College signing statistics

TigerMomTigerMom Members Posts: 215 ✭✭
http://www.golfwrx.com/535476/what-the-numbers-say-about-one-of-the-most-hyped-college-golf-signing-classes-in-history/





"Coaches care where you are from; in men’s golf 80% of the players ranked above 400 in their class signed at a school within approximately 400 miles of their house. In women’s golf 82% of Division 1 players ranked above 250 signed within 400 miles of their house.



Academics matter to Girls: 80% of girls in the top 100 chose a top academic school like Michigan, Pepperdine, Wisconsin, Penn or Yale."
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Comments

  • TigerMomTigerMom Members Posts: 215 ✭✭
    leezer99 wrote:


    I'm not sure what I'm supposed to do with that information.




    Then why reply?
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,067 ✭✭
    leezer99 wrote:


    I'm not sure what I'm supposed to do with that information.




    Aphibarnrat is my favorite International golfer.
  • wildcatdenwildcatden China Cat Sunflower Members Posts: 875 ✭✭
    leezer99 wrote:


    I'm not sure what I'm supposed to do with that information.




    Aphibarnrat is my favorite International golfer.




    Snell Golf balls are just as good as ProV1’s.
  • DavePelz4DavePelz4 A golf course in the Chicago area.ClubWRX Posts: 24,340 ClubWRX
    Not sure I'm agreeing with the 400 mile thing. Mike Small at the University of Illinois (the only program that's a consistent winner there) has of their 9 players, 2 from Belgium, 1 from CA and another from AZ.



    Oklahoma State has 2 players from Norway and another from VA and 1 from the Republic of Texas.
  • TigerMomTigerMom Members Posts: 215 ✭✭
    DavePelz4 wrote:


    Not sure I'm agreeing with the 400 mile thing. Mike Small at the University of Illinois (the only program that's a consistent winner there) has of their 9 players, 2 from Belgium, 1 from CA and another from AZ.



    Oklahoma State has 2 players from Norway and another from VA and 1 from the Republic of Texas.




    people in south don't like to go north for school because of weather and worse competition



    and people in north complain about grass in south and think schools in north are better



    also I think college coaches are more familiar with players close to their school
  • DavePelz4DavePelz4 A golf course in the Chicago area.ClubWRX Posts: 24,340 ClubWRX
    TigerMom wrote:

    DavePelz4 wrote:


    Not sure I'm agreeing with the 400 mile thing. Mike Small at the University of Illinois (the only program that's a consistent winner there) has of their 9 players, 2 from Belgium, 1 from CA and another from AZ.



    Oklahoma State has 2 players from Norway and another from VA and 1 from the Republic of Texas.




    people in south don't like to go north for school because of weather and worse competition



    and people in north complain about grass in south and think schools in north are better



    also I think college coaches are more familiar with players close to their school




    Will agree with the last statement but the first two are broad generalizations like the 400 mile scenario. Considering your screen name and the threads you start, it seems as though you have a daughter or son who is gifted in golf. Care to share more of the story?
  • SixcatSixcat SWVAMembers Posts: 1,441 ✭✭
    More than 58% of college students attend school within 100 miles of home with 30% of those attending less than 25 miles from home. Less than 11% attend school more than 500 miles from home.



    https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/govbeat/wp/2014/06/05/map-the-states-college-kids-cant-wait-to-leave/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.f256f84e240a



    The data in the GolfWRX article is right on par with college attendance patterns for all college students, not just the ones who play college golf.
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,724 ✭✭
    DavePelz4 wrote:


    Not sure I'm agreeing with the 400 mile thing. Mike Small at the University of Illinois (the only program that's a consistent winner there) has of their 9 players, 2 from Belgium, 1 from CA and another from AZ.



    Oklahoma State has 2 players from Norway and another from VA and 1 from the Republic of Texas.




