My swing speed is borderline between a premium ball and a lower-tier ball?

PhilBurgPhilBurg Members Posts: 75
edited Jun 13, 2018 in Golf Balls #1
My question is do I pay a premium price for a premium ball or can I go with a lower-tier. (Ex. Srixon Q Star compared to Srixon Z), curious on how that would affect performance, is there much of a difference if I go with a lower tier ball with a borderline swing speed.
Post edited by Unknown User on

Comments

  • MukkyMukky Members Posts: 362 ✭✭
    TBH, I don't view swing speed as the means to determine whether or not you should play a premium ball
  • North ButteNorth Butte Members Posts: 9,911 ✭✭
    Swing speed has nothing to do with it. Do you want a ball that spins more off irons and around the greens? If so get one with a Urethane cover. If you don’t want it to spin as much with irons and short game shots, get one with a non-Urethane cover.
    “1lb beefstak, with
    1pt bitter beer
    every 6 hours.
    1 ten-mile walk every morning.
    1 bed at 11 sharp every night.
    And don't stuff your head with things you don't understand.” 
  • PhilBurgPhilBurg Members Posts: 75
    edited Jun 13, 2018 #4
    Manufacturers information recommend a particular Ball depending on your swing speed. Some companies make golf balls specifically for moderate swings my question is I'm between moderate and a high-speed swing
  • MukkyMukky Members Posts: 362 ✭✭
    PhilBurg wrote:


    Manufacturers information recommend a particular Ball depending on your swing speed. Some companies make golf balls specifically for moderate swings my question is I'm between moderate and a high-speed swing




    Manufactures have moved away from that practice.
  • pmangpmang Members Posts: 341 ✭✭
    My driver swing speed is 95. I shoot better scores when I play a Titleist ProV1 or Srixon Z-Star. I'm able to get/keep the ball closer to the hole with them. I sometimes use a Project (a) or a Q Star Tour. They are great balls also. But I still play better with the premium ball.
    Taylormade M6 10.5* Tensei CK Blue S
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    Titleist SM7 50*, 54*, 58*
    Taylormade Spider X Copper Single Bend 34"
  • PhilBurgPhilBurg Members Posts: 75
    edited Jun 13, 2018 #7
    pmang wrote:


    My driver swing speed is 95. I shoot better scores when I play a Titleist ProV1 or Srixon Z-Star. I'm able to get/keep the ball closer to the hole with them. I sometimes use a Project (a) or a Q Star Tour. They are great balls also. But I still play better with the premium ball.


    Thanks, those balls are the ones I'm actually contemplating.
  • PhilBurgPhilBurg Members Posts: 75
    Interesting that consumers are saying that club head speed has nothing to do with the type of ball being used.
  • MukkyMukky Members Posts: 362 ✭✭
    PhilBurg wrote:


    Interesting that consumers are saying that club head speed has nothing to do with the type of ball being used.




    It's not consumers saying that, it's the golf ball companies now telling us that. You seem to be really stuck on this whole swing speed dictating your ball choice, so why don't you just buy sleeves of 4 or 5 different balls and figure out what works for you?
  • farmerfarmer Members Posts: 7,853 ✭✭
    edited Jun 13, 2018 #10
    Premium balls are not SS dependent. They play better around the green than non-premium balls. There were some really good deals on premium Srixon's, but they may have expired. Look at golfballs.com.
  • PhilBurgPhilBurg Members Posts: 75
    Mukky wrote:

    PhilBurg wrote:


    Interesting that consumers are saying that club head speed has nothing to do with the type of ball being used.




    It's not consumers saying that, it's the golf ball companies now telling us that. You seem to be really stuck on this whole swing speed dictating your ball choice, so why don't you just buy sleeves of 4 or 5 different balls and figure out what works for you?


    You're describing something that is very obvious, this is called a forum where we discuss experiences and then respond and come to a educated decision on what direction we would like to go in.
  • MukkyMukky Members Posts: 362 ✭✭
    PhilBurg wrote:

    Mukky wrote:

    PhilBurg wrote:


    Interesting that consumers are saying that club head speed has nothing to do with the type of ball being used.




    It's not consumers saying that, it's the golf ball companies now telling us that. You seem to be really stuck on this whole swing speed dictating your ball choice, so why don't you just buy sleeves of 4 or 5 different balls and figure out what works for you?


