Suggestions for Cross-country Golf Trip

howellhandmadehowellhandmade Members Posts: 782 ✭✭✭✭✭
My middle daughter is heading off to college in the PNW. The plan is that she will take a trip with her aunt for a graduation present, and fly back to her university. I will drive her stuff -- not as mad as it sounds since I drive to visit my mom in Colorado every summer -- and meet her and get her moved in, then drive back to Pennsylvania.



What I'd like to do is golf my way back -- drive a day, golf a day. Or maybe a bit of both if courses are close enough. Since I will be stopping in Colorado I'll be taking I-80 out, maybe play The Harvester on the way. For the trip back I could either take the northern I-94 route with Whistling Straits as the anchor, or drop down to Bandon Dunes as the anchor and go back I-80 or even I-90. I can stretch the return trip out to 10 days but I can't zig-zag too much. I can afford a couple of bucket list courses but I'm not looking for top 100 every day.



This plan is in very early stages, and all I've done so far is look at lists online and proximity to interstates. So open to ideas. And if you live near the course you suggest and might want to play golf, so much the better.
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  • BUCKEYERBALL88BUCKEYERBALL88 Members Posts: 996 ✭✭✭✭✭


    My middle daughter is heading off to college in the PNW. The plan is that she will take a trip with her aunt for a graduation present, and fly back to her university. I will drive her stuff -- not as mad as it sounds since I drive to visit my mom in Colorado every summer -- and meet her and get her moved in, then drive back to Pennsylvania.



    What I'd like to do is golf my way back -- drive a day, golf a day. Or maybe a bit of both if courses are close enough. Since I will be stopping in Colorado I'll be taking I-80 out, maybe play The Harvester on the way. For the trip back I could either take the northern I-94 route with Whistling Straits as the anchor, or drop down to Bandon Dunes as the anchor and go back I-80 or even I-90. I can stretch the return trip out to 10 days but I can't zig-zag too much. I can afford a couple of bucket list courses but I'm not looking for top 100 every day.



    This plan is in very early stages, and all I've done so far is look at lists online and proximity to interstates. So open to ideas. And if you live near the course you suggest and might want to play golf, so much the better.




    I recommend Bandon Dunes & erin Hills
  • abergervtabergervt Members Posts: 205 ✭✭
    I went to college in Iowa and have done this route often as well as out to California and back. Harvester is a tad over rated in my book better off playing wakonda club in Des Moines talk about unique layouts. Would certainly suggest ballyneal in Colorado that’s unlike almost anything around. Obliviously Sandhills or dismal river. Hard not hit Brandon or whistling straights. Would also suggest pasatiempo if you find your way to the Bay Area. Dm me if you want to talk more
  • howellhandmadehowellhandmade Members Posts: 782 ✭✭✭✭✭
    abergervt wrote:


    I went to college in Iowa and have done this route often as well as out to California and back. Harvester is a tad over rated in my book better off playing wakonda club in Des Moines talk about unique layouts. Would certainly suggest ballyneal in Colorado that’s unlike almost anything around. Obliviously Sandhills or dismal river. Hard not hit Brandon or whistling straights. Would also suggest pasatiempo if you find your way to the Bay Area. Dm me if you want to talk more




    Thanks for the reply, but it looks like all of those courses (except Pasatiempo which is out of range) are private. Although I would have been disappointed in The Harvester anyway; although it appears on the GD top 100 public list, it is closed for 2018 and will reopen as private in 2019.



  • Roman1274Roman1274 Members Posts: 47 ✭✭
    If you're near NE Indiana check out great Indiana golf. Very reasonably priced stay and play packages
  • ChancemanChanceman Members Posts: 619 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Heading east from Seattle: Gamble Sands, Circling Raven, Old Works, Powder Horn, Ballyneal, Wild Horse, Harvester, Cog Hill, Old Stonewall, Great Bear
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,737 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Take I94 and stop at Links of North Dakota, and Bully Pulpit. I think they offer a deal like 150 for those two courses plus another in Minot. Links of ND is a experience like nothing else. It's really special and if you have a chance to do it, definitely check it out because they are out of the way. Bully Pulpit is similar to Black Diamond Quarry Course, 12 regular holes, but the holes in the badlands are phenomenal and strikingly beautiful. CHASKA Town Course is a good track, almost as good as Hazeltine imo.
  • mallratmallrat Members Posts: 3,014 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    There is a new course in Eastern Oregon called Silvie’s Ranch. I would definitely add that
  • PulledabillPulledabill Members Posts: 355 ✭✭✭✭
    Which college in the "PNW"? Bandon is 1 hour 45 minutes from I-5, over 4 hours to Portland, and 7.5 to Seattle.
  • golf1836golf1836 Chopper Members Posts: 147 ✭✭
    check out the thread best courses nobody talks about and the sprinkle in a few top 100
  • howellhandmadehowellhandmade Members Posts: 782 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Ok, here's the plan. On the way to Vancouver, BC:



