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Lesson Frequency? Duration?

hangontighthangontight Advanced Members Posts: 536 ✭✭
Juniors age?

How long between lessons?

How long does each lesson last?



Any other Releavant commentary on what you’ve found to be the best combination for your kid and why.

Comments

  • leezer99leezer99 Advanced Members Posts: 892 ✭✭
    11

    4-6 weeks

    1 hour



    Have the kid take ownership of the lesson. Warm up before the lesson starts. Work on what you learned in the lesson so you don't waste anyone's time and money.
  • wildcatdenwildcatden China Cat Sunflower Advanced Members Posts: 741 ✭✭
    edited February 19
    Juniors age? 8 Years Old

    How long between lessons? It's been 2.5 years since he had a lesson

    How long does each lesson last? 1 Hour back then



    Any other Relevant commentary on what you’ve found to be the best combination for your kid and why.



    My kid took "lessons" as part of a local junior golf academy when he was 5 till 6.75 years old. He also took about 1/2 dozen 30 minute private lessons with the instructor who ran the academy during that time. I think early instruction to get the fundamentals is a good thing to get them on the right path and to prevent injury from a poor swing. It is also very helpful if the parent is familiar with golf and the nuances of the golf swing (or can at least educate themselves). Having said that, the "junior golf coaching arms race" (and its associated "junior golf equipment arms race") are concerning. In my opinion, I find it strange that all of the experts say to be a multi-sport athlete and to take breaks from golf to avoid repetitive stress injuries.....yet people still push their 12&Under kids to play 40-50 tournaments (or more) year round not including range time, practice rounds, etc. I am actually watching my kid's athletic ability increase and unfold right before my eyes as we play baseball, ski, basketball and tennis. Perhaps as a reference for others, we have played 18 holes of golf and been to the range 4 times in 2019.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭


    Juniors age?

    12

    And 8





    How long between lessons?



    On average about every other month.



    8 year old is once a month



    How long does each lesson last?



    1 to 2 hours



    Any other Releavant commentary on what you’ve found to be the best combination for your kid and why.



    I think length of lessons and other factors depends on what a you need to accomplish. For instance once a week might make be enough other times not enough or too much.



    If just doing lessons to do lessons and have no goals then your probably wasting money.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭
    edited February 20
    Actually I should add this.



    When I started out having my kids take lessons I had an instructor who said the goal should to score x amount by this date. At first though that was great but truthfully he never addressed anything that resulted in real skills building. That thinking is very dangerous and will suck you into endless lessons.



    You should instead focus on skills the kid needs to learn. Scores are a direct result because you are missing putts or can't hit greens or something else is happening. Not sure if this makes sense.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • killer21killer21 Killer Advanced Members Posts: 103
    From the age 5-8 years - Girl. We did lessons hap- hazardly on an approximately monthly bases. 1 hour lessons. Several lessons per year but with no structure due to lack of facilities in the winter and tournaments and soccer in the summer. Lessons were kind of on a need be basis.



    This winter she is 9 years old going to be ten in a couple of weeks. It's time believe it or not to get more serious. She has grown stronger and more co-ordinated and realizes the focus she needs to play well moving forward. I think she is more mature mentally and physically to start to benefit more from lessons as well.



    This winter, we committed to a more structured program 12 hours over 3 months. 4 hours in December and so far 4 hours in February and 4 hours in march so works out to about every second weekend of 2 hour lessons.



    She is very focussed and can handle the 2 hour lesson consisting of irons, then driver, then short game to finish the 2 hour session. We practice 2 - 3 times in between lessons in a simulator or hitting net. So far we have completed 4 x 2 hour sessions and combined with her age and growth I feel she is benefitting from the structure and regular work which will continue going into the spring U.S Kids local tour season.

    Note, this is all in an indoor simulator and indoor practice facility due to weather.

    Note, I would also say this is likely less practice and lessons than most of the girls she is playing against. Possibly a lot less.



    I would say from about 10 on you have to be pretty serious about your coaching program if you want to compete unless your kid is obviously super talented on their own.



    I haven't pushed the structure until now but these kids are so talented, if you want to compete you have to improve. I don't think she was really ready to do the work to improve due to life getting in the way at the early age so I resisted not to push too hard.

