How do you determine what tournaments you kid plays in?

heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,059 ✭✭
Really talking about JGS ranked events. Does everyone understand how they are ranked and do you use it to determine the events they play in?



65% of the rankings is scoring differentials. The top 25% of the worst scores are scratched from the rankings. I look at the course rating more than anything else.



25% is strength of the field.



10% of the rankings is how they finish. Winner, top 5, top 10.

Comments

  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 418 ✭✭


    Really talking about JGS ranked events. Does everyone understand how they are ranked and do you use it to determine the events they play in?



    65% of the rankings is scoring differentials. The top 25% of the worst scores are scratched from the rankings. I look at the course rating more than anything else.



    25% is strength of the field.



    10% of the rankings is how they finish. Winner, top 5, top 10.




    It seems like "gaming" the ranking system would only be useful the closer the kid gets to being recruited? Does it matter what the JGS ranking is before then?



    If not, seems like juniors might be better served getting a lot of tournament "experience" early on so that they are ready when the rankings actually count?
  • Tannerbug33Tannerbug33 Members Posts: 125 ✭✭
    CTgolf wrote:



    Really talking about JGS ranked events. Does everyone understand how they are ranked and do you use it to determine the events they play in?



    65% of the rankings is scoring differentials. The top 25% of the worst scores are scratched from the rankings. I look at the course rating more than anything else.



    25% is strength of the field.



    10% of the rankings is how they finish. Winner, top 5, top 10.




    It seems like "gaming" the ranking system would only be useful the closer the kid gets to being recruited? Does it matter what the JGS ranking is before then?



    If not, seems like juniors might be better served getting a lot of tournament "experience" early on so that they are ready when the rankings actually count?




    I hope that's right because that's the plan we have haha.

    Would like to know what others think as well
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,039 ✭✭
    edited Sep 25, 2018 #4
    When it comes to ranking I think you need to play in the biggest tournaments you can and do reasonably well. In some cases this means you have to travel.



    Almost all them are AJGA tournaments but I think ther are few like Toyota Cup and the Honda Jr classic that aren’t. My daughter is not 12 but next year we are planing on doing as much as possible to qualify. This means for us 2 day tournaments with PBE status only is the most likely outcome.



    My biggest issue right now is the growth spurt and how it seriously effects there ability to score. So based on that plans may alter.
  • Golfingdawg19Golfingdawg19 Members Posts: 356 ✭✭
    Tiger I may be hitting you up to see how things go with your daughter. Mine turns 11 tomorrow and the plan is to stick to US kids until she hits 12. Once she gets to 12 I will start looking at other options. My daughter is on the smaller side of things and I don’t want her playing tons of events where she can’t even get to the greens in regulation. I’ll be interested to see how things go for you.
  • benlenahanbenlenahan Members Posts: 18
    I’d say that sticking with a field that matches your kids scores would be best. A top 5 in a weaker-fielded lower-level CJGA (Primary junior golf tournament provider here in Colorado) or US Kids is more valuable and appealing than a T64 at an AJGA event, even if the course and field was much harder. Kinda how an A in a normal class is arguably better than a B or C in an AP class.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,039 ✭✭
    edited Sep 26, 2018 #7
    benlenahan wrote:


    I'd say that sticking with a field that matches your kids scores would be best. A top 5 in a weaker-fielded lower-level CJGA (Primary junior golf tournament provider here in Colorado) or US Kids is more valuable and appealing than a T64 at an AJGA event, even if the course and field was much harder. Kinda how an A in a normal class is arguably better than a B or C in an AP class.




    One thing I notice is there are Kids ranked High and I know my kid can beat them in a tournament or has in the past. I feel a strategy is you need to play as much as possible against these kids who you can beat.



    The other big thing is play long as long as a course as you can. US kids courses are not really that long and I don't think plays into any long term ranking when they get older. You much better to win a low level AGJA event which should eventually lead to the invitationals one way or another.



