Best Driver of 2019 | Full Article _HERE_ | Discussion Thread _HERE_

Overcoming 'fear'

2»

Comments

  • andrueandrue Members Posts: 1,317 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 9, 2019 1:10pm #32

    @bladehunter said:

    @andrue said:
    Possibly a stupid question but I thought I'd ask it anyway (Image)
    /smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />

    I have a pretty good swing that produces good results. Unfortunately I just don't do it all the time. There's two moves that I keep forgetting or feel 'afraid' to do. One is a full shoulder turn, the other is a hip bump.

    I've had some success with range time but it's been a struggle to take that swing to the course and to keep it there. I was wondering if anyone else had addressed this problem and could offer some thoughts on how to convince my brain that's okay to do a proper swing?

    i hate to say this in a way ... so please take it as in good humor and with good intent..BUT you should take your own putting advice and "just swing and hit it " meaning stop over thinking it ... Which i will now turn on myself and say youre correct , thats exactly the biggest issue with putting woes....

    You make a fair point but to me a putting swing is simple, it has almost no moving parts and the club head is rarely more than half a metre from the ball. It's just a pendulum - take the club back then relax and let it swing down.

    A full swing is a different beast. It has a lot of moving parts (almost every part of your body except your lead foot). At the top of the swing the club head is pretty much a body length distant from the ball. If you took the club to the top of your back swing then just relaxed you'd hit yourself on the back of the head.

    So whilst I agree that the swing itself should always be free of thought you do need to put some thought into the back swing, at least when practising.

    Callaway Rogue Driver.
    Callaway Big Bertha OS Hybrids (3/4/5)
    Callaway Big Bertha OS Irons (6/7/8/9/PW/AW/SW)
    Callaway 60* Sureout wedge
    Callaway 64* Sureout wedge
    Ghost Spider Si 72 Putter
    Callaway Super Soft Yellow (White in winter).
  • bladehunterbladehunter Today was a good day... south carolinaMembers Posts: 27,888 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 9, 2019 1:38pm #33

    @andrue said:

    @bladehunter said:

    @andrue said:
    Possibly a stupid question but I thought I'd ask it anyway (Image)
    /smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />

    I have a pretty good swing that produces good results. Unfortunately I just don't do it all the time. There's two moves that I keep forgetting or feel 'afraid' to do. One is a full shoulder turn, the other is a hip bump.

    I've had some success with range time but it's been a struggle to take that swing to the course and to keep it there. I was wondering if anyone else had addressed this problem and could offer some thoughts on how to convince my brain that's okay to do a proper swing?

    i hate to say this in a way ... so please take it as in good humor and with good intent..BUT you should take your own putting advice and "just swing and hit it " meaning stop over thinking it ... Which i will now turn on myself and say youre correct , thats exactly the biggest issue with putting woes....

    You make a fair point but to me a putting swing is simple, it has almost no moving parts and the club head is rarely more than half a metre from the ball. It's just a pendulum - take the club back then relax and let it swing down.

    A full swing is a different beast. It has a lot of moving parts (almost every part of your body except your lead foot). At the top of the swing the club head is pretty much a body length distant from the ball. If you took the club to the top of your back swing then just relaxed you'd hit yourself on the back of the head.

    So whilst I agree that the swing itself should always be free of thought you do need to put some thought into the back swing, at least when practising.

    I hoped you’d say that. It allows me to give my point. To ME my full swing is as simple as you describe putting. I literally just turn , and turn back. And ball goes relatively where I’m looking. That’s how simple I feel over a full swing. Putting to me is extremely complicated. It shares all the same parts of a full swing and yet its harder to gain that automatic rhythm with it.

    Putting however brings out the same fear response you describe. Half the time I don’t move my shoulders or core. It’s all arms. Half the time it’s a figure 8 coming back and through. Sometimes a push. Sometimes a pull. Rarely online. And the finality of it all is the culprit. With any full shot you get a feeling of “ another chance “. As in “ if I can find it , I can recover “. With a putt if it doesn’t drop , well. It’s a stroke either lost or not gained. Which I realize is the problem. I just cannot figure out how to drop that idea. I’ve found a “ cheat “ method or stroke that works to squash the flinch at impact that I’ve fought and I’ve putted well and yet the mental aspect hasn’t changed. So I know it’s only half the battle. To figure out how to let it go is the answer. I just don’t Know how.

    My point ? To say that I feel your pain. I understand the idea , and to explain some of my other posts to you using your example. So hopefully you ( and anyone else reading ) can relate. Not for any purpose except because I have trouble explaining myself quite frequently and I saw an opening to maybe better explain using a relatable example.