    Her coach is great and it is working out that she is enjoying it and having fun at the same time. Looking forward to seeing how it goes this spring. I know all the other girls are working super hard so we'll see how it goes this spring.
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  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭
    killer21 wrote:


    From the age 5-8 years - Girl. We did lessons hap- hazardly on an approximately monthly bases. 1 hour lessons. Several lessons per year but with no structure due to lack of facilities in the winter and tournaments and soccer in the summer. Lessons were kind of on a need be basis.



    This winter she is 9 years old going to be ten in a couple of weeks. It's time believe it or not to get more serious. She has grown stronger and more co-ordinated and realizes the focus she needs to play well moving forward. I think she is more mature mentally and physically to start to benefit more from lessons as well.



    This winter, we committed to a more structured program 12 hours over 3 months. 4 hours in December and so far 4 hours in February and 4 hours in march so works out to about every second weekend of 2 hour lessons.



    She is very focussed and can handle the 2 hour lesson consisting of irons, then driver, then short game to finish the 2 hour session. We practice 2 - 3 times in between lessons in a simulator or hitting net. So far we have completed 4 x 2 hour sessions and combined with her age and growth I feel she is benefitting from the structure and regular work which will continue going into the spring U.S Kids local tour season.

    Note, this is all in an indoor simulator and indoor practice facility due to weather.

    Note, I would also say this is likely less practice and lessons than most of the girls she is playing against. Possibly a lot less.



    I would say from about 10 on you have to be pretty serious about your coaching program if you want to compete unless your kid is obviously super talented on their own.



    I haven't pushed the structure until now but these kids are so talented, if you want to compete you have to improve. I don't think she was really ready to do the work to improve due to life getting in the way at the early age so I resisted not to push too hard.

    Her coach is great and it is working out that she is enjoying it and having fun at the same time. Looking forward to seeing how it goes this spring. I know all the other girls are working super hard so we'll see how it goes this spring.




    Keep in mind that under 13 a lot of kids that look talented and can score low may not once they get older. I think we really see it with girls more then boys but I have girls so I not really paying attention to what is going with boys.



    My theory with the girls is a lot them do well because under 12 the courses are generally speaking much easier and are short enough that most can use shorter irons to hit the green. From what I seen is a lot girls have great short game but generally speaking not very good long iron play. The weakness in iron play is something that bites them on longer courses. I think with boys you tend to see faster club head speed so they tend to be better long iron play in general.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭
    killer21 wrote:


    From the age 5-8 years - Girl. We did lessons hap- hazardly on an approximately monthly bases. 1 hour lessons. Several lessons per year but with no structure due to lack of facilities in the winter and tournaments and soccer in the summer. Lessons were kind of on a need be basis.



    This winter she is 9 years old going to be ten in a couple of weeks. It's time believe it or not to get more serious. She has grown stronger and more co-ordinated and realizes the focus she needs to play well moving forward. I think she is more mature mentally and physically to start to benefit more from lessons as well.



    This winter, we committed to a more structured program 12 hours over 3 months. 4 hours in December and so far 4 hours in February and 4 hours in march so works out to about every second weekend of 2 hour lessons.



    She is very focussed and can handle the 2 hour lesson consisting of irons, then driver, then short game to finish the 2 hour session. We practice 2 - 3 times in between lessons in a simulator or hitting net. So far we have completed 4 x 2 hour sessions and combined with her age and growth I feel she is benefitting from the structure and regular work which will continue going into the spring U.S Kids local tour season.

    Note, this is all in an indoor simulator and indoor practice facility due to weather.

    Note, I would also say this is likely less practice and lessons than most of the girls she is playing against. Possibly a lot less.



    I would say from about 10 on you have to be pretty serious about your coaching program if you want to compete unless your kid is obviously super talented on their own.



    I haven't pushed the structure until now but these kids are so talented, if you want to compete you have to improve. I don't think she was really ready to do the work to improve due to life getting in the way at the early age so I resisted not to push too hard.

    Her coach is great and it is working out that she is enjoying it and having fun at the same time. Looking forward to seeing how it goes this spring. I know all the other girls are working super hard so we'll see how it goes this spring.




