Thoughts on why people are walking away from the game...

1568101132

Comments

  • BIG STUBIG STU Members Posts: 11,396 ✭✭
    Bad9 wrote:

    aliikane wrote:



    New generation of youth view golf and golfers as stodgy and rigid.



    Proper dress codes, no music allowed on most courses, having to wear polo collared shirts, a rule book that even the pros can't quite decipher and on and on.



    Lucky Strike bowling for those of you who know it got it right with respect to most of the younger generation thinking bowling is boring as heck. And how is it they are packed to the gills just about every night if the week?? They make bowling more about a fun event with turning it more into a party scene w great music, a fun and happy vibe and yes, there's also some bowling involved. Similar to Top Golf which took the very basic and somewhat boring world of driving ranges and added a pure unadulterated FUN factor.



    If we don't change or at least greatly simplify the rules and make golf exciting or cool, we will continue to see less interest.








    I think there are two types of players. Competitive players and go have fun players. To me, taking the game seriously and being competitive is fun and exciting. It doesn't have to be a party to be fun. I agree some of the rules need to be simplified. However personally, I prefer golf to be played how it was traditionally meant to be played. That is just me though. Different "strokes" for different folks. No pun intended. Haha.




    I generally agree with you about how and why I play. Trying to shoot the best score I can under the rules is the enjoyment for me. The problem with tradition(as per my bolded part) is determining what tradition do you subscribe to? Traditions change and evolve. Anchored putting was ok for 20+ years, to me thats long enough to be traditional. The game as played by Nicklaus and Palmer was different than that played by Jones and Quiemet so where do you define tradition.
    Pretty well said. I have tried to explain that on here for years. Basically I am of the old school camp as in blades and persimmon generation. But to put it in a nutshell golf like life has evolved. Golf is what you want to get out of it. I played comp professionally and big money matches for years. I basically retired from doing all of that 10 years ago. I hardly practice. I almost went back a couple of years ago and got my AM status back to play some CGA amateur events. I scrapped those plans when I found out I could get called out on some of the equipment I wanted to play. Screw all of that for some trophy and gift certificates.



    Now days i practice if I want to. I play with a couple of small groups maybe sometimes for very low money games. I have so much vintage equipment i switch around a lot. That is my fun now taking sometimes 60 year old clubs and seeing what I can shoot with them. Do not really care if I shot in the 70s 80s and 90s just like the old stuff. Played 27 last night on the twilight thing at my home course bagging a set of 82 Mac VIP irons and somewhat modern metals. Our Twilight thing starts at 4:00 until dark. It was hot and humid and the course was deserted so I sorta flew around. Had plenty of ice and water. For me It does not get any better than that.

    Really for me now golf is more fun than it has ever been
  • ReasonabilityReasonability Mirror work is a good idea. Members Posts: 8,530 ✭✭
    ^^^^



    Good stuff right there.



    Golf is an "in the moment" sport. Invest whatever you care to in it or not from equipment to time to lessons to whatever winds your personal watch. But it ultimately comes down to moments where we execute briefly (in a moment) after putting some or a lot of preparation into that moment.



    Yes there's a scorecard. Yes, we compete. But at the end of the day it's is compilation of how we managed ourselves and the course over 70 or 80 or 100+ in-the-moment opportunities out there. We can swing whatever we want in terms of sticks, have fun with weekend buds, or play for scholarships and trophies. But we either thrive on those in-the-moment opportunities as we address the ball and send it on it's way, or we don't. What's at stake is not attainable until or unless we revel in-the-moment.



    That little final hole putting meltdown suffered by Jason Duffner at Sawgrass a few weeks ago... that one reportedly cost him about 3/4 of million.



    Now how many of us are honestly ever going to have more than a small trophy, side bet, or friendly ribbing and Sunday bragging rights on the line? We're investing whatever time, money, energy, and personal commitment we individually care to give to golf. We experience these in-the-moment things one shot at a time and compare notes with other golfers on a thing called the scorecard.



    To me and FWIW, in the car heading home all I really want to know is did I selfishly enjoy that compilation of moments? And, did I enjoy the camaraderie, scenery and such that went with it? Win or lose, was it worth it or not?



