How do I get my daughter into a great school by playing golf

She is 6 and very athletic, and has started to play in some tournaments after picking up the game last summer



I don’t care about scholarships but want to help her get into a great academic school



I have the academic side covered but would like to know how I could maximize her chances by having an outstanding extracurricular activity like golf



She also plays a musical instrument intensely



How good does she have to be to play for an Ivy League school?



How about 2nd tier non-Ivy schools that are known for academics?



I have an older child who plays a racket sport at a high level (top 25 in the US) but know little about golf - can you develop children into top golfers by high level instruction and lots of practice like in tennis?
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  • BrianMcGBrianMcG Members Posts: 2,226 ✭✭
    TigerMom wrote:




    I have an older child who plays a racket sport at a high level (top 25 in the US) but know little about golf - can you develop children into top golfers by high level instruction and lots of practice like in tennis?




    Yes. That's pretty much how its done these days. Lots of golf schools like the IMG Academy. Nick Bollettieri basically started it all with tennis and now they do it with golf.
    Walter: Tell me Bobby, why do you play this game?
    Bobby: I play because I love it.
    Walter: Well I play for the money. I have to win. That is why every time we face each other I will always beat you.
  • tatertottatertot Members Posts: 4,302 ✭✭
    And this is what's wrong with America today.
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  • TigerMomTigerMom Posts: 222 ✭✭
    tatertot wrote:


    And this is what's wrong with America today.




    Why?
  • tatertottatertot Members Posts: 4,302 ✭✭
    TigerMom wrote:

    tatertot wrote:


    And this is what's wrong with America today.




    Why?




    Your daughter is 6 ... She plays a musical instrument "intensely" and is "very athletic" and you have academics "covered" and are looking at extra curricular activities to get her into an Igy League school. How bout you let her be a freakin kid and decide what she wants to do wit her life instead of you living the life you wanted through her?
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  • TigerMomTigerMom Posts: 222 ✭✭
    tatertot wrote:

    TigerMom wrote:

    tatertot wrote:


    And this is what's wrong with America today.




    Why?




    Your daughter is 6 ... She plays a musical instrument "intensely" and is "very athletic" and you have academics "covered" and are looking at extra curricular activities to get her into an Igy League school. How bout you let her be a freakin kid and decide what she wants to do wit her life instead of you living the life you wanted through her?




    Ok so parents pushing kids to be the best is what’s wrong with America today?
  • dpb5031dpb5031 Members Posts: 5,019 ✭✭
    TigerMom wrote:

    tatertot wrote:

    TigerMom wrote:

    tatertot wrote:


    And this is what's wrong with America today.




    Why?




    Your daughter is 6 ... She plays a musical instrument "intensely" and is "very athletic" and you have academics "covered" and are looking at extra curricular activities to get her into an Igy League school. How bout you let her be a freakin kid and decide what she wants to do wit her life instead of you living the life you wanted through her?




    Ok so parents pushing kids to be the best is what’s wrong with America today?




    Nah, that's a cop-out for mediocrity. Nothing wrong with wanting the best for your kid. It's finding the right balance between pushing and driving them off the deep-end that's the challenge.



    This is also a cultural issue. Some cultures are very accepting of pushing kids to their limits with no apologies. Others find this level of parental involvement too extreme.



    As to the original question, I'd just keep your daughter involved in the sport and try to make every experience with golf a positive one. Dont make it a job. If she enjoys it you've got a better chance that she develops her own true passion for the game and will be more likely to stick with it and maximize her potential.
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  • CTgolfCTgolf Posts: 407 ✭✭
    TigerMom wrote:


    She is 6 and very athletic, and has started to play in some tournaments after picking up the game last summer



    I don’t care about scholarships but want to help her get into a great academic school



    I have the academic side covered but would like to know how I could maximize her chances by having an outstanding extracurricular activity like golf



    She also plays a musical instrument intensely



    How good does she have to be to play for an Ivy League school?



    How about 2nd tier non-Ivy schools that are known for academics?



    I have an older child who plays a racket sport at a high level (top 25 in the US) but know little about golf - can you develop children into top golfers by high level instruction and lots of practice like in tennis?




    Wrong forum - “everyone here is thinking PGA” (or in your daughter’s case, LPGA)
  • CTgolfCTgolf Posts: 407 ✭✭
    TigerMom wrote:


    She is 6 and very athletic, and has started to play in some tournaments after picking up the game last summer



    I don’t care about scholarships but want to help her get into a great academic school



    I have the academic side covered but would like to know how I could maximize her chances by having an outstanding extracurricular activity like golf



    She also plays a musical instrument intensely



    How good does she have to be to play for an Ivy League school?



    How about 2nd tier non-Ivy schools that are known for academics?