    Keep in mind that under 13 a lot of kids that look talented and can score low may not once they get older. I think we really see it with girls more then boys but I have girls so I not really paying attention to what is going with the boys.



    My theory with the girls is a lot them do well because under 12 the courses are generally speaking much easier and are short enough that most can use shorter irons to hit the green. From what I seen is a lot girls have great short game but generally speaking not very good long iron play. The weakness in long iron play is something that bites them on longer courses. I think with boys you tend to see faster club head speed so they tend to be better long iron play in general.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭
    killer21 wrote:


    From the age 5-8 years - Girl. We did lessons hap- hazardly on an approximately monthly bases. 1 hour lessons. Several lessons per year but with no structure due to lack of facilities in the winter and tournaments and soccer in the summer. Lessons were kind of on a need be basis.



    This winter she is 9 years old going to be ten in a couple of weeks. It's time believe it or not to get more serious. She has grown stronger and more co-ordinated and realizes the focus she needs to play well moving forward. I think she is more mature mentally and physically to start to benefit more from lessons as well.



    This winter, we committed to a more structured program 12 hours over 3 months. 4 hours in December and so far 4 hours in February and 4 hours in march so works out to about every second weekend of 2 hour lessons.



    She is very focussed and can handle the 2 hour lesson consisting of irons, then driver, then short game to finish the 2 hour session. We practice 2 - 3 times in between lessons in a simulator or hitting net. So far we have completed 4 x 2 hour sessions and combined with her age and growth I feel she is benefitting from the structure and regular work which will continue going into the spring U.S Kids local tour season.

    Note, this is all in an indoor simulator and indoor practice facility due to weather.

    Note, I would also say this is likely less practice and lessons than most of the girls she is playing against. Possibly a lot less.



    I would say from about 10 on you have to be pretty serious about your coaching program if you want to compete unless your kid is obviously super talented on their own.



    I haven't pushed the structure until now but these kids are so talented, if you want to compete you have to improve. I don't think she was really ready to do the work to improve due to life getting in the way at the early age so I resisted not to push too hard.

    Her coach is great and it is working out that she is enjoying it and having fun at the same time. Looking forward to seeing how it goes this spring. I know all the other girls are working super hard so we'll see how it goes this spring.




    Keep in mind that under 13 a lot of kids that look talented and can score low may not once they get older. I think we really see it with girls more then boys but I have girls so I not really paying attention to what is going on with the boys.



    My theory with the girls is a lot them do well because under 12 the courses are generally speaking much easier and are short enough that most can use shorter irons to hit the green. From what I seen is a lot girls have great short game but generally speaking not very good long iron play. When it comes to long irons they tend use hybrids or woods to try and reach the green. The weakness in long iron play is something that bites them on longer courses. I think with boys you tend to see faster club head speed so they tend to be better long iron play in general.
  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Charter Members Posts: 8,747
    edited February 26
    tiger1873 wrote:


    Actually I should add this.



    When I started out having my kids take lessons I had an instructor who said the goal should to score x amount by this date. At first though that was great but truthfully he never addressed anything that resulted in real skills building. That thinking is very dangerous and will suck you into endless lessons.



    You should instead focus on skills the kid needs to learn. Scores are a direct result because you are missing putts or can't hit greens or something else is happening. Not sure if this makes sense.




    If a coach said my kid should be shooting x by x date, I would run away really fast. In terms of lesson frequency and duration it depends on a lot of factors: age, skill level etc. I know when my son starts it will be once a month at most util he gets older snd an hr max mixing it up witha concentration of long and short game depending on what needs attention. The coach Ive been talking to charges $250/hr so cost alone prohibits me from seeing him more often image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭
    kekoa wrote:

    tiger1873 wrote:


    Actually I should add this.



    When I started out having my kids take lessons I had an instructor who said the goal should to score x amount by this date. At first though that was great but truthfully he never addressed anything that resulted in real skills building. That thinking is very dangerous and will suck you into endless lessons.



    You should instead focus on skills the kid needs to learn. Scores are a direct result because you are missing putts or can't hit greens or something else is happening. Not sure if this makes sense.