    Blue Top Ridge, Riverside IA

    Wild Horse, NE

    Rochelle Ranch, WY

    Old Works, MT

    Gamble Sands, WA



    Probably will hit Coeur d'Alene and Whistling Straits on the way back.
  • tideridertiderider Members Posts: 2,180 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    have fun ... sounds like a great trip ...
  • secondarysecondary Members Posts: 291 ✭✭


    Ok, here's the plan. On the way to Vancouver, BC:



    Blue Top Ridge, Riverside IA

    Wild Horse, NE

    Rochelle Ranch, WY

    Old Works, MT

    Gamble Sands, WA



    Probably will hit Coeur d'Alene and Whistling Straits on the way back.




    Skip Coeur d Alene and play Circling Raven instead. You will be glad you did. Might want to see about Wine Valley as well.
  • howellhandmadehowellhandmade Members Posts: 782 ✭✭✭✭✭
    secondary wrote:



    Ok, here's the plan. On the way to Vancouver, BC:



    Blue Top Ridge, Riverside IA

    Wild Horse, NE

    Rochelle Ranch, WY

    Old Works, MT

    Gamble Sands, WA



    Probably will hit Coeur d'Alene and Whistling Straits on the way back.




    Skip Coeur d Alene and play Circling Raven instead. You will be glad you did. Might want to see about Wine Valley as well.




    Thank you, I shall. I had nearly decided simply to drive hard for two days to get to Whistling Straits, but Circling Raven looks great.
  • deadsolid...shankdeadsolid...shank ClubWRX Posts: 14,768 ClubWRX
    Rochelle Ranch should be an experience. Almost 7,000' of elevation at Rawlins. And that course is really exposed to the wind.



    If you have time, check out 4 Winds in Kimball, Ne (exit #22 I believe). It is literally less than five minutes from I80, if it take s more than three hours to play I would be shocked, and at $45 it is one of the best values you can find.
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  • howellhandmadehowellhandmade Members Posts: 782 ✭✭✭✭✭


    Rochelle Ranch should be an experience. Almost 7,000' of elevation at Rawlins. And that course is really exposed to the wind.



    If you have time, check out 4 Winds in Kimball, Ne (exit #22 I believe). It is literally less than five minutes from I80, if it take s more than three hours to play I would be shocked, and at $45 it is one of the best values you can find.




    Thanks! You know, I just might. I'm playing Wild Horse in the morning then driving on in to Greeley, which is 4 hours and change. Kimball looks to be about halfway, so if I finish Wild Horse by noon I could squeeze it in and still get to my mom's at a decent hour. It's handy to know about in any case; I drive out every summer but I've always been in a rush and driven straight through. I think this way has to be better.
  • Argonne69Argonne69 Members Posts: 21,933 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 7, 2018 #17
    If you're traveling through Nebraska, it would be worth the detour to head up to the Sand Hills region to play The Prairie Club, and/or Dismal River. If you played Wild Horse in the early morning, you could be at The Prairie Club in time for a mid afternoon round. Either that, or take U.S. 20 on the way back.
  • deadsolid...shankdeadsolid...shank ClubWRX Posts: 14,768 ClubWRX



    Rochelle Ranch should be an experience. Almost 7,000' of elevation at Rawlins. And that course is really exposed to the wind.



    If you have time, check out 4 Winds in Kimball, Ne (exit #22 I believe). It is literally less than five minutes from I80, if it take s more than three hours to play I would be shocked, and at $45 it is one of the best values you can find.




