755 ✭✭
    JoeBloe777 wrote:


    If I walk into CC and they fit me into a 1000.00 dollar driver, then I have wasted not only my time, but theirs as well, because there is no chance that I am paying that. We both would have gotten a lot more out of the fitting if I would have been upfront and told them "hey, my budget it 700 bucks, can we keep it right around that?"At least then they know what shafts are not even worth trying, no matter how much better they may be.




    Are you SURE about that? What if you found that you got the best results from an expensive shaft, and then found someone selling that very shaft here for a lot less money? You might want to know what possibilities are out there, even if you have no intention of purchasing from CC or actually pursuing that equipment later. You've already paid for the fitting, so whose time is being wasted?



    People often take their fitting specs from CC and pursue the equipment on their own. You don't have to buy from CC/pay their prices.
  • Krt22Krt22 Members Posts: 6,504 ✭✭
    KMeloney wrote:

    JoeBloe777 wrote:


    If I walk into CC and they fit me into a 1000.00 dollar driver, then I have wasted not only my time, but theirs as well, because there is no chance that I am paying that. We both would have gotten a lot more out of the fitting if I would have been upfront and told them "hey, my budget it 700 bucks, can we keep it right around that?"At least then they know what shafts are not even worth trying, no matter how much better they may be.




    Are you SURE about that? What if you found that you got the best results from an expensive shaft, and then found someone selling that very shaft here for a lot less money? You might want to know what possibilities are out there, even if you have no intention of purchasing from CC or actually pursuing that equipment later. You've already paid for the fitting, so whose time is being wasted?



    People often take their fitting specs from CC and pursue the equipment on their own. You don't have to buy from CC/pay their prices.




    Bingo. Very easy to find good shafts for much less than retail, find lightly used driver heads for much less. There is also something to be said about knowing what shaft type suits your swing as well (ie flex, weight, basic bend profile). I was fit into a speeder EVO V 757X. It's the replacement for the original speeder evolution, so I picked that up as a cheap experiment off ebay, eventually picked up the Evo V as well. Overall performance seems pretty comparable and both eliminated the big ugly duck hook which was common with my previous gamer (ADDI 6X).
  • DeeBee30DeeBee30 Members Posts: 336 ✭✭
    Krt22 wrote:

    KMeloney wrote:

    JoeBloe777 wrote:


    If I walk into CC and they fit me into a 1000.00 dollar driver, then I have wasted not only my time, but theirs as well, because there is no chance that I am paying that. We both would have gotten a lot more out of the fitting if I would have been upfront and told them "hey, my budget it 700 bucks, can we keep it right around that?"At least then they know what shafts are not even worth trying, no matter how much better they may be.




    Are you SURE about that? What if you found that you got the best results from an expensive shaft, and then found someone selling that very shaft here for a lot less money? You might want to know what possibilities are out there, even if you have no intention of purchasing from CC or actually pursuing that equipment later. You've already paid for the fitting, so whose time is being wasted?



    People often take their fitting specs from CC and pursue the equipment on their own. You don't have to buy from CC/pay their prices.




    Bingo. Very easy to find good shafts for much less than retail, find lightly used driver heads for much less. There is also something to be said about knowing what shaft type suits your swing as well (ie flex, weight, basic bend profile). I was fit into a speeder EVO V 757X. It's the replacement for the original speeder evolution, so I picked that up as a cheap experiment off ebay, eventually picked up the Evo V as well. Overall performance seems pretty comparable and both eliminated the big ugly duck hook which was common with my previous gamer (ADDI 6X).




    Yeah, I knew going in that there would be a premium to pay if I wanted to get the stuff from CC, but I didn't know what it would be. I looked at it as a two-part process. Step 1 was to pay for their fitting service. They offer it as a stand-alone service for a reason, and I see that as a fair exchange. Step 2, after finding out what head/shaft combinations seem to fit me best, was to determine their cost premium. Their prices, before taxes, are actually just under $300 more than retail prices, and 100% of that is in the disassembly and club building work. They're not marking up any of the hard goods.



    The reality is that I'm finding good online prices for new and very lightly used driver heads, along with some shaft pulls - combined with a shaft adapter and grip, I could get the components of my recommended custom driver for about the same as a stock one off the shelf. I just have to decide whether it's worth the $400 premium to get it all brand new from them and have them PURE and assemble it. Then I have to go through the same thought process with the irons.