    If a coach said my kid should be shooting x by x date, I would run away really fast. In terms of lesson frequency and duration it depends on a lot of factors: age, skill level etc. I know when my son starts it will be once a month at most util he gets older snd an hr max mixing it up witha concentration of long and short game depending on what needs attention. The coach Ive been talking to charges $250/hr so cost alone prohibits me from seeing him more often image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />




    Just a question why are you paying $250/hr that seems insanely high for a junior. I can get some of the best instructor in the country for $250 an hour.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭
    kekoa wrote:

    tiger1873 wrote:


    Actually I should add this.



    When I started out having my kids take lessons I had an instructor who said the goal should to score x amount by this date. At first though that was great but truthfully he never addressed anything that resulted in real skills building. That thinking is very dangerous and will suck you into endless lessons.



    You should instead focus on skills the kid needs to learn. Scores are a direct result because you are missing putts or can't hit greens or something else is happening. Not sure if this makes sense.




    If a coach said my kid should be shooting x by x date, I would run away really fast. In terms of lesson frequency and duration it depends on a lot of factors: age, skill level etc. I know when my son starts it will be once a month at most util he gets older snd an hr max mixing it up witha concentration of long and short game depending on what needs attention. The coach Ive been talking to charges $250/hr so cost alone prohibits me from seeing him more often image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />




    Just a question why are paying $250 an hour for a lesson for a junior. That is an insanely high rate for any junior. I will not name names but if you look around you will find that most of the better teachers charge less then that for lessons. Most of the better teachers are probably between $100-$200 at the most an hour.



    For kids under 10 the best bet is to see an assistant pro. Some of them are very good and basically do 30 minute lessons for only $30. For the most part you will learn 90% of what you need from those guys.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭
    kekoa wrote:

    tiger1873 wrote:


    Actually I should add this.



    When I started out having my kids take lessons I had an instructor who said the goal should to score x amount by this date. At first though that was great but truthfully he never addressed anything that resulted in real skills building. That thinking is very dangerous and will suck you into endless lessons.



    You should instead focus on skills the kid needs to learn. Scores are a direct result because you are missing putts or can't hit greens or something else is happening. Not sure if this makes sense.




    If a coach said my kid should be shooting x by x date, I would run away really fast. In terms of lesson frequency and duration it depends on a lot of factors: age, skill level etc. I know when my son starts it will be once a month at most util he gets older snd an hr max mixing it up witha concentration of long and short game depending on what needs attention. The coach Ive been talking to charges $250/hr so cost alone prohibits me from seeing him more often image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />




    Just a question why are paying $250 an hour for a lesson for a junior. That is an insanely high rate for any junior. I will not name names of teachers but if you look around you will find that most of the better teachers charge less then that for lessons for juniors. Most of the better teachers are probably between $100-$200 at the most an hour. No one charges the same price as adults for kids.



    For kids under 10 the best bet is to see an assistant pro. Some of them are very good and basically do 30 minute lessons for only $30. For the most part you will learn 90% of what you need from those guys.
  • darter79darter79 Advanced Members Posts: 654 ✭✭


    Juniors age?

    How long between lessons?

    How long does each lesson last?



    Any other Releavant commentary on what you've found to be the best combination for your kid and why.




    Juniors age? 8

    How long between lessons? depends. But about every 6 weeks in the summer we do about twice a month

    How long does each lesson last? only an hour. Unless its a playing lesson working on course management and shots that are on a course
  • Golfingdawg19Golfingdawg19 Advanced Members Posts: 328 ✭✭
    Big key with lesson frequency is how often your child practices. If you don't practice very often then it will be awhile before you need another lesson. I see kids take lessons all the time who didn't work on what they were taught in the previous lesson. Every time they go see their instructor, its the same lesson over again. Most younger juniors go around once every 4-6 weeks. If there is a specific problem they need to address, they make go back sooner.
  • BertGABertGA Advanced Members Posts: 256 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:




    Just a question why are paying $250 an hour for a lesson for a junior. That is an insanely high rate for any junior. I will not name names of teachers but if you look around you will find that most of the better teachers charge less then that for lessons for juniors. Most of the better teachers are probably between $100-$200 at the most an hour. No one charges the same price as adults for kids.




