How many hours to become high level college player

TigerMomTigerMom Members Posts: 214 ✭✭
Parents and coaches of top players:



How many hours do you estimate a kid would needed to have dedicated (before graduating high school) to a skill sport in order to be able to play at a top 100 college program?
«13

Comments

  • Hateto3PuttHateto3Putt Smoking Makes You Look Cool! Members Posts: 6,288 ✭✭
    Depending on the talent, somewhere between 10 - 20,000.

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  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,080 ✭✭
    I know lots of people try and put hours to things but I am not sure you can just say x hours and the will be this good.



    First off you have have productive practice. Just hitting on the range will never do it. Second you need to have talent which some people do not have. I also believe every golfer has a maximum level they can achieve from what ever reason. The time takes also varries a lot too.



    From what I have seen is if you put in enough time anyone can pretty much break 80.



    People with some talent will be low 70s



    If someone is gifted your going to see them break 70 all the time.



    The real talented kids are good with wedges more importantly putting. If your kid is tapping in 30 foot putts or saving pars regularly there is something there for sure.

  • farmerfarmer Members Posts: 7,906 ✭✭
    The "10000 Hour Rule" came from a book by Malcolm Gladwell. There is wide disagreement in the scientific community about the validity of this theory. In golf there is some correlation between time spent and results, but time spent by itself does not assure a good result. Superior talent will be the ultimate factor. In real life, for your kid to get into a top 100 college golf program, he is probably going to have to be a top 1000 player in his age group.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Members Posts: 309 ✭✭
    farmer wrote:


    The "10000 Hour Rule" came from a book by Malcolm Gladwell. There is wide disagreement in the scientific community about the validity of this theory. In golf there is some correlation between time spent and results, but time spent by itself does not assure a good result. Superior talent will be the ultimate factor. In real life, for your kid to get into a top 100 college golf program, he is probably going to have to be a top 1000 player in his age group.




    I would say top 200 in his graduating class. Maybe top 100.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Members Posts: 309 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:


    I know lots of people try and put hours to things but I am not sure you can just say x hours and the will be this good.



    First off you have have productive practice. Just hitting on the range will never do it. Second you need to have talent which some people do not have. I also believe every golfer has a maximum level they can achieve from what ever reason. The time takes also varries a lot too.



    From what I have seen is if you put in enough time anyone can pretty much break 80.



    People with some talent will be low 70s



    If someone is gifted your going to see them break 70 all the time.



    The real talented kids are good with wedges more importantly putting. If your kid is tapping in 30 foot putts or saving pars regularly there is something there for sure.




    I think they have to be able to poke it 300 to consistently break par. The game has changed. It is all about power. They need 115-120 swing speed in high school.


    tiger1873 wrote:


    I know lots of people try and put hours to things but I am not sure you can just say x hours and the will be this good.



    First off you have have productive practice. Just hitting on the range will never do it. Second you need to have talent which some people do not have. I also believe every golfer has a maximum level they can achieve from what ever reason. The time takes also varries a lot too.



    From what I have seen is if you put in enough time anyone can pretty much break 80.



    People with some talent will be low 70s



    If someone is gifted your going to see them break 70 all the time.



    The real talented kids are good with wedges more importantly putting. If your kid is tapping in 30 foot putts or saving pars regularly there is something there for sure.




    I think they have to be able to poke it 300 to consistently break par. The game has changed. It is all about power. They need 115-120 swing speed in high school. They may never get to that swing speed no matter how much they practice.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,080 ✭✭
    edited Aug 26, 2018 #7




    I know lots of people try and put hours to things but I am not sure you can just say x hours and the will be this good.



    First off you have have productive practice. Just hitting on the range will never do it. Second you need to have talent which some people do not have. I also believe every golfer has a maximum level they can achieve from what ever reason. The time takes also varries a lot too.



    From what I have seen is if you put in enough time anyone can pretty much break 80.



    People with some talent will be low 70s



    If someone is gifted your going to see them break 70 all the time.