    I am not sure how good of a strategy this is but from everything I can know about the rankings this makes sense.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,059 ✭✭
    CTgolf wrote:



    Really talking about JGS ranked events. Does everyone understand how they are ranked and do you use it to determine the events they play in?



    65% of the rankings is scoring differentials. The top 25% of the worst scores are scratched from the rankings. I look at the course rating more than anything else.



    25% is strength of the field.



    10% of the rankings is how they finish. Winner, top 5, top 10.




    It seems like "gaming" the ranking system would only be useful the closer the kid gets to being recruited? Does it matter what the JGS ranking is before then?



    If not, seems like juniors might be better served getting a lot of tournament "experience" early on so that they are ready when the rankings actually count?




    I don't think it is gaming the system. You have to have an understanding of how the rankings work. It is also very different for girl's than it is guys. If you wait until you are there and don't have an understanding of how it works, it is too late. Selecting the right tournaments is a huge aspect and understanding how the scoring differentials work.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,059 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:

    benlenahan wrote:


    I'd say that sticking with a field that matches your kids scores would be best. A top 5 in a weaker-fielded lower-level CJGA (Primary junior golf tournament provider here in Colorado) or US Kids is more valuable and appealing than a T64 at an AJGA event, even if the course and field was much harder. Kinda how an A in a normal class is arguably better than a B or C in an AP class.




    One thing I notice is there are Kids ranked High and I know my kid can beat them in a tournament or has in the past. I feel a strategy is you need to play as much as possible against these kids who you can beat.



    The other big thing is play long as long as a course as you can. US kids courses are not really that long and I don't think plays into any long term ranking when they get older. You much better to win a low level AGJA event which should eventually lead to the invitationals one way or another.



    I am not sure how good of a strategy this is but from everything I can know about the rankings this makes sense.




    Girl's do not need AJGA from the state of Florida. Play FJT events. Girl's are different than guys. Have had this discussion with one of my buddies who has a girl golfer in the 9th grade. Girl's need to play from 5800+ yard tournaments with a course rating of 72 or better.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,039 ✭✭
    edited Sep 26, 2018 #10

    tiger1873 wrote:

    benlenahan wrote:


    I'd say that sticking with a field that matches your kids scores would be best. A top 5 in a weaker-fielded lower-level CJGA (Primary junior golf tournament provider here in Colorado) or US Kids is more valuable and appealing than a T64 at an AJGA event, even if the course and field was much harder. Kinda how an A in a normal class is arguably better than a B or C in an AP class.




    One thing I notice is there are Kids ranked High and I know my kid can beat them in a tournament or has in the past. I feel a strategy is you need to play as much as possible against these kids who you can beat.



    The other big thing is play long as long as a course as you can. US kids courses are not really that long and I don't think plays into any long term ranking when they get older. You much better to win a low level AGJA event which should eventually lead to the invitationals one way or another.



    I am not sure how good of a strategy this is but from everything I can know about the rankings this makes sense.




    Girl's do not need AJGA from the state of Florida. Play FJT events. Girl's are different than guys. Have had this discussion with one of my buddies who has a girl golfer in the 9th grade. Girl's need to play from 5800+ yard tournaments with a course rating of 72 or better.






    I am aware that they don't need AJGA but at the same time I am pretty sure she going to be able to play a lot of AGJA tournaments in the coming years. In her case longer yards are actually a huge advantage for her even now and were looking at doing more of them until she gets enough points. She going be a very very long hitter based on what we are seeing. We clocked her driver at 95mph this week and she is only 11.



    For girls I think one of the biggest tournaments out there is ANA Junior Inspirational. If they do well in that tournament your ranking will be pretty high for them probably even a top 10. I know not everyone can play in this tournament but working up to should be a huge goal for girls.
  • wildcatdenwildcatden China Cat Sunflower Members Posts: 867 ✭✭
    Interesting thread. My son is 5+ years away from having to consider any of this. However, I think the tourneys you play will be defined on what your goal is. For example, what university(s) are you looking to target? What budget are you willing to spend? Are you chasing ranking (is being top10 in JGS important to you)?