    Those kids going to those schools aren’t ranked above 400. The quote was about players ranked above 400. Meaning if you are going to a smaller school or going to be providing depth rather than starting at a top program their going to look local.
  • TigerMomTigerMom Members Posts: 215 ✭✭
    DavePelz4 wrote:

    TigerMom wrote:

    DavePelz4 wrote:


    Not sure I'm agreeing with the 400 mile thing. Mike Small at the University of Illinois (the only program that's a consistent winner there) has of their 9 players, 2 from Belgium, 1 from CA and another from AZ.



    Oklahoma State has 2 players from Norway and another from VA and 1 from the Republic of Texas.




    people in south don't like to go north for school because of weather and worse competition



    and people in north complain about grass in south and think schools in north are better



    also I think college coaches are more familiar with players close to their school




    Will agree with the last statement but the first two are broad generalizations like the 400 mile scenario. Considering your screen name and the threads you start, it seems as though you have a daughter or son who is gifted in golf. Care to share more of the story?




    I don't like to talk about myself



    besides, some in this forum would be able to identify me if I gave some hints (they would be surprised)
  • DavePelz4DavePelz4 A golf course in the Chicago area.ClubWRX Posts: 24,340 ClubWRX
    TigerMom wrote:

    DavePelz4 wrote:

    TigerMom wrote:

    DavePelz4 wrote:


    Not sure I'm agreeing with the 400 mile thing. Mike Small at the University of Illinois (the only program that's a consistent winner there) has of their 9 players, 2 from Belgium, 1 from CA and another from AZ.



    Oklahoma State has 2 players from Norway and another from VA and 1 from the Republic of Texas.




    people in south don't like to go north for school because of weather and worse competition



    and people in north complain about grass in south and think schools in north are better



    also I think college coaches are more familiar with players close to their school




    Will agree with the last statement but the first two are broad generalizations like the 400 mile scenario. Considering your screen name and the threads you start, it seems as though you have a daughter or son who is gifted in golf. Care to share more of the story?




    I don't like to talk about myself



    besides, some in this forum would be able to identify me if I gave some hints (they would be surprised)




    Talk about your daughter or son and not about yourself.



    Based on your screen name I'll share a story about a round with a Tiger Mom. We live in a nice area and there is serious competition to make it on the local high school team. They'll have 100 kids try out for 10-15 spots and if you're not shooting in the 70's, there's not much of a chance of making the team. Any hoo, paired up with 2 old guys like me and a 13 year old whose Mom followed with notebook in hand. She said very little but recorded every shot and the results. She marked distances, etc. She basically did a book report on his round. He hit 13/14 fairways, something like 15 greens and shot a 71. Such a nice kid, too.



    As we walked up the 18th fairway, I asked what she thought of Tommy's round. She said "Tommy not play very well, he miss a couple putts and should have shot 68."



    I played OK for myself that day and shot 81. I asked her what she thought of my round and without missing a beat said..."You suck. You have ugly swing and should take up bowling."



    What she missed in tact she made up with fact.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,067 ✭✭
    TigerMom wrote:
    DavePelz4 wrote:

    TigerMom wrote:

    DavePelz4 wrote:


    Not sure I'm agreeing with the 400 mile thing. Mike Small at the University of Illinois (the only program that's a consistent winner there) has of their 9 players, 2 from Belgium, 1 from CA and another from AZ.



    Oklahoma State has 2 players from Norway and another from VA and 1 from the Republic of Texas.




    people in south don't like to go north for school because of weather and worse competition



    and people in north complain about grass in south and think schools in north are better



    also I think college coaches are more familiar with players close to their school




    Will agree with the last statement but the first two are broad generalizations like the 400 mile scenario. Considering your screen name and the threads you start, it seems as though you have a daughter or son who is gifted in golf. Care to share more of the story?




    I don't like to talk about myself



    besides, some in this forum would be able to identify me if I gave some hints (they would be surprised)




    Lea Ma
  • TigerMomTigerMom Members Posts: 215 ✭✭

    TigerMom wrote:
    DavePelz4 wrote:

    TigerMom wrote:

    DavePelz4 wrote:


    Not sure I'm agreeing with the 400 mile thing. Mike Small at the University of Illinois (the only program that's a consistent winner there) has of their 9 players, 2 from Belgium, 1 from CA and another from AZ.