    The real talented kids are good with wedges more importantly putting. If your kid is tapping in 30 foot putts or saving pars regularly there is something there for sure.




    I think they have to be able to poke it 300 to consistently break par. The game has changed. It is all about power. They need 115-120 swing speed in high school.








    I think they have to be able to poke it 300 to consistently break par. The game has changed. It is all about power. They need 115-120 swing speed in high school. They may never get to that swing speed no matter how much they practice.






    I don’t think you have to poke it past 300 to win tournaments. It may help but I would bet a guy who hits 250 but consistently putts less then 25 putts a round will beat the long hitter every day. I have seen plenty of people who can bomb the ball and even chip decent but can’t putt. Putting is where the tournaments are really won at a high level.
  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,087 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:




    I don't think you have to poke it past 300 to win tournaments. It may help but I would bet a guy who hits 250 but consistently putts less then 25 putts a round will beat the long hitter every day. I have seen plenty of people who can bomb the ball and even chip decent but can't putt. Putting is where the tournaments are really won at a high level.




    Making me do math again...



    3PhIdtZ.jpg

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • GuiaGuia Members Posts: 8,693 ✭✭
    Some are more skilled naturally than others, I have known a few individuals who were scratch after 1 year of playing, many (most) never come close to scratch. Putting in hours is worthless unless it is the right kind of practice, just beating balls when your swing and attitude and not correct, produces nothing. You want to see how far he can go invest in a really good teaching pro to teach and monitor regularly. Best of luck.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Members Posts: 309 ✭✭
    edited Aug 26, 2018 #10
    tiger1873 wrote:





    I know lots of people try and put hours to things but I am not sure you can just say x hours and the will be this good.



    First off you have have productive practice. Just hitting on the range will never do it. Second you need to have talent which some people do not have. I also believe every golfer has a maximum level they can achieve from what ever reason. The time takes also varries a lot too.



    From what I have seen is if you put in enough time anyone can pretty much break 80.



    People with some talent will be low 70s



    If someone is gifted your going to see them break 70 all the time.



    The real talented kids are good with wedges more importantly putting. If your kid is tapping in 30 foot putts or saving pars regularly there is something there for sure.




    I think they have to be able to poke it 300 to consistently break par. The game has changed. It is all about power. They need 115-120 swing speed in high school.








    I think they have to be able to poke it 300 to consistently break par. The game has changed. It is all about power. They need 115-120 swing speed in high school. They may never get to that swing speed no matter how much they practice.






    I don’t think you have to poke it past 300 to win tournaments. It may help but I would bet a guy who hits 250 but consistently putts less then 25 putts a round will beat the long hitter every day. I have seen plenty of people who can bomb the ball and even chip decent but can’t putt. Putting is where the tournaments are really won at a high level.




    I would be shocked if anyone at the AJGA level has won driving 250. Or Junior US AM. Or Western AM. You do realize that the tourneys college coaches care about all play 6900+. Not sure how you compete driving 250 and taking that as your distance throughout the bag. And to assume the long hitters are all 32+ putters is very naive.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,080 ✭✭

    tiger1873 wrote:





    I know lots of people try and put hours to things but I am not sure you can just say x hours and the will be this good.



    First off you have have productive practice. Just hitting on the range will never do it. Second you need to have talent which some people do not have. I also believe every golfer has a maximum level they can achieve from what ever reason. The time takes also varries a lot too.



    From what I have seen is if you put in enough time anyone can pretty much break 80.



    People with some talent will be low 70s



    If someone is gifted your going to see them break 70 all the time.



    The real talented kids are good with wedges more importantly putting. If your kid is tapping in 30 foot putts or saving pars regularly there is something there for sure.




    I think they have to be able to poke it 300 to consistently break par. The game has changed. It is all about power. They need 115-120 swing speed in high school.








    I think they have to be able to poke it 300 to consistently break par. The game has changed. It is all about power. They need 115-120 swing speed in high school. They may never get to that swing speed no matter how much they practice.