    I really don't know but it seems like if you can win in your region of the country, and considering that certain regions are strong in golf (Florida, California, etc...), that things like ranking and getting offers will take care of itself. We live in NorCal and JGANC/JTNC tours will likely still be the primary events going on here in 5 years. Winning those tournaments and playing some of the local/regional AJGA specific events should be enough to get noticed and ranked well. Bottom line is you have to play courses with the right conditions, good/great fields and you have you play well if you want to write your own ticket.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,059 ✭✭
    leezer99 wrote:


    CTgolf wrote:



    Really talking about JGS ranked events. Does everyone understand how they are ranked and do you use it to determine the events they play in?



    65% of the rankings is scoring differentials. The top 25% of the worst scores are scratched from the rankings. I look at the course rating more than anything else.



    25% is strength of the field.



    10% of the rankings is how they finish. Winner, top 5, top 10.




    It seems like "gaming" the ranking system would only be useful the closer the kid gets to being recruited? Does it matter what the JGS ranking is before then?



    If not, seems like juniors might be better served getting a lot of tournament "experience" early on so that they are ready when the rankings actually count?




    I don't think it is gaming the system. You have to have an understanding of how the rankings work. It is also very different for girl's than it is guys. If you wait until you are there and don't have an understanding of how it works, it is too late. Selecting the right tournaments is a huge aspect and understanding how the scoring differentials work.




    http://www.golfwrx.c...ummer-schedule/




    I didn't read the article yet. Unless you are the best of the best you have to play other tournaments than AJGA. AJGA only allows you to play in 5 open events a year.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,059 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:


    tiger1873 wrote:

    benlenahan wrote:


    I'd say that sticking with a field that matches your kids scores would be best. A top 5 in a weaker-fielded lower-level CJGA (Primary junior golf tournament provider here in Colorado) or US Kids is more valuable and appealing than a T64 at an AJGA event, even if the course and field was much harder. Kinda how an A in a normal class is arguably better than a B or C in an AP class.




    One thing I notice is there are Kids ranked High and I know my kid can beat them in a tournament or has in the past. I feel a strategy is you need to play as much as possible against these kids who you can beat.



    The other big thing is play long as long as a course as you can. US kids courses are not really that long and I don't think plays into any long term ranking when they get older. You much better to win a low level AGJA event which should eventually lead to the invitationals one way or another.



    I am not sure how good of a strategy this is but from everything I can know about the rankings this makes sense.




    Girl's do not need AJGA from the state of Florida. Play FJT events. Girl's are different than guys. Have had this discussion with one of my buddies who has a girl golfer in the 9th grade. Girl's need to play from 5800+ yard tournaments with a course rating of 72 or better.






    I am aware that they don't need AJGA but at the same time I am pretty sure she going to be able to play a lot of AGJA tournaments in the coming years. In her case longer yards are actually a huge advantage for her even now and were looking at doing more of them until she gets enough points. She going be a very very long hitter based on what we are seeing. We clocked her driver at 95mph this week and she is only 11.



    For girls I think one of the biggest tournaments out there is ANA Junior Inspirational. If they do well in that tournament your ranking will be pretty high for them probably even a top 10. I know not everyone can play in this tournament but working up to should be a huge goal for girls.




    Playing well in one tournament has nothing to do with the rankings. The ANA is an invitational event only and they only invite around 48 girls from 12-18.

    Unless you are already someone, you aren't playing in it. https://www.ajga.org/microsite/index.asp?tn=2018011#TournamentField



    I started this thread because I know a little bit about how the rankings and tournament selections work. Trying to share what I know and pick up tips from other people and their thoughts.
  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 418 ✭✭
    Slightly different but related question: at what age do JGS rankings matter?
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,039 ✭✭

    tiger1873 wrote:


    tiger1873 wrote:

    benlenahan wrote:


    I'd say that sticking with a field that matches your kids scores would be best. A top 5 in a weaker-fielded lower-level CJGA (Primary junior golf tournament provider here in Colorado) or US Kids is more valuable and appealing than a T64 at an AJGA event, even if the course and field was much harder. Kinda how an A in a normal class is arguably better than a B or C in an AP class.




