The Stock Tour Swing by Tyler Ferrell – Excellent Swing Instruction Book!

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  • CasualLieCasualLie Do Woodchucks Chuck Wood? Members Posts: 1,403 ✭✭
    gentles wrote:


    Sorry for bumping this thread - I let a friend borrow this book, but I’m trying to find the page with pictures of “shallow” and “steeps” movements. If I remember picture there is a whole bunch of moves with either steep or shallow. Can someone with a copy handy send me a pic of these pages? Much appreciated!



    gentles wrote:


    Sorry for bumping this thread - I let a friend borrow this book, but I’m trying to find the page with pictures of “shallow” and “steeps” movements. If I remember picture there is a whole bunch of moves with either steep or shallow. Can someone with a copy handy send me a pic of these pages? Much appreciated!




    These ones?



  • airjammerairjammer Members Posts: 988 ✭✭
    Just done reading it for the 1st time. It has some very nice illustrations on steep and shallow elements that most golfers need to know as well as how to understand your misses which was excellent.



    I think it should be called the tour stock downswing because the setup and backswing portion almost nonexistent. I understand it’s not a step by step type of book but I don’t think you can write a “swing” book without a extensive section about the setup and backswing or at least reference another resource for those issues.



    If anyone wants a cliff notes version of the downswing..top of the backswing with relaxed arms, bump hips toward the target while regaining flexion in the hips and bow the left wrist. When you get halfway down pull the left elbow to the target or the right elbow to your belly button.







  • Rasser75Rasser75 Members Posts: 146 ✭✭
    edited Aug 16, 2018 #94
    This book changed my swing. I can now hit it straight and curve it high and low with great confidence.



    His ideas and concept are brilliant.



    But be aware, you need some basic knowledge. It is surely an advanced book.



    He needs to update the illustrations or find an alternative publisher. Some of the prints are not good.
  • FullOfBrushManFullOfBrushMan Members Posts: 666 ✭✭
    Great book. The videos help so much more than most of the pictures.
  • deathbymuffindeathbymuffin Members Posts: 519 ✭✭
    I just finally picked up a copy. I concur with everyone else. A great book for those of us that really want to fully understand our swing, and where and why it goes wrong when it does. I do agree that it's probably best suited for intermediate to advanced players. Not really a beginner book.
  • Krt22Krt22 Members Posts: 6,504 ✭✭
    I sorta figured the name "The Stock Tour Swing" was enough of a heads up that it wasn't a book for beginners. =)
  • AES83AES83 Members Posts: 13
    Anyone knows if it’s possible to purchase this as an ebook? I prefer reading on my phone/tablet.
  • glkglk send it in jerome Members Posts: 3,319 ✭✭
    AES83 wrote:


    Anyone knows if it’s possible to purchase this as an ebook? I prefer reading on my phone/tablet.


    I asked Tyler in March about this. Said it’s in the works with no firm timeline.
  • DLiverDLiver Members Posts: 2,606 ✭✭




    Holy fark! How the **** can you even swing the club with a mind filled with all this crap?
  • oukeithoukeith Members Posts: 128 ✭✭
    DLiver wrote:



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    Holy fark! How the **** can you even swing the club with a mind filled with all this crap?




    So true.
  • AES83AES83 Members Posts: 13
    edited Oct 15, 2018 #102
    glk wrote:
    AES83 wrote:


    Anyone knows if it’s possible to purchase this as an ebook? I prefer reading on my phone/tablet.


    I asked Tyler in March about this. Said it’s in the works with no firm timeline.




    Thank you!

    Maybe I’€™ll just order the original so that I’€™m set for this winter. :-)
  • me05501me05501 Members Posts: 412
    I'm enjoying this book. I agree that the graphics could be better, but the explanations make sense.



    I took some lessons earlier this year, and that pro had shown me the motorcycle drill. More recently I found Monte's "Zipper Away" drill. Both of those moves are emphasized in this book (Jackson 5 = zipper away).



    I'm a lifelong upper body swinger. Good grip and setup fundamentals have allowed me to play the game decently while being a short hitter.



    I felt a strong sense of recognition when I read early in this book that Tyler identified two types of amateurs:
    • ones who power the swing from the ground, and tend to be good with the driver and not as good with irons and wedges, and
    • ones who try to use their shoulders for power and are good with wedges and irons but struggle with the longer clubs.


    That second guy is ME.



    In the last couple of weeks I've had a couple of range sessions using the Jackson 5/Zipper Away drill. This works very well for me with my irons. I don't need to do anything else to square the clubface. The ball leaves the club face with speed, starts on my target line, and has a nice high flight with a slight draw.



