Can I get some candid input from fitters?

DeeBee30DeeBee30 Members Posts: 318 ✭✭
edited Feb 8, 2019 8:36pm in Instruction & Academy #1
So...I’m going through the grind of deciding what I’m gonna do with the specs from my recent fitting, and a light bulb-type question just went off in my head: how likely is it that the fitter avoided having me hit a shaft simply because it’s available as a custom option from the factory, whereas the suggested model is truly more of a “custom”.



Background: my iron fitting specs call for Mizzy MP-18 SCs with KBS Tour V stiff shafts (110g). It recently occurred to me that my fitter never had me hit any heads with the “standard” KBS Tour shafts (120g). I’m currently in MP-52s with DG300 stiff (130g) with a 6i swing speed of 86mph (smooth tempo with a slight pause at the top). The Tour V got my launch angle from about 21* to about 18*, while reducing backspin from ~5800 to ~5300. All this increased carry from 161 to 172 (yes I realize the MP-18 is 1* stronger) and tightened dispersion enough to matter. FWIW, all lies and lengths are & will remain standard.



Now I’m wondering what kind of results I’d get with the Tour shaft. My understanding is that the ‘V’ is lower launch and lower spin than the Tour, but now I want to see how close they are. I’m not trying to cheap out, but if I could save considerable money on the iron shafts, I can spend it somewhere else (like the M5 w/Evo II shaft they’re recommending!).



I know I can go to any Mizuno Dealer and check out the shaft optimizer, as well as hit the Tour shaft from the cart, but what are some perspectives on (1) if you think a fitter would purposely avoid a shaft that I could get on my own and (2) if your experience with these shafts allows you to speculate somewhat reliably on how they might compare.



Thanks!

Comments

  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 23,070 ✭✭
    edited Feb 9, 2019 5:49am #2
    Well, when it comes to businesses and integrity - unfortunately anything is possible but in general I'd say when finding a fitter competence and knowledge is typically much more of a concern than integrity (and I'm not implying that there is anything you've shared to indicate a problem with competency in your case).



    How many different shafts did he have you test and what were they?



    Keep in mind that weight is actually much more important than flex or profile or launch characteristics - particularly with respect to accuracy, consistency and dispersion (which should be the focus for irons with a quality fitter). If something during the fitting lead the fitter to believe that the 110 gm range was a good weight for you, it wouldn't make sense to put much time or effort into the heavier offerings.



    And from what I can see, the only other shaft option that's close to that weight that Mizzy does offer as custom option would be the Nippon Tour 105 in X-flex.
  • MountainGoatMountainGoat Mid-MarylandMembers Posts: 1,660 ✭✭
    edited Feb 9, 2019 6:04am #3
    You really want "candid"? If you're a 10.5, it doesn't matter very much what iron shaft you buy. You've got issues above and beyond your launch angle and spin. Fitters focus on snazzy shafts, because that's where the money is. Get the club length, lie and balance correct, and you can play well with just about anything. I should add that I'm a certified fitter and club maker. Shaft specs are hugely important for drivers; not so much with irons.
  • KMo23KMo23 Members Posts: 136 ✭✭
    Didn’t you have a 2.5 hour iron fit? I’d say you can trust that fitter wasn’t trying to pull anything on you. Have you reached out to that fitter? Seems better to go to the source rather than random son an Internet forum.
  • toctoc Members Posts: 2,761 ✭✭
    You’re overthinking it
    Glove: ML
    Tees: 2 3/4
    Towel: white
    Repair tool: metal
    Ball Marker: largest poker chip in the world
    Iron headcovers: wait, what?

    The feedback system is annoying
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 23,070 ✭✭
    edited Feb 9, 2019 7:49am #6


    You really want "candid"? If you're a 10.5, it doesn't matter very much what iron shaft you buy. You've got issues above and beyond your launch angle and spin. Fitters focus on snazzy shafts, because that's where the money is. Get the club length, lie and balance correct, and you can play well with just about anything. I should add that I'm a certified fitter and club maker. Shaft specs are hugely important for drivers; not so much with irons.




    Sorry - but since you seem to be fine with true candidness ;-) - that mentality is doing a disservice to the people you fit. Are you really going to tell a 65 yo senior w/ a 75 mph swing speed not to worry about it and just go out and play 130gm DG's?



