Retired, how many times do you play now?

2

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  • RSinSGRSinSG ClubWRX Posts: 3,073 ClubWRX
    “Retirement is highly overrated”



    I disagree 100%. I retired in 2009 after 30 years in law enforcement and never looked back or regretted it. I stayed active in some community positions (board of directors of a water agency) and in church, but I was happy to get out of the rat race. One of my buddies from work retired and after 6 months went back to work full time as director of security for a high-end golf course. Everyone is different.



    As for golf, when I first retired I played 4-5 days a week and I found that was too much. Over the years I’ve settled into two 18 hole leagues on Tue and Thur, and a casual round on Saturday a couple of times a month. I also practice for 2-3 hours on Wednesday, and work at my home course on Monday mornings grooming bunkers. That pretty much pays for my golf. My handicap got down to 3 at one point and I almost shot my age a couple of weeks ago.



    Retirement is wonderful.
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  • phil75070phil75070 Members Posts: 1,888 ✭✭
    edited Aug 28, 2018 #33



    (As a wife, please let me speak for all women when I say, we don’t want you following us around the grocery store. Please don’t come. We don’t really need groceries, we just want to get away from you for awhile.)




    Haha! My wife says the key to our happy marriage is I play golf and she doesn’t - which gives us plenty of time apart.




    People often ask me if my wife plays. I emphatically say, "NO! And I;d like to keep it that way". It wouldn't be an escape if she did, would it?
  • 2Bad4u2Bad4u Members Posts: 212
    Retirement is wonderful !!! I was fortunate enough to be able to retire when I was 56 and I'll be 64 next month.



    Typically I play 3 times per week but sometimes it can be as little as 2 or as much as 4. We play mostly in the early morning with occasional rounds during the weekend.
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  • Outpost31Outpost31 Why don't we just wait here awhile...see what happens... Members Posts: 315 ✭✭
    Once a week here.
  • Carl Spackler3Carl Spackler3 Members Posts: 924 ✭✭
    The funny thing about retiring young is none of your friends are retired. So despite the free time and money, my best golf buddies are stil M-F 9 to 5
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  • YuckYuck Fore! Members Posts: 2,455 ✭✭
    Golf 3 times a week, sometimes 4 or 2. Fishing 1 or 2, Chores, Grandkid, Art, Music, and many other interests, including the occasional nap take up the rest of my time. I worked long hours and traveled frequently during my career. Now that I have been retired the last couple of years I see how much of my life I was missing due to a demanding career. BTW my handicap doubled once I retired.
  • Golfer4LifeGolfer4Life “Don’t bother me with your pettiness” Lake Placid, N.Y. Whiteface G.C.ClubWRX Posts: 2,326 ✭✭
    Five days a week. No golf on weekends because I refuse to play five hour rounds.
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  • dpb5031dpb5031 Members Posts: 5,165 ✭✭
    It's great to be retired but in terms of golf, more isn't always better. I find it challenging to stay really sharp.



    Between tournaments, money games, and last minute casual rounds I found myself playing 4/5 days per week, which for me proved to be too much. First off, it's tough on the body and being sore makes it difficult to play your best. I also tend to lose the ability to focus as intently as required to play my best. Enthusiasm for playing also begins to wane...



    I find 3 days of actual play plus maybe another practice sessions at the range or short game to be optimal. More than that equals diminished returns for me for the reasons above. I'm currently playing to a 1 HC but that would surely go up if I tried to play 5 or 6 days per week.



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  • Golfer4LifeGolfer4Life “Don’t bother me with your pettiness” Lake Placid, N.Y. Whiteface G.C.ClubWRX Posts: 2,326 ✭✭
    edited Oct 2, 2018 #40


    Just bear in mind that retirement is highly overrated.



    Everyone fantasizes about waking up late every morning, playing golf every day and just lounging around but boredom sets in quick as heck and what makes golf a great escape and a therapeutic process simply becomes part of your daily routine.