    No matter how each individual answers those questions privately, he/she is absolutely correct. This isn't a game for everybody.
    A cynic sees the cost of everything
    and the value of nothing.
  • wrmillerwrmiller Members Posts: 1,569 ✭✭
    Love that 'Outlaw golf Association'. Sick and tired of the USGA and their crap. How do I join up? image/wink.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=';)' />
    Primary bag:
    Titleist 913 D3 8.5
    Titleist 915Fd 13.5
    Titleist 913h 17
    Mizuno MP-18 4-PW
    Scratch wedges 50, 55, and 60
    Bettinardi mid-shank putter

    Backup bag:
    Ping G400 9
    Ping G30 fw 13
    Ping G30 hybrid 19
    Ping iBlade 4-PW power spec
    Macgregor VIP wedges 51, 56, and 60
    Bettinardi mid-shank putter
  • 2putttom2putttom # 1 Oregon Duck fan Members Posts: 10,009 ✭✭


    In the famous words of Keith Richards..." I will walk away before they make me run"
    or bury me.
    Tour Exotics E 10 15*
    Srixon 785's w/G P MCC plus 4
    Mizuno T 7 52 MP T7 56 &60
    Bobby Grace [font=comic sans ms,cursive]SNYPER [font=arial,helvetica,sans-serif]II [/font][font=arial,helvetica,sans-serif]46"[/font][/font]
    Oregon Ducks Bag
  • uitar9uitar9 Members Posts: 396 ✭✭
    The last two weekends-playing the munis. All three rounds, golfed with 25-30 year olds. Happy as clams to ride around the 18 holes, couple of beers, couple of numbers, (one guy even offered me a toke-first time thats happened in 30 years) maybe shooting 100, just enjoying the opportunity.



    All I know are the public and muni courses I play. There are more young folks playing than ever. Plus the geezers of course but we are gonna die.



    My country club buddies are all complaining, memberships are down for two reasons...poor economy and death. Can't fight that.



    Those 25 year olds can't afford a $50M share purchase and $10M a year. But they can afford $50 a round when they choose to spend it.
    [font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]WITB[/font]
    [font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]KZG OS11 12 degree driver
    Calloway 16 5-wood
    Calloway
    [/font]
    [font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]20.5 [/font][font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]heavenwood
    Cobra 24.5 9-wood
    [/font]

    [font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]KZG 5-PW irons[/font]
    [font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]KZG 52 and 56 wedges[/font]
    [font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]TM Spider mallet[/font]
  • TollBrosTollBros Overseer of the Test Range Sponsors Posts: 4,914 ✭✭
    Hehateme wrote:


    people leave the game because they suck at golf and spending 4 to 5 hours doing something you suck at isnt a good time




    That doesn't seem to stop anyone I get stuck playing behind it seems. Haha
    http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/forum/608-greengrassevaluationscom/

    Please click the link above for our Sponsor area with rare and Tour only products.
  • third-times-a-charmthird-times-a-charm Members Posts: 1,565 ✭✭
    uitar9 wrote:


    Those 25 year olds can't afford a $50M share purchase and $10M a year. But they can afford $50 a round when they choose to spend it.




    The courses around me - like the one in my avatar photo which you can visit their website and double check (or Orange Tree CC, or Four Seasons Disney) - all offer young professional memberships which are GREAT deals, but you still need to be pretty successful to sustain them.



    Many 'successful' young people can buy a 20k boat no problem since it's a one-time fee with varying maintenance, but a CC membership has a high yearly cost and you better be a member for a decade if you want that down payment to even out.



    Lots of 25-35 age range at the private clubs around me due to these packages they offer.
    Long Live Nike
  • uitar9uitar9 Members Posts: 396 ✭✭

    uitar9 wrote:


    Those 25 year olds can't afford a $50M share purchase and $10M a year. But they can afford $50 a round when they choose to spend it.




    The courses around me - like the one in my avatar photo which you can visit their website and double check (or Orange Tree CC, or Four Seasons Disney) - all offer young professional memberships which are GREAT deals, but you still need to be pretty successful to sustain them.