    Oklahoma State has 2 players from Norway and another from VA and 1 from the Republic of Texas.




    people in south don't like to go north for school because of weather and worse competition



    and people in north complain about grass in south and think schools in north are better



    also I think college coaches are more familiar with players close to their school




    Will agree with the last statement but the first two are broad generalizations like the 400 mile scenario. Considering your screen name and the threads you start, it seems as though you have a daughter or son who is gifted in golf. Care to share more of the story?




    I don't like to talk about myself



    besides, some in this forum would be able to identify me if I gave some hints (they would be surprised)




    Lea Ma




    heavy_hiller,



    great guess!



    (but wrong)

  • NolesNoles Members Posts: 1,424 ✭✭
    Sixcat wrote:


    More than 58% of college students attend school within 100 miles of home with 30% of those attending less than 25 miles from home. Less than 11% attend school more than 500 miles from home.



    https://www.washingt...m=.f256f84e240a



    The data in the GolfWRX article is right on par with college attendance patterns for all college students, not just the ones who play college golf.
    I was just going to ask how these stats compare to regular students.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,067 ✭✭
    leezer99 wrote:
    Just heard an interesting little factoid this morning. The University of Florida receives 50,000 emails per year from prospective junior golfers. In the last six years they have taken ONE student athlete that emailed them first. These top level programs know what they are doing and if they're not reaching out to you then you probably don't fit in their program.




    I heard an interesting fact as well. Over half of the Valedictorians in the States do not get accepted to Ivey League Schools.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,043 ✭✭
    edited Jan 9, 2019 7:27pm #16
    Look you can look at college stats all you want but at the end of the day you have to fit into the program. This means you have to be good enough to among your peers.



    What all these articles don’t talk about is the amount of golfers who quit or leave their programs. Most of the best players leave after a semester or 1st year to turn pro. For many it was a stupid move but still important to understand. This is why some coaches do not target those players. It means they would to find 2 kids next year. If your not a top program that could be an issue.



    There also is large amount of golfers that are unhappy where they are and transfer or leave. The reason you see kids within 400 miles from home is it’s a lot easier to see family if you close. A kid in California playing in South Carolina May not be happy. And get homesick. Being homesick they transfer to a school closer to home.



    Coaches know this stuff so they look for players who will stay there for 4 years. The best way to show a coach your serious is through academics and attitude and playing some good golf.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,043 ✭✭
    edited Jan 9, 2019 7:32pm #17
    The other thing I should add is from the coaches that I have talked to they all stressed academic are very very important. I was told your kid could be the next Tiger Woods but if they show no interest in school score low on the SAT and have poor grades they are not going to recruit someone like that.



    You don’t have to have stellar grades but you need to at least have the basics minimums for college.
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,724 ✭✭
    Kids absolutely do not turn pro after a semester or even a year except for extremely rare occasions. Coaches are bringing in 2-3 players almost every year and sometimes more than that. Players transferring generally has way more to do with lack of playing time. At most public schools you will need way better than basic minimums for college.
  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Posts: 8,852 ClubWRX
    tiger1873 wrote:


    The other thing I should add is from the coaches that I have talked to they all stressed academic are very very important. I was told your kid could be the next Tiger Woods but if they show no interest in school score low on the SAT and have poor grades they are not going to recruit someone like that.



    You don’t have to have stellar grades but you need to at least have the basics minimums for college.




    I hear that min 3.5 hs gpa is the number that college recruiters look for. Being a solid golfer with really good tournament performance goes without saying.



    I cant believe some of the gpa’s that kids maintain these days. 4.0 seems to be just meh at some schools. Kids are shooting for 4.5+ through AP classes.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,067 ✭✭
    iteachgolf wrote:


    Kids absolutely do not turn pro after a semester or even a year except for extremely rare occasions. Coaches are bringing in 2-3 players almost every year and sometimes more than that. Players transferring generally has way more to do with lack of playing time. At most public schools you will need way better than basic minimums for college.