    I had this happen to me...after about 2-3 months after retiring I felt like my brain was turning to birdsh*t and with a lot of my friends still working, I felt a bit out of sorts. By 11:30AM each day I basically ran out of things to do.



    I struggled a bit with what I wanted to do with my life because my career was a big part of what defines me, so i made the decision to go back to work full-time and now find that I get more joy from my career and feeling wanted than a round of golf or two.



    There was a study published not so long ago that tracked ex-CEOs that retired and just powered down or off completely and those that stayed active with work or volunteering. First group died on average 10 years earlier than those that stayed active.



    Retirement is highly overrated.




    Overrated? Perhaps to some, but to me is the best thing after a long career and working since I was thirteen years old. I’m 51 and retired at 49.



    I have been retired for two years and love it. I play golf as much as I want, do things that always wanted to do, but didn't have the time, my quality of life and health are better, I could go on and on.



    Retirement, as everything in life, is what you make of it. I wouldn't change a thing.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
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  • HackerD  HackerD Student of the game Members Posts: 3,151 ✭✭
    edited Oct 2, 2018 #41
    Great thread. Retirement is potentially on the horizon for me, good to hear the variety of life styles. Thing is, already play 3x per week on average. And I like my job, lots of vacation time and the pay is pretty good. So could just keep working indefinitely. We’ll see what happens when grandkids start popping out. Or corporate cost cutters show me the door.
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  • Swisstrader98Swisstrader98 Members Posts: 3,521 ✭✭


    The funny thing about retiring young is none of your friends are retired. So despite the free time and money, my best golf buddies are stil M-F 9 to 5




    Same thing happened to me. I was like YES I can play whenever I want and as much as I want! Then reality bites and I got tired of doing yoga w the wife each morning, then golf and then wondering what to do with myself rest of day. Then all my buddies would be talking about all their conquests at work and I would be like “my downward dog has improved tremendously!”



    Went back to work and find my head is happier feeling like a productive member of society and can still play my golf 2-3 times per day and don’t feel as much pressure as I did when I was chasing the dream at 30. Different strokes
  • Lagavulin62Lagavulin62 Members Posts: 2,005 ✭✭
    I sort of retire every summer as I am in education. Never was one hapoy to go back in mid August because I have too many intrrests to ever get bored. Also I wake up early so my summer schedule is no different than school year. My parents are both retired, 15 years, and they have less free time now than when they were working. I rarely speak to them because they are just too busy. Now thats a littke extreme to me but they like it. I have found that many who can’t handle retirement are the ones defined by their job and workaholics. My job is just a job. I enjoy it and it’s been a great career, but I sure don’t live for it. I guess it’s just the way one looks at life?
  • Event^HorizonEvent^Horizon Members Posts: 71


    I am thinking 4 days a week when I retire, early morning rounds. What do you guys do?




    I play and or practice every day.
  • ohioglfrohioglfr Municipal Junkie Members Posts: 731 ✭✭
    I had visions of playing at least 3 times a week, but now that we’re empty nesters, I find I play once every two weeks, but at the range at least twice a week.

    Odd, it seems I’m busier than ever.

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  • uitar9uitar9 Members Posts: 386 ✭✭
    HackerD wrote:


    Great thread. Retirement is potentially on the horizon for me, good to hear the variety of life styles. Thing is, already play 3x per week on average. And I like my job, lots of vacation time and the pay is pretty good. So could just keep working indefinitely. We'll see what happens when grandkids start popping out. Or corporate cost cutters show me the door.


    This is me accept twice a week with one practice day.



