Why do some kids never move on to higher level

tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭
edited Mar 5, 2019 7:50am in Juniors/College Golf Talk #1
Ok we been playing junior tournaments for long enough to see a lot things. We always moved on to higher levels when it made sense for development.



Just getting into rankings and I notice that some kids we played with over the years are not there. Some these kids are very good or at least were and I would expect the parents to move them on to 2 day events at least. These are parents who play a lot tournaments so they understand that you need to get ranking or at least should have heard this by now.



I went back looked up some them and good number are just still doing 1 day events. We talking about girls that in some cases are 2022 and 2023 that never play ranked events but get 70's on 1 day events. They still play the same courses that they did as young kids.



In other cases I see parents keeping the kids back in lower divisions because they win more often. Again not good for the kid.

once a kid hits 12 you need to pursue ranking and understand you can't win ever event.



I understand doing one day events if a kid not ready but these kids have played for years and by now should have no problem playing 2 day events and actually win or place high on a state level.
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  • dpb5031dpb5031 Members Posts: 5,025 ✭✭
    Tiger, you start a lot of threads about junior golf and I've enjoyed some of those discussions, but honestly, I often can't tell if you're asking a question/seeking advice, or giving it...lol? 😏



    Perhaps the junior players and their families that you're referencing just aren't "all-in" on golf. Seems like you are very invested in your child's golf pursuits, but not every parent is going to share the same passion and motivation, and more still won't take the time to develop the wherewithal needed to navigate the junior golf scene.



    IMO, the kids who ultimately become the best players are self-motivated, passionate, and willing to sacrifice. Children of pushy parents typically only make it so far, but of course there needs to be a balance as kids can't do it without a decent amount of parental support.
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  • TripleBogeysrbetterTripleBogeysrbetter Members Posts: 59 ✭✭
    I know its only one day. Just a big difference between locking up the entire weekend for a 2 day event vs a Saturday or Sunday.



    like @dpb5031 said really depends on the kid.
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  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭
    edited Mar 5, 2019 9:26am #4
    dpb5031 wrote:


    Tiger, you start a lot of threads about junior golf and I've enjoyed some of those discussions, but honestly, I often can't tell if you're asking a question/seeking advice, or giving it...lol? ��






    Honestly it is a bit both because I don't think everyone always understand why you need to have ranking. Also my daughter is just starting to play tournaments that are being ranked. I know for a fact that not every kid is ranked and like everyone I am trying to figure out how rankings work. The more I learn about it the more confused I get about rankings especially JGS rankings.



    I will be the first to admit I care much more about rankings than I should. I think we all do. They probably don't matter as much as we all think they do but I also know they are important and not always fair.



    I am trying to figure out why parents who are all in are not even trying to play ranked tournaments. I know they're all in because they play every weekend and have for years and even in some cases home school for golf so they can practice.



    I think in some cases both the kids and parents don't like losing so they don't pursue harder tournaments. From experience moving up to playing bigger tournaments is very nerve racking you basically start at the bottom and work your way up. Like you said some kids don't have the motivation to start at the bottom.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • BrianMcGBrianMcG Members Posts: 2,227 ✭✭
    They chose their parents poorly.
    Walter: Tell me Bobby, why do you play this game?
    Bobby: I play because I love it.
    Walter: Well I play for the money. I have to win. That is why every time we face each other I will always beat you.
  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 963 ✭✭
    If the parents don't feel a kid is ready they might be holding them back until they feel they are ready. I suppose it goes back to, is it better to be ranked poorly or not at all?

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • TripleBogeysrbetterTripleBogeysrbetter Members Posts: 59 ✭✭
    If you listen to the two day tournament directors. They will tell you your child needs to be in every JGS event.



    Let the kids be kids. If they want to pursue a higher level they will ask.



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  • kcapkcap Members Posts: 154 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:

    dpb5031 wrote:


    Tiger, you start a lot of threads about junior golf and I've enjoyed some of those discussions, but honestly, I often can't tell if you're asking a question/seeking advice, or giving it...lol? ��






    Honestly it is a bit both because I don't think everyone always understand why you need to have ranking. Also my daughter is just starting to play tournaments that are being ranked. I know for a fact that not every kid is ranked and like you said and like everyone I trying to figure out rankings. The more I learn about it the more confused I get about rankings especially JGS rankings.



    I will be the first to admit I care much more about rankings than I should. I think we all do. They probably don't matter as much as we all think they do but I also know they are important and not always fair.