    Ping G410  11.2* Tensei pro OrangeV2 proto 70TX 
    Ping G410 15.5* Graphite Design ADDI 8x
    Ping G410 21* ADDI 105x 
    Ping Blueprint  4-PW   Modus 130X 
    Ping Glide Forged  50  54 60 s400
    Spider X Tour Armlock.  42 inch with jumbo max 17 inch  grip.   


  • andrueandrue Members Posts: 1,317 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 9, 2019 2:56pm #34

    @bladehunter said:

    @andrue said:

    @bladehunter said:

    @andrue said:
    Possibly a stupid question but I thought I'd ask it anyway (Image)
    /smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />

    I have a pretty good swing that produces good results. Unfortunately I just don't do it all the time. There's two moves that I keep forgetting or feel 'afraid' to do. One is a full shoulder turn, the other is a hip bump.

    I've had some success with range time but it's been a struggle to take that swing to the course and to keep it there. I was wondering if anyone else had addressed this problem and could offer some thoughts on how to convince my brain that's okay to do a proper swing?

    i hate to say this in a way ... so please take it as in good humor and with good intent..BUT you should take your own putting advice and "just swing and hit it " meaning stop over thinking it ... Which i will now turn on myself and say youre correct , thats exactly the biggest issue with putting woes....

    You make a fair point but to me a putting swing is simple, it has almost no moving parts and the club head is rarely more than half a metre from the ball. It's just a pendulum - take the club back then relax and let it swing down.

    A full swing is a different beast. It has a lot of moving parts (almost every part of your body except your lead foot). At the top of the swing the club head is pretty much a body length distant from the ball. If you took the club to the top of your back swing then just relaxed you'd hit yourself on the back of the head.

    So whilst I agree that the swing itself should always be free of thought you do need to put some thought into the back swing, at least when practising.

    I hoped you’d say that. It allows me to give my point. To ME my full swing is as simple as you describe putting. I literally just turn , and turn back. And ball goes relatively where I’m looking. That’s how simple I feel over a full swing. Putting to me is extremely complicated. It shares all the same parts of a full swing and yet its harder to gain that automatic rhythm with it.

    I've never been the kind of person that claims they can think their way through a golf swing. To me that's mad. When I reach for my cup of tea I don't try and consciously control my muscles. However I might try and train myself to lift my elbow first to avoid catching the arm of my chair. The last change I made to my golf swing was to go with a single plane swing - or at least stop trying to raise my arms at the top - and that swing thought is still somewhat in my mind. But based on the current results (barring the occasional skied pull with my driver) I think I'm not far from an unconscious full swing. Just turn away from the target and then turn back.

    Putting however brings out the same fear response you describe. Half the time I don’t move my shoulders or core. It’s all arms. Half the time it’s a figure 8 coming back and through. Sometimes a push. Sometimes a pull. Rarely online.

    Different strokes for different folks, clearly. I might have a different putting swing each time but at the moment -thankfully - it feels like a very simple thing to do requiring no preparation and no control. I'm no putting guru though. The best I can claim is that I mostly two putt, sometimes one putt and only very rarely three putt.

    Callaway Rogue Driver.
    Callaway Big Bertha OS Hybrids (3/4/5)
    Callaway Big Bertha OS Irons (6/7/8/9/PW/AW/SW)
    Callaway 60* Sureout wedge
    Callaway 64* Sureout wedge
    Ghost Spider Si 72 Putter
    Callaway Super Soft Yellow (White in winter).
  • North ButteNorth Butte Members Posts: 11,367 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I've been working on my short game a lot lately (well, a lot by my standards not as much as some people). One thing that I've been able to learn is the ball-forward, open-face lob wedge "semi-explosion shot" out of deep rough. Meaning basically play it a lot like a bunker shot and make a pretty big swing, hitting just a fraction behind and underneath the ball to pop it up out of the gunch. I've been practicing a lot from the bunkers anyway so it's pretty natural to use that from the deep grass.

    Here's the thing. I've tried it twice in recent practice rounds and it works a treat. Ball just goes way up in the air, flies about 10-15 yards and lands pretty softly on the green. Like a shot from a good bunker lie, really. It just isn't a scary or hard shot once you've practiced it a few times.

    So this weekend I plant my approach shot on a Par 4 into some really thick gunch on the embankment leading from a pond up to the front of the green. Halfway decent lie on an upslope and only 10 yards short of the green. It's the ideal situation for that mini-explosion shot. But it wasn't a practice round, I was keeping score and the other three guys were watching. So my "fear" was I'd look like an idiot if I tried that big swing and I bladed the ball over the green or whiffed at it or who knows what all.