    Many 'successful' young people can buy a 20k boat no problem since it's a one-time fee with varying maintenance, but a CC membership has a high yearly cost and you better be a member for a decade if you want that down payment to even out.



    Lots of 25-35 age range at the private clubs around me due to these packages they offer.




    Don't disagree.



    There are so many options out there for that dollar. Why are we surprised it isn't golf.
    [font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]WITB[/font]
    [font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]KZG OS11 12 degree driver
    Calloway 16 5-wood
    Calloway
    [/font]
    [font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]20.5 [/font][font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]heavenwood
    Cobra 24.5 9-wood
    [/font]

    [font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]KZG 5-PW irons[/font]
    [font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]KZG 52 and 56 wedges[/font]
    [font=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]TM Spider mallet[/font]
  • BIG STUBIG STU Members Posts: 11,396 ✭✭
    wrmiller wrote:


    Love that 'Outlaw golf Association'. Sick and tired of the USGA and their crap. How do I join up? image/wink.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=';)' />
    All it is is a loosely thing that I started over in the Confessions Section of the 19th hole--- No dues or anything--- No real rules just these few



    1- Play whatever clubs you want to regardless of if they are on some USGA conforming list or not

    2- Have a stated hatred for the USGA (which BTW you have already stated)

    3 - Slam the USGA every time you get a chance on here and other forums and extra points for doing that in public



    Easy to join just pick your own member number and post on your signature
  • hybrid25hybrid25 michiganMembers Posts: 1,560 ✭✭


    New generation of youth view golf and golfers as stodgy and rigid.



    Proper dress codes, no music allowed on most courses, having to wear polo collared shirts, a rule book that even the pros can’t quite decipher and on and on.



    Lucky Strike bowling for those of you who know it got it right with respect to most of the younger generation thinking bowling is boring as heck. And how is it they are packed to the gills just about every night if the week?? They make bowling more about a fun event with turning it more into a party scene w great music, a fun and happy vibe and yes, there’s also some bowling involved. Similar to Top Golf which took the very basic and somewhat boring world of driving ranges and added a pure unadulterated FUN factor.



    If we don’t change or at least greatly simplify the rules and make golf exciting or cool, we will continue to see less interest.
    There is 'glow golf' if you didn't realize.
  • nsxguynsxguy Just anudder user FloridaMembers Posts: 5,837 ✭✭
    edited Jun 10, 2018 #222


    New generation of youth view golf and golfers as stodgy and rigid.



    Proper dress codes, no music allowed on most courses, having to wear polo collared shirts, a rule book that even the pros can't quite decipher and on and on.



    Lucky Strike bowling for those of you who know it got it right with respect to most of the younger generation thinking bowling is boring as heck. And how is it they are packed to the gills just about every night if the week?? They make bowling more about a fun event with turning it more into a party scene w great music, a fun and happy vibe and yes, there's also some bowling involved. Similar to Top Golf which took the very basic and somewhat boring world of driving ranges and added a pure unadulterated FUN factor.



    If we don't change or at least greatly simplify the rules and make golf exciting or cool, we will continue to see less interest.




    You're right. Full unadulterated FUN !!! image/yahoo.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':yahoo:' />



    Let's DANCE !!!



    tenor.gif

    Callaway Epic 10.5 Project X Hzrdus Yellow 63 gr, 6.0
    Adams A12 Pro hybrids, 16*, 20*, Aldila VS Proto Stiff
    Ping G20, 5-PW, DGS300
    Cleveland RTX-4 48, 52, DGS300
    Ping Glide Forged 56*, 60* DGS300
    Odyssey Jailbird Mini (Today - always subject to change LOL)
    Titleist AVX
  • NachosgrandeNachosgrande Members Posts: 259 ✭✭
    Cwing wrote:


    Easiest question to answer in the history of sport. GOLF IS HARD!!!



