Golf Course Superintendent Ready to Answer Any Questions You May Have

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  • bulls9999bulls9999 GHIN Index = 12.8Members  984WRX Points: 206Handicap: GHIN Index 12.8Posts: 984 Golden Tee
    Joined:  edited Aug 4, 2019 #542

    I'm in a high clay area. Clay is very very fine, which is why ponds/lakes are 'cloudy' because the fine particles can stay suspended longer. So when our course fluffs up the sand in the bunkers by raking them with the cart-towed rake, after a few days, they turn 'hard, crusted' again. A USGA-soil/turf guy once told me that if you notice how the bunkers get filled with water on a heavy rain?... yes?.... the clay from the surrounding turf leaches into the bunkers, binds to the sand particles, and literally 'glues them together' to form hard packed, crusty sand. And that the only way to prevent that in our area is to put bunker liners in. Our club looked into it, and wanted that fine white sand you see on tour level courses....cost would be half-million plus for bunker liners (would that be like plastic swimming pools?) plust the expensive sand, so membership is slowly chewing on that thought.

    On -, @seven dewey said:

    Why do some courses have soft fluffy sand that is easy to get out of and others have hard sand that your club just bounces off? I'm sure it has to be a factor of cost/geographical region, but it sure would make golf more fun if it was consistent.
    Posted:
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  • James the Hogan FanJames the Hogan Fan Members  1165WRX Points: 783Handicap: 12Posts: 1,165 Platinum Tees
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    On -, @bulls9999 said:

    Fantastic....
    Question: How come every course (even my own c.c. course), whenever someone is out 'watering the greens' on a hot day, they do it from hole #1 to #18 direction, and sometimes you get the same guyy watering greens, holding you up for 3-5 holes in a row? It happens everywhere...same problem everywhere. Common sense says, if you water greens from hole #18-to-#1 direction, you'll only interfere with any group just once? You need to put that in your golf course maintenance manual.

    On -, @BNGL said:

    Good Afternoon GolfWRX,

    As the title says hit me up with any questions that you may have in relation to golf course agronomy, or why certain practices are done at certain times. Whatever the question you have, if I don't have the answer I will provide it for you.

    Fairways, Greens, and remember to repair your ball marks!

    If you do it 18-1, you (the waterer) are guaranteed to hit (and wait for) every group. Usually you’re not just going in order, you’re just trying to get it done. Hopping from hole to hole where you hope there are gaps. Sometimes that means we hold golfers up, and we’re sorry about it, but sit 20 minutes waiting to do a 3 minute job because Mr. 20 cap won’t hit from 270 until you clear the green.

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  • bulls9999bulls9999 GHIN Index = 12.8Members  984WRX Points: 206Handicap: GHIN Index 12.8Posts: 984 Golden Tee
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    But I can't tell you how many times I've been delayed by the same guy watering greens for 4-5 consecutive holes until some point he goes elsewhere or we pass him completely.

    On -, @bulls9999 said:

    Fantastic....
    Question: How come every course (even my own c.c. course), whenever someone is out 'watering the greens' on a hot day, they do it from hole #1 to #18 direction, and sometimes you get the same guyy watering greens, holding you up for 3-5 holes in a row? It happens everywhere...same problem everywhere. Common sense says, if you water greens from hole #18-to-#1 direction, you'll only interfere with any group just once? You need to put that in your golf course maintenance manual.

    On -, @BNGL said:

    Good Afternoon GolfWRX,

    As the title says hit me up with any questions that you may have in relation to golf course agronomy, or why certain practices are done at certain times. Whatever the question you have, if I don't have the answer I will provide it for you.

    Fairways, Greens, and remember to repair your ball marks!

    If you do it 18-1, you (the waterer) are guaranteed to hit (and wait for) every group. Usually you’re not just going in order, you’re just trying to get it done. Hopping from hole to hole where you hope there are gaps. Sometimes that means we hold golfers up, and we’re sorry about it, but sit 20 minutes waiting to do a 3 minute job because Mr. 20 cap won’t hit from 270 until you clear the green.