    I have an older child who plays a racket sport at a high level (top 25 in the US) but know little about golf - can you develop children into top golfers by high level instruction and lots of practice like in tennis?


    In all seriousness, if your daughter is learning an instrument intensely she probably has the attention span and ability to follow instructions to receive lessons and formal training.



    I would look for a well-regarded professional in your area who specializes in junior instruction and focus on finding someone who gets along well with your child.
  • tatertottatertot Members Posts: 4,302 ✭✭
    TigerMom wrote:

    tatertot wrote:

    TigerMom wrote:

    tatertot wrote:


    And this is what's wrong with America today.




    Why?




    Your daughter is 6 ... She plays a musical instrument "intensely" and is "very athletic" and you have academics "covered" and are looking at extra curricular activities to get her into an Igy League school. How bout you let her be a freakin kid and decide what she wants to do wit her life instead of you living the life you wanted through her?




    Ok so parents pushing kids to be the best is what’s wrong with America today?




    Not going to change your mind on a golf forum - or anywhere. Just feel bad for your daughter.
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  • CTgolfCTgolf Posts: 407 ✭✭
    TigerMom wrote:

    tatertot wrote:

    TigerMom wrote:

    tatertot wrote:


    And this is what's wrong with America today.




    Why?




    Your daughter is 6 ... She plays a musical instrument "intensely" and is "very athletic" and you have academics "covered" and are looking at extra curricular activities to get her into an Igy League school. How bout you let her be a freakin kid and decide what she wants to do wit her life instead of you living the life you wanted through her?




    Ok so parents pushing kids to be the best is what’s wrong with America today?




    I would argue that parents prioritizing “having fun” over everything else is what is wrong with America today
  • NessismNessism To measure is to know... Members Posts: 18,185 ✭✭
    Brother of a guy from work had been grooming his two boys to be pro baseball players since an early age. Pushed them into the "right" schools, got them coaching, training, etc until both wound up with college scholarships. Long story short, neither graduated school and both are out of baseball by their early 20's now. One wrecked his arm and I'm not sure what happened to the other. So much for planning...
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  • BertGABertGA Posts: 270 ✭✭
    edited Jun 17, 2018 #13
    Given the obvious determination of TigerMom, and the apparent willingness of the child to go along with it all, I’m going to suggest golf is NOT going to be the tiebreaker that breaks the admissions code for this child in 11 years.



    TigerMom, if you aren’t interested in a scholarship, I’m doubtful high-level golf performance from your daughter will add any benefit to college admissions. It typically works in the opposite...wildly talented golfer cannot get admission to Stanford becaus their SATs aren’t good enough. Golf tends to take time away from academic achievement. Multi-day travel tournaments prevent other academic activities.



    If your true goal is only to get admissions to the best college you can, then pick up hobbies and overachieve with academics and volunteer/charity activities. By intensely committing to golf at 6 years old, it seems you are more on the path to elite golfing. The average admissions committee will have no idea how good your daughter is, unless the golf coach is campaigning on her behalf. Those talents are rare, like Tiger Woods rare, so I’m not sure that is a realistic goal. Again, if your goal was a scholarship, we are having a different conversation here.



    As for the cultural differences, understand that we are all far more familiar with stories of kids having been pushed too hard into sports at an early age and quitting by puberty. Happens more frequently here than success stories of parents pushing hard and kids growing up loving the sport. Also realize at that age you are just as likely to achieve your desired results by just encouraging ANY sports participation, and waiting to see what you daughter enjoys. Colleges are full of kids on D1 scholarships that didn’t pick up a golf club until 10 or later.



    I know you didn’t ask for this, but I wouldn’t get so hot on Ivy League, either. I am guessing the 2nd Tier schools you are referring too are Stanford, Duke, Northwestern, etc. many people would argue you can get a more prestigious education there. When someone’s says Princeton, I just think privileged money, not outstanding education. But that’s my bias.
  • SkiSchoolProSkiSchoolPro Members Posts: 623
    edited Jun 17, 2018 #14
    BertGA makes some good points, but golf did help me get into a top 25 University (quite a few years ago) as a non-scholarship athlete. A word from the golf coach to the admissions committee certainly helped (along with good SAT scores). At some schools I have heard more recently that the golf coach has a limited number of slots he can tap into with the admissions committee and that it is counterproductive for him to even mention that someone's a good player if he's not in one of those spots.