    Instead of blasting it out I tried chopping down on the back of the ball half-heartedly with a gap wedge. That moved it about five feet but into a slightly better lie. Second try with the gap wedge. Got it onto the fringe of the green. Then a chunked chip and missed my 5-footer for double. Made a triple bogey from an approach shot maybe 40 feet from the hole. Now that was embarrassing.

    While the other guys were heading to the next tee, I stuck the ball back in the original spot and tried the shot I should have played. Predictable result, it popped way up in the air and dropped down 10 feet from the hole. I could have had 10 feet for par and probably a tap-in bogey using EXACTLY THE SHOT I'VE BEEN PRACTICING. Fear of looking like fool is a killer, truly.

    “1lb beefstak, with
    1pt bitter beer
    every 6 hours.
    1 ten-mile walk every morning.
    1 bed at 11 sharp every night.
    And don't stuff your head with things you don't understand.” 
  • andrueandrue Members Posts: 1,317 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 9, 2019 3:31pm #36

    Yeah. I've been working on chipping recently and having a lot of success. What helped me overcome the fear of a mis-strike was a friend who told me to follow through as if I was trying to carry the ball toward the hole. That made a huge difference. Until last Sunday I felt like I was getting close to an up and down every time. Unfortunately whilst I had a pretty good round on Sunday my chipping had slipped back. I kept getting the distance wrong so all I could be sure of was getting onto the green. But to me a chip should be followed by one putt. If it takes two putts either the chip or the first putt was bad.

    The only thing I can think of is that the course is unusual in having very 'lumpy' greens. Most places I've played most greens have subtle slopes. You get the occasional exception but basically you can spot the slope as you walk up and that's all you have to work with. But this course has undulations on most greens. Serious undulations - like if you weren't paying attention you could trip over. I find that makes putting easier because the break(s) are so bleedin' obvious you can't get the alignment wrong. But perhaps that was throwing me off with my chipping, I suppose it makes the landing point more critical.

    Callaway Rogue Driver.
    Callaway Big Bertha OS Hybrids (3/4/5)
    Callaway Big Bertha OS Irons (6/7/8/9/PW/AW/SW)
    Callaway 60* Sureout wedge
    Callaway 64* Sureout wedge
    Ghost Spider Si 72 Putter
    Callaway Super Soft Yellow (White in winter).
  • bladehunterbladehunter Today was a good day... south carolinaMembers Posts: 27,888 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 9, 2019 4:29pm #37

    @andrue said:

    @bladehunter said:

    @andrue said:

    @bladehunter said:

    @andrue said:
    Possibly a stupid question but I thought I'd ask it anyway (Image)
    /smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />

    I have a pretty good swing that produces good results. Unfortunately I just don't do it all the time. There's two moves that I keep forgetting or feel 'afraid' to do. One is a full shoulder turn, the other is a hip bump.

    I've had some success with range time but it's been a struggle to take that swing to the course and to keep it there. I was wondering if anyone else had addressed this problem and could offer some thoughts on how to convince my brain that's okay to do a proper swing?

    i hate to say this in a way ... so please take it as in good humor and with good intent..BUT you should take your own putting advice and "just swing and hit it " meaning stop over thinking it ... Which i will now turn on myself and say youre correct , thats exactly the biggest issue with putting woes....

    You make a fair point but to me a putting swing is simple, it has almost no moving parts and the club head is rarely more than half a metre from the ball. It's just a pendulum - take the club back then relax and let it swing down.

    A full swing is a different beast. It has a lot of moving parts (almost every part of your body except your lead foot). At the top of the swing the club head is pretty much a body length distant from the ball. If you took the club to the top of your back swing then just relaxed you'd hit yourself on the back of the head.

    So whilst I agree that the swing itself should always be free of thought you do need to put some thought into the back swing, at least when practising.

    I hoped you’d say that. It allows me to give my point. To ME my full swing is as simple as you describe putting. I literally just turn , and turn back. And ball goes relatively where I’m looking. That’s how simple I feel over a full swing. Putting to me is extremely complicated. It shares all the same parts of a full swing and yet its harder to gain that automatic rhythm with it.

    I've never been the kind of person that claims they can think their way through a golf swing. To me that's mad. When I reach for my cup of tea I don't try and consciously control my muscles. However I might try and train myself to lift my elbow first to avoid catching the arm of my chair. The last change I made to my golf swing was to go with a single plane swing - or at least stop trying to raise my arms at the top - and that swing thought is still somewhat in my mind. But based on the current results (barring the occasional skied pull with my driver) I think I'm not far from an unconscious full swing. Just turn away from the target and then turn back.