    While I agree that fixating on numbers is not a good idea - especially launch and spin - during the shaft selection, that's a very big difference from saying one can not benefit from a proper shaft fitting or that they should be able to just go out and play any shaft. Some players can manage it but it's crazy to expect it. The games already hard enough, putting them into a poor fit for shaft weight or flex (for those players that have built up certain expectations how how they think the shaft should load/unload) is making the job much worse and even be detrimental in some cases. Been there, done that, not doing it again. It's really only the much better players that should really be able to manage any shaft, not the mid or high cappers.
  • dave5405dave5405 Members Posts: 158 ✭✭
    On your first question, it’s certainly possible, but I would think most likely you’re getting a best recommendation not a cost benefit analysis.



    On your second question, My experience is that the Tour spins more and launches higher than the DG. I found the Tour V comparable to the DG with comparable launch and slightly less spin. Your results will vary, and feel is of course a whole different discussion.



    Are you certain the changes you’re describing are the shaft? What were your numbers in the SC head with the Tour V vs the DG300? I ask, because the changes you’re describing are pretty significant to put it all down to the shaft.



    Where did you get fit?
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,713 ✭✭
    The KBS Tour will go higher than the S300. The V is very different
  • DeeBee30DeeBee30 Members Posts: 318 ✭✭
    edited Feb 9, 2019 10:12pm #9
    Goat - in candor RE my being a 10.5, you really have no idea what’s contributing to my (falling) index. I know where the gaps in my game are, and getting fit into clubs for a good portion of my bag (along with changes to course strategy that I’m making) will definitely contribute to my continued improvement. It’s fine if you don’t think anyone but a low single-to-plus player should be fit, but it’s uninformed opinions like yours - couched as ‘candid feedback’ that contribute zero to peoples’ desire to gather constructive input. Now if you’re a qualified teaching pro and want to spend some time observing my swing and on-course play, I’d be happy to listen to your “feedback”.



    Thanks everyone else for the helpful comments. I understand that no one is able to understand 100% of all the variables because I can only post so much info, but I appreciate some of the perspectives anyway. I’d characterize the (Club Champion) fitting experience as very positive, and my post wasn’t intended to disparage it. By nature, I’m an analytical guy, so I probably am over-thinking the whole shaft recommendation thing.



    My priorities are to ensure that my equipment gives me the best opportunity to hit the best shots that my swing allows. When it comes to irons, that means tightening my lateral dispersion - hopefully concentrated more to one side of my target line vs. both sides, and I’m happy with the Tour V Trackman performance. Not just the numbers, but what it showed for shot consistency. I was just over-analyzing whether we missed something in another shaft, and I need to trust where we landed.
  • Krt22Krt22 Members Posts: 6,442 ✭✭
    You really want "candid"? If you're a 10.5, it doesn't matter very much what iron shaft you buy. You've got issues above and beyond your launch angle and spin. Fitters focus on snazzy shafts, because that's where the money is. Get the club length, lie and balance correct, and you can play well with just about anything. I should add that I'm a certified fitter and club maker. Shaft specs are hugely important for drivers; not so much with irons.




    There are scratch players who swing 6i 75 and 10 index guys who swing 6i 95+. To say what shafts they play doesn't matter seems pretty off base. Would you give a ctaper 130x to a guy that hits 6i 150yrds?



  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 23,070 ✭✭
    edited Feb 10, 2019 4:57am #11
    DeeBee30 wrote:


    I’d characterize the (Club Champion) fitting experience as very positive, and my post wasn’t intended to disparage it.




    That actually helps a little as far as the original question goes. For them, it doens't really matter to the price they will give you whether the shaft is offered by the manufacturer or not. Even if it's the stock shaft you'll find in the heads at any off the shelf retailer, they still order the shafts separately themselves (and charge you for them) and basically completely rebuild the clubs themselves. That extra work and extra cost is part of their "normal" service (which is extremely atypical compared to the vast majority of fitters).



    So there really isn't likely any question of integrity.



    Tons of threads on Club Champion if you want to get more info. Despite their cost 'issues', they do have a pretty good rep for the fitting results.
  • MountainGoatMountainGoat Mid-MarylandMembers Posts: 1,660 ✭✭
    Stuart G. wrote:



    You really want "candid"? If you're a 10.5, it doesn't matter very much what iron shaft you buy. You've got issues above and beyond your launch angle and spin. Fitters focus on snazzy shafts, because that's where the money is. Get the club length, lie and balance correct, and you can play well with just about anything. I should add that I'm a certified fitter and club maker. Shaft specs are hugely important for drivers; not so much with irons.