    Evidence



    http://www.golfwrx.c...up-for-a-while/



    http://www.golfwrx.c...ge__hl__ giving




    There are days when I would agree with you, but for the most part it used to be a difficult game because of the equipment available. Today any idiot can find the fairway 300+ yards out. I can't imagine folks aren't playing because it's too hard anymore.
  • alfiealfie Members Posts: 1,413 ✭✭
    Bourni1 wrote:


    Finding time is tough. I have played since I was around 12 years old or so, its a family sport and was blessed to have spent hours on the course with my grandfather, father, brother, uncles and cousins. Most of us have continued playing but I have had my spurts of 1 or 2 years where I play only 2 or 3 times a year as a result of family and work obligations. They key is to try and make the time if you really love the game. Be it going to the range or putting green, the quick 9 holes at dawn, or the 18 hole 5 hour round on Saturday one must sacrifice something (sleep is usually the easiest one to sacrifice).



    I dont think cost is the big issue with golf. Equipment is easily available, and there are different course options that are affordable compared with other hobbies. I have small children and a very understanding wife, who knows that my job is very demanding and that I spend all week looking forward to my weekend round, but every once in while there will inevitably be stretches where golf is not possible. I really look forward to getting my kids into the game and am sure that will permit me to keep playing for years to come.




    ^^^ THIS! ^^^



    I've come to the "rationalization" that if I want to play, 9 holes, back nine, early or super early in the morning on the weekends is really my only option (2 kids under 4 yrs of age, wife, older parents to keep an eye on, 2 family business to run and everythng else in life). And that's basically once a week. Would like it to be Sat. & Sun., but it's really difficult. It's very difficult to do 18 holes here in NY. So, I've compromised... just lose out some sleep.

    Cost is a factor too, but really... TIME is the major issue.
  • billh17billh17 just happy to play Members Posts: 2,874 ✭✭

    Cwing wrote:


    Easiest question to answer in the history of sport. GOLF IS HARD!!!



    Evidence



    http://www.golfwrx.c...up-for-a-while/



    http://www.golfwrx.c...ge__hl__ giving




    There are days when I would agree with you, but for the most part it used to be a difficult game because of the equipment available. Today any idiot can find the fairway 300+ yards out. I can't imagine folks aren't playing because it's too hard anymore.




    So....90% or so of the people who play this game are idiots? There are many 300 yarders on here,but the majority of the golfing public are

    not hitting their tee shot that distance ! But the equipment is a big factor helping people stay in the game. Time and the learning curve are a

    big obstacle for a lot of folks.
    Certified Orginal Member#2
    Outlaw Golf Association
    To Heck with the USGA
  • Rapatt95Rapatt95 wow Members Posts: 570 ✭✭
    Nard_S wrote:


    Folks are better test takers than before (and it's peaked). Are they really more intelligent? Are people really deeper thinkers and more literate than folks back in the day?



    Btw, how do you measure the intelligence of a Duke Ellington or even a James Brown? Or a Picasso? All genius, no doubt. Where are today's genius in art and science?



    Who's the new Tesla or Einstein? Or Charlie Parker?


    The new Tesla or Einstein?



    I’d say Cuban and Musk are up there in terms of modern day innovation in their respective sectors.



    The minds working on space travel, at the hadron collider, in advanced medicine, etc. I think it’s safe to say that we have plenty of inventors, innovators, and deep thinkers. How many of the amazing artists of history were thought nothing of in their own time? Perhaps you’re simply overlooking those who may be the revered minds of our time when it’s looked back on in a few decades.
    Titleist 909d3 Diamana Blue 60s
    Adams Tight Lies Tour 18* 5w Aldila Tour Blue ATX75tx
    Titleist 913h 19* Diamana Blue 82h s+ 
    Ben Hogan PTx 22*-34* C-Taper Lite 115x (Thank you GolfWRX and Ben Hogan!)
    Ben Hogan Ft Worth 15 37*-45* C-Taper Lite 115x
    Ping Glide Forged 50* DG TI S400 (Thank you GolfWRX and Ping!)
    TM TP ATV 54* KBS Tour-V Wedge
    Vokey SM5 58* DG Wedge
    Ping 1959 B60
  • Hogan9Hogan9 Members Posts: 52 ✭✭
    I think the recession was one of the reasons for the decline in golf participation for the last decade. It is a very expensive game. Also, I believe that our culture is changing in that people spend more and more time looking at screens both on and off the job. I don't even take my cell phone on the course, but I'm in the minority

    on that issue. A round of golf usually takes four hours (five on some public courses) and most people simply can't or won't be "unconnected" for that length of time.