    I am trying to figure out why parents who are all in are not even trying to play ranked tournaments. I know they're all in because they play every weekend and have for years and even in some cases home school for golf so they can practice.



    I think in some cases both the kids and parents don't like losing so they don't pursue harder tournaments. From experience moving up to playing bigger tournaments is very nerve racking you basically start at the bottom and work your way up. Like you said some kids don't have the motivation to start at the bottom.


    Have you ever considered asking them? From your comments, it appears you know the parents/families for a few years. I am sure you will get a lot more insight from the horse's mouth then a bunch of anonymous posters on a junior golf chat.
  • PetethreeputPetethreeput Members Posts: 1,420 ✭✭
    From the parents perspective? Money, interest in golf, expectations of what a child should be doing, realization that touring as a youth is the insidious monetization of youth sports without any guarantees of athletic success in the future, or they believe a well rounded child playing multiple sports is the better path.



    Kids perspective? ****, drugs, rock n roll, music lessons, baseball, soccer, friends, school, video games, don’t like playing competitive sports.



    Rankings are different than playing a sport. A kid who doesn’t play in AJGA events but still plays high school and wins high school tournaments often enough, the college coach will find them. Rankings are the ESPNization of youth sport (formerly referred to as monetization).



    So these same parents may be asking why you continue to trudge on? It’s personal choice based on the parents situation and the kids interest.
  • dpb5031dpb5031 Members Posts: 5,025 ✭✭


    I know its only one day. Just a big difference between locking up the entire weekend for a 2 day event vs a Saturday or Sunday.



    like @dpb5031 said really depends on the kid.




    Theres a junior Tour in NJ (JGA Tour) run by a great guy named John Petronis. He combines 2 single day tournaments on successive weekends to meet rankings requirements. This was very convenient for us when my daughter was younger and we were trying to balance competing interests and obligations.
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  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭
    edited Mar 5, 2019 9:32am #11
    leezer99 wrote:


    If the parents don't feel a kid is ready they might be holding them back until they feel they are ready. I suppose it goes back to, is it better to be ranked poorly or not at all?




    I agree with that but if you are not ranked and a 2023 graduate then your way behind. I am also not talking about kids scoring in the 90's or 100's in those cases I would say hold off and work on their game better. In some of the cases we are talking about girls scoring in the low 70's so even playing local 2 day events there ranking is going to be ok for their age. The scores are low enough to actually win a lot events if they did it 2 days in a row.
  • tiger1873 wrote:


    Ok we been playing junior tournaments for long enough to see a lot things. We always moved on to higher levels when it made sense for development.



    Just getting into rankings and I notice that some kids we played with over the years are not there. Some these kids are very good or at least were and I would expect the parents to move them on to 2 day events at least. These are parents who play a lot tournaments so they understand that you need to get ranking or at least should have heard this by now.



    I went back looked up some them and good number are just still doing 1 day events. We talking about girls that in some cases are 2022 and 2023 that never play ranked events but get 70's on 1 day events. They still play the same courses that they did as young kids.



    In other cases I see parents keeping the kids back in lower divisions because they win more often. Again not good for the kid.

    once a kid hits 12 you need to pursue ranking and understand you can't win ever event.



    I understand doing one day events if a kid not ready but these kids have played for years and by now should have no problem playing 2 day events and actually win or place high on a state level.








    Two theories that you see from different individuals on junior golf:

    1) Some look at junior golf and say that things don't realty matter until they get about 13-14. Spending all the money on tournaments and travel doesn't really matter at the younger ages because colleges don't look at that. The younger ages are building blocks for later in their golf career so don't take things so seriously. Many will argue that rushing kids to the higher levels actually causes them to regress. They feel like a kid should dominate at the lower levels before moving up. Kids need to get use to shooting low scores from shorter distances to build confidence.



    2) Then you have the other folks that are concerned about winning and rankings now. They assume everything is an arms race and you have to do what everyone else does or you are getting behind. These parents feel like the top kids at the younger ages will also develop into the top kids as they are older. They are usually the ones who have their kids specialize in just golf. Many of them even home school their kids so they can practice as much as possible.