    Don't get me wrong...I went into this process being ready to spend money on new (to me) sticks. While I didn't have a set budget in mind, it's hard to ignore the cost difference between buying new from them vs. sourcing new or lightly used online. For a driver, 7 irons and 3 wedges, that difference is substantial - like nearly half my annual green fees spend, or more than one of my golf trips.
  • Arlin964Arlin964 Members Posts: 79 ✭✭
    Krt22 wrote:

    DeeBee30 wrote:


    Krt:



    - TM M5 9* w/full fade weight bias and w/Fuji Speeder Evo II 661 stiff

    - Mizuno MP18 SC w/KBS Tour V stiff; standard length and lie

    - Titleist Vokey wedges: 52/12, 56/10, 60/12; stock shafts

    - Installing all Golf Pride New Decade Midsize grips as per my current clubs

    - Hybrid still TBD



    Keeping my TM SLDR 3W and Odyssey White Hot #1 putter, just adding a Superstroke 3.0 grip to putter




    Cool, debunks the myth that CC only fits ppl into Oban iron shafts and accra wood shafts =)



    Both my buddy and I were recommended to play the same iron shafts in the wedges, so interesting they have you in the stock DG wedge shaft




    Funny you say that. At my fitting, I was started with Oban shafts and they just didn’t work. I ended up with Accra in Driver, 3w, and hybrids. Still working through what I intend to buy through CC and what I’ll try on my own.
    TaylorMade R1 10.5*
    Ping Anser 3w
    Callaway Rogue X - 3h, 4h, 5h
    Nickent 6DX - 6-PW
    Wilson Staff PMP 50*
    Cleveland CBX 56*
    Odyssey #7s O-Works
  • sdiz88sdiz88 Members Posts: 2
    First post, long time member. I'd agree that since CC is a chain, experiences will vary from location and staff. I was fit at my local CC, and the experience was great. They spent 2+ hours and 150+ swings with multiple combos to make sure my new driver, 3w, and 3h were dialed in perfectly. Honestly, the pricing didn't even occur to me until my fitter showed and explained the final spec sheet. Obviously I knew that it was going to cost more than the average shop since the tour spec shafts performed best in my scenario, and we were working with newly released equipment. If you think about it, even the big box places don't discount the newly released clubs. CC charges full retail and only carry the newest models, they also charge time for their services. This will obviously make them expensive in comparison, but their perfect fit guarantee, warranties, convenience, and overall customer service was well worth it in my opinion. They weren't pushy in any way, I could've just as easily taken my specs elsewhere but it just didn't make sense for me.
  • GolfChannelGolfChannel Orlando, FloridaMembers Posts: 1,731 ✭✭
    gsrjc wrote:




    Okay, here comes the expansion.
    Driver: He who shall not be named...
    3 Wood: Callaway Rogue w/Project X Blue Evenflow 75
    5 Wood: Callaway Rogue w/Project X Blue Evenflow 75
    Irons: Ping iBlade Nippon AWT 2.0 Stiff
    Wedges: Callaway MD3 50, 54, and Honma TW737 Forged 62
    Putter: Original Odyssey White Hot XG No. 7
    Ball: Srixon Z-Star 2018 (Yellow)
  • BottleCapBottleCap Members Posts: 1,329 ✭✭
    jcolton wrote:
    KMeloney wrote:
    You've completely misread or misunderstood my post. Don't start with the "elitist" nonsense, because you're just way off base. The poster I was responding most directly to 1) said he wanted to try STOCK offerings (which CC just doesn't carry), and 2) gave them a budget well below your example. He believed that there was a whole market out there for people like him [that CC doesn't satisfy]. I believe that one already exists -- and those are the big box stores that carry exactly what he's looking to try out. Now, that's a pretty low bar set there. Personally, I don't think the poster should relegate himself to that market. However, he did set his budget well below the example you gave, and said he wanted to try stock shafts that CC doesn't carry. (He even suggests that the fitter at CC should gear him toward something cheaper because of his "level" and how often he plays. Why should those things matter? How is a CC fitter supposed to assign a dollar amount to that?) I think the poster could be doing himself a disservice with his approach and criteria. If he is willing to adjust his budget AT ALL, and/or if he wants to compare his stock offering to other aftermarket head/shaft combos, then CC IS HIS MARKET. And with the bar being set so low to consider yourself banished to the big-box-stores-only market, it doesn't take much to find that CC really could be an appropriate market to be in. He only needs to decide what he's willing to pay for, or what performance he's willing to forgo by sticking to his budget. As soon as he does that, CC is THE MARKET between off-the-shelf and the-skies-the-limit. And what he'll likely find there is that most people are in the same exact camp, who "want the best performance from our equipment but prefer to keep the spending a little more in check." Now, if you think that CC doesn't actually cater to those people, or wish they charged less, or you don't like their business model, then that's another conversation.
    I never mentioned in my post or to him that I wanted to specifically try stock option shafts. I said I did not want to spend $1000 on one club and I suggested my budget being $500-$700, then I was told he can not fit me into a club that I can order from the manufacturer in that price range. Which my price range suggests that $100-$200 upgrade shafts that manufacturers offer are still in my price range. Maybe the phrase "stock option" wasn't the right one, by stock I meant ordered from the manufacturer. I also never expected the fitter put a dollar amount to my budget "because of my level and how often I play", which is why I told him my budget from the very beginning. I simply said I'm a weekend golfer and that was my personal reason as to why didn't want to spend $1000 on a driver. In my eyes the difference between a $700 driver (which you can order from the manufacturer and not through club champion) and a $1000 driver is not significant enough for me to justify spending the extra money. But what do I know, I've only been golfing for two years and have never even swung another driver besides the one I've been using the last two years from craigslist. Which bring ups a good point, as you said about comparing stock offerings to other aftermarket options. I was never asked or offered the chance to even think about adjusting my budget. I said I didn't want to spend $1000 on one club, gave him my budget, and was told I could not order anything from the manufacturer in that price range. I would have been more than happy to hit higher end shafts to try and change my mind. Isn't their job to sell and upgrade products just like any other retail store? I'm paying the cost of a fitting, wouldn't the best thing to do be hit stock options and higher end options to open my eyes to the difference between the two? Not steer me out the door because I said I didn't want to spend $1000 on one club. Maybe it was just bad communication between us from the beginning I'm not sure. Either way, they have made it right and have proved they really care about their customer service.