    The instructors charging juniors full-price are top-tier, and able to charge whatever they want. They fill their books quick, and it doesn't make a difference to them what age. It's an hour of their time, and their time is worth $x.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Advanced Members Posts: 254
    Agree - price is a supply/demand issue. If you’re price sensitive, but you know the swing well enough to implement fixes and you’re knowledgeable enough to understand different swing philosophies, I would use the skillest app and find an instructor who’s philosophy you agree with. The most I’ve seen charged for a single lesson is $150.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Advanced Members Posts: 254
    edited February 26
    tiger1873 wrote:

    kekoa wrote:

    tiger1873 wrote:


    Actually I should add this.



    When I started out having my kids take lessons I had an instructor who said the goal should to score x amount by this date. At first though that was great but truthfully he never addressed anything that resulted in real skills building. That thinking is very dangerous and will suck you into endless lessons.



    You should instead focus on skills the kid needs to learn. Scores are a direct result because you are missing putts or can't hit greens or something else is happening. Not sure if this makes sense.




    If a coach said my kid should be shooting x by x date, I would run away really fast. In terms of lesson frequency and duration it depends on a lot of factors: age, skill level etc. I know when my son starts it will be once a month at most util he gets older snd an hr max mixing it up witha concentration of long and short game depending on what needs attention. The coach Ive been talking to charges $250/hr so cost alone prohibits me from seeing him more often image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />




    Just a question why are paying $250 an hour for a lesson for a junior. That is an insanely high rate for any junior. I will not name names of teachers but if you look around you will find that most of the better teachers charge less then that for lessons for juniors. Most of the better teachers are probably between $100-$200 at the most an hour. No one charges the same price as adults for kids.



    For kids under 10 the best bet is to see an assistant pro. Some of them are very good and basically do 30 minute lessons for only $30. For the most part you will learn 90% of what you need from those guys.




    If you’re getting discounted lessons for juniors, highly likely you’re just getting fundamental big-picture lessons (which most pga teachers can teach) and not real technical swing lessons/implementation. If a pro is teaching certain advanced technical swing changes and your junior can handle it, not sure why there would be any discount between junior and adult.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭

    tiger1873 wrote:

    kekoa wrote:

    tiger1873 wrote:


    Actually I should add this.



    When I started out having my kids take lessons I had an instructor who said the goal should to score x amount by this date. At first though that was great but truthfully he never addressed anything that resulted in real skills building. That thinking is very dangerous and will suck you into endless lessons.



    You should instead focus on skills the kid needs to learn. Scores are a direct result because you are missing putts or can't hit greens or something else is happening. Not sure if this makes sense.




    If a coach said my kid should be shooting x by x date, I would run away really fast. In terms of lesson frequency and duration it depends on a lot of factors: age, skill level etc. I know when my son starts it will be once a month at most util he gets older snd an hr max mixing it up witha concentration of long and short game depending on what needs attention. The coach Ive been talking to charges $250/hr so cost alone prohibits me from seeing him more often image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />




    Just a question why are paying $250 an hour for a lesson for a junior. That is an insanely high rate for any junior. I will not name names of teachers but if you look around you will find that most of the better teachers charge less then that for lessons for juniors. Most of the better teachers are probably between $100-$200 at the most an hour. No one charges the same price as adults for kids.



    For kids under 10 the best bet is to see an assistant pro. Some of them are very good and basically do 30 minute lessons for only $30. For the most part you will learn 90% of what you need from those guys.




    If you're getting discounted lessons for juniors, highly likely you're just getting fundamental big-picture lessons (which most pga teachers can teach) and not real technical swing lessons/implementation. If a pro is teaching certain advanced technical swing changes and you're junior can handle it, not sure why there would be any discount between junior and adult.




    Everyone I have ever seen worth anything has a junior rate that is cheaper than adult rates. It has nothing to do with quality of instruction either. In fact I have usually found it the opposite that the worse the teacher the less juniors they deal with and don't offer discounts.