    My guess is the parents that you refer to fall into mindset number one and you fall into mindset number 2.
  • thelefthandedgolferthelefthandedgolfer Lefty Boomers Posts: 17 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:




    I agree with that but if you are not ranked and a 2023 graduate then your way behind. I am also not talking about kids scoring in the 90's or 100's in those cases I would say hold off and work on their game better. In some of the cases we are talking about girls scoring in the low 70's so even playing local 2 day events there ranking is going to be ok for their age. The scores are low enough to actually win a lot events if they did it 2 days in a row.



    tiger1873 wrote:




    In other cases I see parents keeping the kids back in lower divisions because they win more often. Again not good for the kid.

    once a kid hits 12 you need to pursue ranking and understand you can't win ever event.






    I'm not sure it matters what anyone else has to say...



    Every family and child has different circumstances and personalities. Children mature at different rates and some simply aren't ready for 36 holes yet. In other cases, parents don't know anything about the rankings or care. Finally, consider this crazy thought....their kid doesn't want to play 12 hours of golf in a weekend.



    The only reason someone asks the question you are posing is because they are afraid they are missing out on something. In that case, ask the question and listen to the answers and apply them to your own situation. It's counterintuitive to ask a question and then provide your own answers to the replies.

  • tiger1873 wrote:




    I agree with that but if you are not ranked and a 2023 graduate then your way behind. I am also not talking about kids scoring in the 90's or 100's in those cases I would say hold off and work on their game better. In some of the cases we are talking about girls scoring in the low 70's so even playing local 2 day events there ranking is going to be ok for their age. The scores are low enough to actually win a lot events if they did it 2 days in a row.



    tiger1873 wrote:




    In other cases I see parents keeping the kids back in lower divisions because they win more often. Again not good for the kid.

    once a kid hits 12 you need to pursue ranking and understand you can't win ever event.






    I'm not sure it matters what anyone else has to say...



    Every family and child has different circumstances and personalities. Children mature at different rates and some simply aren't ready for 36 holes yet. In other cases, parents don't know anything about the rankings or care. Finally, consider this crazy thought....their kid doesn't want to play 12 hours of golf in a weekend.



    The only reason someone asks the question you are posing is because they are afraid they are missing out on something. In that case, ask the question and listen to the answers and apply them to your own situation. It's counterintuitive to ask a question and then provide your own answers to the replies.




    THIS!
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭
    edited Mar 5, 2019 11:02am #15

    tiger1873 wrote:


    I agree with that but if you are not ranked and a 2023 graduate then your way behind. I am also not talking about kids scoring in the 90's or 100's in those cases I would say hold off and work on their game better. In some of the cases we are talking about girls scoring in the low 70's so even playing local 2 day events there ranking is going to be ok for their age. The scores are low enough to actually win a lot events if they did it 2 days in a row.



    tiger1873 wrote:


    In other cases I see parents keeping the kids back in lower divisions because they win more often. Again not good for the kid.

    once a kid hits 12 you need to pursue ranking and understand you can't win ever event.






    I'm not sure it matters what anyone else has to say...



    Every family and child has different circumstances and personalities. Children mature at different rates and some simply aren't ready for 36 holes yet. In other cases, parents don't know anything about the rankings or care. Finally, consider this crazy thought....their kid doesn't want to play 12 hours of golf in a weekend.



    The only reason someone asks the question you are posing is because they are afraid they are missing out on something. In that case, ask the question and listen to the answers and apply them to your own situation. It's counterintuitive to ask a question and then provide your own answers to the replies.




    I already know ranking is important and in junior golf it is something you need to understand. Most of us know this already this.



    My only question is are we going to see these kids ever again? I have theories on why there are not but I suspect we will not see them again so they are not going to be a factor in rankings in the next few years when it matters. I wondering if others have seen the same thing with people they played with.



    To me it seems crazy to delay playing in multi-day events because there very different then a 1 day tournament because every shot counts over multiple days. It takes a few tournaments for kids to learn every stroke matters.
  • kcapkcap Members Posts: 154 ✭✭
    I don’t get it! If you already know then why ask.



    If you are not going to see them again then why bother!!



    Also who care if you will see kids again or not; focus on your child and develop him/her cause you don’t which could/competition is around the corner.



    I always tell my kids.. practice hard/smart and try your best, the rest will take care of itself.

  • PetethreeputPetethreeput Members Posts: 1,420 ✭✭
    The better question to ask is:

    Why does the ranking matter? The only function of ranking is external. The ranking alerts college coaches and "scouts" to watch kids play golf. There is no intrinsic need for rankings. The logical progression if the last sentence is true is this; a ranking's only purpose is either a future college scholarship (money) or sponsorships (again money).