    Putting however brings out the same fear response you describe. Half the time I don’t move my shoulders or core. It’s all arms. Half the time it’s a figure 8 coming back and through. Sometimes a push. Sometimes a pull. Rarely online.

    Different strokes for different folks, clearly. I might have a different putting swing each time but at the moment -thankfully - it feels like a very simple thing to do requiring no preparation and no control. I'm no putting guru though. The best I can claim is that I mostly two putt, sometimes one putt and only very rarely three putt.

    Fair enough. I’m not trying to start an argument... at alll. I think we are both a little wrong and a little correct. Meaning I’m obviously over thinking putting. But I suspect you maybe overthinking full swing too. But I have nothing to base that on , except your post. It reminded me of myself.

    Good point on putting though. If I stop trying to make putts I can 2 putt all day. Never 3 putt. But I don’t make any 1 putts either. When I gripe about putting its 1 putts. I can “ not 3 putt “ with the best of them. But that seriously limits your scoring ability. Especially on longer courses where you don’t get to par 5s in 2.

    Anyway. I’ll stop now. Lol. Thanks for the back and forth.

    Ping G410  11.2* Tensei pro OrangeV2 proto 70TX 
    Ping G410 15.5* Graphite Design ADDI 8x
    Ping G410 21* ADDI 105x 
    Ping Blueprint  4-PW   Modus 130X 
    Ping Glide Forged  50  54 60 s400
    Spider X Tour Armlock.  42 inch with jumbo max 17 inch  grip.   


  • hoselpaloozahoselpalooza Members Posts: 226 ✭✭✭

    @davep043 said:
    (Quote)

    I think that everyone who has gone through a swing change has gone through a period of uncertainty and inconsistency. In the end, making the change is usually positive, just keep working at it.

    this is an underrated comment. in a sense, fear is uncertainty. eliminate uncertainty. eliminate fear.

    any hunch or conviction i share today may very well be disproven or overturned tomorrow, and i welcome that. i'm simply here to learn with others, even if my enthusiasm for golf occasionally masquerades as knowledge. after all, the more i learn the less i know.

  • Lefty Light HItterLefty Light HItter Members Posts: 1,508 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I don't think there is an "unconscious" swing out there. Everyone has things going thru their mind and when hitting a ball your senses are heightened. It's why the grip can feel funny when you're nervous, why you hear every **** thing said behind you or even on the next green. You have to recognize your senses are heightened, accept it and then do things to bring you back to the goal and that is make as confident of a swing you can with good tempo.

    I agree that making changes can cause negative effects on your score. If you have the time to both play and practice I think you should continue on with the changes. You have to mix in "game swings" when practicing with those swings where you're making changes. Do 2 or 3 swings working on your one thing and then do 2 or 3 game swings at a target.

    When playing you've got to get a PSR and learn to focus on tempo and positive self talk. I've made drastic changes to my ballstriking this summer with not one lesson and it's been thru developing a routine, following it and a lot of self talk. I literally played multiple rounds with telling myself over the ball, "you're the best **** golfer on this course". I shanked a shot a few weeks ago, came up to the next hole which was a long par 4 that required a 4i and I flushed it. I immediately told myself out loud, "great **** come back man. Way to bounce back." It sounds weird, but it works. Focus on tempo and ONLY positive self talk. Tell yourself you did well for following your routine or making a good swing. Never tell yourself you suck or that was ****. Walk like Brooks Koepka even if you just laid the sod over on a chip.

    In search of solid contact...
  • oikos1oikos1 Members Posts: 2,358 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Interesting that the things mentioned that caused and an solved your "fear" were mechanical. "More shoulder turn", "hip bump", "follow through". It's amazing how understanding, effort and improvement eliminates the perception of fear. You're on a good path now. There is plenty to fear if you want to fear something, but golf shouldn't be one of them.

  • bladehunterbladehunter Today was a good day... south carolinaMembers Posts: 27,888 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 10, 2019 2:36pm #41

    @Lefty Light HItter said:
    I don't think there is an "unconscious" swing out there. Everyone has things going thru their mind and when hitting a ball your senses are heightened. It's why the grip can feel funny when you're nervous, why you hear every **** thing said behind you or even on the next green. You have to recognize your senses are heightened, accept it and then do things to bring you back to the goal and that is make as confident of a swing you can with good tempo.

    I agree that making changes can cause negative effects on your score. If you have the time to both play and practice I think you should continue on with the changes. You have to mix in "game swings" when practicing with those swings where you're making changes. Do 2 or 3 swings working on your one thing and then do 2 or 3 game swings at a target.