    I don’t think you have to poke it past 300 to win tournaments. It may help but I would bet a guy who hits 250 but consistently putts less then 25 putts a round will beat the long hitter every day. I have seen plenty of people who can bomb the ball and even chip decent but can’t putt. Putting is where the tournaments are really won at a high level.




    I would be shocked if anyone at the AJGA level has won driving 250. Or Junior US AM. Or Western AM. You do realize that the tourneys college coaches care about all play 6900+. Not sure how you compete driving 250 and taking that as your distance throughout the bag. And to assume the long hitters are all 32+ putters is very naive.




    You talking about pga players who all have good putting. If your playing college golf I am sure you will find shorter drives then what is the pga.



    When it comes to driving distance It not as big deal you making it out to be you can hit the green on a second shot. If they can make a high percentage of putts in 10 feet there going to pretty competitive.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Members Posts: 309 ✭✭
    edited Aug 27, 2018 #12
    tiger1873 wrote:


    tiger1873 wrote:





    I know lots of people try and put hours to things but I am not sure you can just say x hours and the will be this good.



    First off you have have productive practice. Just hitting on the range will never do it. Second you need to have talent which some people do not have. I also believe every golfer has a maximum level they can achieve from what ever reason. The time takes also varries a lot too.



    From what I have seen is if you put in enough time anyone can pretty much break 80.



    People with some talent will be low 70s



    If someone is gifted your going to see them break 70 all the time.



    The real talented kids are good with wedges more importantly putting. If your kid is tapping in 30 foot putts or saving pars regularly there is something there for sure.




    I think they have to be able to poke it 300 to consistently break par. The game has changed. It is all about power. They need 115-120 swing speed in high school.








    I think they have to be able to poke it 300 to consistently break par. The game has changed. It is all about power. They need 115-120 swing speed in high school. They may never get to that swing speed no matter how much they practice.






    I don’t think you have to poke it past 300 to win tournaments. It may help but I would bet a guy who hits 250 but consistently putts less then 25 putts a round will beat the long hitter every day. I have seen plenty of people who can bomb the ball and even chip decent but can’t putt. Putting is where the tournaments are really won at a high level.




    I would be shocked if anyone at the AJGA level has won driving 250. Or Junior US AM. Or Western AM. You do realize that the tourneys college coaches care about all play 6900+. Not sure how you compete driving 250 and taking that as your distance throughout the bag. And to assume the long hitters are all 32+ putters is very naive.




    You talking about pga players who all have good putting. If your playing college golf I am sure you will find shorter drives then what is the pga.



    When it comes to driving distance It not as big deal you making it out to be you can hit the green on a second shot. If they can make a high percentage of putts in 10 feet there going to pretty competitive.




    Th OP was asking how many hours it will take to become a high level collegiate player. My point is that hours alone are not enough - IMO, as a boy, you need power. You mention GIR and making putts. Most of the aspiring collegiate players have sufficient putting in high school. By sufficient, they average at least 32 putts a round or better. In fact, I would argue that putting and short game can be honed with hours of practice; distance cannot (otherwise, Luke Donald and Brian Harman would be 300 by now). Even Jordan is messing with his swing too much in search of 20 extra yards.



    When it comes to greens in regulation, when par 4s are 420+, par 3s are 190+ and par 5s are 520+ (Distances that are standard in tournaments that college coaches look at), you can’t be 250 or less off the tee and expect to go under par consistently. If you have hybrid into the green and a third of the field or more are hitting 9i or less, the latter is likely to hit more greens and have better proximity to the hole. Koepka was recently talking about how much longer juniors are getting. If you watched the US Am, NCAA championships, Junior Am... it is clear that the ones that are winning or advancing are the ones that hit it long. Having been involved in an aspiring high school golfer, it is clear to me that coaches care about distance as well - they ask for swing speed and, in one tourney, watched trackman at the range of each player in the tournament field to see distances.



    Hours help in consistency and mental toughness and strategy. Hence, hours help in the short game and game management.