    I played my first round at age 9 and started playing more seriously around 12 or 13. IMO, to maximize golf potential it's good to play a variety of sports at younger ages. I tend to agree with those who say it can be counterproductive for the parent to push too hard to a particular sport. My dad exposed me to golf, but I pushed myself to become better and play more. If your daughter seems to like golf, get her some good instruction with someone who works well with kids and see if she decides to pursue it later more seriously. Its my understanding that because of Title Nine there are quite a few golf scholarships available for girls.
    Golfing when I can.
  • chrissdcchrissdc Members Posts: 48 ✭✭
    Golf will help getting into Ivy League schools, provided the girl is a very good player. The admission standards for an athlete are less than a non athlete. There is a trend of girls and guys going to Ivy League schools and once they are there, the players stop playing and since they are already have been admitted and attending the school, the school cannot ask them to leave.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭
    Ivy League schools do not offer athletic scholarships.
  • farmerfarmer Members Posts: 7,778 ✭✭
    Todd Marinovich, Sean O'Hair, the Ball kids, Trophy Kids, many, many examples of over involvement by the parents. If the OP is really trying to determine her daughters future when the child is 6, that is awful.
  • CTgolfCTgolf Posts: 407 ✭✭


    Ivy League schools do not offer athletic scholarships.




    The OP said she didn’t care about scholarships
  • farmerfarmer Members Posts: 7,778 ✭✭
    CTgolf wrote:



    Ivy League schools do not offer athletic scholarships.




    The OP said she didn't care about scholarships
    Well, Harvard is free if you can get accepted. My son was recruited by Harvard (they wanted more diversity, and a farmers son from Texas was not the usual), and when I told them we couldn't afford it, they said "No problem.".
  • TigerMomTigerMom Posts: 222 ✭✭
    Nessism wrote:


    Brother of a guy from work had been grooming his two boys to be pro baseball players since an early age. Pushed them into the "right" schools, got them coaching, training, etc until both wound up with college scholarships. Long story short, neither graduated school and both are out of baseball by their early 20's now. One wrecked his arm and I'm not sure what happened to the other. So much for planning...




    They would have been better off focusing on getting into a good college and graduating with a degree that could get them a great job
  • Sean2Sean2 #TheWRX (Callaway Trip) Members Posts: 30,826 ✭✭
    farmer wrote:

    CTgolf wrote:



    Ivy League schools do not offer athletic scholarships.




    The OP said she didn't care about scholarships
    Well, Harvard is free if you can get accepted. My son was recruited by Harvard (they wanted more diversity, and a farmers son from Texas was not the usual), and when I told them we couldn't afford it, they said "No problem.".




    They have more money in their endowments than the GDP of about 90 nations. Roughly $36 billion at this point.
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  • TigerMomTigerMom Posts: 222 ✭✭
    BertGA wrote:


    Given the obvious determination of TigerMom, and the apparent willingness of the child to go along with it all, I’m going to suggest golf is NOT going to be the tiebreaker that breaks the admissions code for this child in 11 years.



    TigerMom, if you aren’t interested in a scholarship, I’m doubtful high-level golf performance from your daughter will add any benefit to college admissions. It typically works in the opposite...wildly talented golfer cannot get admission to Stanford becaus their SATs aren’t good enough. Golf tends to take time away from academic achievement. Multi-day travel tournaments prevent other academic activities.



    If your true goal is only to get admissions to the best college you can, then pick up hobbies and overachieve with academics and volunteer/charity activities. By intensely committing to golf at 6 years old, it seems you are more on the path to elite golfing. The average admissions committee will have no idea how good your daughter is, unless the golf coach is campaigning on her behalf. Those talents are rare, like Tiger Woods rare, so I’m not sure that is a realistic goal. Again, if your goal was a scholarship, we are having a different conversation here.



    As for the cultural differences, understand that we are all far more familiar with stories of kids having been pushed too hard into sports at an early age and quitting by puberty. Happens more frequently here than success stories of parents pushing hard and kids growing up loving the sport. Also realize at that age you are just as likely to achieve your desired results by just encouraging ANY sports participation, and waiting to see what you daughter enjoys. Colleges are full of kids on D1 scholarships that didn’t pick up a golf club until 10 or later.



    I know you didn’t ask for this, but I wouldn’t get so hot on Ivy League, either. I am guessing the 2nd Tier schools you are referring too are Stanford, Duke, Northwestern, etc. many people would argue you can get a more prestigious education there. When someone’s says Princeton, I just think privileged money, not outstanding education. But that’s my bias.




    Thanks for this thoughtful response



    Most applicants to the top colleges have near perfect grades and test scores and are just mediocre in sports and other extra curricular activities



    The ones who show excellence outside academics, along with leadership abilities, are typically the ones that get in



    There are other factors too but that’s probably beyond the scope of this discussion



    I think among elites, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Stanford and MIT are considered top tier; other Ivy’s and top 10 schools are 2nd tier
  • GSDriverGSDriver Members Posts: 576 ✭✭
    6 and planning for college? Nice.