    When playing you've got to get a PSR and learn to focus on tempo and positive self talk. I've made drastic changes to my ballstriking this summer with not one lesson and it's been thru developing a routine, following it and a lot of self talk. I literally played multiple rounds with telling myself over the ball, "you're the best **** golfer on this course". I shanked a shot a few weeks ago, came up to the next hole which was a long par 4 that required a 4i and I flushed it. I immediately told myself out loud, "great **** come back man. Way to bounce back." It sounds weird, but it works. Focus on tempo and ONLY positive self talk. Tell yourself you did well for following your routine or making a good swing. Never tell yourself you suck or that was ****. Walk like Brooks Koepka even if you just laid the sod over on a chip.

    Very much an interesting topic to me.

    I find there to be a fine line between actual confidence and this “ positive self talk “. It’s been said that I need that with putter. And yet I find it impossible to fake that. But with ball striking I don’t have to lie to myself. I know I hit the middle a lot. And I know that I see a shot every single swing and I know when I execute exactly what I intended to do vs just had a good result from a miss. I’ll be unhappy with a good result from a miss. Why ? I didn’t execute. Not unhappy as in throwing a fit. Just saying something like “ **** it. Missed that one “. Even if I’m putting or in the fairway. Which irritates some people. But I don’t personally care.

    What I’m saying is , I’m honest with myself either way on a swing. Why not with putter too ? I’m a big boy. I can take the truth. When I suck I know it. Lying to myself doesn’t help. I just then think “ that was terrible now adjust and conquer “. I’m a master at self repair on course. This real confidence comes from knowing , not thinking , (not lying to myself to convince myself , ) that I have a very solid and simple swing. Real confidence is what works.

    Proven yet again when I changed putting methods to Armlock recently and immediately after a proper fitting unit was in my hand I began seeing the line and making putts. 4 rounds ago and I literally expect to make everything. Why ? Real results. No lies that “ I’m the best putter “ etc. I wasn’t. I sucked out loud. Period. A guy averaging 14 GIR a round who flies it farther than most with driver and has a scoring average of 74.5 knows he sucks at putting. No amount of lies will convince me that what I was doing was going to work. I knew it was a dead end street .. I’d banged my head on that post for 3 years. I had gone all summer without a sub 30 putt round. And the same day I got this Armlock fitted to me and comfortable i went out and had 28 putts. Then 2 more rounds in the 20s. Now that’s real confidence to build on.

    Disclaimer. This ^ is my opinion. It’s for me. And I usually see things a little skewed versus most folks. Myself knows me. And he always knows when I’m lying to him. Lol.

    Ping G410  11.2* Tensei pro OrangeV2 proto 70TX 
    Ping G410 15.5* Graphite Design ADDI 8x
    Ping G410 21* ADDI 105x 
    Ping Blueprint  4-PW   Modus 130X 
    Ping Glide Forged  50  54 60 s400
    Spider X Tour Armlock.  42 inch with jumbo max 17 inch  grip.   


  • Nard_SNard_S Members Posts: 3,506 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    For me, "fear" has come to be defined as lack of conviction. When I say to myself with full faith, 'I got this', I can execute freely and to much higher degree of success.

  • Lefty Light HItterLefty Light HItter Members Posts: 1,508 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @bladehunter said:
    I find there to be a fine line between actual confidence and this “ positive self talk “. It’s been said that I need that with putter. And yet I find it impossible to fake that. But with ball striking I don’t have to lie to myself. I know I hit the middle a lot. And I know that I see a shot every single swing and I know when I execute exactly what I intended to do vs just had a good result from a miss. I’ll be unhappy with a good result from a miss. Why ? I didn’t execute. Not unhappy as in throwing a fit. Just saying something like “ **** it. Missed that one “. Even if I’m putting or in the fairway. Which irritates some people. But I don’t personally care.

    What I’m saying is , I’m honest with myself either way on a swing. Why not with putter too ? I’m a big boy. I can take the truth. When I suck I know it. Lying to myself doesn’t help. I just then think “ that was terrible now adjust and conquer “. I’m a master at self repair on course. This real confidence comes from knowing , not thinking , (not lying to myself to convince myself , ) that I have a very solid and simple swing. Real confidence is what works.