    I get it - it must be frustrating to have a junior that’s short off the tee. You want to believe that distance doesn’t matter as much. Same goes if you have a long hitter that can’t chip and putt (you are committed to potential). I’m just trying to explain what I’ve experienced. If my younger junior is not poking it 280 by the time he’s 15, I will know it’s a long road ahead and top division I golf is not likely.



    BTW - is this really different in any level of golf. Short hitters succeed at 12 and under bc the other players may not have put in the hours into the short game. The ones that finish in the top 10 at worlds are the long hitters. The only difference in high school is that those longer hitters develop a short game. Brian Harman said he beat DJ all the time as a junior bc DJ would have blow up holes. Then DJ developed a short game and it’s game over.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,080 ✭✭






    Th OP was asking how many hours it will take to become a high level collegiate player. My point is that hours alone are not enough - IMO, as a boy, you need power. You mention GIR and making putts. Most of the aspiring collegiate players have sufficient putting in high school. By sufficient, they average at least 32 putts a round or better. In fact, I would argue that putting and short game can be honed with hours of practice; distance cannot (otherwise, Luke Donald and Brian Harman would be 300 by now). Even Jordan is messing with his swing too much in search of 20 extra yards.



    When it comes to greens in regulation, when par 4s are 420+, par 3s are 190+ and par 5s are 520+ (Distances that are standard in tournaments that college coaches look at), you can't be 250 or less off the tee and expect to go under par consistently. If you have hybrid into the green and a third of the field or more are hitting 9i or less, the latter is likely to hit more greens and have better proximity to the hole. Koepka was recently talking about how much longer juniors are getting. If you watched the US Am, NCAA championships, Junior Am... it is clear that the ones that are winning or advancing are the ones that hit it long. Having been involved in an aspiring high school golfer, it is clear to me that coaches care about distance as well - they ask for swing speed and, in one tourney, watched trackman at the range of each player in the tournament field to see distances.



    Hours help in consistency and mental toughness and strategy. Hence, hours help in the short game and game management.



    I get it - it must be frustrating to have a junior that's short off the tee. You want to believe that distance doesn't matter as much. Same goes if you have a long hitter that can't chip and putt (you are committed to potential). I'm just trying to explain what I've experienced. If my younger junior is not poking it 280 by the time he's 15, I will know it's a long road ahead and top division I golf is not likely.



    BTW - is this really different in any level of golf. Short hitters succeed at 12 and under bc the other players may not have put in the hours into the short game. The ones that finish in the top 10 at worlds are the long hitters. The only difference in high school is that those longer hitters develop a short game. Brian Harman said he beat DJ all the time as a junior bc DJ would have blow up holes. Then DJ developed a short game and it's game over.




    I didn't say distance doesn't matter it does help and makes it easier. But to say that a player needs to drive past 300 yards or they don't have chance is plain wrong. Distance only matters if you can't hit the greens in regulation period.



    If you are hitting above 80% of the greens and putting less then 30 putts a round chances are you have a good shot at playing D1 golf. I am sure a lot coaches would love to see a prospect like that.



    The biggest thing a top golfer needs is consistency and accuracy. If you are have those two things not too much is going to get in your way. some people will never reach the consistency and accuracy needed no mater how much they practice.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Members Posts: 309 ✭✭
    I stand corrected. You show me a player that averages 14-15 GIR from 6900+ yardages driving 250. Stenson leads the tour at 75% GIR.
  • munny11munny11 Members Posts: 8 ✭✭
    edited Aug 27, 2018 #15
    Not sure this is accurate or not, but this is what https://www.athletic...cholarships.htm says about driving distances and scores for college recruits.







    D1- Driving Distance 270+ yards, Avg Scores 65-75

    D2- Driving Distance 260+ yards, Avg Scores 67-77

    D3- Driving Distance 260+ yards, Avg Scores 68-79
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,816 ✭✭


    I stand corrected. You show me a player that averages 14-15 GIR from 6900+ yardages driving 250. Stenson leads the tour at 75% GIR.