    Posted:
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    GBB 5-wood (18*), 7-wood (20*); Mitsubishi KuroKage 50 
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    Callaway Rogue 19* 3-Hb, Aldila Synergy 60-Reg
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  • James the Hogan FanJames the Hogan Fan Members  1165WRX Points: 783Handicap: 12Posts: 1,165 Platinum Tees
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    On -, @bulls9999 said:

    But I can't tell you how many times I've been delayed by the same guy watering greens for 4-5 consecutive holes until some point he goes elsewhere or we pass him completely.

    On -, @bulls9999 said:

    Fantastic....
    Question: How come every course (even my own c.c. course), whenever someone is out 'watering the greens' on a hot day, they do it from hole #1 to #18 direction, and sometimes you get the same guyy watering greens, holding you up for 3-5 holes in a row? It happens everywhere...same problem everywhere. Common sense says, if you water greens from hole #18-to-#1 direction, you'll only interfere with any group just once? You need to put that in your golf course maintenance manual.

    On -, @BNGL said:

    Good Afternoon GolfWRX,

    As the title says hit me up with any questions that you may have in relation to golf course agronomy, or why certain practices are done at certain times. Whatever the question you have, if I don't have the answer I will provide it for you.

    Fairways, Greens, and remember to repair your ball marks!

    If you do it 18-1, you (the waterer) are guaranteed to hit (and wait for) every group. Usually you’re not just going in order, you’re just trying to get it done. Hopping from hole to hole where you hope there are gaps. Sometimes that means we hold golfers up, and we’re sorry about it, but sit 20 minutes waiting to do a 3 minute job because Mr. 20 cap won’t hit from 270 until you clear the green.

    Sounds like more than enough! I understand and I'm just trying to defend the guy. Usually the worst times for player interference are when you're hopping from hole to hole and you leave yourself a couple holes right as they get filled by big, slow, boombox blasting foursomes. On the other hand, some of the guys out there (and I'm guilty myself from time to time) just get into the 'zone of oblivion' and aren't paying attention to anything. I do try to go reverse-order whenever possible.

    Posted:
    Golfing in Finland!
    Taylormade R15
    W/S Fybrid 3W
    W/S Fybrid 5W
    Hogan Apex 2003 (3-E)
    Mizuno 56
    Maxfli Revolution 60
    Macgregor Jackie Pung Putter #10

  • mallratmallrat Members  3281WRX Points: 436Posts: 3,281 Titanium Tees
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    does anyone have experience win brown ring patch or summer patch?

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  • BNGLBNGL Jupiter, FloridaMembers  1933WRX Points: 607Posts: 1,933 Platinum Tees
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    On -, @mallrat said:

    does anyone have experience win brown ring patch or summer patch?

    Yes, typically greens that show brown ring patch are nitrogen deficient so control with fungicides and fert is a pretty potent combination. I’m pretty high on strobis (heritage/insignia) at a curative rate with a little fert to follow.

    Summer patch is a little different, make sure you diagnose it correctly as it has similar appearance to necrotic ring spot. Strobis are good treatment again, but I’ve had good success with something called Banner and another product called Bayleton. BASF did just release a new product called Navicon which is supposed to be the next big thing in fungicides summer patch control was on there and would be a good match as trials have shown it doesn’t ding the turf like bayleton will. Make sure to put out plenty of water with bayleton/banner.

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  • mallratmallrat Members  3281WRX Points: 436Posts: 3,281 Titanium Tees
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    We got it on one of our event lawns, nothing on the course. Our chemical rep came out and looked at it with our Super because we’ve never had it on our property. I went out and sprayed Banner, 28-0-0 and 2 other chemicals that aren’t coming to me right now. The Banner seemed to get rid of it over the weekend. Just something we really didn’t know about having never seen it.

    I thought the rep called it both names though.

    Posted:
  • BNGLBNGL Jupiter, FloridaMembers  1933WRX Points: 607Posts: 1,933 Platinum Tees
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    On -, @mallrat said:

    We got it on one of our event lawns, nothing on the course. Our chemical rep came out and looked at it with our Super because we’ve never had it on our property. I went out and sprayed Banner, 28-0-0 and 2 other chemicals that aren’t coming to me right now. The Banner seemed to get rid of it over the weekend. Just something we really didn’t know about having never seen it.

    I thought the rep called it both names though.

    They can look similar and be treated with similar products, they are both part of the fungi kingdom and ascomycota division but then beach off at the class level; summer pitch is sordariomycetea BRP escapes me right now but that’s why diagnosis is so important because they may look similar but be treated differently

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  • mallratmallrat Members  3281WRX Points: 436Posts: 3,281 Titanium Tees
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    BNGL did you leave your club? Saw an ad on GCSAA for the course I thought you were at.