    One thing I notice is there are Kids ranked High and I know my kid can beat them in a tournament or has in the past. I feel a strategy is you need to play as much as possible against these kids who you can beat.



    The other big thing is play long as long as a course as you can. US kids courses are not really that long and I don't think plays into any long term ranking when they get older. You much better to win a low level AGJA event which should eventually lead to the invitationals one way or another.



    I am not sure how good of a strategy this is but from everything I can know about the rankings this makes sense.




    Girl's do not need AJGA from the state of Florida. Play FJT events. Girl's are different than guys. Have had this discussion with one of my buddies who has a girl golfer in the 9th grade. Girl's need to play from 5800+ yard tournaments with a course rating of 72 or better.






    I am aware that they don't need AJGA but at the same time I am pretty sure she going to be able to play a lot of AGJA tournaments in the coming years. In her case longer yards are actually a huge advantage for her even now and were looking at doing more of them until she gets enough points. She going be a very very long hitter based on what we are seeing. We clocked her driver at 95mph this week and she is only 11.



    For girls I think one of the biggest tournaments out there is ANA Junior Inspirational. If they do well in that tournament your ranking will be pretty high for them probably even a top 10. I know not everyone can play in this tournament but working up to should be a huge goal for girls.




    Playing well in one tournament has nothing to do with the rankings. The ANA is an invitational event only and they only invite around 48 girls from 12-18.

    Unless you are already someone, you aren't playing in it. https://www.ajga.org/microsite/index.asp?tn=2018011#TournamentField



    I started this thread because I know a little bit about how the rankings and tournament selections work. Trying to share what I know and pick up tips from other people and their thoughts.




    From what i have seen and been told is you need to get those invitations otherwise you are at a disadvantage. So the goal is play tournaments that will eventually get those invitations.



    When playing non Agja tournaments it seems that certain areas get higher rankings based on past players and regions that have been strong.



    For instance California tournaments seem to be a good way to rank. I would say Florida is a close second and perhaps Arizona. Also surprising Ohio , Massachusetts and New York seem to be good. Texas tournaments seem to throw about as much weight as Ohio but you get extremely competitive fields there.



    The biggest thing I seen that hurts players is they play too early in tournaments they are not ready for.





  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,059 ✭✭
    CTgolf wrote:


    Slightly different but related question: at what age do JGS rankings matter?




    12 to 13 is when they start to matter.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,059 ✭✭
    edited Sep 26, 2018 #17
    What you just typed has nothing to do with how the rankings work. Whomever told you, doesn't really understand either.



    Getting those invitations put you at a disadvantage to what? I know girl's who play at Stanford, Vanderbilt, and many top programs nationally that were never invited. So what are they putting you at a disadvantage of? You literally have to be in the top 2 players in your state of all classes combine to have even close to a chance to get invited. You are more likely to get a full ride scholarship than you are to be invited to one of these events.



    The state you are in has nothing to do with rankings. Rankings are 65% scoring differential, 25% strength of field, and 10% where you finish. Strength of field is determined by how many high ranked girls are in the field. California and Florida will have a higher strength of field because they have better players. Texas always has good players, but it is such a big state they are spread out.



    Playing too early doesn't hurt anyone.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,059 ✭✭
    edited Sep 26, 2018 #18
    leezer99 wrote:



    What you just typed has nothing to do with how the rankings work. Whomever told you, doesn't really understand either.



    Getting those invitations put you at a disadvantage to what? I know girl's who play at Stanford, Vanderbilt, and many top programs nationally that were never invited. So what are they putting you at a disadvantage of? You literally have to be in the top 2 players in your state to have even close to a chance to get invited. You are more likely to get a full ride scholarship than you are to be invited to one of these events.



