ANNOUNCEMENT:
Please have patience. We understand that this sucks and it will get MUCH better.

Link to full post HERE
Please add any bugs (problems) with new software in the Website Help Forum. There is a dedicated thread HERE.

Grandpa Syndrome

yellowlover519yellowlover519 Advanced Members Posts: 254
edited February 26 in Juniors/College Golf Talk
When did you first have your grandpa-syndrome moment with your junior in golf and how do you keep it in check, intentionally or otherwise? Or let's talk about any grandpa-syndrome moments as it has happened to me multiple times only to remind to check myself.



What is it: that moment when your junior hits an amazing tee shot or otherwise (can be a long putt, bunker shot, chip, punch shot...) and your hopes/focus on your junior's golf game changes. The grandpa-syndrome happens when you think you are raising the next Tiger or something similar to that effect and the time and investment keeps growing. The check happens when you realize there's a lot of growing to do.



I've had many and need to constantly check myself, but I think my first was when my son was 5 and won his fourth ever tournament start at a local event shooting a 44. It got checked quickly as he shot a 52 at the next event. Then it happened again at a regional only to be checked at world's. Then it's a shot here and there, only to remind myself that one shot doesn't define his ability or potential. One was at IMG when he was 8 and he had like 80-some yards over hanging branches and hit this towering 8 iron to 8 feet.



I call it grandpa-syndrome because the grandparents (especially since they never saw juniors play so well at a young age, even if they are knowledgeable golfers themselves) always seem to pour out the praise and expectations.



I know we've all experienced it and thought it would be fun to share and reminisce about those moments.

Comments

  • DavePelz4DavePelz4 A golf course in the Chicago area.ClubWRX Charter Members Posts: 23,998 ClubWRX
    I think my first grandpa-symptom (read senior moment) was when I quoted myself in the first post in a thread.
  • grewgrew Advanced Members Posts: 207 ✭✭
    I think my first grandpa-symptom (read senior moment) was when I quoted myself in the first post in a thread.


    DavePelz4 wrote:


    I think my first grandpa-symptom (read senior moment) was when I quoted myself in the first post in a thread.
    Ping G400 LST Kyoshi Black 05
    Cobra F7 3 Wood HZRDUS Yellow
    Srixon z745 Nippon Modus Tour 105 (x)
    52/58 Ping Forged Wedges
    Ping Vault ZB
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Advanced Members Posts: 2,905 ✭✭
    This is one of the reasons why winning at 9 doesn't matter. Winning too early and too often can give unrealistic expectations for the future. In sports there are two careers for most male athletes, before puberty and after puberty. What you do before puberty doesn't matter.
  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Charter Members Posts: 8,747
    edited February 26


    This is one of the reasons why winning at 9 doesn't matter. Winning too early and too often can give unrealistic expectations for the future. In sports there are two careers for most male athletes, before puberty and after puberty. What you do before puberty doesn't matter.




    Thanks goodness. Hopefully by puberty my son hangs it up.
  • augustgolfaugustgolf Golf with dignity Coastal NCAdvanced Members Posts: 3,881 ✭✭
    DavePelz4 wrote:


    I think my first grandpa-symptom (read senior moment) was when I quoted myself in the first post in a thread.




    [sharedmedia=core:attachments:4765536]



    Decided to utilize these when farting on the tee while my opponent tries to tee off



    cheap insurance



    definite grandpa syndrome moment
    Pings from the beginning

    OGA member 1415
    or is it 1514...
    I don't remember exactly
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭


    This is one of the reasons why winning at 9 doesn't matter. Winning too early and too often can give unrealistic expectations for the future. In sports there are two careers for most male athletes, before puberty and after puberty. What you do before puberty doesn't matter.






    This is a big thing a lot parents do not understand with young kids. In golf I view 12 as the last of the kiddie age tournaments.



    Having a 12 year old and looking at tournaments my kid will play is a sobering effect. The yardages jump and courses get much harder.



    The kids who won at 12 in many cases do not win or even perform in 13-18 age group. Kids who used to break par when they were 10 and 11 can’t break 90 now.



    On the flip side some kids get a lot better and suddenly are winning.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Advanced Members Posts: 2,905 ✭✭
    kekoa wrote:



    This is one of the reasons why winning at 9 doesn't matter. Winning too early and too often can give unrealistic expectations for the future. In sports there are two careers for most male athletes, before puberty and after puberty. What you do before puberty doesn't matter.




    Thanks goodness. Hopefully by puberty my son hangs it up.




    Happens to a lot of kids in a lot of different sports.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Advanced Members Posts: 254
    edited February 26
    I still think there’s a stronger correlation between juniors that did well before 12 and their high school rankings than the ones that did well and fell off that projected growth chart. While winning at 12u may not mean anything as you say, didn’t someone post that 75% of the US Kids world field over the past 10 years played collegiate golf. I don’t remember the exact stat but if it’s anything close to that, there is a strong correlation of doing well at 12U and going on to do well in high school; much more so than it being meaningless.



    Also - if you look at the top 10 boys on the Rolex rankings for AJGA, a lot seemed to have played US Kids Worlds which means they were winning at younger ages.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭


    I still think there’s a stronger correlation between juniors that did well before 12 and their high school rankings than the ones that did well and fell off that projected growth chart. While winning at 12u may not mean anything as you say, didn’t someone post that 75% of the US Kids world field over the past 10 years played collegiate golf. I don’t remember the exact stat but if it’s anything close to that, there is a strong correlation of doing well at 12U and going on to do well in high school; much more so than it being meaningless.