    How about you invest for the next twelve years cuz WTF knows what college golf will look like 12 years in the future, or if even around?



    Burn her out and she may not even go to college, so I suggest invest, let your daughter be a kid and figure out what she may like, not what you think she should like.
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  • chrissdcchrissdc Members Posts: 48 ✭✭
    If you are going to play on the schools team, the admissions standards are easier.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭
    edited Jun 18, 2018 #25
    At 6 years old it way to early to worry about college and let alone worrying about her golf.



    I been told Academics is very important for kids playing golf. The reason is sometimes they can combine academics scholarships with golf. The combination is a good option and will open doors.



    When it comes to golf the talent has to be there and if it isn’t you can’t really teach it by spending money. Simply put talent is needed to get to a high level of golf.
  • alfridayalfriday Members Posts: 456 ✭✭
    "How good does she have to be to play for an Ivy League school?



    How about 2nd tier non-Ivy schools that are known for academics?"



    These statements bothered me a bit from the OP. Are you saying the Ivy league schools are the only tier one schools out there and all else are tier two? Stanford grads may disagree with you. All three of my children went to small colleges and while we looked at Ivy schools, my children chose "lesser" schools which were a better fit for them. My daughter even played a sport at her school (Bryn Mawr). There are a lot of great schools out there and the Ivy schools may or may not be a good fit for your daughter.



    You might check out this book to help broaden your perspective:



    https://www.amazon.com/Hidden-Ivies-3rd-Americas-Universities/dp/0062420909
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭
    alfriday wrote:


    "How good does she have to be to play for an Ivy League school?



    How about 2nd tier non-Ivy schools that are known for academics?"



    These statements bothered me a bit from the OP. Are you saying the Ivy league schools are the only tier one schools out there and all else are tier two? Stanford grads may disagree with you. All three of my children went to small colleges and while we looked at Ivy schools, my children chose "lesser" schools which were a better fit for them. My daughter even played a sport at her school (Bryn Mawr). There are a lot of great schools out there and the Ivy schools may or may not be a good fit for your daughter.



    You might check out this book to help broaden your perspective:



    https://www.amazon.c...s/dp/0062420909




    Yep.



    I would discourage my kids from going to an Ivy league school. The education isn't better than anywhere else. The connections you make are.
  • jholzjholz Members Posts: 1,296 ✭✭
    Field hockey and lacrosse are worthy of consideration as well - if you are purely looking to use sport as an entre into blue-blood society.
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  • TigerMomTigerMom Posts: 222 ✭✭
    alfriday wrote:


    "How good does she have to be to play for an Ivy League school?



    How about 2nd tier non-Ivy schools that are known for academics?"



    These statements bothered me a bit from the OP. Are you saying the Ivy league schools are the only tier one schools out there and all else are tier two? Stanford grads may disagree with you. All three of my children went to small colleges and while we looked at Ivy schools, my children chose "lesser" schools which were a better fit for them. My daughter even played a sport at her school (Bryn Mawr). There are a lot of great schools out there and the Ivy schools may or may not be a good fit for your daughter.



    You might check out this book to help broaden your perspective:



    https://www.amazon.c...s/dp/0062420909




    http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/topic/1653448-how-do-i-get-my-daughter-into-a-great-school-by-playing-golf/#entry17539514
  • TigerMomTigerMom Posts: 222 ✭✭
    jholz wrote:


    Field hockey and lacrosse are worthy of consideration as well - if you are purely looking to use sport as an entre into blue-blood society.




    Thanks - my daughter is trying many different sports, including (but not only) lacrosse and tennis, both of which my older children play at a high level
  • TigerMomTigerMom Posts: 222 ✭✭

    alfriday wrote:


    "How good does she have to be to play for an Ivy League school?



    How about 2nd tier non-Ivy schools that are known for academics?"



    These statements bothered me a bit from the OP. Are you saying the Ivy league schools are the only tier one schools out there and all else are tier two? Stanford grads may disagree with you. All three of my children went to small colleges and while we looked at Ivy schools, my children chose "lesser" schools which were a better fit for them. My daughter even played a sport at her school (Bryn Mawr). There are a lot of great schools out there and the Ivy schools may or may not be a good fit for your daughter.



    You might check out this book to help broaden your perspective:



    https://www.amazon.c...s/dp/0062420909




    Yep.



    I would discourage my kids from going to an Ivy league school. The education isn't better than anywhere else. The connections you make are.




    Private universities all charge roughly the same price



    The best professors who could work anywhere want to be at the most prestigious schools



    But the real value is in the connections made and credential (degree) received - a Harvard degree will get you an interview or a foot in the door easier than from any other place



    State schools are cheaper, but I think most would agree you get what you pay for in making that trade off



    This is an unusual perspective



    To each his own
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