    Sorry - but since you seem to be fine with true candidness ;-) - that mentality is doing a disservice to the people you fit. Are you really going to tell a 65 yo senior w/ a 75 mph swing speed not to worry about it and just go out and play 130gm DG's?



    While I agree that fixating on numbers is not a good idea - especially launch and spin - during the shaft selection, that's a very big difference from saying one can not benefit from a proper shaft fitting or that they should be able to just go out and play any shaft. Some players can manage it but it's crazy to expect it. The games already hard enough, putting them into a poor fit for shaft weight or flex (for those players that have built up certain expectations how how they think the shaft should load/unload) is making the job much worse and even be detrimental in some cases. Been there, done that, not doing it again. It's really only the much better players that should really be able to manage any shaft, not the mid or high cappers.




    I'm being taken a little farther than intended. For a mid-capper, the primary fitting goal is to find a combination of components that promotes the ability of the player to achieve a center strike as often as possible. That's a job for length, lie and club balance (SW and MOI). Type of shaft matters to the extent that it affects those parameters. For a steel shaft, flex is less important that people tend to imagine. Spin and launch angle are way down the list of considerations.



    Modern fitters tend to give short attention to SW and MOI, and they have essentially no ability to adjust grip type and size during the fitting. These things are hugely important. In the present case, the OP never even hit the desired head with a standard shaft. The fitter went right to a lighter one. The only reason I might make that choice is if the golfer required longer shaft for some reason, and I needed the lighter shaft to achieve the right balance. To make that choice because of spin and launch angle puts the cart before the horse, so to speak.
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 23,070 ✭✭
    edited Feb 10, 2019 8:24am #13


    I'm being taken a little farther than intended. For a mid-capper, the primary fitting goal is to find a combination of components that promotes the ability of the player to achieve a center strike as often as possible. That's a job for length, lie and club balance (SW and MOI). Type of shaft matters to the extent that it affects those parameters. For a steel shaft, flex is less important that people tend to imagine. Spin and launch angle are way down the list of considerations.






    Good - I don't disagree with most of that. But it's still an incomplete approach.



    Shaft weight contributes and compliments MOI and is equally as important as swing weight (more for some, less for others). So to look at one aspect of weight and ignore the others is not a good approach. So you can't or shouldn't completely ignore the shaft selection.as implied in your original comments.



    And while for many it's true the flex really isn't very critical, there are certainly some people who have developed certain sensitivities to the feel of the shaft loading and unloading - so getting the stiffness profile (really feel) 'right' is very critical aspect of fitting for those individuals. If it's not, it can screw up tempo, rhythm, transition and/or release, impose a left or right sided bias, and be very detrimental to consistency and accuracy. And that possibility has nothing to do with the quality of the swing or the skill level of the player or whether the shaft is steel or graphite. So unless you actually test your clients with different profiles and actually see how the results change as the profile does, you'll never know if you are dealing with one of those individuals or not.




    Modern fitters tend to give short attention to SW and MOI, and they have essentially no ability to adjust grip type and size during the fitting. These things are hugely important. In the present case, the OP never even hit the desired head with a standard shaft. The fitter went right to a lighter one. The only reason I might make that choice is if the golfer required longer shaft for some reason, and I needed the lighter shaft to achieve the right balance. To make that choice because of spin and launch angle puts the cart before the horse, so to speak.




    That's not really a characteristic of modern fitters. Now I agree that is very true of the big box store or retail "fitters" - but using the term fitters or fitting for those individuals is stretching the term quite a bit more than it should be.



    For the OP we know one shaft he didn't try and one shaft he did try. We don't know anything else about what he may or may not have tried or how complete the fitting was - although Club Champion actually has a fairly good rep for the quality of their fittings.
  • JagpilotohioJagpilotohio 45+ inch drivers are evil. Columbus, OHMembers Posts: 7,221 ✭✭

    Stuart G. wrote:



    You really want "candid"? If you're a 10.5, it doesn't matter very much what iron shaft you buy. You've got issues above and beyond your launch angle and spin. Fitters focus on snazzy shafts, because that's where the money is. Get the club length, lie and balance correct, and you can play well with just about anything. I should add that I'm a certified fitter and club maker. Shaft specs are hugely important for drivers; not so much with irons.




    Sorry - but since you seem to be fine with true candidness ;-) - that mentality is doing a disservice to the people you fit. Are you really going to tell a 65 yo senior w/ a 75 mph swing speed not to worry about it and just go out and play 130gm DG's?