    Thanks! You know, I just might. I'm playing Wild Horse in the morning then driving on in to Greeley, which is 4 hours and change. Kimball looks to be about halfway, so if I finish Wild Horse by noon I could squeeze it in and still get to my mom's at a decent hour. It's handy to know about in any case; I drive out every summer but I've always been in a rush and driven straight through. I think this way has to be better.




    It’s a good course too. Highly underrated. Then you can just go south on Hwy 71 from Kimball to get to Greeley.
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  • howellhandmadehowellhandmade Members Posts: 782 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 27, 2018 #19
    The trip so far:



    Riverside, Iowa -- not a bad deal; because of the casino a really nice room is about a hundred bucks and you can eat enough at the buffet to live for a week like a snake. The course is very nice, pleasing contours from the rolling hills, fairly soft and target-y. They let me off first thing as a single which worked out great. Easiest course of the trip for me.



    Wild Horse, Nebraska -- great course. Super firm conditions, densest, healthiest turf I've seen anywhere. The course presents an interesting contrast between perfectly maintained and wild and ragged. The greens were like bristle dart boards, very true without being super fast. Loved putting here and made several that were unusually long for me. With the native grass areas and the deep, wild bunkers and the chest-high sunflowers and the wind you could imagine yourself on a seaside links course. Most difficult course of the trip for me -- there's no rough to speak of and the fairways are fast, so if you get offline you're quickly into the stuff where your ball is technically in play but 90% lost.



    Rochelle Ranch, Wyoming -- I just finished reading Doak's book on golf course architecture, in which he argues that courses could vastly lower the need for water and chemicals simply by letting the grass grow a bit longer and not competing for the tightest fairways and the fastest greens. I don't know if it was intentional, but the grass at Rochelle Ranch seemed at least 25% longer overall than any other course I've played recently. Very playable, greens on the slow side, very healthy, well-conditioned course. Long, although it is at altitude.. Couple of real risk-reward holes, like #13, a par 4 with a drivable green if you go straight over the water. Kind of a marvel of a course, if you've driven I-80 through Wyoming you've seen it and maybe wondered if it's worthwhile. It is.



    Old Works, Montana -- Stayed in the Trade Winds motel, which was not nearly as clean as the online reviews led me to believe it would be and overpriced at $70, but O'Bella, the restaurant directly across the street, was excellent. Anaconda, MT is a shell of an old mining boom town (once nearly 50k residents), but remains a great, characteristic place. The course is quite good. The front nine has a wonderful connection to the mining history of the site; the ruins of the copper smelting works (in 1919 the 585-foot smelter stack was the highest masonry structure in the world) frown over you and you play through and over heaps of rubble and tailings. The front nine has most of the elevation change, which, combined with the altitude, can make you feel like a tour player. The Par 3 7th plays 40-50 yards short -- I rather enjoyed sticking a 200-yard 7-iron close. The back nine is just fine, but, by comparison, feels like any other Nicklaus course out west. Great staff, nice little restaurant. Again, they let me out walking at first light, which was perfect for a traveler.



    Gamble Sands, Washington -- I'm still thinking about this course. I've never played anything like it, kind of like a combination of golf and pinball. The interplay between terrain and course is mind-bending. From your feet (great course to walk) it looks like a vast extravagance of closely-mown turf (there are no defined tee boxes, just markers that could go anywhere and sometimes do, and the greens are just a hair shorter than the fairways) and the course looks like it extends into the next state. Somehow the course takes on the scale of the landscape and messes with your eyes. But holes that look at first like they are at least 800 yards long resolve into fairly normal 400-ish yarders, once you figure out that the ample driving area was a trick of depth perception, and when you look at an aerial photo the course is actually pretty normal-sized. There are dramatic forced carries, but, again, through tricks of perspective they aren't quite as long as they seem. At its core the course is very playable and not difficult, but I found it difficult to play well. The dramatic contours, immense greens, and fast conditions have a way of exerting control over your ball after it lands so that you could hit what you thought was a great shot and what you thought was an off-the-planet terrible shot and wind up with a 50-foot putt for both. And the greens are tough. Lots of slope, and lots of grain. The grain goes toward the river, and it exerts a LOT of influence, so you can find yourself blowing an uphill putt six feet past and leaving a downhill putt six feet short. Of course, that's starting with that 50-foot putt you wound up with when you landed on the green instead of 30 feet short like you were supposed to.