    9 players over the past 15 years have gone straight from college to the PGA.
  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 422 ✭✭
    It is extremely competitive to play for a handful of top schools. But it doesn't seem that difficult to play college golf (or even D1 for that matter) in general.



    http://juniorgolfscoreboard.com/early_signees.asp



    So it seems like no matter what the level of play, a decent % of junior golfers find a place to play somewhere - just need to adjust expectations and target schools appropriately given level of ability/performance, academics and schools' needs. If your heart is set on a specific school or group of schools, then it becomes a bit more dicey unless you are uniquely overly qualified.



    Additionally it seems like a lot of the email traffic coaches receive are from recruiting services, as well as many kids who have no chance (and probably know it).



    http://www.golfwrx.com/474418/stop-bothering-me-why-ncaa-golf-coaches-already-get-too-many-emails/



    "In the data collection, we also asked college coaches what percent of the emails are coming from “recruiting services,” and 27 percent of coaches are getting less than 10 percent from recruiting services, while 38 percent of coaches are getting up to 25 percent, 23 percent are getting up to 50 percent, and 12 percent are getting more than 50 percent of their emails from recruiting services."



    Lastly, I read recently that almost 12% of applicants to MIT scored lower than 700 on the Math section of the SAT. 1 out of 1828 applicants with < 700 Math SAT were admitted. So there are a ton of applicants who pretty much know they have no chance who are applying. Probably similar with aspiring junior golfers spamming coaches at top college programs.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,043 ✭✭
    CTgolf wrote:


    It is extremely competitive to play for a handful of top schools. But it doesn't seem that difficult to play college golf (or even D1 for that matter) in general.



    http://juniorgolfsco...rly_signees.asp



    So it seems like no matter what the level of play, a decent % of junior golfers find a place to play somewhere - just need to adjust expectations and target schools appropriately given level of ability/performance, academics and schools' needs. If your heart is set on a specific school or group of schools, then it becomes a bit more dicey unless you are uniquely overly qualified.



    Additionally it seems like a lot of the email traffic coaches receive are from recruiting services, as well as many kids who have no chance (and probably know it).



    http://www.golfwrx.c...oo-many-emails/



    "In the data collection, we also asked college coaches what percent of the emails are coming from “recruiting services,” and 27 percent of coaches are getting less than 10 percent from recruiting services, while 38 percent of coaches are getting up to 25 percent, 23 percent are getting up to 50 percent, and 12 percent are getting more than 50 percent of their emails from recruiting services."



    Lastly, I read recently that almost 12% of applicants to MIT scored lower than 700 on the Math section of the SAT. 1 out of 1828 applicants with < 700 Math SAT were admitted. So there are a ton of applicants who pretty much know they have no chance who are applying. Probably similar with aspiring junior golfers spamming coaches at top college programs.




    Hiring those recurring services I believe are a waste of money. Want to get a coaches radar seek them out and get opportunities to get in front of them. There are are so many ways to meet coaches you should have no problem finding them and they are actually very accessible if you approach them with the right frame of mind.



    You also have no business approaching a school if you can't at least score similar or very near what the current team does in tournaments. It pretty easy to find scoring averages. Some schools have shocking high averages especially for girls. If you score above the worst player I would think your chances are pretty slim unless it is a special circumstance.



    We also not talking about lowest score but actual averages over the last year. This why every tournament counts otherwise you going to have sell the coach on why that tournament raised your average.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,067 ✭✭
    CTgolf wrote:


    It is extremely competitive to play for a handful of top schools. But it doesn't seem that difficult to play college golf (or even D1 for that matter) in general.



    http://juniorgolfsco...rly_signees.asp



    So it seems like no matter what the level of play, a decent % of junior golfers find a place to play somewhere - just need to adjust expectations and target schools appropriately given level of ability/performance, academics and schools' needs. If your heart is set on a specific school or group of schools, then it becomes a bit more dicey unless you are uniquely overly qualified.