    The state you are in has nothing to do with rankings. Rankings are 65% scoring differential, 25% strength of field, and 10% where you finish. Strength of field is determined by how many high ranked girls are in the field. California and Florida will have a higher strength of field because they have better players. Texas always has good players, but it is such a big state they are spread out.



    Playing too early doesn't hurt anyone.




    How is scoring differential worked out? Field average and your players over / under that number? Or is it like a handicap differential with the slope and course rating? As a Californian I would like to see the strength of field % closer to 40% and the differential closer to 50% of the ranking.




    Scoring differential is figured by the score minus the course rating that JGS assigns the course . The Tournament sends in the length and slope to JGS and they figure out the course rating. You can actually go to JGS and use their past tournament results feature to look up Course Ratings of the courses that have been played in previous years. https://www.juniorgolfscoreboard.com/searchresultsx.asp They keep 75% of the top scoring differentials and throw out the rest. They round down up to .75. So if there are 14 scores on JGS, 75% is 10.5 so they keep 10 scores and throw out 4.



    Hope that helps. All that info came from an email conversation I had with one of the staff members of JGS over the past couple of weeks.



    I think strength of field is too high. I understand what you are saying though and have to agree because we live in Florida and FJT events have great fields.
  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 418 ✭✭
    edited Sep 27, 2018 #19


    Really talking about JGS ranked events. Does everyone understand how they are ranked and do you use it to determine the events they play in?



    65% of the rankings is scoring differentials. The top 25% of the worst scores are scratched from the rankings. I look at the course rating more than anything else.



    25% is strength of the field.



    10% of the rankings is how they finish. Winner, top 5, top 10.




    I want to state at the onset that IMHO this type of thinking goes against the long-term focus of developing the best golfer. I think juniors can maximize their potential by playing lots of different courses in all kinds of conditions against the best competition possible (as long as they are mature enough to not get discouraged easily).



    However if the objective is solely optimizing ranking, then given the formula I think playing courses that the junior is comfortable on (scores well vs rating, course "suits their eye") should be the primary consideration in which tournaments to play in.



    This is obviously easier in regions where a disproportionate number of tournaments and events are played.



    Conversely, it would seem to make sense to *avoid* tournaments that are played on courses/setups where the player typically struggles in relation to course rating, even if the tournament has prestige or name recognition.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,059 ✭✭
    CTgolf wrote:



    Really talking about JGS ranked events. Does everyone understand how they are ranked and do you use it to determine the events they play in?



    65% of the rankings is scoring differentials. The top 25% of the worst scores are scratched from the rankings. I look at the course rating more than anything else.



    25% is strength of the field.



    10% of the rankings is how they finish. Winner, top 5, top 10.




    I want to state at the onset that IMHO this type of thinking goes against the long-term focus of developing the best golfer. I think juniors can maximize their potential by playing lots of different courses in all kinds of conditions against the best competition possible (as long as they are mature enough to not get discouraged easily).



    However if the objective is solely optimizing ranking, then given the formula I think playing courses that the junior is comfortable on (scores well vs rating, course "suits their eye") should be the primary consideration in which tournaments to play in.



    This is obviously easier in regions where a disproportionate number of tournaments and events are played.



    Conversely, it would seem to make sense to *avoid* tournaments that are played on courses/setups where the player typically struggles in relation to course rating, even if the tournament has prestige or name recognition.




    College coaches want to see how well a kids game travels. If you are conditioned to not leave your area, they will probably overlook what you are doing. They want you to play state wide and at least in your region of the States. Colleges just don't stay in there area and courses are different going from region to region of the US. Even in Florida, course are different from South to Central to North Florida.



    My kid usually plays practice rounds well before an event to see if he likes the course. He usually likes the course regardless. It is important to play at least one practice round before the event. In state he will play a course up to a week or even a month in advance. If he doesn't like the course I will withdraw him (have never had to this but willing to). Playing in out of state this is harder to do. Warm up, shut up, play. If he can't get a practice round in we don't even consider the event.