    For my driver, I have to add the motorcycle drill to make sure I square the face. I'm finding the sweet spot more often and the ball is starting online. I have hit some drives that seemed to stay in the air forever. If I don't square the clubface they're still hit hard and starting online but they curve offline to the right.



    Other than implementing these two moves, the only adjustment I've had to make is to set up closer to the ball. I'm clearing my hips (finally) and there's more room for the club to come inside, so I have to make sure not to be reaching for the ball. One of my setup cues with the driver is to have the ball on the heel at address, which seems to give me center contact.



    So I'm hitting the ball better just in time for winter. image/biggrin.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':D' />
  • BottleCapBottleCap Members Posts: 1,329 ✭✭
    edited Oct 19, 2018 #104
    I'm about half way through and it's really good stuff. When I first saw the book when it arrived a few days ago I thought it was way too thick, but I haven't been able to put it down.



    The swing Tyler is pushing is the flatter swing you see on tour. The one that looks like Paul Casey as opposed to Bubba or Mickelson.



    The graphics are fine, what bothers me is the placement of the page numbers.
    Titleist TS2 GD TourAD DI 7S
    Titleist 917 F3 GD TourAD IZ 8S
    Mizuno MP-18 MMC 3-4 DG AMT S300
    Mizuno MP-18 5-PW DG S400
    Vokey SM7 54M and 60M
    Cameron Newport 2 CT
    Bridgestone Tour B XS
  • me05501me05501 Members Posts: 412
    Practiced for nine holes yesterday with no warm up. I was a walking single with no one in front or behind, so on most shots I hit two balls.



    I have trouble committing to doing the hip bump and the motorcycle move on the same swing. image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' /> Generally, my first ball was okay and my second ball was a lot better. I just have to trust it more. Two transition moves is a lot to think about, and a smarter man would ingrain one of them before adding the other.



    That man is not me.
  • glkglk send it in jerome Members Posts: 3,319 ✭✭
    me05501 wrote:


    Practiced for nine holes yesterday with no warm up. I was a walking single with no one in front or behind, so on most shots I hit two balls.



    I have trouble committing to doing the hip bump and the motorcycle move on the same swing. image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' /> Generally, my first ball was okay and my second ball was a lot better. I just have to trust it more. Two transition moves is a lot to think about, and a smarter man would ingrain one of them before adding the other.



    That man is not me.


    I’d experiment a bit with the motorcycle. For me I found that I’m better at ending the backswing with and then maintaining a l dj. Multiple ways to achieve it.
  • CasualLieCasualLie Do Woodchucks Chuck Wood? Members Posts: 1,403 ✭✭
    1. I think there are other ways to achieve the "motorcycle" move other than conscious effort, so one has to look into that before focusing on hands and over doing it.



    2. There is a lot of experimentation. How early you start the move, how late, and how much...and all of this is impacted by swing width (different length clubs). I have found it to be great to consciously use this 100 yards in, somewhat good 7i - PW...but as I get closer to Driver, the swing is just too fast to be thinking about this!
  • Krt22Krt22 Members Posts: 6,504 ✭✭
    me05501 wrote:


    Practiced for nine holes yesterday with no warm up. I was a walking single with no one in front or behind, so on most shots I hit two balls.



    I have trouble committing to doing the hip bump and the motorcycle move on the same swing. image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' /> Generally, my first ball was okay and my second ball was a lot better. I just have to trust it more. Two transition moves is a lot to think about, and a smarter man would ingrain one of them before adding the other.



    That man is not me.




    Sometimes you need to do both



  • glkglk send it in jerome Members Posts: 3,319 ✭✭
    edited Nov 12, 2018 #109
    Martin Hall, on School of Golf TGC, is doing a segment on Tyler's book on Tuesday night 11/13 at 7 Eastern.
  • ralphs007ralphs007 Members Posts: 18
    DLiver wrote:





    Holy fark! How the **** can you even swing the club with a mind filled with all this crap?


    +1

    I had one of my best ball striking years using, "Harvey Penick's Magic Move".Simple, but it worked like a charm! I'm sure there are some golfers who could learn from this book,but for me,it would be a total disaster!
  • glkglk send it in jerome Members Posts: 3,319 ✭✭
    FYI a podcast with Tyler from late 2017 right as his book was coming out.