    Also - if you look at the top 10 boys on the Rolex rankings for AJGA, a lot seemed to have played US Kids Worlds which means they were winning at younger ages.




    Your confusing the part that a lot kids may play US Kids worlds but it by no means they won them. There is a big difference plenty of kids win at 12 because they simply developed early both physically and mentally more then other kids. By the time there 14 or 15 the other kids have caught up or surpassed them.



    Also the courses get much harder so just having a good short game is not going to work anymore you actually need a good iron game.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Advanced Members Posts: 254
    tiger1873 wrote:



    I still think there’s a stronger correlation between juniors that did well before 12 and their high school rankings than the ones that did well and fell off that projected growth chart. While winning at 12u may not mean anything as you say, didn’t someone post that 75% of the US Kids world field over the past 10 years played collegiate golf. I don’t remember the exact stat but if it’s anything close to that, there is a strong correlation of doing well at 12U and going on to do well in high school; much more so than it being meaningless.



    Also - if you look at the top 10 boys on the Rolex rankings for AJGA, a lot seemed to have played US Kids Worlds which means they were winning at younger ages.




    Your confusing the part that a lot kids may play US Kids worlds but it by no means they won them. There is a big difference plenty of kids win at 12 because they simply developed early both physically and mentally more then other kids. By the time there 14 or 15 the other kids have caught up or surpassed them.



    Also the courses get much harder so just having a good short game is not going to work anymore you actually need a good iron game.




    If they are playing us kids worlds, they at least won multiple events on their local tour. They have status. The point wasn’t winning worlds doesn’t matter it was winning at a young age doesn’t matter. In either case, don’t take the few that didn’t succeed at an older age and look at the overwhelming percentage that did have success in the high school years and that also won at some level when they were young.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭

    tiger1873 wrote:



    I still think there’s a stronger correlation between juniors that did well before 12 and their high school rankings than the ones that did well and fell off that projected growth chart. While winning at 12u may not mean anything as you say, didn’t someone post that 75% of the US Kids world field over the past 10 years played collegiate golf. I don’t remember the exact stat but if it’s anything close to that, there is a strong correlation of doing well at 12U and going on to do well in high school; much more so than it being meaningless.



    Also - if you look at the top 10 boys on the Rolex rankings for AJGA, a lot seemed to have played US Kids Worlds which means they were winning at younger ages.




    Your confusing the part that a lot kids may play US Kids worlds but it by no means they won them. There is a big difference plenty of kids win at 12 because they simply developed early both physically and mentally more then other kids. By the time there 14 or 15 the other kids have caught up or surpassed them.



    Also the courses get much harder so just having a good short game is not going to work anymore you actually need a good iron game.




    If they are playing us kids worlds, they at least won multiple events on their local tour. They have status. The point wasn’t winning worlds doesn’t matter it was winning at a young age doesn’t matter. In either case, don’t take the few that didn’t succeed at an older age and look at the overwhelming percentage that did have success in the high school years and that also won at some level when they were young.




    Winning at locals is not the same as winning at worlds. For some local events you just need to show up. This especially true of regions that are not competitive.



    Some the best kids out there never pick up a club until there 12 or 13 and in a year two win a lot tournaments. Happens all the time.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Advanced Members Posts: 254
    They still have to meet the scoring average. I think you just like to conform opinions to your personal situation. Are you saying that there are more juniors ranked in the top 100 of any given class that didn’t pick up a club until they were 12-13 than there are kids that played tournament golf and had success when they were much younger?



    Don’t say it happens all the time. That’s like saying there are plenty of high school junior golfers that are awesome and can only drive it 240. Of course it happens. That doesn’t mean that distance isn’t a huge advantage and the correlation between distance off the tee and the ceiling to go low is much higher than someone who lacks power.



    Or are you saying winning at a young age is not predictive of future success. This I agree with. However, you can’t deny the correlation.
  • kcapkcap Advanced Members Posts: 137
    Why do I feel this is Nth time we are having the same discussion on the forum. I think everyone should just agree to disagree on this topic.



    Winning at a young age helps but does not guarantee success.
  • leezer99leezer99 Advanced Members Posts: 893 ✭✭
    kcap wrote:


    Why do I feel this is Nth time we are having the same discussion on the forum. I think everyone should just agree to disagree on this topic.



    Winning at a young age helps but does not guarantee success.




    It runs in six month cycles. We'll be talking about it again in August.
  • augustgolfaugustgolf Golf with dignity Coastal NCAdvanced Members Posts: 3,881 ✭✭
    leezer99 wrote:

    kcap wrote:


    Why do I feel this is Nth time we are having the same discussion on the forum. I think everyone should just agree to disagree on this topic.



    Winning at a young age helps but does not guarantee success.




    It runs in six month cycles. We'll be talking about it again in August.




    [sharedmedia=core:attachments:4932302]
    Pings from the beginning

    OGA member 1415
    or is it 1514...
    I don't remember exactly
  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Charter Members Posts: 8,747
    kcap wrote:


    Why do I feel this is Nth time we are having the same discussion on the forum. I think everyone should just agree to disagree on this topic.



    Winning at a young age helps but does not guarantee success.