    There is only one course I would never even suggest him play in and that is Old CorkScrew in Estero, Florida. When I consider tournaments, I look at past ratings as well as past scores. If the scores are higher with what is regarded as the better player, I just pass that venue up. Old Corkscrew is one of those courses that I should have passed up for my daughter several years ago. Learned that lesson the hard way.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,059 ✭✭
    leezer99 wrote:

    CTgolf wrote:



    Really talking about JGS ranked events. Does everyone understand how they are ranked and do you use it to determine the events they play in?



    65% of the rankings is scoring differentials. The top 25% of the worst scores are scratched from the rankings. I look at the course rating more than anything else.



    25% is strength of the field.



    10% of the rankings is how they finish. Winner, top 5, top 10.




    I want to state at the onset that IMHO this type of thinking goes against the long-term focus of developing the best golfer. I think juniors can maximize their potential by playing lots of different courses in all kinds of conditions against the best competition possible (as long as they are mature enough to not get discouraged easily).



    However if the objective is solely optimizing ranking, then given the formula I think playing courses that the junior is comfortable on (scores well vs rating, course "suits their eye") should be the primary consideration in which tournaments to play in.



    This is obviously easier in regions where a disproportionate number of tournaments and events are played.



    Conversely, it would seem to make sense to *avoid* tournaments that are played on courses/setups where the player typically struggles in relation to course rating, even if the tournament has prestige or name recognition.




    JGS isn't for developing a golfer, it's for assigning a number to a person so that it's easier for someone else to judge their ability.




    It is also for looking and seeing that this kid is better than me and I need to improve to beat them.
  • wlmwlm Members Posts: 94 ✭✭
    Rankings is a great topic.



    Initially, JGS is the main ranking system. Up until about age 12, playing multi day tournaments with good fields is important. As the player moves up the ranking, strength of field gets to become important and will be a significant distinguishing factor between players.



    Around age 12-13, accumulating AJGA stars becomes important. Play qualifiers and JGS ranked events that award stars



    If the player is successful and reaches fully exempt, then the Rolex ranking becomes most important, as the goal is to be invited to invitationals. So play in high point tourneys (this is around high school and upper high school time). JGS becomes less important and Golfweek starts becoming relevant for colleges, Sage invitation (if fortunate), etc.



    Then WAGR ....
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,059 ✭✭
    wlm wrote:


    Rankings is a great topic.



    Initially, JGS is the main ranking system. Up until about age 12, playing multi day tournaments with good fields is important. As the player moves up the ranking, strength of field gets to become important and will be a significant distinguishing factor between players.



    Around age 12-13, accumulating AJGA stars becomes important. Play qualifiers and JGS ranked events that award stars



    If the player is successful and reaches fully exempt, then the Rolex ranking becomes most important, as the goal is to be invited to invitationals. So play in high point tourneys (this is around high school and upper high school time). JGS becomes less important and Golfweek starts becoming relevant for colleges, Sage invitation (if fortunate), etc.



    Then WAGR ....




    Yes Sir. Thanks for the post.
  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 418 ✭✭
    leezer99 wrote:

    CTgolf wrote:



    Really talking about JGS ranked events. Does everyone understand how they are ranked and do you use it to determine the events they play in?



    65% of the rankings is scoring differentials. The top 25% of the worst scores are scratched from the rankings. I look at the course rating more than anything else.



    25% is strength of the field.



    10% of the rankings is how they finish. Winner, top 5, top 10.




    I want to state at the onset that IMHO this type of thinking goes against the long-term focus of developing the best golfer. I think juniors can maximize their potential by playing lots of different courses in all kinds of conditions against the best competition possible (as long as they are mature enough to not get discouraged easily).



    However if the objective is solely optimizing ranking, then given the formula I think playing courses that the junior is comfortable on (scores well vs rating, course "suits their eye") should be the primary consideration in which tournaments to play in.



    This is obviously easier in regions where a disproportionate number of tournaments and events are played.



    Conversely, it would seem to make sense to *avoid* tournaments that are played on courses/setups where the player typically struggles in relation to course rating, even if the tournament has prestige or name recognition.