    Maybe these two reasons aren't important to the parent. Maybe it isn't important to the kid (this I can almost guarantee).



    I walked this path in a different sport as a kid, and personally i wanted to insure my kids enjoyed the game. My goal was to have my kids play the sport for as long as they wanted. Meaning, they would have the ability to not get cut from a team before they were ready to quit. My anecdotal perspective is the most competitive coaches and parents are those whose athletic careers were cut short before they were ready to hang em up.



    Its a pretty harsh assessment for sure, and while i am sure in some capacity it is offensive to people, the real question is, "Why does a junior ranking matter to ME?"
  • SixcatSixcat SWVAPosts: 1,416 ✭✭
    I have two examples in my family. My daughter began playing golf at about age 7. She was able to get so far but hanging out with her friends and having other experiences besides golf became more important to her than golf. She took up playing the Mandolin and is on the middle school track team. She has also tried competitive swimming, basketball, soccer and softball. I think it's great. I want her to be happy and couldn't care less if she plays golf. If she is happy and healthy, I am a proud and happy father!



    My nephew began playing baseball at about age 6. It got to the point he was playing 300 games per year all over the country without anything resembling free time. He was an excellent catcher and started getting the attention of some ACC and SEC baseball programs by the beginning of high school. At which point, he burned out and hasn't played baseball since. My brother has been nothing short of supportive. My nephew is happy, healthy and enjoying what little time he has left being a kid.



    As parents, we should be careful not to live our childhood regrets through our children! Let them be who they are, not who we may want them to be!
  • thelefthandedgolferthelefthandedgolfer Lefty Boomers Posts: 17 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:




    My only question is are we going to see these kids ever again? I suspect we will not see them again so they are not going to be a factor in rankings in the next few years when it matters.






    If they are scoring in the low 70's, you will see them again. They will be well rested and their parents will have saved some money from not playing every ranked tournament they could find with a high course rating and 5 or more kids.
  • tatertottatertot Members Posts: 4,304 ✭✭
    Sixcat wrote:


    I have two examples in my family. My daughter began playing golf at about age 7. She was able to get so far but hanging out with her friends and having other experiences besides golf became more important to her than golf. She took up playing the Mandolin and is on the middle school track team. She has also tried competitive swimming, basketball, soccer and softball. I think it's great. I want her to be happy and couldn't care less if she plays golf. If she is happy and healthy, I am a proud and happy father!



    My nephew began playing baseball at about age 6. It got to the point he was playing 300 games per year all over the country without anything resembling free time. He was an excellent catcher and started getting the attention of some ACC and SEC baseball programs by the beginning of high school. At which point, he burned out and hasn't played baseball since. My brother has been nothing short of supportive. My nephew is happy, healthy and enjoying what little time he has left being a kid.



    As parents, we should be careful not to live our childhood regrets through our children! Let them be who they are, not who we may want them to be!




    Wish I could like this more than once ... Parents, please let your kids be kids. They shouldn't be working on college scholarships at age 6. The they'll never be a kid again. They'll have years and years to earn money and do plenty of "adult" things with adult responsibilities. Give them opportunities, but let them decide if they want to take them.
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  • bulls9999bulls9999 Posts: 664 ✭✭
    edited Mar 5, 2019 2:45pm #21
    I remember when my son was in junior tournaments in OK, there was the Southern Section PGA which ran 1-day tournaments that included several (2-3/summer) 2-day tournaments. At about the same time, the OJGT started up and they were only 2-day (Sat-Sun) tournaments. As a parent who was looking to see my son 'got credit' for the 2-day tournaments on Junior Golf Scoreboard, I was miffed when the PGA series wasn't submitting the scores. I asked JGS why my son's 2-day tournaments weren't showing up and he said, yes the 2-day tournaments are eligible but the scores are not being submitted by the tournament director...what?. I bugged the tournament director to the point of annoyance about that and just concluded it was pure laziness on his part.... imagine, he could have been getting 'his kids' in his tournament series national accreditation for their tournament scoring, but wasn't because too lazy to submit an email spreadsheet with name, town, scores.....nothing more than what you'd likely have to keep track for your own tournaments; at the time I was bugging him, I even brought up the same thing, using back-to-back 1-day tournaments in different towns as "2-day" tournaments to get more scores reported. After parents were discussing these during tournaments, a host of kids left that series, including mine, for the OJGT 2-day series where the interest was in promoting the kids results. I remember having a discussion with our club pro who was on the board of the sectional PGA at the time and 'let him have it how his section failed the kids in the program'....he went and made the case and they got a younger guy involved with junior tournaments who revamped the sectional program. Glad to see that was done eventually. And yea, the 2-day weekend tournaments presented their own issues as some kids/parents were able to play every weekend and accrue points, whereas those who played even half were losing ground to get into the final tournament of champions....but that's life.


    dpb5031 wrote:



    I know its only one day. Just a big difference between locking up the entire weekend for a 2 day event vs a Saturday or Sunday.



    like @dpb5031 said really depends on the kid.