    I can sort of relate with that as I haven't putted well this summer either. I don't average 14 a round, but have recently had three straight rounds that I hit 14 in a round and shot a 78, 78, 77, 78 so I can feel you on that one. Again, we're all just throwing stuff out to help one another and we don't have the magic secret, but have you ever went to a putting green, set up and just make short putt after short putt, etc just to continually see it go in the hole? At the very least you have that sound that feel of the putt dropping to then take to the course and use that as part of the routine and see you making that putt. Another part I didn't mention was I tell myself what shot I want to hit as part of the routine (as you probably do) and I see that shot in my head. Like you said, it's easy to see when you hit it on the range or the day before. It's tougher when you haven't hit it before or in a long time. I've made my range sessions where I hit some shots and stop with that club because I want to remember that exact flight and feel to use it later. Maybe try taking that approach to putting? **** I'm going to try that! I think I just learned by offering advice.

    Oh and I'll share something I changed putting yesterday and i made 3 birdies on a 9 hole round and no 3 putts and lipped two more for birdies. I took the flag out and started telling myself to hit the ball to the spot I was aimed at. I think the flag had artificially been stuck in my head rather than a specific spot on the cup or off of it. By time I made it to the 4th hole I had enough confidence that I was getting pissed for lipping out a 30' putt! Like you said, success breeds confidence.

    In search of solid contact...
  • howaboutmehowaboutme Fairfax, VAMembers Posts: 152 ✭✭✭

    Good topic.

    My specific fear is hitting driver in front of anyone, even people I know. It can be friends, random people I'm grouped with or even just the starter that may or may not be looking at me. The result may be a great drive or not. I don't have this fear when hitting irons off the tee or any other place on the course.

    Luckily, like everything else, just playing more helps and I'm slowing getting over the fear.

  • bladehunterbladehunter Today was a good day... south carolinaMembers Posts: 27,888 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 10, 2019 3:31pm #45

    @Lefty Light HItter said:

    @bladehunter said:
    I find there to be a fine line between actual confidence and this “ positive self talk “. It’s been said that I need that with putter. And yet I find it impossible to fake that. But with ball striking I don’t have to lie to myself. I know I hit the middle a lot. And I know that I see a shot every single swing and I know when I execute exactly what I intended to do vs just had a good result from a miss. I’ll be unhappy with a good result from a miss. Why ? I didn’t execute. Not unhappy as in throwing a fit. Just saying something like “ **** it. Missed that one “. Even if I’m putting or in the fairway. Which irritates some people. But I don’t personally care.

    What I’m saying is , I’m honest with myself either way on a swing. Why not with putter too ? I’m a big boy. I can take the truth. When I suck I know it. Lying to myself doesn’t help. I just then think “ that was terrible now adjust and conquer “. I’m a master at self repair on course. This real confidence comes from knowing , not thinking , (not lying to myself to convince myself , ) that I have a very solid and simple swing. Real confidence is what works.

    I can sort of relate with that as I haven't putted well this summer either. I don't average 14 a round, but have recently had three straight rounds that I hit 14 in a round and shot a 78, 78, 77, 78 so I can feel you on that one. Again, we're all just throwing stuff out to help one another and we don't have the magic secret, but have you ever went to a putting green, set up and just make short putt after short putt, etc just to continually see it go in the hole? At the very least you have that sound that feel of the putt dropping to then take to the course and use that as part of the routine and see you making that putt. Another part I didn't mention was I tell myself what shot I want to hit as part of the routine (as you probably do) and I see that shot in my head. Like you said, it's easy to see when you hit it on the range or the day before. It's tougher when you haven't hit it before or in a long time. I've made my range sessions where I hit some shots and stop with that club because I want to remember that exact flight and feel to use it later. Maybe try taking that approach to putting? **** I'm going to try that! I think I just learned by offering advice.

    Oh and I'll share something I changed putting yesterday and i made 3 birdies on a 9 hole round and no 3 putts and lipped two more for birdies. I took the flag out and started telling myself to hit the ball to the spot I was aimed at. I think the flag had artificially been stuck in my head rather than a specific spot on the cup or off of it. By time I made it to the 4th hole I had enough confidence that I was getting pissed for lipping out a 30' putt! Like you said, success breeds confidence.

    Yep. Same way I think of shots. I even say my yardage out loud. You’d be shocked how much your brain knows if you can let it go on it’s own. I’ve even tried it with 2 clubs too much for a stock shot yardage ... Like say I pick a 7 iron and say to myself “ 152....152....152”. Three times fast while I see a high fade or low draw. Step in and go. It’s crazy the difference in that result vs if i took a 7 and didn’t know exact yardage and just tried to feel it in. I can do both. But knowing the exact number and saying it out loud makes a huge difference. And I’m a fast player. This all takes 4-5 seconds tops.

    To your point on putting. Makes me wonder just now , if knowing the putts length would matter ? As in a rough step off .