    I can name more than a few. One was a recent runner up at US Am Public Links
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,816 ✭✭

    farmer wrote:


    The "10000 Hour Rule" came from a book by Malcolm Gladwell. There is wide disagreement in the scientific community about the validity of this theory. In golf there is some correlation between time spent and results, but time spent by itself does not assure a good result. Superior talent will be the ultimate factor. In real life, for your kid to get into a top 100 college golf program, he is probably going to have to be a top 1000 player in his age group.




    I would say top 200 in his graduating class. Maybe top 100.




    Top 700 is more accurate. Top 100 in your class will often get you into top 30 program. Every team is going to bring in 2-3 kids on average a year.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,130 ✭✭
    iteachgolf wrote:



    I stand corrected. You show me a player that averages 14-15 GIR from 6900+ yardages driving 250. Stenson leads the tour at 75% GIR.




    I can name more than a few. One was a recent runner up at US Am Public Links




    That isn't their average over the course of their career. Anyone at anytime can catch lightning in a bottle and have a great week. Over the course of a career you wouldn't gamble on that 250 yard drive week in and week out to win.
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,816 ✭✭

    iteachgolf wrote:



    I stand corrected. You show me a player that averages 14-15 GIR from 6900+ yardages driving 250. Stenson leads the tour at 75% GIR.




    I can name more than a few. One was a recent runner up at US Am Public Links




    That isn't their average over the course of their career. Anyone at anytime can catch lightning in a bottle and have a great week. Over the course of a career you wouldn't gamble on that 250 yard drive week in and week out to win.




    He was top 10 amateur in the world. Played in 3 US Ams and 3 US Pub Links, finishing in top 10 twice. First year as a pro made it to Q School Finals and is the best mini tour player right now in the state of FL. Absolutely not lightening in a bottle at all. He’s a +8-9 handicap. He swings 97mph and flies it about 240





    Here are some of his professional scores in the last few years

    http://www.westfloridagolftour.com/PlayerProfile.aspx?PlayerID=3563
  • TigerMomTigerMom Members Posts: 214 ✭✭
    There is debate about boys driving distances for top colleges - what about for girls?



    How far do they have to hit?



  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,130 ✭✭
    edited Aug 27, 2018 #21
    TigerMom wrote:


    There is debate about boys driving distances for top colleges - what about for girls?



    How far do they have to hit?




    https://www.athleticscholarships.net/golfscholarships.htm



    Scroll down on this link that munny provided. I think more realistic is 220 or so+ for D1 golf.
  • ShilgyShilgy PhoenixMembers Posts: 11,604 ✭✭
    iteachgolf wrote:


    iteachgolf wrote:



    I stand corrected. You show me a player that averages 14-15 GIR from 6900+ yardages driving 250. Stenson leads the tour at 75% GIR.




    I can name more than a few. One was a recent runner up at US Am Public Links




    That isn't their average over the course of their career. Anyone at anytime can catch lightning in a bottle and have a great week. Over the course of a career you wouldn't gamble on that 250 yard drive week in and week out to win.




    He was top 10 amateur in the world. Played in 3 US Ams and 3 US Pub Links, finishing in top 10 twice. First year as a pro made it to Q School Finals and is the best mini tour player right now in the state of FL. Absolutely not lightening in a bottle at all. He's a +8-9 handicap. He swings 97mph and flies it about 240





    Here are some of his professional scores in the last few years

    http://www.westflori...x?PlayerID=3563
    What would you say are his chances of "making it"? 29 years old-turned pro 5 years ago and flies it 240?
    WITB
    Tools for the job!

    To paraphrase Dr Seuss: Don't cry because the round of golf is over-smile because it happened . :)

    Game is recovering from total ankle replacement. Getting there and glad to be pain free!
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,816 ✭✭
    Shilgy wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:


    iteachgolf wrote:



    I stand corrected. You show me a player that averages 14-15 GIR from 6900+ yardages driving 250. Stenson leads the tour at 75% GIR.