    HH is hard up on saying that winning early doesnt mean anything and doesnt guarantee success down the line. I agree with the latter only. I havent heard anyone say that their kid is winning everything as an 8 y/o and is destined to be the next Tiger so Im not sure why he keeps on with the broken record.
  • leezer99leezer99 Advanced Members Posts: 893 ✭✭
    kekoa wrote:
    kcap wrote:


    Why do I feel this is Nth time we are having the same discussion on the forum. I think everyone should just agree to disagree on this topic.



    Winning at a young age helps but does not guarantee success.




    HH is hard up on saying that winning early doesnt mean anything and doesnt guarantee success down the line. I agree with the latter only. I havent heard anyone say that their kid is winning everything as an 8 y/o and is destined to be the next Tiger so Im not sure why he keeps on with the broken record.


    #golfprodigy
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Advanced Members Posts: 2,905 ✭✭
    edited February 27
    kekoa wrote:
    kcap wrote:


    Why do I feel this is Nth time we are having the same discussion on the forum. I think everyone should just agree to disagree on this topic.



    Winning at a young age helps but does not guarantee success.




    HH is hard up on saying that winning early doesnt mean anything and doesnt guarantee success down the line. I agree with the latter only. I havent heard anyone say that their kid is winning everything as an 8 y/o and is destined to be the next Tiger so Im not sure why he keeps on with the broken record.




    I wasn’t the one that brought it up. It was brought up in another thread.



    Secondly, I am right.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • BeerPerHoleBeerPerHole Advanced Members Posts: 1,050 ✭✭
    edited February 27
    In my short time at golfwrx I have noticed that this juniors area of the site routinely has threads that turn into shite shows. That's unfortunate.
    Ping G400 Max, 8-degrees, tour stiff
    Mizuno JPX900 Forged irons
    Srixon Z Star & Snell MTB Black
    Alesian Space Dust IPA
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Advanced Members Posts: 2,905 ✭✭


    In my short time at golfwrx I have noticed that this juniors area of the site routinely has threads that turn into shite shows. That's unfortunate.




    That is because of the "Grandpa Syndrome". Parents don't want to hear what the reality is and we have all been there.
  • leezer99leezer99 Advanced Members Posts: 893 ✭✭


    In my short time at golfwrx I have noticed that this juniors area of the site routinely has threads that turn into shite shows. That's unfortunate.




    That is because of the "Grandpa Syndrome". Parents don't want to hear what the reality is and we have all been there.


    This forum is so cyclical... There will be a ton of posts for a couple days and then someone will get butt hurt, a fight will break out and then the forum goes silent for a week. Rinse and repeat the next week when someone else asks a weird question.
  • deadsolid...shankdeadsolid...shank ClubWRX Charter Members Posts: 14,334 ClubWRX
    They’re trying to make my grandkids into soccer or hockey players. I don’t know anything about those sports. They’re going to take away my “Grandpa Moment”opportunities!��
    Titleist 910 8.5
    Titleist 910 15*
    Titleist 910H 17*
    2-6 Mizuno MP-60, 7-PW MP-67
    SC GoLo
    Vokey SM5 52,58,62
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Advanced Members Posts: 2,905 ✭✭
    edited February 28


    They’re trying to make my grandkids into soccer or hockey players. I don’t know anything about those sports. They’re going to take away my “Grandpa Moment”opportunities!��




    Hockey looks like a fun sport to play. Growing up in the 80's in south Florida it wasn't something I had the opportunity to try. Kids now in metropolitan areas of Florida can play. Wish I knew more about the game.



    Soccer is as fun as watching paint dry. My daughter was 5 and came home from preschool. She told us at the dinner table that she wanted to play a sport. My wife, without blinking and eye, said "I can tell you one sport your not playing and that is soccer." Made me fall in love with her all over again. We gave her a list of sports to play and she picked tennis. She took lessons for a couple of years until she decided she was going to be a dancer.
  • HoosierMizunoHoosierMizuno Advanced Members Posts: 3,319 ✭✭



    They’re trying to make my grandkids into soccer or hockey players. I don’t know anything about those sports. They’re going to take away my “Grandpa Moment”opportunities!��




    Hockey looks like a fun sport to play. Growing up in the 80's in south Florida it wasn't something I had the opportunity to try. Kids now in metropolitan areas of Florida can play. Wish I knew more about the game.



    Soccer is as fun as watching paint dry. My daughter was 5 and came home from preschool. She told us at the dinner table that she wanted to play a sport. My wife, without blinking and eye, said "I can tell you one sport your not playing and that is soccer." Made me fall in love with her all over again. We gave her a list of sports to play and she picked tennis. She took lessons for a couple of years until she decided she was going to be a dancer.




    not to mention womens soccer is one of the leading sports for concussions.
    [font=georgia,serif]Ping G400 Max 10.5 w/ Hzrdus Black 6.0 75g
    TM M2 3HL w/ Rogue Black 70 S
    Cobra F8 19*
    J15CB w/ Modus 120X 4-P
    [/font]
    [font=georgia,serif]Cleveland RTX3 CB 50 54 58[/font]
    [font=georgia,serif]TM Spider Tour Black w/ T-sightline 36" [/font]
  • leezer99leezer99 Advanced Members Posts: 893 ✭✭




    They’re trying to make my grandkids into soccer or hockey players. I don’t know anything about those sports. They’re going to take away my “Grandpa Moment”opportunities!��




    Hockey looks like a fun sport to play. Growing up in the 80's in south Florida it wasn't something I had the opportunity to try. Kids now in metropolitan areas of Florida can play. Wish I knew more about the game.