    Attention spans have grown shorter over time which has contributed to the decline as well. I still see a lot of young people playing at our club. I hope most of them will stick with the game and help it grow once again.
  • phil75070phil75070 Members Posts: 1,891 ✭✭
    I think it is two things, the time it takes to play a round, especially on weekends, and the cost of equipment. It wast that long a go a top of the line driver sold for $299. Now most are $499 and up! Well over $1000 for a set of irons; Putters $200 and up for the good ones.
  • hybrid25hybrid25 michiganMembers Posts: 1,560 ✭✭
    phil75070 wrote:


    I think it is two things, the time it takes to play a round, especially on weekends, and the cost of equipment. It wast that long a go a top of the line driver sold for $299. Now most are $499 and up! Well over $1000 for a set of irons; Putters $200 and up for the good ones.
    I think the consensus is, including your post, that time is a huge importance to whether people play or not. Imagine a father of two kids working 50 hours a week, and then taking 7 hours away from a Saturday or Sunday to go play golf. When you factor in driving time and maybe a little bit of practice time it could easily add up to 6 or 7 hours.
  • FourTopsFourTops Banned Posts: 1,676 ✭✭
    I don't blame the cost of golf. I bought a set of 1-SW Ping Eye 2's for $89...in very good condition. Old blade putters work just fine. There's drivers for $49 in the used bin that are in great shape. There's used "like new" bags on Ebay for $50. 15 pack of balls for $12.



    Plus, as for time...folks can play 9 holes in about 2-2.5 hours...nobody said folks have to play 18. I got "dragged out" as a kid and loved playing once I got the drift of the game.
  • BlackDiamondPar5BlackDiamondPar5 Members Posts: 5,306 ✭✭
    phil75070 wrote:


    I think it is two things, the time it takes to play a round, especially on weekends, and the cost of equipment. It wast that long a go a top of the line driver sold for $299. Now most are $499 and up! Well over $1000 for a set of irons; Putters $200 and up for the good ones.


    Time is the biggest factor by far. Cost of equipment? No. I just bought a used cleveland launcher, mint condition for $60. The used equipment market is plentiful and amazing prices.
  • kgeisler13kgeisler13 ClubWRX Posts: 342 ClubWRX
    I think there are a lot of factors mostly money and time. All golf equipment is very expensive. That is why I do most of my searching for everything besides wedges on this website. The prices may be relevant to the prices they were back in the 70s and 80s but I think most people are making less money, especially younger people. I have friends that are just starting to play in college and they obviously can't get brand new equipment so they have to find nice used clubs or hammy downs. Also I think a round of golf cost to much as well. I understand you have to charge a certain amount to pay your bills and staff but eventually I think the high price will drive some people away. I'm sure some prices are designed to drive away hackers and people going to the course to party. Like a lot of you have said, golf takes to long to play at certain golf courses. Most people can't find 5 hours of their day to go play golf.
    KG
  • hnryclayhnryclay Members Posts: 238 ✭✭
    I don't think cost is as much of a factor as people let on. Golf is as cheap now as it has been in my lifetime. The biggest factor I see is the expectations of society for men in families. I rarely saw my father as a child, as he worked from 7 in the morning, until 4 in the afternoon, and then was involved in several other activities. Now fathers are expected to go to youth sports practices, games, and generally be involved in raising children. It is not just golf that is impacted, fraternal organisations that draw from the same pool of applicants are also on the wane ( Masonic lodges, Shriners, Elks, Rotary ). If you are not constantly around your kids, you are viewed as a bad parent. I actually see a lot of "new" golfers in their 50s, and 60s who are returning to the game after their kids are grown.
  • ritz0019ritz0019 Members Posts: 333 ✭✭
    I think golf has peaked, that's all. During the Tiger era, more people were interested in the game. Look at NASCAR, same situation. There was a period of time when raceways was selling out and people were going nuts over racing. Now, racing is back where it was before the huge peak. Golf is the same. Tiger brought more people to the game. Then, it kinda crashed back down to a country club sport again. Here is why I don't buy the money and time theory. Take a few other example hobbies:



    1) Fly fishing...good luck doing this in under 4 hours and spending less than you do on golf.