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  • caniac6caniac6 Members  3450WRX Points: 1,096Handicap: 4Posts: 3,450 Titanium Tees
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    The super at my course is leaving Sept. 1. I learned today that the course is not going to hire a new super until next year. A guy from another course that is about 20 miles away is going to try to help out. We still have some hot weather to get through, and I don't know if anyone, that will be there everyday, is qualified to apply chemicals. This cost saving move seems like a formula for disaster.

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  • mallratmallrat Members  3281WRX Points: 436Posts: 3,281 Titanium Tees
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    I know 2 courses that have gone that or a similar route and they are both in miserable condition. One was a PGA Pro who thought he knew enough to run the maintenance side of things and oh boy.

    On a side note, there is a chance that they may not be legally allowed to spray anything if no one has their spray license.

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  • caniac6caniac6 Members  3450WRX Points: 1,096Handicap: 4Posts: 3,450 Titanium Tees
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    On -, @mallrat said:

    I know 2 courses that have gone that or a similar route and they are both in miserable condition. One was a PGA Pro who thought he knew enough to run the maintenance side of things and oh boy.

    On a side note, there is a chance that they may not be legally allowed to spray anything if no one has their spray license.

    I would bet that the guy coming from the other course will have a license. I just don't know if there will be anyone there on a daily basis that will be able to identify an issue on the greens. I have been a member here for 10 years, and I also have a turf degree, and I know how valuable and important a good super is. This situation is kind of making me think of looking elsewhere. I just think this isn't how you want to cut costs.

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  • smashdnsmashdn Let's cut them trees down. Members  2215WRX Points: 862Posts: 2,215 Platinum Tees
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    What did your course do when the super went on vacation for a week?

    It doesn't sound ideal but as long as you have someone coming who is knowledgeable I don't think it will be the ruination of your course either.

    By chance is your course attempting to lure this other super away?

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  • doubledubdoubledub ClubWRX  103WRX Points: 55Handicap: +.5Posts: 103 ClubWRX
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    I was listening to the Fried Egg podcast with the Southern Hills super the other day and heard them talking about a system installed during the SH reno/resto that allows them to manipulate the soil temp of the greens. I thought they were talking about a sub air system at first but did some research and found they lay a system of underground piping in the greens to heat/cool the soil. Anyone have experience with this or know how much it would cost, sounds pretty crazy to me? I think the whole renovation cost 19 million and I bet this system made up a pretty good chunk of that! Also seems like a crazy complicated system to maintain. Here is an article that summarizes what they did. https://www.achrnews.com/articles/141118-pga-championship-course-installs-hydronic-green-conditioning

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  • caniac6caniac6 Members  3450WRX Points: 1,096Handicap: 4Posts: 3,450 Titanium Tees
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    On -, @smashdn said:

    What did your course do when the super went on vacation for a week?

    It doesn't sound ideal but as long as you have someone coming who is knowledgeable I don't think it will be the ruination of your course either.

    By chance is your course attempting to lure this other super away?

    We had an asst. super that covered while the super was on vacation, but he moved to another course. Plus, a week is a lot different than 4 months. The other guy will only be there a few days a week, and probably for only a few hours at a time. If we have no one that can recognize a disease on a green, and it goes untreated for several days, it really can have some big time problems on the greens. I really think a course can do a lot better without a PGA pro than it can without a qualified super.

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  • Mikey5eMikey5e michMembers  1326WRX Points: 300Handicap: 15Posts: 1,326 Platinum Tees
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    I haven't gone through the entire thread, but, are golf rangers backing off enforcing 'pace of play' more these days?
    (hope this is within the realm of intended topics)

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  • GolfnuckGolfnuck Members  659WRX Points: 111Posts: 659 Golden Tee
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    On -, @bulls9999 said:

    I'm in a high clay area. Clay is very very fine, which is why ponds/lakes are 'cloudy' because the fine particles can stay suspended longer. So when our course fluffs up the sand in the bunkers by raking them with the cart-towed rake, after a few days, they turn 'hard, crusted' again. A USGA-soil/turf guy once told me that if you notice how the bunkers get filled with water on a heavy rain?... yes?.... the clay from the surrounding turf leaches into the bunkers, binds to the sand particles, and literally 'glues them together' to form hard packed, crusty sand. And that the only way to prevent that in our area is to put bunker liners in. Our club looked into it, and wanted that fine white sand you see on tour level courses....cost would be half-million plus for bunker liners (would that be like plastic swimming pools?) plust the expensive sand, so membership is slowly chewing on that thought.