    JGS isn't for developing a golfer, it's for assigning a number to a person so that it's easier for someone else to judge their ability.




    No one said JGS was for developing a golfer, but by limiting the tournaments a junior plays to optimize rankings (because they ALL count towards the pool of potential tournaments that are used to calculate the ranking) you may inadvertently be hindering the development of a golfer.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,059 ✭✭
    CTgolf wrote:

    leezer99 wrote:

    CTgolf wrote:



    Really talking about JGS ranked events. Does everyone understand how they are ranked and do you use it to determine the events they play in?



    65% of the rankings is scoring differentials. The top 25% of the worst scores are scratched from the rankings. I look at the course rating more than anything else.



    25% is strength of the field.



    10% of the rankings is how they finish. Winner, top 5, top 10.




    I want to state at the onset that IMHO this type of thinking goes against the long-term focus of developing the best golfer. I think juniors can maximize their potential by playing lots of different courses in all kinds of conditions against the best competition possible (as long as they are mature enough to not get discouraged easily).



    However if the objective is solely optimizing ranking, then given the formula I think playing courses that the junior is comfortable on (scores well vs rating, course "suits their eye") should be the primary consideration in which tournaments to play in.



    This is obviously easier in regions where a disproportionate number of tournaments and events are played.



    Conversely, it would seem to make sense to *avoid* tournaments that are played on courses/setups where the player typically struggles in relation to course rating, even if the tournament has prestige or name recognition.




    JGS isn't for developing a golfer, it's for assigning a number to a person so that it's easier for someone else to judge their ability.




    but by limiting the tournaments a junior plays to optimize rankings (because they ALL count towards the pool of potential tournaments that are used to calculate the ranking) you may inadvertently be hindering the development of a golfer.




    This can be true. By the same token, you can hinder the process by playing too much as well.
  • TigerMomTigerMom Members Posts: 215 ✭✭
    edited Sep 28, 2018 #26
    parents game the rankings all the time in tennis and squash, targeting "easy" tournaments or playing up in age group so it doesn't affect ranking



    many coaches don't like it and think it is a distraction and undermines the work they are doing



    parents who do it are sometimes considered a bit neurotic and it can sometimes be detrimental to kid's confidence



    golf might be different though since you are not competing head to head



    it looks silly if your ranking is much better than someone you consistently lose matches to (equivalent to a vanity handicap)
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,712 ✭✭
    I think it’s important to play courses you can shoot low scores and good finishes on as well as tough courses and fields you have to grind out finishes. I like mixing a lot of FJTs with carefully selected AJGAs. Choosing courses that fit your game and can showcase your abilities is important. Playing every AJGA you can get into or in your area is a mistake IMO unless you’re the top of the top and then it really doesn’t matter.



    For girls AJGAs really aren’t necessary, and I’m talking full ride scholarship offers from multiple major conference D1 schools. Can they help? Yea but again selecting the correct course that fits your strengths is important.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,039 ✭✭
    edited Oct 2, 2018 #28
    iteachgolf wrote:


    I think it’s important to play courses you can shoot low scores and good finishes on as well as tough courses and fields you have to grind out finishes. I like mixing a lot of FJTs with carefully selected AJGAs. Choosing courses that fit your game and can showcase your abilities is important. Playing every AJGA you can get into or in your area is a mistake IMO unless you’re the top of the top and then it really doesn’t matter.



    For girls AJGAs really aren’t necessary, and I’m talking full ride scholarship offers from multiple major conference D1 schools. Can they help? Yea but again selecting the correct course that fits your strengths is important.




    I am looking at tournaments next year and some of the courses look like there going be very low scoring events just based on some Courses I am seeing.



    What are your thoughts on easy courses that you think a lot of players will go low since there short and you don’t get into trouble. Which makes it pretty easy to get birdies.



    On be other hand she may score higher but do better angainst the field on a harder course that is harder to get birdies.