    2) Camping..again same thing.

    3) Hunting...guns, deer stand, cold gear, accessories, and being out in the woods for hours.
    Titleist 8.5 degree TS3 w/ 65 Even Flow 6.5
    Titleist 15 degree TS3 w/ 75 Even Flow 6.5 
    Titleist 2 iron 718 T-MB w/ Project X PXi 6.5
    Titleist 4 iron 718 T-MB w/ Modus 120X
    Titleist 5-PW 718 CB's w/ Modus 120X
    Titleist Vokey SM7 52, 56, 50 degree w/ Modus 120X
    Odyssey O Works Black 2M CS w/ Stability EI-GJ-1.0 34 7/8 inches 

  • NaptimeNaptime Members Posts: 611 ✭✭
    edited Jul 5, 2018 #235
    To an outsider golf is like a clique with its own culture. It's not that hard to look like a total moron even before you get to the first tee. If you have a mentor, some of that stuff is a less painful lesson. Even teeing a ball - I've seen people try to use their fingers instead of pressing down on the ball. Things like don't leave the cart in front of the hole. Play ready golf but being aware of what is going around around you or might be overdoing it. So now you are on #1 and everybody is staring at you, or it just feels that way.



    I just played a round with a fishing bud who is taking up golf. Finances are not an issue for him. But he went out and bought clubs on eBay without really knowing anything about clubs. Didn't like the idea of getting fitted and paying $1-2k for clubs just because his other golfing crew said to get fitted. So the grips are well worn and different sizes, and he's getting them regripped. New players have no clue what they are looking for in clubs. I've seen the same thing with boats and fishing etc. Folks buy stuff totally unsuited for their goals, but they won't know what they need til they get experience using gear they didn't need. At least golf is cheaper than boating.



    Personally I think the biggest incentive to take up golf is having friends/family who play and who will mentor you without giving you a ton of sh!t along the way.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • Sean2Sean2 #TheWRX (Callaway Trip) Members Posts: 30,826 ✭✭

    phil75070 wrote:


    I think it is two things, the time it takes to play a round, especially on weekends, and the cost of equipment. It wast that long a go a top of the line driver sold for $299. Now most are $499 and up! Well over $1000 for a set of irons; Putters $200 and up for the good ones.


    Time is the biggest factor by far. Cost of equipment? No. I just bought a used cleveland launcher, mint condition for $60. The used equipment market is plentiful and amazing prices.




    Not only that, but there are plenty of golf courses one can play for relatively little money.



    I think another factor may be frustration. We have become an instant gratification society and golf offers anything but. It requires patience and practice...and if one doesn't have a real talent for the game (like some of us), it requires that times two.
    [font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]Callaway Rogue[/font]
    [font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]Callaway GBB Epic 16º/20º/24º[/font]
    [font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]Callaway Steelhead XR 25º[/font]
    [font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]Callaway Apex CF16 6-AW [/font]
    [font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]Callaway MD3/MD-PM 54º/58º[/font]
    [font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]Callaway "O" Works #7[/font]
  • hnryclayhnryclay Members Posts: 238 ✭✭
    ritz0019 wrote:


    I think golf has peaked, that's all. During the Tiger era, more people were interested in the game. Look at NASCAR, same situation. There was a period of time when raceways was selling out and people were going nuts over racing. Now, racing is back where it was before the huge peak. Golf is the same. Tiger brought more people to the game. Then, it kinda crashed back down to a country club sport again. Here is why I don't buy the money and time theory. Take a few other example hobbies:



    1) Fly fishing...good luck doing this in under 4 hours and spending less than you do on golf.

    2) Camping..again same thing.

    3) Hunting...guns, deer stand, cold gear, accessories, and being out in the woods for hours.