    You are probably not the customer they're looking for, I am the customer they want.



    I went to a Titleist fitting day and got into a TS2. Wasn't impressed with the shafts in the cart, i just chose the one that looked the nicest. The day my TS2 was delivered I took it along with a fairway to Club Champion and got new shafts, with the fitting, shaft, and build, came out to 1200.



    After a few weeks I didn't like them and they stayed in the closet until this week when I took them back into Club Champion for a new fitting. So another 1200 for new shafts.



    Some retailers pursue a strategy that doesn't involve chasing every dollar. Retailers that pursue a low price strategy can attract customers that want to haggle and return items.
    Titleist TS2 GD TourAD DI 7S
    Titleist 917 F3 GD TourAD IZ 8S
    Mizuno MP-18 MMC 3-4 DG AMT S300
    Mizuno MP-18 5-PW DG S400
    Vokey SM7 54M and 60M
    Cameron Newport 2 CT
    Bridgestone Tour B XS
  • Hateto3PuttHateto3Putt Smoking Makes You Look Cool! Members Posts: 6,277 ✭✭
    BottleCap wrote:




    You are probably not the customer they're looking for, I am the customer they want.



    I went to a Titleist fitting day and got into a TS2. Wasn't impressed with the shafts in the cart, i just chose the one that looked the nicest. The day my TS2 was delivered I took it along with a fairway to Club Champion and got new shafts, with the fitting, shaft, and build, came out to 1200.



    After a few weeks I didn't like them and they stayed in the closet until this week when I took them back into Club Champion for a new fitting. So another 1200 for new shafts.






    With that insane shopping habit, you're the customer EVERY retailer wants!
  • BottleCapBottleCap Members Posts: 1,329 ✭✭

    BottleCap wrote:


    You are probably not the customer they're looking for, I am the customer they want.



    I went to a Titleist fitting day and got into a TS2. Wasn't impressed with the shafts in the cart, i just chose the one that looked the nicest. The day my TS2 was delivered I took it along with a fairway to Club Champion and got new shafts, with the fitting, shaft, and build, came out to 1200.



    After a few weeks I didn't like them and they stayed in the closet until this week when I took them back into Club Champion for a new fitting. So another 1200 for new shafts.






    With that insane shopping habit, you're the customer EVERY retailer wants!




    It's just how I choose to spend my money.



    I know a couple that are "foodies" they spend between 2-4k a month eating at restaurants



    I know a guy that spends 4k a month on call girls.



    I know a couple that spends 3/4 of their earnings on their mortgage



    I budget 500 a month for golf equipment
    Titleist TS2 GD TourAD DI 7S
    Titleist 917 F3 GD TourAD IZ 8S
    Mizuno MP-18 MMC 3-4 DG AMT S300
    Mizuno MP-18 5-PW DG S400
    Vokey SM7 54M and 60M
    Cameron Newport 2 CT
    Bridgestone Tour B XS
  • Irae133Irae133 Members Posts: 9 ✭✭
    BottleCap wrote:


    BottleCap wrote:


    You are probably not the customer they're looking for, I am the customer they want.



    I went to a Titleist fitting day and got into a TS2. Wasn't impressed with the shafts in the cart, i just chose the one that looked the nicest. The day my TS2 was delivered I took it along with a fairway to Club Champion and got new shafts, with the fitting, shaft, and build, came out to 1200.



    After a few weeks I didn't like them and they stayed in the closet until this week when I took them back into Club Champion for a new fitting. So another 1200 for new shafts.






    With that insane shopping habit, you're the customer EVERY retailer wants!




    It's just how I choose to spend my money.



    I know a couple that are "foodies" they spend between 2-4k a month eating at restaurants



    I know a guy that spends 4k a month on call girls.



    I know a couple that spends 3/4 of their earnings on their mortgage



    I budget 500 a month for golf equipment




    *heavy breathing*

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