    Soccer is as fun as watching paint dry. My daughter was 5 and came home from preschool. She told us at the dinner table that she wanted to play a sport. My wife, without blinking and eye, said "I can tell you one sport your not playing and that is soccer." Made me fall in love with her all over again. We gave her a list of sports to play and she picked tennis. She took lessons for a couple of years until she decided she was going to be a dancer.




    not to mention womens soccer is one of the leading sports for concussions.




    My son's golf coach is also a HS girls soccer coach. The concussion problem is for real.
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Advanced Members Posts: 2,905 ✭✭



    They’re trying to make my grandkids into soccer or hockey players. I don’t know anything about those sports. They’re going to take away my “Grandpa Moment”opportunities!��




    Hockey looks like a fun sport to play. Growing up in the 80's in south Florida it wasn't something I had the opportunity to try. Kids now in metropolitan areas of Florida can play. Wish I knew more about the game.



    Soccer is as fun as watching paint dry. My daughter was 5 and came home from preschool. She told us at the dinner table that she wanted to play a sport. My wife, without blinking and eye, said "I can tell you one sport your not playing and that is soccer." Made me fall in love with her all over again. We gave her a list of sports to play and she picked tennis. She took lessons for a couple of years until she decided she was going to be a dancer.




    not to mention womens soccer is one of the leading sports for concussions.




    It is also high on torn ACL’s for women.
  • BeerPerHoleBeerPerHole Advanced Members Posts: 1,050 ✭✭
    edited March 1
    My boy played soccer. It was interesting. He grew tired of the team sport dynamic...where the coach's kid gets to try to score a goal over and over. After a season and a half of begging the coach (I didn't get involved) the coach put my son at forward. 20 seconds in...goal! Then, back to fullback for another couple weeks. Then, begging, 20 to 30 seconds on offence and...GOAL! My son inherited the sprinter gene in our family. Fast kid, just flew past the opponents. He'd get a pass and all our parents would jump up and say, "There he goes!"



    He stood there, 11 years old, in front of the other parents at a practice and said, "I've decided to retire from soccer to focus on golf." It was cute. The problem with kids sports is the parents...



    I hope I get to be a sports grandpa...
    Ping G400 Max, 8-degrees, tour stiff
    Mizuno JPX900 Forged irons
    Srixon Z Star & Snell MTB Black
    Alesian Space Dust IPA
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Advanced Members Posts: 2,905 ✭✭


    My boy played soccer. It was interesting. He grew tired of the team sport dynamic...where the coach's kid gets to try to score a goal over and over. After a season and a half of begging the coach (I didn't get involved) the coach put my son at forward. 20 seconds in...goal! Then, back to fullback for another couple weeks. Then, begging, 20 to 30 seconds on offence and...GOAL! My son inherited the sprinter gene in our family. Fast kid, just flew past the opponents. He'd get a pass and all our parents would jump up and say, "There he goes!"



    He stood there, 11 years old, in front of the other parents at a practice and said, "I've decided to retire from soccer to focus on golf." It was cute. The problem with kids sports is the parents...



    I hope I get to be a sports grandpa...




    This is awesome.



    The happiest day of my parenting career is when my kid decided he didn't want to play baseball anymore. I was tired of being around the other parents who wanted Johnny to play baseball year round. They were doing it for coach pitch so their kid could earn a scholarship at 18. I still laugh about it. Now they are playing travel tee ball in Florida. It blows my mind. The entire dynamic of travel baseball has ruined all of youth sports. Too many people trying to make a dime off of kids and sports in general. It honestly makes me sick.



    I taught and coached basketball in an inner city school in Orlando 25 years ago. Had 4 kids from my team get involved with an AAU coach. He had asked them for $500.00 each to go to a tournament. I told the kids and their parents to watch out from this guy because he was a crook. Sure enough, they all payed the $500.00 and the coach never showed up to pick them up. These were kids that couldn't afford the $500.00. The guy left town and no one ever heard from him again.
  • wildcatdenwildcatden China Cat Sunflower Advanced Members Posts: 743 ✭✭



    My boy played soccer. It was interesting. He grew tired of the team sport dynamic...where the coach's kid gets to try to score a goal over and over. After a season and a half of begging the coach (I didn't get involved) the coach put my son at forward. 20 seconds in...goal! Then, back to fullback for another couple weeks. Then, begging, 20 to 30 seconds on offence and...GOAL! My son inherited the sprinter gene in our family. Fast kid, just flew past the opponents. He'd get a pass and all our parents would jump up and say, "There he goes!"



    He stood there, 11 years old, in front of the other parents at a practice and said, "I've decided to retire from soccer to focus on golf." It was cute. The problem with kids sports is the parents...



    I hope I get to be a sports grandpa...




    This is awesome.



    The happiest day of my parenting career is when my kid decided he didn't want to play baseball anymore. I was tired of being around the other parents who wanted Johnny to play baseball year round. They were doing it for coach pitch so their kid could earn a scholarship at 18. I still laugh about it. Now they are playing travel tee ball in Florida. It blows my mind. The entire dynamic of travel baseball has ruined all of youth sports. Too many people trying to make a dime off of kids and sports in general. It honestly makes me sick.



    I taught and coached basketball in an inner city school in Orlando 25 years ago. Had 4 kids from my team get involved with an AAU coach. He had asked them for $500.00 each to go to a tournament. I told the kids and their parents to watch out from this guy because he was a crook. Sure enough, they all payed the $500.00 and the coach never showed up to pick them up. These were kids that couldn't afford the $500.00. The guy left town and no one ever heard from him again.