    Fly Fishing, fishing in general, and Hunting are also in decline.
  • NaptimeNaptime Members Posts: 611 ✭✭
    I don't fish or shoot much these days because I'm golfing so much.
  • FourTopsFourTops Banned Posts: 1,676 ✭✭
    edited Jul 5, 2018 #239
    Naptime wrote:


    To an outsider golf is like a clique with its own culture. It's not that hard to look like a total moron even before you get to the first tee. If you have a mentor, some of that stuff is a less painful lesson. Even teeing a ball - I've seen people try to use their fingers instead of pressing down on the ball. Things like don't leave the cart in from of the hole. Play ready golf but being aware of what is going around around you or might be overdoing it. So now you are on #1 and everybody is staring at you, or it just feels that way.



    I just played a round with a fishing bud who is taking up golf. Finances are not an issue for him. But he went out and bought clubs on eBay without really knowing anything about clubs. Didn't like the idea of getting fitted and paying $1-2k for clubs just because his other golfing crew said to get fitted. So the grips are well worn and different sizes, and he's getting them regripped. New players have no clue what they are looking for in clubs. I've seen the same thing with boats and fishing etc. Folks buy stuff totally unsuited for their goals, but they won't know what they need til they get experience using gear they didn't need. At least golf is cheaper than boating.



    Personally I think the biggest incentive to take up golf is having friends/family who play and who will mentor you without giving you a ton of sh!t along the way.




    I can see what you're saying. Talk about feeling like a moron....I started out playing golf with a buddy who was #2 man on the high school team, #1 was Rick Smith...that Rick Smith. I would play with my buddy much more, but sometimes with both. They would get up to the tee, drive the ball straight down the middle...then I get up there...giant slice. What's funny is you'd think they would have been annoyed, but it was the opposite. They enjoyed helping me go from shooting 120 to low 90s in one summer. I learned stuff that would have taken years to learn.



    New folks think us seasoned players are laughing at them, but we're not. For me, there's nothing more fun for me than helping newbies, and it actually helps me to keep track of my fundamentals, so my game actually improves during the process.



    EDIT: Plus, I think courses should "deputize" folks to teach at ranges, let them charge less to help new folks. There's plenty of very good players who could pick up some cash and get folks moved from lousy to decent basic golf.
  • McgeenoMcgeeno Members Posts: 1,988 ✭✭
    Most my friends in their early 30s have kids and can’t get away for 4-6 hours on a weekend (drive there/round/beers/lunch after etc) without calling the president and requesting a special leave.



    I think it’s as simple as time and money...



  • ritz0019ritz0019 Members Posts: 333 ✭✭
    hnryclay wrote:

    ritz0019 wrote:


    I think golf has peaked, that's all. During the Tiger era, more people were interested in the game. Look at NASCAR, same situation. There was a period of time when raceways was selling out and people were going nuts over racing. Now, racing is back where it was before the huge peak. Golf is the same. Tiger brought more people to the game. Then, it kinda crashed back down to a country club sport again. Here is why I don't buy the money and time theory. Take a few other example hobbies:



    1) Fly fishing...good luck doing this in under 4 hours and spending less than you do on golf.

    2) Camping..again same thing.

    3) Hunting...guns, deer stand, cold gear, accessories, and being out in the woods for hours.




    Fly Fishing, fishing in general, and Hunting are also in decline.




    That's not accurate information:



    1) Fly-fishing is up 9.8% in the last 3 years

    2) Freshwater fishing is up 0.9% in the last 3 years, saltwater 4.0%

    3) Depending on the type, hunting is up 4.8% - 10.3%, but none of those categories have declined in the last 3 years

    4) Camping is up 8.9% in the last 3 years.
    Titleist 8.5 degree TS3 w/ 65 Even Flow 6.5
    Titleist 15 degree TS3 w/ 75 Even Flow 6.5 
    Titleist 2 iron 718 T-MB w/ Project X PXi 6.5
    Titleist 4 iron 718 T-MB w/ Modus 120X
    Titleist 5-PW 718 CB's w/ Modus 120X
    Titleist Vokey SM7 52, 56, 50 degree w/ Modus 120X
    Odyssey O Works Black 2M CS w/ Stability EI-GJ-1.0 34 7/8 inches 

Sign In or Register to comment.