    While I agree that fixating on numbers is not a good idea - especially launch and spin - during the shaft selection, that's a very big difference from saying one can not benefit from a proper shaft fitting or that they should be able to just go out and play any shaft. Some players can manage it but it's crazy to expect it. The games already hard enough, putting them into a poor fit for shaft weight or flex (for those players that have built up certain expectations how how they think the shaft should load/unload) is making the job much worse and even be detrimental in some cases. Been there, done that, not doing it again. It's really only the much better players that should really be able to manage any shaft, not the mid or high cappers.




    I'm being taken a little farther than intended. For a mid-capper, the primary fitting goal is to find a combination of components that promotes the ability of the player to achieve a center strike as often as possible. That's a job for length, lie and club balance (SW and MOI). Type of shaft matters to the extent that it affects those parameters. For a steel shaft, flex is less important that people tend to imagine. Spin and launch angle are way down the list of considerations.



    Modern fitters tend to give short attention to SW and MOI, and they have essentially no ability to adjust grip type and size during the fitting. These things are hugely important. In the present case, the OP never even hit the desired head with a standard shaft. The fitter went right to a lighter one. The only reason I might make that choice is if the golfer required longer shaft for some reason, and I needed the lighter shaft to achieve the right balance. To make that choice because of spin and launch angle puts the cart before the horse, so to speak.




    Eeeh. Depends on the golfer. Launch and spin angle are EXTREMELY important to some. I’m one. I ended up in Tour V 120X almost entirely because of high spin issues. Shaft is incredible for me. I could play C taper S+ as well but I don’t care for the feel and the launch is a bit lower than I need.



    I should really use graphite for arthritis in my hands and shoulder, but I literally can not find a graphite that can mimic the Tour V. I’ve tried 9 different makes and models over 3 years. I LOVE the Recoil Prototype 125 feel, weight, and flight, but I spin them a few hundred Rpms too much. I have then in my wedges as a compromise, but I need to be very careful how hard I swing them.
    9.5* Cobra LTD, Old school Grafalloy Blue, 43.5"
    14* Cally 815 alpha fuji 665 X 42"
    16* Cally 815 alpha fuji 665 X, 41.5" (set to 17*)
    19* Titleist 816 H2 fuji 8.8X TS 40.0"
    4-7 2016 Hogan PTx, KBS Tour V, 120X.  
    Ping i210 8 & 9 Proto 125 F5 hardstepped 1x.
    Ping glide 2 46-12, 50-12, 54-14 (at 55) stealth, Vokey SM6 60M (61). Wedges Recoil Proto 125 F5
    33.5" Ghost spider slant neck.
    Srixon Z-star XV
    Jones Trouper Bag
  • DeeBee30DeeBee30 Members Posts: 318 ✭✭
    Stuart G. wrote:



    I'm being taken a little farther than intended. For a mid-capper, the primary fitting goal is to find a combination of components that promotes the ability of the player to achieve a center strike as often as possible. That's a job for length, lie and club balance (SW and MOI). Type of shaft matters to the extent that it affects those parameters. For a steel shaft, flex is less important that people tend to imagine. Spin and launch angle are way down the list of considerations.






    Good - I don't disagree with most of that. But it's still an incomplete approach.



    Shaft weight contributes and compliments MOI and is equally as important as swing weight (more for some, less for others). So to look at one aspect of weight and ignore the others is not a good approach. So you can't or shouldn't completely ignore the shaft selection.as implied in your original comments.



    And while for many it's true the flex really isn't very critical, there are certainly some people who have developed certain sensitivities to the feel of the shaft loading and unloading - so getting the stiffness profile (really feel) 'right' is very critical aspect of fitting for those individuals. If it's not, it can screw up tempo, rhythm, transition and/or release, impose a left or right sided bias, and be very detrimental to consistency and accuracy. And that possibility has nothing to do with the quality of the swing or the skill level of the player or whether the shaft is steel or graphite. So unless you actually test your clients with different profiles and actually see how the results change as the profile does, you'll never know if you are dealing with one of those individuals or not.




    Modern fitters tend to give short attention to SW and MOI, and they have essentially no ability to adjust grip type and size during the fitting. These things are hugely important. In the present case, the OP never even hit the desired head with a standard shaft. The fitter went right to a lighter one. The only reason I might make that choice is if the golfer required longer shaft for some reason, and I needed the lighter shaft to achieve the right balance. To make that choice because of spin and launch angle puts the cart before the horse, so to speak.