    Wow the "crook coach" is terrible. Hope the karma caught up with him.



    With Little League baseball, I talked with a baseball dad about why his kid stopped playing LL at age 9-10 (AAA level here) and started playing travel ball. He said it was because of the LL coaches playing favoritism to their own kids and the other asst coaches kids. He said at least with travel ball you have a "professional" (his words not mine) that doesn't play favorites like the "dad coaches" do. Good old fashioned LL is dying here. For A-Ball through Majors, there are only 5 teams per level. We have had to coordinate with a neighboring LL (which also only has 5 teams per level) to schedule out a season. I'm surprised these two LL's haven't merged, but that is probably more politics and power hunger.
  • BeerPerHoleBeerPerHole Advanced Members Posts: 1,050 ✭✭



    My boy played soccer. It was interesting. He grew tired of the team sport dynamic...where the coach's kid gets to try to score a goal over and over. After a season and a half of begging the coach (I didn't get involved) the coach put my son at forward. 20 seconds in...goal! Then, back to fullback for another couple weeks. Then, begging, 20 to 30 seconds on offence and...GOAL! My son inherited the sprinter gene in our family. Fast kid, just flew past the opponents. He'd get a pass and all our parents would jump up and say, "There he goes!"



    He stood there, 11 years old, in front of the other parents at a practice and said, "I've decided to retire from soccer to focus on golf." It was cute. The problem with kids sports is the parents...



    I hope I get to be a sports grandpa...




    This is awesome.



    The happiest day of my parenting career is when my kid decided he didn't want to play baseball anymore. I was tired of being around the other parents who wanted Johnny to play baseball year round. They were doing it for coach pitch so their kid could earn a scholarship at 18. I still laugh about it. Now they are playing travel tee ball in Florida. It blows my mind. The entire dynamic of travel baseball has ruined all of youth sports. Too many people trying to make a dime off of kids and sports in general. It honestly makes me sick.



    I taught and coached basketball in an inner city school in Orlando 25 years ago. Had 4 kids from my team get involved with an AAU coach. He had asked them for $500.00 each to go to a tournament. I told the kids and their parents to watch out from this guy because he was a crook. Sure enough, they all payed the $500.00 and the coach never showed up to pick them up. These were kids that couldn't afford the $500.00. The guy left town and no one ever heard from him again.


    OMG...who could do that to kids? Terrible.



    The parental behavior a youth soccer games was terrible. Terrible. Had a guy try to start a fight with me right in front of his wife and poor kid. I just shook my head and walked in disbelief...



    I played pop warner football when little. Now, a friend of mind who's coaching peewee football has to break up fist fights between parents (even from the same team) almost every game.



    Watch Idiocracy...(you're welcome in advance)
    Ping G400 Max, 8-degrees, tour stiff
    Mizuno JPX900 Forged irons
    Srixon Z Star & Snell MTB Black
    Alesian Space Dust IPA
  • deadsolid...shankdeadsolid...shank ClubWRX Charter Members Posts: 14,334 ClubWRX




    They’re trying to make my grandkids into soccer or hockey players. I don’t know anything about those sports. They’re going to take away my “Grandpa Moment”opportunities!��




    Hockey looks like a fun sport to play. Growing up in the 80's in south Florida it wasn't something I had the opportunity to try. Kids now in metropolitan areas of Florida can play. Wish I knew more about the game.



    Soccer is as fun as watching paint dry. My daughter was 5 and came home from preschool. She told us at the dinner table that she wanted to play a sport. My wife, without blinking and eye, said "I can tell you one sport your not playing and that is soccer." Made me fall in love with her all over again. We gave her a list of sports to play and she picked tennis. She took lessons for a couple of years until she decided she was going to be a dancer.




    not to mention womens soccer is one of the leading sports for concussions.




    It is also high on torn ACL’s for women.




    I’ve posted this on here before, but it still seems pertinent. My daughter in law played D1 soccer. My son was a D2 linebacker. She has many more physical issues resulting from the college athletics thian he does.
    Titleist 910 8.5
    Titleist 910 15*
    Titleist 910H 17*
    2-6 Mizuno MP-60, 7-PW MP-67
    SC GoLo
    Vokey SM5 52,58,62
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Advanced Members Posts: 254
    leezer99 wrote:

    kcap wrote:


    Why do I feel this is Nth time we are having the same discussion on the forum. I think everyone should just agree to disagree on this topic.



    Winning at a young age helps but does not guarantee success.




    It runs in six month cycles. We'll be talking about it again in August.




    Why wait 6 months? Just looked at the the Rolex rankings and top 3 males either won UKSG worlds or did well several years at 12u. I’m sure if I took the time to research the top 100, the majority will have had success at 12u at the USKG level, winning local/regional tourneys (not only USKG) and going to world’s. Since the Rolex rankings is a strong indicator on getting an offer at top D1, the correlation of success at 12u and playing major D1 seems to be strong.



    At the pro level - time will tell. USKG hasn’t been around long enough for an accurate sample set. I would say the next 10-15 years will be telling if there’s a correlation between 12u success and the pro level. Obviously, that correlation isn’t going to be as strong as playing D1 bc kids give verbals at 15-16, so the age gap is much smaller between 12u success and college commits/signings.