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51C7R7K6uYI
  • airjammerairjammer Members Posts: 988 ✭✭
    Has anyone took a in person lesson from Tyler? I’m not looking to take a lesson, I’m just curious and would love to hear the experience.
  • BB28403BB28403 Members Posts: 3,645 ✭✭
    edited Feb 9, 2019 3:24am #113
    This is probably the best golf instruction book I have read. Tyler did an unbelievable job. The organization and detail are both excellent




    Being honest it’s like a text book. ZZZZZZZzzzzzzz



    I don’t need to know how Nuclear fission works by the equation. Just heat my house.
  • Krt22Krt22 Members Posts: 6,504 ✭✭
    edited Feb 9, 2019 11:38am #114
    BB28403 wrote:

    This is probably the best golf instruction book I have read. Tyler did an unbelievable job. The organization and detail are both excellent




    Being honest it’s like a text book. ZZZZZZZzzzzzzz



    I don’t need to know how Nuclear fission works by the equation. Just heat my house.




    I disagree. Is it detailed/technical, absolutely. Is it so detailed/technical that you need to be a university student/PhD to understand and learn from it? Absolutely not.



    If you want to "find it in the dirt", yeah you won't like it. But if you want to learn the fine details of the golf swing and largely how all of the cause and effect relationships work, its great. Most amateurs focus on the effects (compensations), a quick fix, a drill, lightning in a bottle perhaps.If you want to focus on everything else, this book has it all fully detailed. Like all things in golf, how much you put in is directly proportional to how much you get out. If you go in an open mind, there is a lot to learn



    I too used to write off a lot of the technical jargon, but the more I read it, the more I understand it and how it applies to my swing and faults.
  • BB28403BB28403 Members Posts: 3,645 ✭✭
    Krt22 wrote:
    BB28403 wrote:

    This is probably the best golf instruction book I have read. Tyler did an unbelievable job. The organization and detail are both excellent




    Being honest it’s like a text book. ZZZZZZZzzzzzzz



    I don’t need to know how Nuclear fission works by the equation. Just heat my house.




    I disagree. Is it detailed/technical, absolutely. Is it so detailed/technical that you need to be a university student/PhD to understand and learn from it? Absolutely not.



    If you want to "find it in the dirt", yeah you won't like it. But if you want to learn the fine details of the golf swing and largely how all of the cause and effect relationships work, its great. Most amateurs focus on the effects (compensations), a quick fix, a drill, lightning in a bottle perhaps.If you want to focus on everything else, this book has it all fully detailed. Like all things in golf, how much you put in is directly proportional to how much you get out. If you go in an open mind, there is a lot to learn



    I too used to write off a lot of the technical jargon, but the more I read it, the more I understand it and how it applies to my swing and faults.




    This is my view, sure butch Harmon can create superstars and yes Claude Harmon coaches Rickie, but who coaches butch and Claude ? Say they were younger, they would need coaches too, knowing what you are doing does not help, you need a coach who knows all this stuff but as a player you don’t need to understand it. If you do understand it great! But you still have to listen to your coach, all this stuff will just make you question him and have conflicting views.



    If it helps your scores in some miraculous way then great, but I don’t think it will unless Tyler is your coach. And he does coach! So go see him image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />.
  • Krt22Krt22 Members Posts: 6,504 ✭✭
    Again, disagree, I never said it replaces good instruction, but it absolutely supplements it. Such that when you are with your instructor and working on understanding your flaws and fixes, the time is much more efficient since you at least have a decent idea of what is going on, what the fix is, and why. A lot of time stubborn golfers are given drills, they don't understand why they are doing the drill, they say it feels weird/unnatural/etc, and thus predispose themselves to write it off. But if you have basic knowledge of what differentiates your swing from that of even an "average" PGA tour player, you are more likely to absorb the concept quickly. So you can spend more time on the lesson tee finding the right feel that makes it all click for you vs having the instructor explain what is going on and why it's not ideal



    And you don't need Tyler to be your coach, the move he teaches isn't dramatically different than the move many top tier coaches teach. If you actually read the book and made the effort to fully understand the principles, you'd see the common trends a lot of modern coaches shoot to incorporate.
  • BB28403BB28403 Members Posts: 3,645 ✭✭
    Krt22 wrote:
    Again, disagree, I never said it replaces good instruction, but it absolutely supplements it. Such that when you are with your instructor and working on understanding your flaws and fixes, the time is much more efficient since you at least have a decent idea of what is going on, what the fix is, and why. A lot of time stubborn golfers are given drills, they don't understand why they are doing the drill, they say it feels weird/unnatural/etc, and thus predispose themselves to write it off. But if you have basic knowledge of what differentiates your swing from that of even an "average" PGA tour player, you are more likely to absorb the concept quickly. So you can spend more time on the lesson tee finding the right feel that makes it all click for you vs having the instructor explain what is going on and why it's not ideal



    And you don't need Tyler to be your coach, the move he teaches isn't dramatically different than the move many top tier coaches teach. If you actually read the book and made the effort to fully understand the principles, you'd see the common trends a lot of modern coaches shoot to incorporate.