    I think they are gonna find me either stationary at my desk or drooling around the office.
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  • Argonne69Argonne69 Members Posts: 20,401 ✭✭
    Yeah, great thread. I'm very likely going to wind up in the early retirement category late next year, as my company is in a 2 1/2 year downsizing initiative. After 30+ years in IT, I'm not particularly looking forward to looking for a new job given my age, and the history of age discrimination in IT. If I decide to call it quits for good, or take an extended break, I'm seriously thinking about selling my condo, buying a 40+ ft class A motor home, and roaming around the continent for a few years playing golf, visiting all the national parks, riding tourist railroads, and drinking a lot of craft beer. I figure I'd walk a single round each weekday in the late morning, and spend the remainder of the day checking out the local area. 'Don't see a need to play on the weekends with the larger crowds and more expensive fees. At this point I have no idea where I'd like to retire permanently, so getting a chance to visit the lower 48 would allow me to scope out some of the areas that may be worth putting down roots.



    I'm currently averaging over 100 rounds a year on 85+ courses. I figure I could play 250 rounds a year on 250 courses as I motor around. Burnout is always a possibility, but being in a different locale every few days would hopefully break up the monotony.



    Any retires consider the RV route?
  • bellkenbellken Members Posts: 780 ✭✭
    I got to retire early (corporate right sizing, - but, I ended up well prepared, despite having school age children). My golf buddies are all still working, so, I practice more than I play.
  • aweldayawelday FlatShtick Members Posts: 36 ✭✭
    Practice three and play two (or vice versa) interspersed with a week off or so every month.
  • TrugravityTrugravity Members Posts: 284 ✭✭
    edited Dec 18, 2018 #50
    Hey Arg,



    Last summer I went to Omaha to take a short game lesson from James Sieckmann. After the lesson, I headed west and played Quarry Oaks GC, and ended up joining another single on the back nine for 2-3 holes. He had bought an RV 2-3 years earlier, traveled around the country checking out National Parks and golf courses. Very interesting guy who loved what he was doing!



    I retired last year and love it! I play 4-5 times a week but have plenty of other hobbies, too! I became the Assistant Girls HS Golf Coach, and started working a handful of hours a week at Snowstar Winter Park, think skiing/snowboarding/tubing/zip lines. I love the vibe with all sorts of little kids/families having a great time!
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • mupepperboymupepperboy Members Posts: 85 ✭✭
    Can’t wait til I’m able to contribute/qualified to answer this thread!
  • parpar41parpar41 Members Posts: 1,218 ✭✭
    edited Dec 30, 2018 #52
    RE: pubic or private course; how many rounds per week?



    Interesting posts. Thanks.



    One key determinant has been overlooked so far, however, imho.



    You need to know whether a retired guy is a member of a club, or not.



    Why? Because, at a private course, there is really no incremental cost to for each additional round of golf



    You can play 5 or more rounds of golf in a week for the same price as one.



    I would bet that most retired guys who play many rounds each week do so as members of a course.



    Conversely, it is relatively easy to find compelling reasons not to shell out another $60 or more each day for a round of golf at a public course, no matter how nice the course.



    In fact, in my previous neighbourhood, the public tracks were more interesting than my private course
  • KAndyManKAndyMan JUST GOTTA SEND IT!!! Members Posts: 323 ✭✭


    Just bear in mind that retirement is highly overrated.



    Everyone fantasizes about waking up late every morning, playing golf every day and just lounging around but boredom sets in quick as heck and what makes golf a great escape and a therapeutic process simply becomes part of your daily routine.



    I had this happen to me...after about 2-3 months after retiring I felt like my brain was turning to birdsh*t and with a lot of my friends still working, I felt a bit out of sorts. By 11:30AM each day I basically ran out of things to do.



    I struggled a bit with what I wanted to do with my life because my career was a big part of what defines me, so i made the decision to go back to work full-time and now find that I get more joy from my career and feeling wanted than a round of golf or two.



    There was a study published not so long ago that tracked ex-CEOs that retired and just powered down or off completely and those that stayed active with work or volunteering. First group died on average 10 years earlier than those that stayed active.



    Retirement is highly overrated.