    Gamble Sands would be a fun course to play over and over and try different shots. There were several holes where I knew I should have hit anything but driver into a safe spot where it would obviously run into an area where I would have a 7-iron in, but I just couldn't restrain myself from trying to drive it into a slot that would run right up to the green, That's how you can have the whole world to miss it off the tee and still wind up hitting your second shot backwards out of a ravine. I'd love to play again, and try a bumped hybrid, or a putter, from some places I hit wedge, and hit an iron or hybrid from some tees where, with only one shot at it, I couldn't pass up the chance for glory. Psychology, man, you know you're being tricked but you do it anyway. That's why I keep thinking about this course.



    I don't have unlimited funds for golf. This trip is a big splurge for me, and the $50-80 per round most of the places charge is quite a bit more than I pay back home. I could play Whistling Straits on the way home but decided to pass because it is just too expensive. I have a tendency to spoil things for myself, finding it hard to enjoy, say, a really expensive meal in a restaurant knowing that I could have had three meals in restaurants that are just fine for the same money. My concern about Gamble Sands was that, even though it's my only really "big" green fee of the trip, it would weigh on my mind and I wouldn't enjoy the round. I didn't think of the money once, and if I hadn't had to be in Vancouver by a certain hour that evening I would have played it again.



    That's it for now. I'm planning to play Canyon River in Missoula, Hawktree in Bismarck, and The Bog in Wisconsin on my way home. Roughly 10 hours of driving after golf each day, that's working out as a decent pace.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • ihatecats18ihatecats18 Members Posts: 286 ✭✭✭✭
    I94 on the way home will give you ample courses in w nd, mn and WI. I honestly would try to golfnow it or pick a Troy Burne on the MN WI border
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  • howellhandmadehowellhandmade Members Posts: 782 ✭✭✭✭✭


    I94 on the way home will give you ample courses in w nd, mn and WI. I honestly would try to golfnow it or pick a Troy Burne on the MN WI border




    True. At this point, though, I have to make progress homeward, there aren't any more days available to stretch out for more golf. I've already picked the courses and made hotel reservations based on having enough time to play in the morning, drive to the next place, and get at least five or six hours sleep before doing it again. I've been going to Colorado to visit my mom for years and I reckon I'll be visiting Vancouver for at least the next four years, so I'll do this again and try different courses. Maybe. I'd like to play Wild Horse and Rochelle Ranch again for sure. On the Pgh-CO leg the Iowa spot is kinda open, and on the CO-Vancouver leg the Montana spot is open. Maybe next time I can stretch the homeward leg a few more days and play more courses along I-94.
  • eboettneeboettne Members Posts: 203 ✭✭✭
    Following to get your reaction to Hawktree. hopefully you get good weather and it doesn't blow too much. Last time I was there was 30mph winds and greens running about an 11 or 12. Enjoy!
  • rtraudtrtraudt Members Posts: 1,794 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Sounds like a blast of a trip thus far...making me want to find an excuse to get out and play gamble sands! Also, as a local, I would look for something other than the Bog in MKE (unless you’re somehow totally committed). Sure, it’s a good course in a pretty setting, but if you’re looking for something not terribly far off of 94 I would look up both Washington County (near Milwaukee) or University Ridge (Madison, home course of the Badgers). Or perhaps even Glen Erin in Janesville. I’m guessing that you don’t want to go further north, so places like Lawsonia and Sand Valley are out of the running, but if not Lawsonia would be my “can’t miss” from the state given your previously mentioned budget/price range. Just food for thought in case you have any flexibility!
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  • howellhandmadehowellhandmade Members Posts: 782 ✭✭✭✭✭
    rtraudt wrote:


    Sounds like a blast of a trip thus far...making me want to find an excuse to get out and play gamble sands! Also, as a local, I would look for something other than the Bog in MKE (unless you’re somehow totally committed). Sure, it’s a good course in a pretty setting, but if you’re looking for something not terribly far off of 94 I would look up both Washington County (near Milwaukee) or University Ridge (Madison, home course of the Badgers). Or perhaps even Glen Erin in Janesville. I’m guessing that you don’t want to go further north, so places like Lawsonia and Sand Valley are out of the running, but if not Lawsonia would be my “can’t miss” from the state given your previously mentioned budget/price range. Just food for thought in case you have any flexibility!