    Whatever floats your boat! How many strokes have you shaved off since incorporating the book?
  • Krt22Krt22 Members Posts: 6,504 ✭✭
    edited Feb 10, 2019 9:05pm #118
    Let's not make this about me, It's not whatever floats my boat. You dismissed the book completely for a poor reason (In my opinion), so I offered some legitimate insight on the book and how it may be valuable to the reader actually interested in learning.



    It's interesting you brought up the textbook analogy though. Even though it's NOT hard to read like a textbook, it functions in the same way a textbook does in the academic setting. It's a supplement to what you learn in lecture (or lessons). Very few do well just reading the text book, very few do well just going to lecture, the ones who do the best typically read the book prior to lecture and use the book as a reference when needed.



    For what it's worth I dropped 6 strokes in 6 months from the date I bought the book. I had some online lessons with Monte mixed in there and the book gave me immediate understanding of what I was doing wrong and what Monte wanted me to do to fix it.



    Again, it does t replace good instruction, it just makes good instruction more effective/efficient.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • howellhandmadehowellhandmade Members Posts: 736 ✭✭
    Posting to follow this thread, and also to say that I think it’s a good book. I’ve struggled with the common errors of across the line at the top, steep and EE on the way down. The motorcycle drill seems to be a valuable feel for me to shallow the shaft. A fairly aggressive application of throttle seems to do what nothing previously has done, putting my left wrist in a position to let the head drop.



    I envy those who don’t need to learn or think about their golf swings, and also those who have found coaches who have been able to guide them to good swings. As someone who started late and ingrained a lot of bad habits and has yet to find a pro able to maintain a consistent direction, I find books that help me understand to give me hope. I think I may try the video lesson approach with Mr. Ferrell.
  • BB28403BB28403 Members Posts: 3,645 ✭✭
    edited Feb 11, 2019 9:53am #120
    Krt22 wrote:
    Let's not make this about me, It's not whatever floats my boat. You dismissed the book completely for a poor reason (In my opinion), so I offered some legitimate insight on the book and how it may be valuable to the reader actually interested in learning.



    It's interesting you brought up the textbook analogy though. Even though it's NOT hard to read like a textbook, it functions in the same way a textbook does in the academic setting. It's a supplement to what you learn in lecture (or lessons). Very few do well just reading the text book, very few do well just going to lecture, the ones who do the best typically read the book prior to lecture and use the book as a reference when needed.



    For what it's worth I dropped 6 strokes in 6 months from the date I bought the book. I had some online lessons with Monte mixed in there and the book gave me immediate understanding of what I was doing wrong and what Monte wanted me to do to fix it.



    Again, it does t replace good instruction, it just makes good instruction more effective/efficient.




    **** dude chill out! Lol. I bought the book for $25, tried to read it, and it was boring me to tears. That’s just my experience . Sorry you feel the need to discredit my opinion. Whatever floats your boat means , I see your opinion and that is good you have one. We all have differing opinions.

  • ThinkingPlusThinkingPlus South TexasClubWRX Posts: 1,544 ClubWRX
    Fantastic book. There are many ways to execute good golf swings, but it is really nice to have those approaches broken down to biomechanical components and cataloged. While I may not be able to swing like the pros, I like to understand the swing components they prefer.
    Driver: Callaway GBB Epic 9° w/Project X HZRDUS T800 65 gm 6.0 flex
    3W: Callaway Rogue w/Project X Evenflow 5.5 Graphite R-flex
    Hybrids: Callaway Apex 3h, 4h w/MR Kuro Kage 80HY S-flex
    Irons: Maltby TS-1 5i-GW w/KBS Tour R-flex
    Sand Wedge: Titleist Vokey SM7 54/08 M Grind w/KBS Tour R-Flex
    Lob Wedge: Titleist Vokey SM6 58/04 L Grind w/TT Wedge Flex
    Putter: Scotty Cameron Futura X w/Super Stroke Mid Slim 2.0
    Ball: Titleist AVX in yellow

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