    I actually couldnt agree with this more. Ive been pretty fortunate and retired almost 2 years ago at the ripe old age of 32. At the time i figured "huh guess its time to retire". The first year was a blast. The last 6 months have been absolute he!! Bored out of my mind. Currently in the middle of moving to a new state and start a new business (or 3). The next time i retire will be the day i take the big dirt nap. Though i prob wont be involved in the daily duties in my 70s-80s but i will still be very much involved putting in at least 10-20 hours a week. The rest of my time will be spent mentoring, charities, travel and golf 2x week.
  • vernonvernon Hi! I'm Holly! Members Posts: 1,184 ✭✭
    Guess I'm glad I wasn't a CEO!
  • nichhonichho Members Posts: 1,921 ✭✭
    vernon wrote:



    Just bear in mind that retirement is highly overrated.



    Everyone fantasizes about waking up late every morning, playing golf every day and just lounging around but boredom sets in quick as heck and what makes golf a great escape and a therapeutic process simply becomes part of your daily routine.



    I had this happen to me...after about 2-3 months after retiring I felt like my brain was turning to birdsh*t and with a lot of my friends still working, I felt a bit out of sorts. By 11:30AM each day I basically ran out of things to do.



    I struggled a bit with what I wanted to do with my life because my career was a big part of what defines me, so i made the decision to go back to work full-time and now find that I get more joy from my career and feeling wanted than a round of golf or two.



    There was a study published not so long ago that tracked ex-CEOs that retired and just powered down or off completely and those that stayed active with work or volunteering. First group died on average 10 years earlier than those that stayed active.



    Retirement is highly overrated.
    Boredom?



    Wow.



    Not here! I retired at 60 and am 65 now and haven't been bored a single second.



    Golf, fish and PLENTY of stuff to do around the old homestead.



    My wife still works so I've taken over all of the indoor domestic duties as well.



    I play 4 - 5 times a week (except when the fishing's really good then maybe only 3 - 4 times.



    Do yard work, housework, laundry or whatever in the mornings and am playing by between noon and one as the rest of the day is mine.



    Well, at least until I have to come home and get dinner started!



    However, I DO have a contingency plan if in fact boredom ever rears its hoary head.



    It's called a nap!



    Retirement rocks!




    Your reply mirrors my life. I retired early at 52, I was a firefighter, but my wife still works so like you I carry out all the domestic duties (trained by the British Army). Plus my daughter has just had twins and relies on me a lot.



    Add to that the fact that I am the maintenance man for all of the family homes, daughter, son and ours, so it can get quite busy.



    Despite all of that I usually play 3 times a week and practise one which is enough to leave me always anticipating the next round which is important. As we all know the next round is going to be our best ever!!



    I loved my job, by the time I retired I was quite a way up the ladder, but I have never missed it, not for a moment, which has always surprised me greatly but then again I firmly believe that life is too short and you best make the most of what you have.
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  • vernonvernon Hi! I'm Holly! Members Posts: 1,184 ✭✭
    nichho wrote:

    vernon wrote:



    Just bear in mind that retirement is highly overrated.



    Everyone fantasizes about waking up late every morning, playing golf every day and just lounging around but boredom sets in quick as heck and what makes golf a great escape and a therapeutic process simply becomes part of your daily routine.



    I had this happen to me...after about 2-3 months after retiring I felt like my brain was turning to birdsh*t and with a lot of my friends still working, I felt a bit out of sorts. By 11:30AM each day I basically ran out of things to do.



    I struggled a bit with what I wanted to do with my life because my career was a big part of what defines me, so i made the decision to go back to work full-time and now find that I get more joy from my career and feeling wanted than a round of golf or two.



    There was a study published not so long ago that tracked ex-CEOs that retired and just powered down or off completely and those that stayed active with work or volunteering. First group died on average 10 years earlier than those that stayed active.



    Retirement is highly overrated.
    Boredom?



    Wow.



    Not here! I retired at 60 and am 65 now and haven't been bored a single second.



    Golf, fish and PLENTY of stuff to do around the old homestead.