    So I still believe success at 12u matters. Whether it’s experience or confidence, it matters. Yes, post-puberty matters more on what you will do with that opportunity, but you can’t deny the correlation if your aspirations are having an OPPORTUNITY to play D1 golf.



    I’m sure we’re going to head down the road that playing for a non power 5/65 is more beneficial or opportunities at top DII is better; better yet, all the examples of the players that played well and never even qualified for world’s (USKG or IMG (Rory, els, Tiger, Day, Finau, Phil...) yada-yada-yada...



    But really, isn’t the barometer for most on this forum D1 golf at a high level?

  • leezer99leezer99 Advanced Members Posts: 893 ✭✭

    leezer99 wrote:

    kcap wrote:


    Why do I feel this is Nth time we are having the same discussion on the forum. I think everyone should just agree to disagree on this topic.



    Winning at a young age helps but does not guarantee success.




    It runs in six month cycles. We'll be talking about it again in August.




    Why wait 6 months? Just looked at the the Rolex rankings and top 3 males either won UKSG worlds or did well several years at 12u. I'm sure if I took the time to research the top 100, the majority will have had success at 12u at the USKG level, winning local/regional tourneys (not only USKG) and going to world's. Since the Rolex rankings is a strong indicator on getting an offer at top D1, the correlation of success at 12u and playing major D1 seems to be strong.



    At the pro level - time will tell. USKG hasn't been around long enough for an accurate sample set. I would say the next 10-15 years will be telling if there's a correlation between 12u success and the pro level. Obviously, that correlation isn't going to be as strong as playing D1 bc kids give verbals at 15-16, so the age gap is much smaller between 12u success and college commits/signings.



    So I still believe success at 12u matters. Whether it's experience or confidence, it matters. Yes, post-puberty matters more on what you will do with that opportunity, but you can't deny the correlation if your aspirations are having an OPPORTUNITY to play D1 golf.



    I'm sure we're going to head down the road that playing for a non power 5/65 is more beneficial or opportunities at top DII is better; better yet, all the examples of the players that played well and never even qualified for world's (USKG or IMG (Rory, els, Tiger, Day, Finau, Phil...) yada-yada-yada...



    But really, isn't the barometer for most on this forum D1 golf at a high level?




    Tiger won IMG Worlds a bunch of times..



    http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1984



    http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1985



    http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1988



    http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1989



    http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1990



    http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1991
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭
    edited March 4
    Stop beating a dead horse. Winning tournaments under 13 means nothing. Above 13 is what matters and always will. You can miss greens have a bad swing and you will still do well and win kiddie tournaments. Lots of parents dream dies when their kids turn 13. At that age it starts to be obvious who can really hit and who can’t



    Winning on short easy kiddie courses is a different skill set set then real courses that need real skills. Like anything playing at a young age helps but that is about all you can say about it.



    If anyone says they can predict success from looking at younger kids there just giving a line of BS.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Advanced Members Posts: 254
    tiger1873 wrote:


    Stop beating a dead horse. Winning tournaments under 13 means nothing. Above 13 is what matters and always will. You can miss greens have a bad swing and you will still do well and win kiddie tournaments. Lots of parents dream dies when their kids turn 13. At that age it starts to be obvious who can really hit and who can’t



    Winning on short easy kiddie courses is a different skill set set then real courses that need real skills. Like anything playing at a young age helps but that is about all you can say about it.



    If anyone says they can predict success from looking at younger kids there just giving a line of BS.




    Do you know the difference between predictive success and correlation? I think the argument is around whether there is a correlation, hence, whether it matters.



    I think Rolex rankings is a pretty good data point on this. What’s your data against the correlation?

    leezer99 wrote:


    leezer99 wrote:

    kcap wrote:


    Why do I feel this is Nth time we are having the same discussion on the forum. I think everyone should just agree to disagree on this topic.



    Winning at a young age helps but does not guarantee success.




    It runs in six month cycles. We'll be talking about it again in August.




    Why wait 6 months? Just looked at the the Rolex rankings and top 3 males either won UKSG worlds or did well several years at 12u. I'm sure if I took the time to research the top 100, the majority will have had success at 12u at the USKG level, winning local/regional tourneys (not only USKG) and going to world's. Since the Rolex rankings is a strong indicator on getting an offer at top D1, the correlation of success at 12u and playing major D1 seems to be strong.



    At the pro level - time will tell. USKG hasn't been around long enough for an accurate sample set. I would say the next 10-15 years will be telling if there's a correlation between 12u success and the pro level. Obviously, that correlation isn't going to be as strong as playing D1 bc kids give verbals at 15-16, so the age gap is much smaller between 12u success and college commits/signings.



    So I still believe success at 12u matters. Whether it's experience or confidence, it matters. Yes, post-puberty matters more on what you will do with that opportunity, but you can't deny the correlation if your aspirations are having an OPPORTUNITY to play D1 golf.



    I'm sure we're going to head down the road that playing for a non power 5/65 is more beneficial or opportunities at top DII is better; better yet, all the examples of the players that played well and never even qualified for world's (USKG or IMG (Rory, els, Tiger, Day, Finau, Phil...) yada-yada-yada...



    But really, isn't the barometer for most on this forum D1 golf at a high level?




    Tiger won IMG Worlds a bunch of times..