    There are a lot reason's it make good business sense to teach juniors. I even heard of pro's teaching juniors for free just because they know the kid has talent and they can help.
  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Charter Members Posts: 8,747


    Agree - price is a supply/demand issue. If you're price sensitive, but you know the swing well enough to implement fixes and you're knowledgeable enough to understand different swing philosophies, I would use the skillest app and find an instructor who's philosophy you agree with. The most I've seen charged for a single lesson is $150.




    I've never asked, but I wonder what a guy like GG charges to see a junior. Last time I checked, he was in the $400 range/hr for adults, but his prices seem to vary with the individual.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭
    edited February 26
    kekoa wrote:



    Agree - price is a supply/demand issue. If you're price sensitive, but you know the swing well enough to implement fixes and you're knowledgeable enough to understand different swing philosophies, I would use the skillest app and find an instructor who's philosophy you agree with. The most I've seen charged for a single lesson is $150.




    I've never asked, but I wonder what a guy like GG charges to see a junior. Last time I checked, he was in the $400 range/hr for adults, but his prices seem to vary with the individual.




    I can tell you that for sure you can see 2 very famous golf instructors here in south florida for under $250 an hour. One of them is a golf channel regular and he is only $200 and the other has a lot golf schools around the country. Both are very highly regarded and you really can't go wrong with either them. There actually on the top end of the range here too. The regular adults advertised for them rates are high as $700 an hour.



    If you are in Texas you can get a very high regarded junior coach who was a former PGA player for $110 an hour who is probably as good as the guys above just not famous. Honestly I actually think this guy is better in some respects to the other guys on some things. He actually good enough I thought of flying to him a few times a year and spending a day with him just to see him. It this level where the value is in golf instruction.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Advanced Members Posts: 254
    Supply and demand. I can show you a 500 square foot apartment in Manhattan that costs $1MM.



    Stop being so critical about costs. You're clearly not spending it.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭
    edited February 26


    Supply and demand. I can show you a 500 square foot apartment in Manhattan that costs $1MM.



    Stop being so critical about costs. You're clearly not spending it.




    You have no clue what you are talking about. Instructors charge less for juniors and it all not what they can get away with either.



    Let's look at Jim Mclean and what he personally charges for juniors and that is only $250 an hour and he probably the most expensive rates for juniors. But having said that this is the advertised rate so I am sure he works out better deals when the financial need arises and he sees someone he wants to teach.





    https://www.jimmclea...n-by-jim-mclean



    I think most people would agree Jim Mclean is a top tier instructor and most us could get by with less.
  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Charter Members Posts: 8,747
    tiger1873 wrote:



    Supply and demand. I can show you a 500 square foot apartment in Manhattan that costs $1MM.



    Stop being so critical about costs. You're clearly not spending it.




    You have no clue what you are talking about. Instructors charge less for juniors and it all not what they can get away with either.



    Let's look at Jim Mclean and what he personally charges for juniors and that is only $250 an hour. This is the advertised rate so I am sure he works out better deals when the need arises.





    https://www.jimmclea...n-by-jim-mclean



    I think most people would agree Jim Mclean is a top tier instructor.




    You can't pull out one instructor who charges less for juniors and say it's the same across the board. Lets just say it depends on the instructor- because it does. For any top tier instructor you say charges less for juniors, there are those that charge the same rate across the board (junior, adult, senior, etc.).
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Advanced Members Posts: 254
    edited February 26
    tiger1873 wrote:



    Supply and demand. I can show you a 500 square foot apartment in Manhattan that costs $1MM.



    Stop being so critical about costs. You're clearly not spending it.




    You have no clue what you are talking about. Instructors charge less for juniors and it all not what they can get away with either.



    Let's look at Jim Mclean and what he personally charges for juniors and that is only $250 an hour and he probably the most expensive rates for juniors. But having said that this is the advertised rate so I am sure he works out better deals when the financial need arises and he sees someone he wants to teach.





    [url="https://www.jimmclean.com/golf-instruction-by-jim-mclean"]https://www.jimmclea...n-by-jim-mclean[/url]



    I think most people would agree Jim Mclean is a top tier instructor and most us could get by with less.