    Ping G410  11.2* Tensei pro OrangeV2 proto 70TX 
    Ping G410 15.5* Graphite Design ADDI 8x
    Ping G410 21* ADDI 105x 
    Ping Blueprint  4-PW   Modus 130X 
    Ping Glide Forged  50  54 60 s400
    Spider X Tour Armlock.  42 inch with jumbo max 17 inch  grip.   


  • wkuo3wkuo3 RELEASE Members Posts: 4,311 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Your instinct for self preservation took over if your body might sustain injury from the movement.
    First to check if your body has had injury in the past, or, if you have underlying issue that's not discovered yet. If you get a clean bill of health for the movement then, do more stretching to help you execute these movements. Once your body is used to these motions, the fear will be gone.
    Or, simply practice more, until your body and mind get used to execute the motion.

  • Lefty Light HItterLefty Light HItter Members Posts: 1,508 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @bladehunter said:

    Same way I think of shots. I even say my yardage out loud. You’d be shocked how much your brain knows if you can let it go on it’s own. I’ve even tried it with 2 clubs too much for a stock shot yardage ... Like say I pick a 7 iron and say to myself “ 152....152....152”. Three times fast while I see a high fade or low draw. Step in and go. It’s crazy the difference in that result vs if i took a 7 and didn’t know exact yardage and just tried to feel it in. I can do both. But knowing the exact number and saying it out loud makes a huge difference. And I’m a fast player. This all takes 4-5 seconds tops.

    To your point on putting. Makes me wonder just now , if knowing the putts length would matter ? As in a rough step off .

    I think anything is possible with it. If it wasn't why would you not pick out a specific spot to roll the ball to? I'm sure you pick a spot based on the read and adjust to move that spot for distance (Tiger Woods video game Tiger Vision) so why not tell yourself a number if you want? I agree on the full shot yardages. I've never done the call out the yardage, but I have pulled either way too much club or not enough club based on stock yardages and still hit it pin high. Hit a 7i 140 yesterday because 8 wouldn't be enough based on lie and a little wind. I just told myself I needed to hit this one pin high and it happened. Sounds stupid, but it works.

    I think the biggest takeaway is tell yourself what you want to do (not what you don't want to do). At the very least you know you've done what you could mentally to be successful.

    In search of solid contact...
  • BarfolomewBarfolomew #worstWRXer Members Posts: 1,534 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Practice on the course..... we do it all the time when we play late in the day. Drop a bunch of balls on a real fairway when there's no one behind you... its great. I love practicing chipping on the course when its empty, its very enjoyable to be way out on the course and practice chipping for 10 minutes as the sun sets.... mmm wish I was there now

    G30 LST
    3 wood M2 HL
    OnOffOnAgain Kuros 4-P
    Cleveland Blob
    SeeMore Butts
  • andrueandrue Members Posts: 1,317 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Barfolomew said:
    Practice on the course..... we do it all the time when we play late in the day. Drop a bunch of balls on a real fairway when there's no one behind you... its great. I love practicing chipping on the course when its empty, its very enjoyable to be way out on the course and practice chipping for 10 minutes as the sun sets.... mmm wish I was there now

    At 0917 sat at my desk I definitely wish I was on a golf course. I love my job (computer programmer) but as I approach my mid 50s it's getting harder to convince myself to wait until I'm 60 before retiring. If only the world wasn't so insane right now..

    Callaway Rogue Driver.
    Callaway Big Bertha OS Hybrids (3/4/5)
    Callaway Big Bertha OS Irons (6/7/8/9/PW/AW/SW)
    Callaway 60* Sureout wedge
    Callaway 64* Sureout wedge
    Ghost Spider Si 72 Putter
    Callaway Super Soft Yellow (White in winter).
  • naval2006naval2006 ArgentinaMembers Posts: 986 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I’ve learnt to play through fear by going for it full tilt on the tee or longer shots to the green. But thinking between shots is worse than fear. Mostly because the average golfers thinking is often negative. Personally every time I play a decent round I just hit the ball, go after it and hit again. No thinking at all. I leave no room for fear or dark thoughts that way.

  • ERUddOHERUddOH Members Posts: 94 ✭✭✭

    I stole something from some management seminar, it's so simple but it works/worked for me. Definitely during a practice round, empty course as some mention above, I get over the ball and think "How would I swing if I weren't afraid?" Then I swing away. Sounds silly but it worked.

  • larrybudlarrybud Members Posts: 11,428 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    This sounds really morbid, but about 5 years ago I was watching a special on "Nova" about mortality, and they followed around 3 or 4 people who were diagnosed with a terminal disease. Watching people handle real fear unknowingly made me a better player. I mean, it's freakin' golf. I played a couple of hours after watching that show, and it changed me as a person and player. Just swing, baby.