    Theres a junior Tour in NJ (JGA Tour) run by a great guy named John Petronis. He combines 2 single day tournaments on successive weekends to meet rankings requirements. This was very convenient for us when my daughter was younger and we were trying to balance competing interests and obligations.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
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  • NolesNoles Posts: 1,420 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:


    tiger1873 wrote:


    I agree with that but if you are not ranked and a 2023 graduate then your way behind. I am also not talking about kids scoring in the 90's or 100's in those cases I would say hold off and work on their game better. In some of the cases we are talking about girls scoring in the low 70's so even playing local 2 day events there ranking is going to be ok for their age. The scores are low enough to actually win a lot events if they did it 2 days in a row.



    tiger1873 wrote:


    In other cases I see parents keeping the kids back in lower divisions because they win more often. Again not good for the kid.

    once a kid hits 12 you need to pursue ranking and understand you can't win ever event.






    I'm not sure it matters what anyone else has to say...



    Every family and child has different circumstances and personalities. Children mature at different rates and some simply aren't ready for 36 holes yet. In other cases, parents don't know anything about the rankings or care. Finally, consider this crazy thought....their kid doesn't want to play 12 hours of golf in a weekend.



    The only reason someone asks the question you are posing is because they are afraid they are missing out on something. In that case, ask the question and listen to the answers and apply them to your own situation. It's counterintuitive to ask a question and then provide your own answers to the replies.




    I already know ranking is important and in junior golf it is something you need to understand. Most of us know this already this.



    My only question is are we going to see these kids ever again? I have theories on why there are not but I suspect we will not see them again so they are not going to be a factor in rankings in the next few years when it matters. I wondering if others have seen the same thing with people they played with.



    To me it seems crazy to delay playing in multi-day events because there very different then a 1 day tournament because every shot counts over multiple days. It takes a few tournaments for kids to learn every stroke matters.
    It all depends on a person"s goals or desires.
  • tatertottatertot Members Posts: 4,304 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:


    Ok we been playing junior tournaments for long enough to see a lot things. We always moved on to higher levels when it made sense for development.



    Just getting into rankings and I notice that some kids we played with over the years are not there. Some these kids are very good or at least were and I would expect the parents to move them on to 2 day events at least. These are parents who play a lot tournaments so they understand that you need to get ranking or at least should have heard this by now.



    I went back looked up some them and good number are just still doing 1 day events. We talking about girls that in some cases are 2022 and 2023 that never play ranked events but get 70's on 1 day events. They still play the same courses that they did as young kids.



    In other cases I see parents keeping the kids back in lower divisions because they win more often. Again not good for the kid.

    once a kid hits 12 you need to pursue ranking and understand you can't win ever event.



    I understand doing one day events if a kid not ready but these kids have played for years and by now should have no problem playing 2 day events and actually win or place high on a state level.




    Wow ... You make a lot of assumptions about other people's children and lives.



    This is going to come as a shock to you, but not everybody has the same goals and values as you. And they don't feel the need to do the same things you do. Therefore, they make different decisions than you. Might take a moment and try to take a look at the world from a different perspective occasionally and realize you aren't the center of the universe.
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  • raynorfan1raynorfan1 Members Posts: 3,519 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:


    I agree with that but if you are not ranked and a 2023 graduate then your way behind.




    Way behind what?



    The specific plan that you have for your child may be different for other people. It's undoubtedly true that such kids are behind what you've formulated as your ideal plan.



    But if you had a kid who never played a "ranked" tournament, but came out of nowhere as a Junior/Senior to win everything, it's not like college coaches (and others) are going to ignore them because they haven't been ranked since they were 8 years old.
  • wildcatdenwildcatden China Cat Sunflower Members Posts: 827 ✭✭
    When my kid was 6, I was initially grasped by the "possibilities" of my kid becoming a golf star. I would even admit to pushing too much. It was stupid, stupid, stupid of me. I then came to know this forum and the good advice that you often receive here. Letting your kid be a kid and supporting them and allowing them to explore and experience as much as they can is priority #1.