    [url="http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1984"]http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1984[/url]



    [url="http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1985"]http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1985[/url]



    [url="http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1988"]http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1988[/url]



    [url="http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1989"]http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1989[/url]



    [url="http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1990"]http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1990[/url]



    [url="http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1991"]http://www.juniorworldgolf.com/node/13408?pg=1991[/url]




    Yes, the aforementioned players all played IMG - was saying that you can’t just use USKG.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭
    edited March 4

    tiger1873 wrote:


    Stop beating a dead horse. Winning tournaments under 13 means nothing. Above 13 is what matters and always will. You can miss greens have a bad swing and you will still do well and win kiddie tournaments. Lots of parents dream dies when their kids turn 13. At that age it starts to be obvious who can really hit and who can’t



    Winning on short easy kiddie courses is a different skill set set then real courses that need real skills. Like anything playing at a young age helps but that is about all you can say about it.



    If anyone says they can predict success from looking at younger kids there just giving a line of BS.




    Do you know the difference between predictive success and correlation? I think the argument is around whether there is a correlation, hence, whether it matters.



    I think Rolex rankings is a pretty good data point on this. What’s your data against the correlation?.




    There is no such thing as predictive success. It been tried for generations and you know what no one has ever been correct.



    You can read stats or interpert data all you want but there is no way to read what kid desires or work ethic will be when their 18 or 20. You can hope but a lot kids burn out lose interest and don’t care anymore. If there a way to guarantee success don’t you think with all the money in sports that someone wouldn’t have found a way to profit off it.



    Want to know who going to turn pro look at the college and amature ranking those at the top usually do. How they get there though is unique for every player.
  • BeerPerHoleBeerPerHole Advanced Members Posts: 1,050 ✭✭





    They’re trying to make my grandkids into soccer or hockey players. I don’t know anything about those sports. They’re going to take away my “Grandpa Moment”opportunities!��




    Hockey looks like a fun sport to play. Growing up in the 80's in south Florida it wasn't something I had the opportunity to try. Kids now in metropolitan areas of Florida can play. Wish I knew more about the game.



    Soccer is as fun as watching paint dry. My daughter was 5 and came home from preschool. She told us at the dinner table that she wanted to play a sport. My wife, without blinking and eye, said "I can tell you one sport your not playing and that is soccer." Made me fall in love with her all over again. We gave her a list of sports to play and she picked tennis. She took lessons for a couple of years until she decided she was going to be a dancer.




    not to mention womens soccer is one of the leading sports for concussions.




    It is also high on torn ACL’s for women.




    I’ve posted this on here before, but it still seems pertinent. My daughter in law played D1 soccer. My son was a D2 linebacker. She has many more physical issues resulting from the college athletics thian he does.
    I was a D2 fullback. That's why I walk like Fred Sanford now...
    Ping G400 Max, 8-degrees, tour stiff
    Mizuno JPX900 Forged irons
    Srixon Z Star & Snell MTB Black
    Alesian Space Dust IPA
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Advanced Members Posts: 2,905 ✭✭
    edited March 6


    I was a D2 fullback. That's why I walk like Fred Sanford now...




    Why is it the Sanford and Son's theme song is now resonating in my head? Won't get rid of this tune for several hours now. Thanks.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • BeerPerHoleBeerPerHole Advanced Members Posts: 1,050 ✭✭



    I was a D2 fullback. That's why I walk like Fred Sanford now...




    Why is it the Sanford and Son's theme song is now resonating in my head? Won't get rid of this tune for several hours now. Thanks.
    Haha!!! You're welcome. Great theme song. By the way I love, love, love that avatar! I'm going to drop that way from now on...
    Ping G400 Max, 8-degrees, tour stiff
    Mizuno JPX900 Forged irons
    Srixon Z Star & Snell MTB Black
    Alesian Space Dust IPA
  • PetethreeputPetethreeput Advanced Members Posts: 1,409 ✭✭


    They’re trying to make my grandkids into soccer or hockey players. I don’t know anything about those sports. They’re going to take away my “Grandpa Moment”opportunities!��




    I don't want to derail the thread, but after 40 years in these sports, I think I can help you be a more active fan and by proxy, others in a similar situation for these two sports.



    Hockey: First off, no one can really hear you except the other parents, the rink is loud with sticks, pucks, skates, etc. so know that. Many parents stick with these basics, but you can expand as you see fit and each can then be yelled louder with the annoying question tone for emphasis when there is no change. "Hit 'em!" "Step up!" "Don't watch the puck!" "Skate!" "Clear out the front!" "Keep your legs moving!"

    Now hockey is notorious for parent fights, if this is more your thing, always lead with the players number and always direct it at the kid on the opposing team. If the kid's number is 15, it should always be "One five," so make sure each of these is preceded by their number. "Watch the elbows!" "Did your dad teach you that?" "Keep the stick down!" "Scoreboard! (good after a little chirpfest between players)" Generally the fight will be between yourself and the over-enthusiastic parent/grandparent of onefive.

    To the refs, there isn't much you can say except, "Watch the cheap shots!" "He's getting mugged in front of the net!" "That was offside!"



    Soccer is a little more nuanced since everyone can hear you, and the vitriol is usually reserved for the referee, but here are the varying levels, depending on who you want to be on the sidelines.

    Beginner grandparent? "Boot it!" "Handball!" "He's holding!" "Run!" "Get the ball!" "Talk!" and my favorite, usually yelled at the young family member playing, "If he/she is holding (pushing, etc) then do it back. They aren't calling it!" This is usually followed by, and you really need to use the disgusted tone for this one, "This game is gonna get out of hand if the ref doesn't start to hand out cards."