    On -, @seven dewey said:

    Why do some courses have soft fluffy sand that is easy to get out of and others have hard sand that your club just bounces off? I'm sure it has to be a factor of cost/geographical region, but it sure would make golf more fun if it was consistent.

    We just changed all of our bunkers to the "Better Billy Bunker" system.

    It is a liner system but uses pea gravel and a special polymer instead of the traditional textile liners.

    Here is a brief description from the American Society of Golf Course Architects -

    https://asgca.org/architect/better-billy-bunker/

    https://www.billybunker.com/copy-of-better-billy-bunker-1

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  • smashdnsmashdn Let's cut them trees down. Members  2215WRX Points: 862Posts: 2,215 Platinum Tees
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    On -, @doubledub said:

    manipulate the soil temp of the greens.

    I could see that being beneficial. I don't know how true this is but I have had guys at two different courses around here tell me that the roots of the bentgrass greens "boiled" and died two years ago when we had several weeks in a row of super high temperatures coupled with super high moisture. The soil profile was so filled with moisture I guess it conducted the heat down into the root zone.

    In the two years since then we have had really hot days (~100F) but it has been dry. While the grass is stressed and shaggy and soft from misting it, it has not resulted in any die offs like the wet and heat did.

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  • mallratmallrat Members  3281WRX Points: 436Posts: 3,281 Titanium Tees
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    On -, @smashdn said:

    On -, @doubledub said:

    manipulate the soil temp of the greens.

    I could see that being beneficial. I don't know how true this is but I have had guys at two different courses around here tell me that the roots of the bentgrass greens "boiled" and died two years ago when we had several weeks in a row of super high temperatures coupled with super high moisture. The soil profile was so filled with moisture I guess it conducted the heat down into the root zone.

    In the two years since then we have had really hot days (~100F) but it has been dry. While the grass is stressed and shaggy and soft from misting it, it has not resulted in any die offs like the wet and heat did.

    I know that can be an issue but it might have caused Pythium. When there is too much water or moisture in the soil, the sun will then start to heat up the water which can then cook the roots.

    Pythium is a disease that from my understanding is from too much moisture in the soil mixed with humidity and temperature. I believe a rough guide is when humidity plus temperature equals or is over 150 you have to be very careful.

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  • mallratmallrat Members  3281WRX Points: 436Posts: 3,281 Titanium Tees
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    On -, @Golfnuck said:

    On -, @bulls9999 said:

    I'm in a high clay area. Clay is very very fine, which is why ponds/lakes are 'cloudy' because the fine particles can stay suspended longer. So when our course fluffs up the sand in the bunkers by raking them with the cart-towed rake, after a few days, they turn 'hard, crusted' again. A USGA-soil/turf guy once told me that if you notice how the bunkers get filled with water on a heavy rain?... yes?.... the clay from the surrounding turf leaches into the bunkers, binds to the sand particles, and literally 'glues them together' to form hard packed, crusty sand. And that the only way to prevent that in our area is to put bunker liners in. Our club looked into it, and wanted that fine white sand you see on tour level courses....cost would be half-million plus for bunker liners (would that be like plastic swimming pools?) plust the expensive sand, so membership is slowly chewing on that thought.

    On -, @seven dewey said:

    Why do some courses have soft fluffy sand that is easy to get out of and others have hard sand that your club just bounces off? I'm sure it has to be a factor of cost/geographical region, but it sure would make golf more fun if it was consistent.

    We just changed all of our bunkers to the "Better Billy Bunker" system.

    It is a liner system but uses pea gravel and a special polymer instead of the traditional textile liners.

    Here is a brief description from the American Society of Golf Course Architects -

    https://asgca.org/architect/better-billy-bunker/

    https://www.billybunker.com/copy-of-better-billy-bunker-1

    That is also a quality of using a very specific type of cheaper golf course sand. I believe it is called Riverdale or something like that. That sand is no longer used I believe but it is very common. It is a tannsand that when moisture hits it sticks together. My course used this sand for 15 years and in many bunkers you would think you were hitting off clay but if you go in with a shovel and dig down there is 6-8 inches of sand.