    Thanks for thoughts for the future. I'm meeting friends from Milwaukee and The Bog is a course they wanted to try.
  • howellhandmadehowellhandmade Members Posts: 782 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 1, 2018 #25
    The homeward leg of my trip was not quite as great as the first two legs. Because I had to get home, I had to drive harder, which might not have been an issue if I had felt well. Unfortunately, when my mother-in-law came to Vancouver to "help" she brought along a hacking, sneezing cold, and I spent several days cooped up in the car and the Airbnb with her. No doubt I would have enjoyed the golf more if I hadn't been flirting with the LD50 of Theraflu, but if I'd been sensible and given up on golf and just driven and rested I would have resented it. Forever.



    My mom used to live in Missoula, MT so I've driven by Canyon River GC a bunch of times. You can't tell a whole lot by a glimpse of a green (par 3 14th as it turns out) and some houses at 70 mph and I kind of always assumed it was private but obviously it's not. As golf communities go, it is attractive and strikes a nice balance between golf and real estate, to the extent that the course didn't get the short end of the stick. The holes have nice character and it's enjoyable to play. There are some pretty water holes like 10, and a few where you kind of get away from the houses. However, the flip side of a development that is laid out so that just about every lot has a road on one side and a golf hole on the other is that a) you're rarely out of sight of houses and b) there are frequent portages through the houses from one body of golf to another. This isn't horrible with a cart, which I had because I felt like ****, but I have greater affection for courses where carts are more of an option and less of a necessity. The Craftsman-style houses are attractive and modestly sized, and it looks like a great place to live although if I lived there I wouldn't want riffraff like me waltzing on. At least the houses aren't in play like some golf course developments. I played the front nine with a local named Red who, at 78, plays every day with a loose rotator cuff and slack biceps and was playing his first round with new single-length irons. Badass, eh? We didn't compare scores but I think he had me by a few shots and I did NOT whine about having a cold.



    Thanks to Red we turned in 90 minutes and I had time for breakfast and coffee and still was on the road by 10:30. The drive from Missoula to Bismarck is about as unpopulated and low-stress as you can get these days, so I didn't feel too much worse for wear when I showed up for my 7:20 tee time at Hawktree GC the next morning. I have excellent cold etiquette so I did not shake hands with Fred, who was going out ahead of me and asked if I wanted company. Good thing I always say yes; Fred turned out to be one of the original investors in the course. I'm sure I would have enjoyed the course even if I hadn't played it with a **** of a nice guy and good player who knew the course back when it was a gravel pit, but it sure didn't hurt.



    One of the risks of playing different courses every day on a trip across the US is that you can start to think you know something. As a golfer I've primarily specialized in shaggy munis, playing private or upscale public courses with about the same frequency and attitude that a wino finds a twenty in the street. So I listen skeptically to myself when I say things about how a course seems to fit in its land. I think, tap the brakes Herbert Warren Wind, you play nine new courses in three weeks and now you know terroir? That said, the courses that stand out for me are the ones that fit in their land, that don't seem imposed on it. Gamble Sands was the best and most engrossing example of that for me. Wild Horse and Rochelle Ranch are also right at home in the prairie and high desert, respectively. Hawktree is similarly memorable. I know, thanks to Fred, that it was actually a lot of work to turn a gravel pit back into contours and vegetation that belong there. But it was well done. It's a pure golf course and I'd love to play it again but I hope to be a little straighter next time -- if you go, bring lots of golf balls.



    Fred was such a mensch that I stayed for lunch and more conversation with him, which put me just a little behind for the 742-mile drive to Wisconsin. Especially since both coffee and Theraflu are diuretics, and I was pretty much being kept on the road by both. By the time I arrived in West Bend somewhere after midnight and an hour after I'd decided the GPS was playing a cruel joke and dumping me in the middle of nowhere, I was a mess. I'm a good example of why I hate hotels; after I spent the night sniffling and coughing and shivering in that room it needed a biohazard team and not the cursory wipe it almost certainly got. It just occurred to me that I should probably blame my cold on one of the four hotel rooms I stayed in prior to Vancouver rather than my mother-in-law, but, nah.