    My wife still works so I've taken over all of the indoor domestic duties as well.



    I play 4 - 5 times a week (except when the fishing's really good then maybe only 3 - 4 times.



    Do yard work, housework, laundry or whatever in the mornings and am playing by between noon and one as the rest of the day is mine.



    Well, at least until I have to come home and get dinner started!



    However, I DO have a contingency plan if in fact boredom ever rears its hoary head.



    It's called a nap!



    Retirement rocks!




    Your reply mirrors my life. I retired early at 52, I was a firefighter, but my wife still works so like you I carry out all the domestic duties (trained by the British Army). Plus my daughter has just had twins and relies on me a lot.



    Add to that the fact that I am the maintenance man for all of the family homes, daughter, son and ours, so it can get quite busy.



    Despite all of that I usually play 3 times a week and practise one which is enough to leave me always anticipating the next round which is important. As we all know the next round is going to be our best ever!!



    I loved my job, by the time I retired I was quite a way up the ladder, but I have never missed it, not for a moment, which has always surprised me greatly but then again I firmly believe that life is too short and you best make the most of what you have.
    Good for you! I was a firefighter in the 70's (yes, that long ago) before a fall and resulting injury forced me to seek another line of work.



    However, my brother retired as a city fire chief three years ago at age 53 and now when we're not playing or fishing he and I take care of all the extended family duties as well and have a great time doing it.



    My only regret is that I wasn't able to retire at a younger age like you and him!



    I've long believed that life is made up of many stages/chapters or whatever you want to call it and this was just the next one - and, so far, the best one.
  • dbigstickdbigstick Members Posts: 31 ✭✭
    I retired but now have two part time.jobs

    Upside is I am playing at least once a week and practicing 2-3 times per week.
  • LeftDaddyLeftDaddy Members Posts: 714 ✭✭
    I’m working towards the early retirement plan. I could probably retire now but haven’t figured out health care, and would have to cut lifestyle back, and there’s just no sense in it since I currently like my job and it still allows me some flexibility to play golf, travel, etc.



    My “dream” is to play golf several times per week, and play tennis or pickle ball a time or two with my wife, travel, spend early afternoons at the beach, see our kids / grandkids, etc (no grandkids yet). My wife would disagree with golfgirlrobin though...she would be glad to have me at the grocery store and everywhere else she goes...and that scares me as I consider retirement. She’s great, but I’m hoping that we will have both “together” and “separate “ hobbies 😀



    I do worry, though, that I’ll have a hard time relaxing in retirement. A colleague of mine has convinced me that he knows me and knows I would need more stimulation of my mind than golf will provide. So I’m “transitioning” my idea of retirement to something that looks like a lot of golf/beach/family time sprinkled with some part time work of some sort.



    I do plan to settle into an area and a club close to where my kids end up but on a beach...no idea currently where that will be. I’ve also considered a fair amount of international travel / even living abroad for a while.



    Anyway, as you see, I’m still trying to figure all of this out...I have a plan, but I’m also well aware that my plans may change. Glad to read other posts in here where guys have done it and what they say about it!
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  • 7044570445 Members Posts: 112 ✭✭
    Retired and play 3 to 4 days a week, usually three and if I go to the course on a 4th day, I usually just practice on putting and chipping for about a hour or so. For us older guys that’s where we score.
  • 7044570445 Members Posts: 112 ✭✭
    Retired and play 3 to 4 days a week, usually three and if I go to the course on a 4th day, I usually just practice on putting and chipping for about a hour or so. For us older guys that’s where we score.
  • SixtySomePingSixtySomePing Members Posts: 5,115 ✭✭
    Retired this week. Haven't played yet, it's the last day/week of February. So I'm 0 for 1. Somethin's gotta change... image/dntknw.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':dntknw:' />



    Upside is in retirement my golf has been well under budget, bogey free so far, no three putts, haven't lost a ball yet, back feels great...
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