    Experienced, but not expert level: "C'mon, don't just boot it!" "Play it out of the back!" "Keep it on the deck!" "Support!"

    Expert, but probably just watched youtube videos on the game: "Get it in the mixer!" "Play the knockdown" "Step up!"

    Pretentious a**: "Answer the question!" "That is offside!" "Do you know the laws of the game?" "I know it is in your opinion, but it stinks!" The nuances here are deep. First, this is coach speak for those who have taken the coaching courses. The second one is there can only be offside, not offsides, because only one direction is offside, the other is on side. And the rules of soccer are referred to as the laws of the game, not the rules. And in each one, it starts with "In the opinion of the referee..."



    Completely tongue in cheek, but I hope this helps.
  • deadsolid...shankdeadsolid...shank ClubWRX Charter Members Posts: 14,334 ClubWRX



    I was a D2 fullback. That's why I walk like Fred Sanford now...




    Why is it the Sanford and Son's theme song is now resonating in my head? Won't get rid of this tune for several hours now. Thanks.




    That’s funny!
    Titleist 910 8.5
    Titleist 910 15*
    Titleist 910H 17*
    2-6 Mizuno MP-60, 7-PW MP-67
    SC GoLo
    Vokey SM5 52,58,62
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Advanced Members Posts: 2,905 ✭✭




    I was a D2 fullback. That's why I walk like Fred Sanford now...




    Why is it the Sanford and Son's theme song is now resonating in my head? Won't get rid of this tune for several hours now. Thanks.




    That’s funny!




    Thanks.... I have to stay out of this thread now. Ear worm again.
  • leezer99leezer99 Advanced Members Posts: 893 ✭✭





    I was a D2 fullback. That's why I walk like Fred Sanford now...




    Why is it the Sanford and Son's theme song is now resonating in my head? Won't get rid of this tune for several hours now. Thanks.




    That’s funny!




    Thanks.... I have to stay out of this thread now. Ear worm again.




    TIL - it's actually called The Streetbeater by Quincy Jones.
  • PetethreeputPetethreeput Advanced Members Posts: 1,409 ✭✭
    edited March 7
    Apparently my parent guide to guide to fandom wasn't well received.



    But, I my child participated in one golf tournament... you read that correctly, 1. It was a 3 hole tourney for 4/5 year olds, and they played a short par 3 with a bunker in the front with a lip about 2' high. All 8 kids went in the bunker. Now my kid had grown up in bunkers, you know, building castles, raking, hitting shots out of the bunker, sand angels... the normal stuff kids do when you are the last group on the course knowing the power raker is coming through at 6AM the next day before anyone played again. And for the record, I would rake the traps after the times spent in there.



    My child stepped into the bunker and blasted out to about 20' from the hole (and then gloriously 4 putted after everyone got out). But the excitement of getting out first try was palpable. The other kids swung, and swung, and swung for what seemed like forever. When one kid finally broke down crying, the pro who was there to make sure the parents didn't go off the deep end said, "Everyone, just pick your ball up and throw it onto the green." So there is my kid on the green waiting patiently while these kids toss their balls onto the green and much closer than she was.



    Proud dad thinks to himself, "Man, that was the turning point in this tournament and my kid is going to be a superstar! The only kid to get out of the trap, what a talent! They kicked the **** out of those other kids!"



    At the trophy ceremony, we were given the 4th place trophy. I never said a thing to my child except how proud I was, but they knew the score. Next year I asked if they wanted to do it again, and the answer was, "No."



    The kids mine "kicked the **** out of?" Two are playing college golf and one won the club championship last summer.



    [EDIT] Since none of the other kids got out, they decided to make it a two hole tournament.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Advanced Members Posts: 930 ✭✭


    Apparently my parent guide to guide to fandom wasn't well received.



    But, I my child participated in one golf tournament... you read that correctly, 1. It was a 3 hole tourney for 4/5 year olds, and they played a short par 3 with a bunker in the front with a lip about 2' high. All 8 kids went in the bunker. Now my kid had grown up in bunkers, you know, building castles, raking, hitting shots out of the bunker, sand angels... the normal stuff kids do when you are the last group on the course knowing the power raker is coming through at 6AM the next day before anyone played again. And for the record, I would rake the traps after the times spent in there.



    My child stepped into the bunker and blasted out to about 20' from the hole (and then gloriously 4 putted after everyone got out). But the excitement of getting out first try was palpable. The other kids swung, and swung, and swung for what seemed like forever. When one kid finally broke down crying, the pro who was there to make sure the parents didn't go off the deep end said, "Everyone, just pick your ball up and throw it onto the green." So there is my kid on the green waiting patiently while these kids toss their balls onto the green and much closer than she was.



    Proud dad thinks to himself, "Man, that was the turning point in this tournament and my kid is going to be a superstar! The only kid to get out of the trap, what a talent! They kicked the **** out of those other kids!"



    At the trophy ceremony, we were given the 4th place trophy. I never said a thing to my child except how proud I was, but they knew the score. Next year I asked if they wanted to do it again, and the answer was, "No."



    The kids mine "kicked the **** out of?" Two are playing college golf and one won the club championship last summer.



    [EDIT] Since none of the other kids got out, they decided to make it a two hole tournament.




    This is why you know nothing about junior golf! Enough said as they will be locking this thread soon too.
Sign In or Register to comment.