    I can name more than a few. One was a recent runner up at US Am Public Links




    That isn't their average over the course of their career. Anyone at anytime can catch lightning in a bottle and have a great week. Over the course of a career you wouldn't gamble on that 250 yard drive week in and week out to win.




    He was top 10 amateur in the world. Played in 3 US Ams and 3 US Pub Links, finishing in top 10 twice. First year as a pro made it to Q School Finals and is the best mini tour player right now in the state of FL. Absolutely not lightening in a bottle at all. He's a +8-9 handicap. He swings 97mph and flies it about 240





    Here are some of his professional scores in the last few years

    [url="http://www.westfloridagolftour.com/PlayerProfile.aspx?PlayerID=3563"]http://www.westflori...x?PlayerID=3563[/url]
    What would you say are his chances of "making it"? 29 years old-turned pro 5 years ago and flies it 240?




    What’s your definition of making it? He’s the top money earner on most mini tours in FL. He’s played on Web.com and PGA Tour Canada. He’s far more comfortable in FL than anywhere else. But I think if he got a full Web season he’d do pretty well
  • ShilgyShilgy PhoenixMembers Posts: 11,604 ✭✭
    iteachgolf wrote:




    What's your definition of making it? He's the top money earner on most mini tours in FL. He's played on Web.com and PGA Tour Canada. He's far more comfortable in FL than anywhere else. But I think if he got a full Web season he'd do pretty well
    I am not talking down on him at all. By making it I meant playing on and keeping a card on the PGA Tour. Can that be done today hitting it that short? I saw he played a couple Web events a few years ago but was more curious in general. Not necessary him but in general. can a player that short succeed on today's tour?
    WITB
    Tools for the job!

    To paraphrase Dr Seuss: Don't cry because the round of golf is over-smile because it happened . :)

    Game is recovering from total ankle replacement. Getting there and glad to be pain free!
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,816 ✭✭
    edited Aug 27, 2018 #25
    Shilgy wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:




    What's your definition of making it? He's the top money earner on most mini tours in FL. He's played on Web.com and PGA Tour Canada. He's far more comfortable in FL than anywhere else. But I think if he got a full Web season he'd do pretty well
    I am not talking down on him at all. By making it I meant playing on and keeping a card on the PGA Tour. Can that be done today hitting it that short? I saw he played a couple Web events a few years ago but was more curious in general. Not necessary him but in general. can a player that short succeed on today's tour?




    The right player yes. David Toms has done ok only slightly faster. He’s beat plenty of guys who are doing great on tour. He’d do fine as long as he didn’t let it be an issue
  • ShilgyShilgy PhoenixMembers Posts: 11,604 ✭✭
    iteachgolf wrote:

    Shilgy wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:


    What's your definition of making it? He's the top money earner on most mini tours in FL. He's played on Web.com and PGA Tour Canada. He's far more comfortable in FL than anywhere else. But I think if he got a full Web season he'd do pretty well
    I am not talking down on him at all. By making it I meant playing on and keeping a card on the PGA Tour. Can that be done today hitting it that short? I saw he played a couple Web events a few years ago but was more curious in general. Not necessary him but in general. can a player that short succeed on today's tour?




    The right player yes. David Toms has done ok only slightly faster. He's beat plenty of guys who are doing great on tour. He'd do fine as long as he didn't let it be an issue
    What is holding him back then in your opinion? I have known guys that were more comfortable being the lead guy at a smaller level is that the case? Shortest guys I could find on tour average about 10-15 yards carry longer. Gotta be tough to overcome hitting 1-2 clubs longer than the shortest guys on every hole.



    Good luck to him!
    WITB
    Tools for the job!