    You're describing something that is very obvious, this is called a forum where we discuss experiences and then respond and come to a educated decision on what direction we would like to go in.




    Exactly and yet you don't seem to believe any of the advice that has been given to you. Enjoy whatever ball you decide fits your swing speed
  • North ButteNorth Butte Members Posts: 9,911 ✭✭
    And by the way, “premium” and “mid-tier” are marketing gobbledegook with no actual meaning. Are you talking about price tiers? There are very inexpensive Urethane balls and there are premium-priced 2-piece Surlyn balls and everything in between.
    “1lb beefstak, with
    1pt bitter beer
    every 6 hours.
    1 ten-mile walk every morning.
    1 bed at 11 sharp every night.
    And don't stuff your head with things you don't understand.” 
  • PhilBurgPhilBurg Members Posts: 75
    edited Jun 14, 2018 #14
    "Choose the compression of your ball based on your swing speed. A good rule of thumb is 100 compression for swing speeds over 100 miles per hour, 90 compression for swing speeds over 90 mph and 80 compression for swing speeds under 90 mph." This is what I'm reading out there.
  • North ButteNorth Butte Members Posts: 9,911 ✭✭
    It is complete nonsense. Sounds like it was written circa 1998 about wound balls.
    “1lb beefstak, with
    1pt bitter beer
    every 6 hours.
    1 ten-mile walk every morning.
    1 bed at 11 sharp every night.
    And don't stuff your head with things you don't understand.” 
  • GhostwedgeGhostwedge Members Posts: 653 ✭✭
    Iʻd probably disregard that " swingspeed match compression" idea. Have a buddie who is scratch, SS is 105-110 and plays a Callaway SuperSoft. Same here, SS 95 and play a softer ball.





  • Bad9Bad9 Members Posts: 4,216 ✭✭
    PhilBurg wrote:


    "Choose the compression of your ball based on your swing speed. A good rule of thumb is 100 compression for swing speeds over 100 miles per hour, 90 compression for swing speeds over 90 mph and 80 compression for swing speeds under 90 mph." This is what I'm reading out there.




    Is there even a modern ball that has 100 compression? As North Butte says that sounds like the marketing gobbledygook from the 90's and early 00's
    Ping G400 10.5°/Xcaliber SL r flex
    Callaway Heavenwood Xcaliber SL r flex
    Maltby KE4 Tour 25°/Xcaliber HY r flex

    Maltby KE4 Tour 28°/Xcaliber HY r flex
    Ping I200 5-G/CFS70 r flex
    Maltby Tricept 54°/Xcaliber r flex
    Maltby Tricept 58°/Xcaliber r flex
    Mizuno Bettinardi C06
  • AtraynAtrayn ClubWRX Posts: 2,053 ✭✭
    I echo the fact that SS is not the determining factor. If you want Premium results from a cheaper ball:

    https://www.snellgolf.com/



    This is my go to ball. I play MTB red. Just switched after using up last years MTB Black. I've been alternating between 4 pc Ksigs and this ball this year and for me, given all else the same, how it performs in the wind took it past the premiums for me.
    "Someday, it may even be possible to construct some kind of machine
    that will swing a golf club as well as it can possibly be done." "That is probably as close to
    the perfect swing as it would be possible for human beings to get." Ben Hogan 1965 SI

    2017 Taylormade M2 9.5 (set at 10.5) w/ Diamana S+ Blueboard 60 S
    2010 Tour Edge Exotics XCG3 3W w/Fujikura Motore S 15 deg
    2014 Taylormade SLDR S HL 3W 17deg Fujikura Speeder 65 R, shortened
    2009 Callaway Xforged 3i w/ KBS tour S
    2012 Cobra Amp Forged 4-GW w/ KBS tour S
    2013 Miura forged 54 & 58 wedges - w/ DG Tour issue S
    Ping Cadence Rustler Traditional putter
  • hwturner17hwturner17 Members Posts: 327 ✭✭
    Yeah I hate to pile on, but swing speed shouldn't determine the compression you choose. Ball companies used to guide consumers to certain balls based on swing speed because it was easier for them. The snell golf link posted above is great info and he's as expert on the topic as you can be. Compression will determine how the ball feels on full shots, so if you like a softer feeling there are quite a few options these days, even with urethane covers. The spin around the greens and firmness on chips will only have to do with the outermost cover (thickness, urethane vs. non-urethane). For comparison, I believe the Q-Star Tour is around 77 compression, which is on the softer end. The Srixon XV and Prov1X around in the 105 range for compression. Most urethane 3 layer balls are somewhere in between those two number. (Z star is 88. Think the Prov1 is somewhere near there).



