At what age does winning become important

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Comments

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,010 ✭✭
    iteachgolf wrote:

    golfer929 wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:

    golfer929 wrote:


    I don't care what age you are, a win is a win. Doesn't matter if you shoot 100, if you still win you're the best there was and that's all that matters. It doesn't matter to me if you shot 65 and lost, at the end of the day you didn't get the job done.



    If you told your boss "Hey Boss man/woman, I didn't get that contract we wanted, but I put in all the talking points and gave them the best graphs we had!" What do you think they would say..



    "If you ain't first, you're last!"




    Except it does matter. Shooting 65 to finish 2nd on the PGA Tour means a lot more than shooting 100 to win the 6th flight of the club championship. A second place finish in an AJGA event means ridiculously more than winning a local event shooting 100. You're not the best there was, you were simply the biggest tadpole in the puddle. Which is way different than being the second largest shark in the ocean




    I respect what you're saying ITeach, but if a student of yours goes out into an AJGA event and wins with an average score of 75, he still won the event on a big stage. On the PGA Tour if shoot 77 on the last day and still win the event you're a PGA Tour winner. The score is irrelevant, just go out and win.




    75 average would never win an AJGA event. As players get better your simply not going to win that often when playing bigger events. My top girl and top boy are both +7 handicaps or better and near the top of their graduating class in ranking, and both maybe win 5% of the time. With fields as deep as they are it's very hard to win events like the Wyndham, the Polo, the Western Junior, and US Junior or any AJGA invitational. **** its hard to win an FJT event here in Florida.




    There is a lot truth in this statement. The older the kids get the harder it is to win. Not only does the field get deeper the courses and pin placements get harder too. 5% win in a national AJGA event is actually impressive. If I had a kid who won ever week and dominated the National AJGA at every tournament it would almost be stupid to not turn pro as fast as you can because your going win a lot professional events. I think Tiger Woods is the only one to even come close and the field was not as deep as it today.



    The truth is even if my daughter broke 70 week in week out I would be hard pressed to think she could win every week and become a pro. There is a good chance she wouldn't even be able to cover expenses on tour.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭
    golfer929 wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:

    golfer929 wrote:


    I don't care what age you are, a win is a win. Doesn't matter if you shoot 100, if you still win you're the best there was and that's all that matters. It doesn't matter to me if you shot 65 and lost, at the end of the day you didn't get the job done.



    If you told your boss "Hey Boss man/woman, I didn't get that contract we wanted, but I put in all the talking points and gave them the best graphs we had!" What do you think they would say..



    "If you ain't first, you're last!"




    Except it does matter. Shooting 65 to finish 2nd on the PGA Tour means a lot more than shooting 100 to win the 6th flight of the club championship. A second place finish in an AJGA event means ridiculously more than winning a local event shooting 100. You're not the best there was, you were simply the biggest tadpole in the puddle. Which is way different than being the second largest shark in the ocean




    I respect what you're saying ITeach, but if a student of yours goes out into an AJGA event and wins with an average score of 75, he still won the event on a big stage. On the PGA Tour if shoot 77 on the last day and still win the event you're a PGA Tour winner. The score is irrelevant, just go out and win.




    Eh..... You would be wrong and Sports Psychologists would tell you the same thing. The goal should be on the long term development and believing in the process.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭
    golfer929 wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:

    golfer929 wrote:


    I don't care what age you are, a win is a win. Doesn't matter if you shoot 100, if you still win you're the best there was and that's all that matters. It doesn't matter to me if you shot 65 and lost, at the end of the day you didn't get the job done.



    If you told your boss "Hey Boss man/woman, I didn't get that contract we wanted, but I put in all the talking points and gave them the best graphs we had!" What do you think they would say..



    "If you ain't first, you're last!"




    Except it does matter. Shooting 65 to finish 2nd on the PGA Tour means a lot more than shooting 100 to win the 6th flight of the club championship. A second place finish in an AJGA event means ridiculously more than winning a local event shooting 100. You're not the best there was, you were simply the biggest tadpole in the puddle. Which is way different than being the second largest shark in the ocean




    I respect what you're saying ITeach, but if a student of yours goes out into an AJGA event and wins with an average score of 75, he still won the event on a big stage. On the PGA Tour if shoot 77 on the last day and still win the event you're a PGA Tour winner. The score is irrelevant, just go out and win.




    Winning should be a by product of hard work and working for long term development. Winning too early and winning too much can create problems of there own, especially in a sport like golf. It can create entitlement and doesn't allow a kid to develop properly to learn how to be mentally tough. When a kid gets pushed and begins to lose then the wheels can fall off. For every Tiger Woods and Phil Mickleson that won early and kept winning, there are thousands of kids that won early and stopped winning. The goal has to be on long term development creating perseverance, patience, resilience, and mental toughness.
  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 962 ✭✭
    FWIW, Faldo was talking about Joaquin Nieman today and how being the #1 ranked amateur and winning has helped him learn how to close out tournaments. Definitely was saying winning as an amateur was/is important.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

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