    Additionally it seems like a lot of the email traffic coaches receive are from recruiting services, as well as many kids who have no chance (and probably know it).



    http://www.golfwrx.c...oo-many-emails/



    "In the data collection, we also asked college coaches what percent of the emails are coming from “recruiting services,” and 27 percent of coaches are getting less than 10 percent from recruiting services, while 38 percent of coaches are getting up to 25 percent, 23 percent are getting up to 50 percent, and 12 percent are getting more than 50 percent of their emails from recruiting services."



    Lastly, I read recently that almost 12% of applicants to MIT scored lower than 700 on the Math section of the SAT. 1 out of 1828 applicants with < 700 Math SAT were admitted. So there are a ton of applicants who pretty much know they have no chance who are applying. Probably similar with aspiring junior golfers spamming coaches at top college programs.




    There are 300+ D1 schools. If every school takes two kids that is the top 600 of the class. The average ranking for the best schools or big schools is 80. The average scoring differential for a D1 player on JGS is 0.50. The top 300 going D1 will get some type of money. The next 300 will get very little if any at all.
  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 422 ✭✭

    CTgolf wrote:


    It is extremely competitive to play for a handful of top schools. But it doesn't seem that difficult to play college golf (or even D1 for that matter) in general.



    http://juniorgolfsco...rly_signees.asp



    So it seems like no matter what the level of play, a decent % of junior golfers find a place to play somewhere - just need to adjust expectations and target schools appropriately given level of ability/performance, academics and schools' needs. If your heart is set on a specific school or group of schools, then it becomes a bit more dicey unless you are uniquely overly qualified.



    Additionally it seems like a lot of the email traffic coaches receive are from recruiting services, as well as many kids who have no chance (and probably know it).



    http://www.golfwrx.c...oo-many-emails/



    "In the data collection, we also asked college coaches what percent of the emails are coming from “recruiting services,” and 27 percent of coaches are getting less than 10 percent from recruiting services, while 38 percent of coaches are getting up to 25 percent, 23 percent are getting up to 50 percent, and 12 percent are getting more than 50 percent of their emails from recruiting services."



    Lastly, I read recently that almost 12% of applicants to MIT scored lower than 700 on the Math section of the SAT. 1 out of 1828 applicants with < 700 Math SAT were admitted. So there are a ton of applicants who pretty much know they have no chance who are applying. Probably similar with aspiring junior golfers spamming coaches at top college programs.




    There are 300+ D1 schools. If every school takes two kids that is the top 600 of the class. The average ranking for the best schools or big schools is 80. The average scoring differential for a D1 player on JGS is 0.50. The top 300 going D1 will get some type of money. The next 300 will get very little if any at all.




    I don't disagree, although not everyone is angling for a scholarship. Plenty of D2 and D3 programs out there as well, with many D3 schools giving the equivalent of athletic scholarships.



    The reality is, unless you are aspiring for a career as a touring professional, you don't need to play for a big name school (and even then it's not a requirement).
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,724 ✭✭
    Not all recruiting services are created equal. Some of the guys who help with recruiting are extremely well connected. I can tell you some of my kids wouldn’t be at the school they are at without the help of a certain college recruiter. His connections opened the door but at the end of the day the juniors resume earned them a spot. They just would likely not of been looked at without a mutual connection.



    And I’m talking top 10 programs and VERY good juniors golfers as well as border line kids looking for a preferred walk on spot
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,043 ✭✭
    iteachgolf wrote:


    Not all recruiting services are created equal. Some of the guys who help with recruiting are extremely well connected. I can tell you some of my kids wouldn’t be at the school they are at without the help of a certain college recruiter. His connections opened the door but at the end of the day the juniors resume earned them a spot. They just would likely not of been looked at without a mutual connection.



    And I’m talking top 10 programs and VERY good juniors golfers as well as border line kids looking for a preferred walk on spot




    I wasn’t talking about having someone who is well connected to help you. I know there are former coaches who work with people and those may make sense. I would expect you would connect via referal to these people and have personal contact.



    The recruiting stuff I have seen just look like someone built a email server and spam people.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,043 ✭✭
    CTgolf wrote:


    CTgolf wrote:


    It is extremely competitive to play for a handful of top schools. But it doesn't seem that difficult to play college golf (or even D1 for that matter) in general.