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  • BNGLBNGL Jupiter, FloridaMembers  1933WRX Points: 607Posts: 1,933 Platinum Tees
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    On -, @doubledub said:

    I was listening to the Fried Egg podcast with the Southern Hills super the other day and heard them talking about a system installed during the SH reno/resto that allows them to manipulate the soil temp of the greens. I thought they were talking about a sub air system at first but did some research and found they lay a system of underground piping in the greens to heat/cool the soil. Anyone have experience with this or know how much it would cost, sounds pretty crazy to me? I think the whole renovation cost 19 million and I bet this system made up a pretty good chunk of that! Also seems like a crazy complicated system to maintain. Here is an article that summarizes what they did. https://www.achrnews.com/articles/141118-pga-championship-course-installs-hydronic-green-conditioning

    I regret that I can only give one like to your post. Russ Myers is a terrifically talented superintendent, truly one of the best in the world. He’s carved himself out a home in Tulsa, at a terrific facility with money.
    That article posited something essential, and that should be taken to heart by everyone, paraphrasing here, but the difference between golf courses and elite world renowned country clubs is luxury. Understand that as cool as this system is, it is not a necessity. Nor is subair, or billy bunker liners, or fairway rollers etc. BUT these are tools that can make our jobs and product much easier and better.

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  • BNGLBNGL Jupiter, FloridaMembers  1933WRX Points: 607Posts: 1,933 Platinum Tees
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    On -, @mallrat said:

    BNGL did you leave your club? Saw an ad on GCSAA for the course I thought you were at.

    Yes I left officially 1 June. We had several postings actually may still be available, ANGC was on GCSAA not too long ago.

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  • BNGLBNGL Jupiter, FloridaMembers  1933WRX Points: 607Posts: 1,933 Platinum Tees
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    On -, @caniac6 said:

    On -, @smashdn said:

    What did your course do when the super went on vacation for a week?

    It doesn't sound ideal but as long as you have someone coming who is knowledgeable I don't think it will be the ruination of your course either.

    By chance is your course attempting to lure this other super away?

    We had an asst. super that covered while the super was on vacation, but he moved to another course. Plus, a week is a lot different than 4 months. The other guy will only be there a few days a week, and probably for only a few hours at a time. If we have no one that can recognize a disease on a green, and it goes untreated for several days, it really can have some big time problems on the greens. I really think a course can do a lot better without a PGA pro than it can without a qualified super.

    While not an ideal situation, but maybe you could chip in for a bit? You did state you had a degree. I am not sure what type of club you are at, and I do share your concerns and empathize I do think that it can be done temporarily as long as the crew is good. If there is a good crew in place and the guy coming over is motivated, then it should be ok.

    Posted:
  • BNGLBNGL Jupiter, FloridaMembers  1933WRX Points: 607Posts: 1,933 Platinum Tees
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    On -, @bulls9999 said:

    Fantastic....
    Question: How come every course (even my own c.c. course), whenever someone is out 'watering the greens' on a hot day, they do it from hole #1 to #18 direction, and sometimes you get the same guyy watering greens, holding you up for 3-5 holes in a row? It happens everywhere...same problem everywhere. Common sense says, if you water greens from hole #18-to-#1 direction, you'll only interfere with any group just once? You need to put that in your golf course maintenance manual.

    On -, @BNGL said:

    Good Afternoon GolfWRX,

    As the title says hit me up with any questions that you may have in relation to golf course agronomy, or why certain practices are done at certain times. Whatever the question you have, if I don't have the answer I will provide it for you.

    Fairways, Greens, and remember to repair your ball marks!

    It is a tremendously difficult balance between golfer and worker. If you only have one guy available to hand water, don't use a hose pop the overheads on to save time. I don't know as that I have ever had a set order to go in, on a non tournament day. I just want the guys to get it done, usually on a low ET day, we will start at 1330 probe and water amongst four guys all with radios and the days tee sheet to guess where play is and they knock it out. Some guys water 6 greens, others water only 2 because of play or what not.
    As for not going 18 backwards, as someone said you would then hit every group as opposed to only a couple. I try to not have my guys/gals water right in front of groups because guys I learned from beat the mantra of, "I don't want members playing on wet greens!" into my head when I was a youngin.