    To paraphrase Dr Seuss: Don't cry because the round of golf is over-smile because it happened . :)

    Game is recovering from total ankle replacement. Getting there and glad to be pain free!
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Members Posts: 309 ✭✭
    iteachgolf wrote:

    Shilgy wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:






    What's your definition of making it? He's the top money earner on most mini tours in FL. He's played on Web.com and PGA Tour Canada. He's far more comfortable in FL than anywhere else. But I think if he got a full Web season he'd do pretty well
    I am not talking down on him at all. By making it I meant playing on and keeping a card on the PGA Tour. Can that be done today hitting it that short? I saw he played a couple Web events a few years ago but was more curious in general. Not necessary him but in general. can a player that short succeed on today's tour?




    The right player yes. David Toms has done ok only slightly faster. He’s beat plenty of guys who are doing great on tour. He’d do fine as long as he didn’t let it be an issue




    240?! We’re now talking about 240?! Let’s tell everyone in basketball they can go to kentucky or Duke at 5’6”. Cite spud Webb and muggsy Bougues. Iteach - you just want to be a contrarian. Toms averaged 270 in 2014-2015 btw. 240?!
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,130 ✭✭
    edited Aug 27, 2018 #28

    iteachgolf wrote:

    Shilgy wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:


    What's your definition of making it? He's the top money earner on most mini tours in FL. He's played on Web.com and PGA Tour Canada. He's far more comfortable in FL than anywhere else. But I think if he got a full Web season he'd do pretty well
    I am not talking down on him at all. By making it I meant playing on and keeping a card on the PGA Tour. Can that be done today hitting it that short? I saw he played a couple Web events a few years ago but was more curious in general. Not necessary him but in general. can a player that short succeed on today's tour?




    The right player yes. David Toms has done ok only slightly faster. He's beat plenty of guys who are doing great on tour. He'd do fine as long as he didn't let it be an issue




    240?! We're now talking about 240?! Let's tell everyone in basketball they can go to kentucky or Duke at 5'6". Cite spud Webb and muggsy Bougues. Iteach - you just want to be a contrarian. Toms averaged 270 in 2014-2015 btw. 240?!




    He said 240 carry. That will put him out there around 260ish.



    He swings 97mph and flies it about 240
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Members Posts: 309 ✭✭
    There was a 497 par 4 at the us junior am this year. So he has no chance of a GIR. His scrambling must be better than anyone on PGA. He must average 20 putts a round. 240?!
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,130 ✭✭
    edited Aug 27, 2018 #30


    There was a 497 par 4 at the us junior am this year. So he has no chance of a GIR. His scrambling must be better than anyone on PGA. He must average 20 putts a round. 240?!




    That simply isn't true. Those events have hard fairways running at a 10 stimp just like PGA events. My daughter played USGA Girl's AM at Ridgewood CC a couple of years ago and the fairways are smoking fast. Guys on PGA average longer than they really are for the same reason.



    At US Kids worlds last year my son was banging the ball 240-260 yet he only was averaging 220 off the tee in Florida.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,080 ✭✭
    edited Aug 27, 2018 #31

    iteachgolf wrote:



    I stand corrected. You show me a player that averages 14-15 GIR from 6900+ yardages driving 250. Stenson leads the tour at 75% GIR.




    I can name more than a few. One was a recent runner up at US Am Public Links




    That isn't their average over the course of their career. Anyone at anytime can catch lightning in a bottle and have a great week. Over the course of a career you wouldn't gamble on that 250 yard drive week in and week out to win.




    If your kid is only doing 250 it might be good to have a talk with them if they think there going to dominate the pga tour. But at the same time I could see where they get a scholarship if they have good fundamentals and are scoring decent.



    One issue I see too many people get caught up in driving distance and forget is only a factor in a few holes a round. The vast majority or holes are not par 5s or long par 4 on any course. More shots are actually lost missing fairways, greens and not converting putts within 10 feet.



    I know this because I have seen it first hand as there is one girl on the local tour. I would say she drives between 150-180. It a good drive but not long either for what I would consider a top junior girl at 11-12. The thing is she plays her game well and hits fairways and GIR and makes the putts. When she short for a hole she can place the ball for a easy chip to still make par. The thing is she is hard to beat because she still scores low and is consistent. I learned you have to play with what you got rather then try and do something you can’t.
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