    Why is what they charge so important to you is my question. I thought you said anyone over $200 is too much and that, in your limited experience, the better ones charge less. If an instructor decides to discount a junior or work with that junior for free, why is that your standard? Are you in search for the instructor that will teach your child for less? Do you measure your child’s ability by what a coach decides to charge that junior (even if that’s free). Are you concerned that your junior isn’t getting the level of instruction that someone is getting from a $500/hour instructor and trying to justify your reasonable price point?



    Supply and demand doesn’t mean that there isn’t price fluctuation. I’m sure that same 500 square foot apartment would have sold less to the developer’s child or friend or any insider upon a new construction project.



    I just don’t get why you have a problem with instructors that demand higher prices. It’s their business - they charge what they feel is reasonable. Are you saying that the services an instructor provides in general isn’t worth more than $250 an hour? Is that the point you’re trying to make?
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭
    edited February 26
    kekoa wrote:

    tiger1873 wrote:



    Supply and demand. I can show you a 500 square foot apartment in Manhattan that costs $1MM.



    Stop being so critical about costs. You're clearly not spending it.




    You have no clue what you are talking about. Instructors charge less for juniors and it all not what they can get away with either.



    Let's look at Jim Mclean and what he personally charges for juniors and that is only $250 an hour. This is the advertised rate so I am sure he works out better deals when the need arises.





    https://www.jimmclea...n-by-jim-mclean



    I think most people would agree Jim Mclean is a top tier instructor.




    You can't pull out one instructor who charges less for juniors and say it's the same across the board. Lets just say it depends on the instructor- because it does. For any top tier instructor you say charges less for juniors, there are those that charge the same rate across the board (junior, adult, senior, etc.).




    I could pull another 20 instructors that do the same thing with links showing the same thing. Jim Mclean is a pretty good top tier coach and his record is pretty good. To be honest I would not pay more then what he charges to anyone else. His record is pretty good too. If you are not finding coaches that charge less for juniors you are going to the wrong coach for sure.





    Kekoa you don't have to spend a fortune to get a good coach. Shop around you will find a good coach in your area that works with juniors and that usually means they offer rates for less.
  • leezer99leezer99 Advanced Members Posts: 892 ✭✭
    It all depends on the coach. At Sean Foley's Performance Academy there are kids and families that pay $0.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Advanced Members Posts: 254
    leezer99 wrote:


    It all depends on the coach. At Sean Foley's Performance Academy there are kids and families that pay $0.




    Yep - and I have known kids at JPGA that attend for free as well.
  • hangontighthangontight Advanced Members Posts: 536 ✭✭
    leezer99 wrote:


    It all depends on the coach. At Sean Foley's Performance Academy there are kids and families that pay $0.




    Is foley teaching these kids, or is is a staff instructor? Serious question, curious.
  • leezer99leezer99 Advanced Members Posts: 892 ✭✭

    leezer99 wrote:


    It all depends on the coach. At Sean Foley's Performance Academy there are kids and families that pay $0.




    Is foley teaching these kids, or is is a staff instructor? Serious question, curious.




    It's a group of instructors.
  • malarayat4227malarayat4227 Members Posts: 3
    My 11 year old daughter made her middle school golf team last week. We decided now is a great time to start her on a more structured lesson/practice schedule with a teaching pro at our club. She just had her first lesson of a series (1 hr lessons) and it went very well. Coach suggested next lesson in 2 weeks. I am excited to see where this goes.



    She began golf at 6 and has attended 1-2x/month junior golf clinics, summer camps and school break camps at our club. She did PGA Jr League the last 2 years and had 2-3 private 30 min lessons with the team coach during the seasons.



    Other relevant details:
    • Her new coach is a recent PGA section awardee and accomplished tournament player. A number of his junior students have earned D1 golf scholarships. He also has students that have gone on to various Tours. His jr lesson rate is significantly less than what others have posted here and is the same as his adult rate (typical country club hourly lesson rate). I like him and take lessons from him as well.
    • Daughter is multi-sport. She does travel softball concurrently. She made her school soccer team this past fall…the first time she played competitive soccer ever. I hope she does not continue with soccer. Our family went skiing for the first time last week. We all had fun and will continue to ski.
    • These lessons are useless and a waste of time and money if she does not practice what she is taught. School practice is 3-4x/wk at the muni. Will add 1 practice session and minimum 9 holes/wk at the club.
  • orangebangorangebang Advanced Members Posts: 836 ✭✭


    Juniors age?