    [url=&quot;http://juniorgolfscoreboard.com/early_signees.asp&quot;]http://juniorgolfsco...rly_signees.asp[/url]



    So it seems like no matter what the level of play, a decent % of junior golfers find a place to play somewhere - just need to adjust expectations and target schools appropriately given level of ability/performance, academics and schools' needs. If your heart is set on a specific school or group of schools, then it becomes a bit more dicey unless you are uniquely overly qualified.



    Additionally it seems like a lot of the email traffic coaches receive are from recruiting services, as well as many kids who have no chance (and probably know it).



    [url=&quot;http://www.golfwrx.com/474418/stop-bothering-me-why-ncaa-golf-coaches-already-get-too-many-emails/&quot;]http://www.golfwrx.c...oo-many-emails/[/url]



    "In the data collection, we also asked college coaches what percent of the emails are coming from “recruiting services,” and 27 percent of coaches are getting less than 10 percent from recruiting services, while 38 percent of coaches are getting up to 25 percent, 23 percent are getting up to 50 percent, and 12 percent are getting more than 50 percent of their emails from recruiting services."



    Lastly, I read recently that almost 12% of applicants to MIT scored lower than 700 on the Math section of the SAT. 1 out of 1828 applicants with < 700 Math SAT were admitted. So there are a ton of applicants who pretty much know they have no chance who are applying. Probably similar with aspiring junior golfers spamming coaches at top college programs.




    There are 300+ D1 schools. If every school takes two kids that is the top 600 of the class. The average ranking for the best schools or big schools is 80. The average scoring differential for a D1 player on JGS is 0.50. The top 300 going D1 will get some type of money. The next 300 will get very little if any at all.




    I don't disagree, although not everyone is angling for a scholarship. Plenty of D2 and D3 programs out there as well, with many D3 schools giving the equivalent of athletic scholarships.



    The reality is, unless you are aspiring for a career as a touring professional, you don't need to play for a big name school (and even then it's not a requirement).




    This why studying and doing good is very important. Plenty of kids get a free ride with academic scholarships. Big Schools have tons of ways to get money.



    Lettering and doing well academically while in college is a very valuable thing. It always has been even 100 years ago when Bobby Jones played.
  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Posts: 8,852 ClubWRX
    I keep hearing this statement. 'If you are good enough, the college will find you.'
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,724 ✭✭
    kekoa wrote:


    I keep hearing this statement. 'If you are good enough, the college will find you.'




    You better be really really good. One of my kids who had 8 straight tournament rounds of par or better in fairly big events had zero interest or offers until I called in a few favors and got him some meetings with coaches. He ended up with two offers from top 10 D2 programs and some mid major D1 interest.





    I’d suggest being proactive when the time comes. Doesn’t mean be annoying and spam them.
  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Posts: 8,852 ClubWRX
    iteachgolf wrote:

    kekoa wrote:


    I keep hearing this statement. 'If you are good enough, the college will find you.'




    You better be really really good. One of my kids who had 8 straight tournament rounds of par or better in fairly big events had zero interest or offers until I called in a few favors and got him some meetings with coaches. He ended up with two offers from top 10 D2 programs and some mid major D1 interest.





    I'd suggest being proactive when the time comes. Doesn't mean be annoying and spam them.




    Dan, if it was up to you would you prefer a kid attend a top tier D2 program or lower tier D1?
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,724 ✭✭
    kekoa wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:

    kekoa wrote:


    I keep hearing this statement. 'If you are good enough, the college will find you.'




    You better be really really good. One of my kids who had 8 straight tournament rounds of par or better in fairly big events had zero interest or offers until I called in a few favors and got him some meetings with coaches. He ended up with two offers from top 10 D2 programs and some mid major D1 interest.





    I'd suggest being proactive when the time comes. Doesn't mean be annoying and spam them.




    Dan, if it was up to you would you prefer a kid attend a top tier D2 program or lower tier D1?




    D2. The top D2 teams are can win D1 events and do.
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