    That's not really a characteristic of modern fitters. Now I agree that is very true of the big box store or retail "fitters" - but using the term fitters or fitting for those individuals is stretching the term quite a bit more than it should be.



    For the OP we know one shaft he didn't try and one shaft he did try. We don't know anything else about what he may or may not have tried or how complete the fitting was - although Club Champion actually has a fairly good rep for the quality of their fittings.




    BINGO! on "some people who have developed certain sensitivities to the feel of the shaft loading and unloading"



    While steel shafts may not be as pronounced as graphite in many of these characteristics, I could tell a difference in how different shafts were loading (feeling boardy or whippy) and had different sensations of being able to feel where the head was at the top and during the downswing.



    Couple that feel with ball speed, spin rate, launch angle, height and landing angle, and it translated into some very real differences in terms of shaft performance, even with the same MP-18 SC head.
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 23,070 ✭✭
    DeeBee30 wrote:


    BINGO! on "some people who have developed certain sensitivities to the feel of the shaft loading and unloading"



    While steel shafts may not be as pronounced as graphite in many of these characteristics, I could tell a difference in how different shafts were loading (feeling boardy or whippy) and had different sensations of being able to feel where the head was at the top and during the downswing.




    Just to clarify, there is a difference between someone being sensitive enough to feel the difference and those different feels actually causing problems. Many can feel the difference but it will not adversely effect the swing. The big problems don't start until the player has established certain expectations for they think the shaft should feel and when the actual feel doesn't meet their expectations, it can throw the swing off quite a bit. Either it results in some type of 'balk' at or they try to force the shaft to load in a way that does match the feel (e.g. swing harder to try to increase the loading if it's too stiff. Or if too soft, decelerate to try to keep the shaft from loading too much.
  • baudibaudi Members Posts: 643 ✭✭
    At best the fitter could have build you one test club with MP 52 (nice head btw) paired the KBS TOUR V. Built to specs of 18SC (loft, hw)

    Then you would have felt and seen what this shaft does to your swing and trajectory in the course compared to s300. Quite A DIFFERENCE altogether. He also should give you a test club of the 18SC (for a day or week) with the best shaft Mizuno offers for your game.

    Afterwards you can decide which option is best: new shaft set up, new sticks Mizuno semi custom or Mizuno headed fully customized.

    Quite a price difference.
  • Krt22Krt22 Members Posts: 6,442 ✭✭
    Stuart G. wrote:






    And while for many it's true the flex really isn't very critical, there are certainly some people who have developed certain sensitivities to the feel of the shaft loading and unloading - so getting the stiffness profile (really feel) 'right' is very critical aspect of fitting for those individuals. If it's not, it can screw up tempo, rhythm, transition and/or release, impose a left or right sided bias, and be very detrimental to consistency and accuracy. And that possibility has nothing to do with the quality of the swing or the skill level of the player or whether the shaft is steel or graphite. So unless you actually test your clients with different profiles and actually see how the results change as the profile does, you'll never know if you are dealing with one of those individuals or not.






    Fully agree bend profile absolutely does matter. I saw dramatic differences in dispersion going to a different profile. I'd say for the average golfer flex may not matter as much, but for stronger golfers it starts to come into play. I have a quick transition so I get terrible numbers with softer shafts because I subconsciously react to the head lagging behind and then try to save it with my hands. Could I learn to hit that shaft? Sure, but it means throttling back and when I do decide to go after one the big left comes into play. Why try to suit my swing to the equipment when I can just as easily get the right shaft and tighten up dispersion without any changes to my swing
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 23,070 ✭✭
    edited Feb 11, 2019 8:45am #19
    Krt22 wrote:


    I'd say for the average golfer flex may not matter as much, but for stronger golfers it starts to come into play.




    Just my own (unproven) theory but I don't think strength really has anything to do with it. I think it really comes down to how the individual has learned to swing the club. What keys the individual has come to focus and depend on as input/feedback used to controlling the swing, particularly in this case, the release timing and sequencing. Since much of the time during the swing we can't see the club or where it is, we have to rely on other sources of input and different individuals have learned to use different inputs to gauge the progress of the clubs motion during the swing.
  • Chowdah86Chowdah86 Members Posts: 334 ✭✭
    edited Feb 11, 2019 9:20am #20
    Not a fitter. But I have played for a long time and have tested just about everything out there



    Find comfort in knowing it really doesnt matter as long as you get the following right:





    Loft



    Lie



    Grip size



    Shaft Flex



    Shaft weight (this doesnt have to be precise, but way too heavy or way too light will hurt your game)



    CG location.