    Bottom line is that it's confusing for consumers and it's all because the manufacturers had trouble describing the differences on a box.



    To directly answer your original question, you really don't have to pay premium prices for premium balls anymore due to the constant sales and the direct to consumer balls (Snell, Vice, Cut etc). Once you realize that, you can pick and choose what best fits your taste, because all premium balls will perform admirably for you on the course. My personal recommendation would be Snell MTB Black. Mid compression ball that performs as good if not better than a ProV1 according to the testing that's been done.



    Hope you find your gamer OP, good luck
    Driver: Ping G410 Plus
    FW: Ping Anser 4 wood
    Irons: Ping i210 4-U
    Wedges: 54/58 MD Forged
    Putter: Odyssey #7

    Ball: revolving door
  • lil'mikelil'mike Members Posts: 1,278 ✭✭
    edited Jun 14, 2018 #20
    The premium balls like the Z-Star's are on sale everywhere for only $20 a dozen so you could play a premium ball that is better than the Q-Star for a great price! Just stock up on a few dozen while they are on sale!
  • North ButteNorth Butte Members Posts: 9,911 ✭✭
    In today’s market you can get whatever type of ball suits your game for at most $2/ball, sometimes less.
    “1lb beefstak, with
    1pt bitter beer
    every 6 hours.
    1 ten-mile walk every morning.
    1 bed at 11 sharp every night.
    And don't stuff your head with things you don't understand.” 
  • BirdieRollBirdieRoll Members Posts: 361 ✭✭
    Choosing a ball based on swing speed is hogwash. Pick urethane or non-urethane. Pick your feel: hard, medium, soft. Pick your price point. There are more options than ever.



    But spending the summer trying out balls that do different things won't help your game. Find a ball you like and stick with it. Bridgestone's RXS happens to be mine this year (urethane, soft, medium price-point).
  • Gary GutfulGary Gutful Members Posts: 1,170 ✭✭
    Mukky wrote:


    TBH, I don't view swing speed as the means to determine whether or not you should play a premium ball


    This.
  • BY#99BY#99 Members Posts: 321 ✭✭
    BirdieRoll wrote:


    Choosing a ball based on swing speed is hogwash. Pick urethane or non-urethane. Pick your feel: hard, medium, soft. Pick your price point. There are more options than ever.



    But spending the summer trying out balls that do different things won't help your game. Find a ball you like and stick with it. Bridgestone's RXS happens to be mine this year (urethane, soft, medium price-point).




    This. There are so many options out there you can find your preference
  • gvogelgvogel Members Posts: 7,331 ✭✭
    PhilBurg wrote:


    My question is do I pay a premium price for a premium ball or can I go with a lower-tier. (Ex. Srixon Q Star compared to Srixon Z), curious on how that would affect performance, is there much of a difference if I go with a lower tier ball with a borderline swing speed.




    The different balls for different swing speeds is a narrative adopted by Bridgestone Golf in order to take market share away from Titleist.



    Titleist came back and suggested that a player should pick a ball that performs best on and around the green.
    Boyhood, like measles, is one of those complaints which a man should catch young and have done with it, for when it comes in middle life it is apt to be serious. - P. G. Wodehouse
    Unseen, in the background, Fate was quietly slipping the lead into the boxing-glove.
  • atomheartmotheratomheartmother Members Posts: 123
    To be fair there are ball companies that still include what kind of driver swing speed and distance of certain clubs in their “ball fitting” questionnaire things, such as Vice.
  • MukkyMukky Members Posts: 362 ✭✭


    To be fair there are ball companies that still include what kind of driver swing speed and distance of certain clubs in their “ball fitting” questionnaire things, such as Vice.




    My understanding is that vice doesn't design their balls and just buys a few different off the shelf balls and labels them "vice", so they may have no idea what determines how a ball performs
  • DaveLeeNCDaveLeeNC Members Posts: 5,168 ✭✭
    edited Jun 18, 2018 #28
    This was around 10 or so years ago when prevailing wisdom was that the Pro V1 was the choice for shorter hitters and the V1x for bombers. Gary Woodland was one of the tours longest hitters and played the V1. More than one of the LPGA's shortest played the V1x.



    dave
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