    My initial thought is the harder course is the better one if all things are equal.
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,712 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:


    I think it’s important to play courses you can shoot low scores and good finishes on as well as tough courses and fields you have to grind out finishes. I like mixing a lot of FJTs with carefully selected AJGAs. Choosing courses that fit your game and can showcase your abilities is important. Playing every AJGA you can get into or in your area is a mistake IMO unless you’re the top of the top and then it really doesn’t matter.



    For girls AJGAs really aren’t necessary, and I’m talking full ride scholarship offers from multiple major conference D1 schools. Can they help? Yea but again selecting the correct course that fits your strengths is important.




    I am looking at tournaments next year and some of the courses look like there going be very low scoring events just based on some Courses I am seeing.



    What are your thoughts on easy courses that you think a lot of players will go low since there short and you don’t get into trouble. Which makes it pretty easy to get birdies.



    On be other hand she may score higher but do better angainst the field on a harder course that is harder to get birdies.



    My initial thought is the harder course is the better one if all things are equal.




    Depends on the age but I’d go the opposite. The only way you comfortable shooting low scores in tournaments is having lots of opportunities to do so.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,039 ✭✭
    iteachgolf wrote:

    tiger1873 wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:


    I think it’s important to play courses you can shoot low scores and good finishes on as well as tough courses and fields you have to grind out finishes. I like mixing a lot of FJTs with carefully selected AJGAs. Choosing courses that fit your game and can showcase your abilities is important. Playing every AJGA you can get into or in your area is a mistake IMO unless you’re the top of the top and then it really doesn’t matter.



    For girls AJGAs really aren’t necessary, and I’m talking full ride scholarship offers from multiple major conference D1 schools. Can they help? Yea but again selecting the correct course that fits your strengths is important.




    I am looking at tournaments next year and some of the courses look like there going be very low scoring events just based on some Courses I am seeing.



    What are your thoughts on easy courses that you think a lot of players will go low since there short and you don’t get into trouble. Which makes it pretty easy to get birdies.



    On be other hand she may score higher but do better angainst the field on a harder course that is harder to get birdies.



    My initial thought is the harder course is the better one if all things are equal.




    Depends on the age but I’d go the opposite. The only way you comfortable shooting low scores in tournaments is having lots of opportunities to do so.




    In this case we are talking about AGJA preview events. Concern is lots of players older then her and Older players not accurate off the tee may clean up at the event. I think distance is not issue but get concerned when accuracy is not rewarded. Not sure if that makes sense.

  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,712 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:

    tiger1873 wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:


    I think it’s important to play courses you can shoot low scores and good finishes on as well as tough courses and fields you have to grind out finishes. I like mixing a lot of FJTs with carefully selected AJGAs. Choosing courses that fit your game and can showcase your abilities is important. Playing every AJGA you can get into or in your area is a mistake IMO unless you’re the top of the top and then it really doesn’t matter.



    For girls AJGAs really aren’t necessary, and I’m talking full ride scholarship offers from multiple major conference D1 schools. Can they help? Yea but again selecting the correct course that fits your strengths is important.




    I am looking at tournaments next year and some of the courses look like there going be very low scoring events just based on some Courses I am seeing.



    What are your thoughts on easy courses that you think a lot of players will go low since there short and you don’t get into trouble. Which makes it pretty easy to get birdies.



    On be other hand she may score higher but do better angainst the field on a harder course that is harder to get birdies.



    My initial thought is the harder course is the better one if all things are equal.




    Depends on the age but I’d go the opposite. The only way you comfortable shooting low scores in tournaments is having lots of opportunities to do so.




    In this case we are talking about AGJA preview events. Concern is lots of players older then her and Older players not accurate off the tee may clean up at the event. I think distance is not issue but get concerned when accuracy is not rewarded. Not sure if that makes sense.




    I think you need to stop worry about what other kids are doing. Older kids than her won’t even factor into her recruiting as it’s based on grad class. You set her up to play well and wherever that finishes in the tournament is good. Literally nothing matters at 12 years old from almost all college coaches perspectives. Especially preview events. It’s about setting up the future
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