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  • BNGLBNGL Jupiter, FloridaMembers  1933WRX Points: 607Posts: 1,933 Platinum Tees
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    On -, @Mikey5e said:

    I haven't gone through the entire thread, but, are golf rangers backing off enforcing 'pace of play' more these days?
    (hope this is within the realm of intended topics)

    Uhm to be honest I am not sure, the last couple of times I have played where a ranger was roaming, Orlando area, they were at least talking about it...not really sure they're enforcing it. Which is unfortunate.

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  • TexasTurfTexasTurf Members  103WRX Points: 64Posts: 103 Fairways
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    On -, @BNGL said:

    On -, @doubledub said:

    I was listening to the Fried Egg podcast with the Southern Hills super the other day and heard them talking about a system installed during the SH reno/resto that allows them to manipulate the soil temp of the greens. I thought they were talking about a sub air system at first but did some research and found they lay a system of underground piping in the greens to heat/cool the soil. Anyone have experience with this or know how much it would cost, sounds pretty crazy to me? I think the whole renovation cost 19 million and I bet this system made up a pretty good chunk of that! Also seems like a crazy complicated system to maintain. Here is an article that summarizes what they did. https://www.achrnews.com/articles/141118-pga-championship-course-installs-hydronic-green-conditioning

    I regret that I can only give one like to your post. Russ Myers is a terrifically talented superintendent, truly one of the best in the world. He’s carved himself out a home in Tulsa, at a terrific facility with money.
    That article posited something essential, and that should be taken to heart by everyone, paraphrasing here, but the difference between golf courses and elite world renowned country clubs is luxury. Understand that as cool as this system is, it is not a necessity. Nor is subair, or billy bunker liners, or fairway rollers etc. BUT these are tools that can make our jobs and product much easier and better.

    Exactly. It's definitely a luxury item. And whether hydronics would be helpful or not all depends on the location/climate and the type of grass you're working with. I think hydronics would help much more with heating greens to get the grass growing earlier in the year and would provide minimal benefit of cooling in the summer - when air movement and moisture control is much more important.

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  • AlmostscratchonceAlmostscratchonce Members  190WRX Points: 75Posts: 190 Fairways
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    BNGL -

    On -, @BNGL said:

    Yes I left officially 1 June. We had several postings actually may still be available, ANGC was on GCSAA not too long ago.

    You moving from S. Florida to E. Georgia?

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  • smashdnsmashdn Let's cut them trees down. Members  2215WRX Points: 862Posts: 2,215 Platinum Tees
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    https://www.golfadvisor.com/articles/robotic-greens-mower-presidio-san-francisco

    On -, @BNGL thoughts?

    If you had your druthers, would you take automated green mowing or automated bunker raking?

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  • TexasTurfTexasTurf Members  103WRX Points: 64Posts: 103 Fairways
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    On -, @smashdn said:

    https://www.golfadvisor.com/articles/robotic-greens-mower-presidio-san-francisco

    On -, @BNGL thoughts?

    If you had your druthers, would you take automated green mowing or automated bunker raking?

    I'm not BNGL. But I would take bunker raking over greens mowing in a heartbeat. The golf course is only as good as it's greens. If that thing starts scalping a green, leaking, etc. you're going to end up with issues. A human greens mower will stop at the first sign of something wrong. I can't imagine automated greens mowing without someone there to supervise it. At that point why not just have that person run the mower.

    If something unintended happens in the bunkers, no big deal. It can be fixed easily.

    Posted:
  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
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  • mallratmallrat Members  3281WRX Points: 436Posts: 3,281 Titanium Tees
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    As to what Texas is saying.

    Last year I was on a tri-plex. I was mowing 3-9 which means straight sideways on the greens basically. After my second pass I somehow got a stick caught in the back of the reel. So a full pass with a 1/2” wide x 1/2” deep gouge out of the green. I noticed it right away and called the mechanic out and we found out what it was. Ow can you imagine that being a robotic mower with no supervision? There would have been 20 of those gouges not 1.

    Side note... Spent 2 hours working and trying g to fix it. At the end of the day I got it to the point that it didn’t effect a rolling putt at all but you could see it for over a month.

    Posted:
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