    How long between lessons?

    How long does each lesson last?



    Any other Releavant commentary on what you've found to be the best combination for your kid and why.


    14.

    Used to have lessons weekly, every other week. It grew to a month in between, and now it's once every 2-3 months.



    The lessons are an hour long, always on a grass driving range with video.



    She has friends that go weekly, but that's because the parents don't play golf or don't have time to accompany their kids to the range.



    For the better part of 2 years I was at every range session and practice session she had. I was able to keep an eye on her swing during practice, and send video to her instructor so if things went weird, he could give me some tips to work on. That helped a lot, so we didn't have to go to lessons as often.
    TM M2 10.5*
    TM RBZ Stage 2 3 HL
    Ping G10 21* 7 wood
    Cobra Baffler XL 4H
    Ping i e1 irons 5-PW
    Titleist Vokey SM6 Raw 50.08F 54.14F 58.12K DG S200
    Scotty Cameron Futura H14 Limited
    Seamus Snowtrooper Fescue Sunday Bag
  • BloctonGolf11BloctonGolf11 Advanced Members Posts: 185
    Know I am in the minority here but my son loves it, is improving, and has a great relationship with his coach.



    9 Years Old

    Once a Week

    30 minutes a lesson
    Dad's Bag

    D: Ping G30 10 degree, Aldila Reg Flex
    3W, and 7W: Cleveland Black, Bassara, Lite Flex
    5i - PW: Titleist AP1 716, DG XP90 Reg Flex
    W: 48 Cleveland Rotex 3
    W: 52 Cleveland Rotex 2
    W: 56 Vokey SM6 F Grind
    P: TP Mills Flat-T Proto
    Ball: Srixon Q-Star

    Son's Bag (9 years old)
    D: Callaway XR16, Flynn Shaft (Set to 15.5)
    3W: Cobra Biocell, Flynn Shaft (Set to 19.5)
    4H: Cobra Biocell, Flynn Shaft (Set to 25)
    5i-PW: US Kids Tour Series TS2
    W: 52, 56 degree US Kids Tour Series TS2
    P: Nike Oven MC-07W Prototype
    Ball: Wilson Duo Soft/Callaway Chrome Soft Truvis
  • barrysmootbarrysmoot It's Not So Much How You Drive, But How You Arrive ;) Advanced Members Posts: 397 ✭✭
    kekoa wrote:

    tiger1873 wrote:


    Actually I should add this.



    When I started out having my kids take lessons I had an instructor who said the goal should to score x amount by this date. At first though that was great but truthfully he never addressed anything that resulted in real skills building. That thinking is very dangerous and will suck you into endless lessons.



    You should instead focus on skills the kid needs to learn. Scores are a direct result because you are missing putts or can't hit greens or something else is happening. Not sure if this makes sense.




    If a coach said my kid should be shooting x by x date, I would run away really fast. In terms of lesson frequency and duration it depends on a lot of factors: age, skill level etc. I know when my son starts it will be once a month at most util he gets older snd an hr max mixing it up witha concentration of long and short game depending on what needs attention. The coach Ive been talking to charges $250/hr so cost alone prohibits me from seeing him more often image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />




    People I know that have gone to him say it also depends on what car you drive. I kid you not I have heard that from different people telling me. Some that drive down 2 hours from SLO and some that live nearby in Westlake/TO.



    To go back to the OP, I personally think group lessons while they are really young are the way to go. As they get really serious about it and really show they want to get to the next level, then private lessons. The big factor is $$$ and how much doesn't break the bank.



    I also think you can go back to the saying "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." I would initially go weekly if there are a lot of things to fix/work on. However, once lessons start to become the instruction and your kid is consistent, then maybe you can just do 1-2x/month or even less just to do maintenance work so they don't create bad habits.



    IMHO it's a balance between building a solid game and then maintaining. Just my 2 cents.



    BS
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