  • bladehunterbladehunter Today was a good day... south carolinaMembers Posts: 27,888 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @larrybud said:
    This sounds really morbid, but about 5 years ago I was watching a special on "Nova" about mortality, and they followed around 3 or 4 people who were diagnosed with a terminal disease. Watching people handle real fear unknowingly made me a better player. I mean, it's freakin' golf. I played a couple of hours after watching that show, and it changed me as a person and player. Just swing, baby.

    Agree with that. I have to remind myself of it with putter though. Lol. But I’ve been around the block , saw a few things. And absolutely golf is silly compared to some of those things. Most things are silly by comparison. Thanks for the Reminder

    Ping G410  11.2* Tensei pro OrangeV2 proto 70TX 
    Ping G410 15.5* Graphite Design ADDI 8x
    Ping G410 21* ADDI 105x 
    Ping Blueprint  4-PW   Modus 130X 
    Ping Glide Forged  50  54 60 s400
    Spider X Tour Armlock.  42 inch with jumbo max 17 inch  grip.   


  • oikos1oikos1 Members Posts: 2,358 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 12, 2019 4:17am #54

    Stop perpetuating your own demise. Group hug and validate everyone's feelings. Good. Now move on. Thing is, you're all going to find you should've stopped making this real a long time ago.

  • jobinjobin Members Posts: 33 ✭✭

    My personal estimation: 50 yrs of play, 20 times per year, usual score 100 = 100,000 on-course golf shots. Over 45 of those years every shot, WRONG! Wrong (self-taught) ideas in my head, wrong vision of success, wrong motion of body.
    Now, perhaps i have the correct ideas, improved motion and a more positive vision but statistically for me to move the Regression line down to shooting 90 consistently will be Very difficult. My old body cannot do as my mind wants: the knees, hips and lower back moan at night so next day i'm tired, lack focus and unable to control the mind/body interaction.
    Said the golf swing is a 'remembered feel'. If each of us had a perfect feel of the correct swing and a superb memory, as youngsters have, we could all play better. I fight the persistent memory of a crappy swing feeling.
    Uncertainty of technique and insecurity of performance do not lead to golf happiness.
    But i enjoy the day out and hitting some good shots. Certainly my putting has improved. Deleting history? Wish it were possible!

  • bladehunterbladehunter Today was a good day... south carolinaMembers Posts: 27,888 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @oikos1 said:
    Stop perpetuating your own demise. Group hug and validate everyone's feelings. Good. Now move on. Thing is, you're all going to find you should've stopped making this real a long time ago.

    I’m not sure that sparking conversation with others is helping our own demise. Our demise is coming one way or another. No avoiding it. Figuratively ( time to time in this game ) and literally.
    The point that was made above is the opposite of what you said. The point is that when considering a task ask yourself “ will this kill me “. If no then no need for fear. I’ve asked myself this question all the way through school , work , starting a business etc. as a naturally introverted person ( yea I know. Doesn’t seem that way here ) this is what works to convince you to go ahead with the task . As in you fight the “ fight or flight “ reflex by reminding yourself the consequences of the action isn’t really that big of a deal.

    Ping G410  11.2* Tensei pro OrangeV2 proto 70TX 
    Ping G410 15.5* Graphite Design ADDI 8x
    Ping G410 21* ADDI 105x 
    Ping Blueprint  4-PW   Modus 130X 
    Ping Glide Forged  50  54 60 s400
    Spider X Tour Armlock.  42 inch with jumbo max 17 inch  grip.   


  • oikos1oikos1 Members Posts: 2,358 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @bladehunter said:

    @oikos1 said:
    Stop perpetuating your own demise. Group hug and validate everyone's feelings. Good. Now move on. Thing is, you're all going to find you should've stopped making this real a long time ago.

    I’m not sure that sparking conversation with others is helping our own demise. Our demise is coming one way or another. No avoiding it. Figuratively ( time to time in this game ) and literally.
    The point that was made above is the opposite of what you said. The point is that when considering a task ask yourself “ will this kill me “. If no then no need for fear. I’ve asked myself this question all the way through school , work , starting a business etc. as a naturally introverted person ( yea I know. Doesn’t seem that way here ) this is what works to convince you to go ahead with the task . As in you fight the “ fight or flight “ reflex by reminding yourself the consequences of the action isn’t really that big of a deal.

    Maybe i missed something. Pretty sure you just said there is no need for fear in golf, which is exactly my point.

    Now if you're standing on #17 tee box about to lose your house to your opponent and you, you're wife and you're three kids are going to be living in the minivan tonight, then perhaps you have something to fear when playing golf.

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file