    Look at address (thats on you)



    I basically fit myself for equipment. I switched to doing this a while ago and I am far better off. A basic understanding of the things above is all you need.







    Also, Im a 6 cap. And I have on many occasions shot the same differential using my grandmas old clubs when visiting her in naples.



    Hers: Graphite lady flex shafts from the mid 90s. -1”. Thin slick brittle ladies grips. Lie angle is way too flat for me.



    Mine: DG S300 +1/2”. +2*. Midsize tour velvets



    The two clubs of hers that may leave minute room for improvement on my game are the Old cally Warbird high lofted 3 wood and the acoushnet bulls eye putter.
  • Krt22Krt22 Members Posts: 6,442 ✭✭
    Stuart G. wrote:

    Krt22 wrote:


    I'd say for the average golfer flex may not matter as much, but for stronger golfers it starts to come into play.




    Just my own (unproven) theory but I don't think strength really has anything to do with it. I think it really comes down to how the individual has learned to swing the club. What keys the individual has come to focus and depend on as input/feedback used to controlling the swing, particularly in this case, the release timing and sequencing. Since much of the time during the swing we can't see the club or where it is, we have to rely on other sources of input and different individuals have learned to use different inputs to gauge the progress of the clubs motion during the swing.




    Perhaps I should have said faster. But yes, how you swing matters. I have a pretty compact backswing, quick transition, but still get my 6i up north of 93mph. Someone with a smoother swing can likely generate the same speed and be fine with a softer profile.
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 23,070 ✭✭
    edited Feb 12, 2019 8:31am #22
    Krt22 wrote:

    Stuart G. wrote:

    Krt22 wrote:


    I'd say for the average golfer flex may not matter as much, but for stronger golfers it starts to come into play.




    Just my own (unproven) theory but I don't think strength really has anything to do with it. I think it really comes down to how the individual has learned to swing the club. What keys the individual has come to focus and depend on as input/feedback used to controlling the swing, particularly in this case, the release timing and sequencing. Since much of the time during the swing we can't see the club or where it is, we have to rely on other sources of input and different individuals have learned to use different inputs to gauge the progress of the clubs motion during the swing.




    Perhaps I should have said faster. But yes, how you swing matters. I have a pretty compact backswing, quick transition, but still get my 6i up north of 93mph. Someone with a smoother swing can likely generate the same speed and be fine with a softer profile.




    Well, I get where you are coming from. Yes, how fast you accelerate the club certainly can effect how much loading actually occurs - and therefore how much the feel can change for a specific change in stiffness. So the potential might be greater for those aggressive transitions just because they would be subjected to a greater change in feel. But that's only potential, whether that potential is realized is more about what I was trying to address. e.g. given a particular change in feel, what's the likely hood that the swing will be influenced and change - which is really the core reason for significant effects to the final ball flight results and importance of the stiffness during the fitting.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • Swisstrader98Swisstrader98 Members Posts: 3,519 ✭✭
    Some good input here but now your head must be spinning and hence giving new meaning to spin rates😂



    In my head, fittings come down to 2 very simple notions: 1) do you trust your fitter and 2) are you happy with the results? If you answered yes to both, start enjoying your new sticks. EOS
  • DeeBee30DeeBee30 Members Posts: 318 ✭✭
    baudi wrote:


    At best the fitter could have build you one test club with MP 52 (nice head btw) paired the KBS TOUR V. Built to specs of 18SC (loft, hw)

    Then you would have felt and seen what this shaft does to your swing and trajectory in the course compared to s300. Quite A DIFFERENCE altogether. He also should give you a test club of the 18SC (for a day or week) with the best shaft Mizuno offers for your game.

    Afterwards you can decide which option is best: new shaft set up, new sticks Mizuno semi custom or Mizuno headed fully customized.

    Quite a price difference.




    This would have been ideal, but it's not their model - I can respect that. And as much as I'd love to have a test club for a period of time, it wouldn't do me much good here in Chicago right now. In the past, I've always bought clubs only after having the opportunity to take clubs out for a real range session and a round or two. This was my first time getting an extensive fitting done, aside from using them to select and install a shaft about a decade ago.

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