    I don't want to say too much about The Bog (an Arnold Palmer design) in Saukville because I didn't have a control group for me that wasn't exhausted, sick, secretly chafing at the 5-hour pace of play (my group's fault, not the course's) and looking down the barrel of Chicago rush hour traffic. It is beautiful country and the course is well-conditioned -- worth mentioning that being a little soft was the only sign it took 13 inches of rain earlier in the week. It was good to catch up with an old friend, which was the reason I was there. It seemed to me a course more penal than strategic in design, though, and it rekindled my dislike of blind tee shots. Understood, blind shots have a place in course architecture and history, but one or two is enough. Probably if I played the course with a full charge I would have a different reaction. Oh, yeah, when I went to GHIN to enter my score the course couldn't be found. The kid at the pro shop looked at me like I'd grown a unicorn horn when I asked if the course might have another name, so I don't know what the people who play there regularly do.



    Things looked grim leaving The Bog at 2:30pm with Chicago (and Milwaukee) traffic between me and home, but I made it safely around 3am. Feeling much better now. Looking back over the trip, I have a few things I would have done differently. Rochelle Ranch -- insect repellent. Hawktree -- more golf balls. I didn't run out, but didn't end with much of a surplus. Gamble Sands -- a real camera, wide angle lens. Cell phone doesn't do it justice. And I'd probably stay at the Inn at Gamble Sands instead of the vastly cheaper motel a half hour away even if I had to sell my plasma a time or two before the trip.
  • eboettneeboettne Members Posts: 203 ✭✭✭
    Sounds like you had a great playing partner for Hawktree but you're right that course can run you through the gauntlet, especially on a windy day. If you ever run through North Dakota again I'd recommend going a bit further North to play Links of North Dakota perched above Lake Sakakawea. Great write up and thanks for sharing!
  • I_HATE_SNOWI_HATE_SNOW Members Posts: 3,346 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Wildhorse, Gothenburg NE, head north to Prairie Club near Valentine, NE.
  • VicvaradoVicvarado TXMembers Posts: 90 ✭✭✭
    Thanks OP for an entertaining thread. I enjoyed the read.
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  • howellhandmadehowellhandmade Members Posts: 782 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Well, it looks like I’m doing the trip again this summer. The visit to my mom in Greeley is a given, and the drive to Vancouver is somewhat optional but my daughter has some stuff that she wants at school and my wife got me a round at Whistler for Christmas, and I MUST play Gamble Sands again, so . . .

    So, how to improve the route? Wild Horse in NE stays. The point between Pittsburgh and Gothenburg, however, is vulnerable. Last year I played Blue Top Ridge at the Riverside Casino. Nice course, a little soft and resort-y. Room was inexpensive enough, the casino was a bit depressing. Another course in the general vicinity of Davenport, IA might serve.

    Rochelle Ranch stays. Thinking about going through Salt Lake City, though, instead of up through central Montana, where I played Old Works in Anaconda. There’s a clarinet mouthpiece maker in SLC I haven’t seen in awhile, and I haven’t golfed in Utah yet. A course north of SLC would fit nicely.

    I’m apt to have more time to get from Vancouver back to Pittsburgh this summer. Last year I was on a tight schedule and was miserably sick. This year I might drive across through Calgary (have a brother-in-law who is a member at Glencoe) and down through Glacier, or maybe stay north. I’d like to play Hawktree in ND again, and evidently there’s a buttload of golf to be played in Wisconsin. Options are open.

    Looking forward to your suggestions.

  • bonamanabonamana Members Posts: 3

    This is Tom from the Missouri Bluffs. Wisconsin is a really good place. I played the Whistling strait (you need to take a caddy-mandatory) but the Irish course on the other side of the ridge allows golf cart. They are right next to each other sharing some of the boundaries. I liked them both. Erin Hills is also very good again you have to take a caddy or carry the bag yourself which I do not recommend.

  • bonamanabonamana Members Posts: 3

    This is Tom from the Missouri Bluffs. Wisconsin is a really good place. I played the Whistling strait (you need to take a caddy-mandatory) but the Irish course on the other side of the ridge allows golf cart. They are right next to each other sharing some of the boundaries. I liked them both. Erin Hills is also very good again you have to take a caddy or carry the bag yourself which I do not recommend.

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