    Is my kid going to be a golf star? A baseball star? A scientist? A financial wizard? It will happen in due time. The only thing I can really ask of my kid is to give 100% effort into whatever endeavor he is trying out at the moment.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭
    raynorfan1 wrote:

    tiger1873 wrote:


    I agree with that but if you are not ranked and a 2023 graduate then your way behind.




    Way behind what?



    The specific plan that you have for your child may be different for other people. It's undoubtedly true that such kids are behind what you've formulated as your ideal plan.



    But if you had a kid who never played a "ranked" tournament, but came out of nowhere as a Junior/Senior to win everything, it's not like college coaches (and others) are going to ignore them because they haven't been ranked since they were 8 years old.




    I don't think you understand how rankings work. You are not going to come out of nowhere by winning 1 tournament. To be honest your not even going to be allowed to play in the tournament that matter in the first place.



    If you're a senior and have not played in ranked JGS tournaments by then the chances of getting a scholarship is slim to none.
  • SixcatSixcat SWVAPosts: 1,416 ✭✭
    tatertot wrote:

    Sixcat wrote:


    I have two examples in my family. My daughter began playing golf at about age 7. She was able to get so far but hanging out with her friends and having other experiences besides golf became more important to her than golf. She took up playing the Mandolin and is on the middle school track team. She has also tried competitive swimming, basketball, soccer and softball. I think it's great. I want her to be happy and couldn't care less if she plays golf. If she is happy and healthy, I am a proud and happy father!



    My nephew began playing baseball at about age 6. It got to the point he was playing 300 games per year all over the country without anything resembling free time. He was an excellent catcher and started getting the attention of some ACC and SEC baseball programs by the beginning of high school. At which point, he burned out and hasn't played baseball since. My brother has been nothing short of supportive. My nephew is happy, healthy and enjoying what little time he has left being a kid.



    As parents, we should be careful not to live our childhood regrets through our children! Let them be who they are, not who we may want them to be!




    Wish I could like this more than once ... Parents, please let your kids be kids. They shouldn't be working on college scholarships at age 6. The they'll never be a kid again. They'll have years and years to earn money and do plenty of "adult" things with adult responsibilities. Give them opportunities, but let them decide if they want to take them.




    I think it would shock some people to learn that 5.4% of all institutional grants and 2.1% of all college grants are athletics based according to the most recent data! Which means no less than 94.6% of all scholarship dollars are academic based and have nothing to do with athletics!
  • raynorfan1raynorfan1 Members Posts: 3,519 ✭✭
    tiger1873 wrote:

    raynorfan1 wrote:

    tiger1873 wrote:


    I agree with that but if you are not ranked and a 2023 graduate then your way behind.




    Way behind what?



    The specific plan that you have for your child may be different for other people. It's undoubtedly true that such kids are behind what you've formulated as your ideal plan.



    But if you had a kid who never played a "ranked" tournament, but came out of nowhere as a Junior/Senior to win everything, it's not like college coaches (and others) are going to ignore them because they haven't been ranked since they were 8 years old.




    I don't think you understand how rankings work. You are not going to come out of nowhere by winning 1 tournament. To be honest your not even going to be allowed to play in the tournament that matter in the first place.



    If you're a senior and have not played in ranked JGS tournaments by then the chances of getting a scholarship is slim to none.




    Just hypothetically. If the first and only tournament you ever play in is the Junior Amateur, and you win it, I think you'll get a few offers.



    Is that going to happen? Probably not. But talent can make up a lot of ground quickly.
  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Posts: 280 ✭✭
    edited Mar 5, 2019 1:50pm #29
    tatertot wrote:

    Sixcat wrote:


    I have two examples in my family. My daughter began playing golf at about age 7. She was able to get so far but hanging out with her friends and having other experiences besides golf became more important to her than golf. She took up playing the Mandolin and is on the middle school track team. She has also tried competitive swimming, basketball, soccer and softball. I think it's great. I want her to be happy and couldn't care less if she plays golf. If she is happy and healthy, I am a proud and happy father!



    My nephew began playing baseball at about age 6. It got to the point he was playing 300 games per year all over the country without anything resembling free time. He was an excellent catcher and started getting the attention of some ACC and SEC baseball programs by the beginning of high school. At which point, he burned out and hasn't played baseball since. My brother has been nothing short of supportive. My nephew is happy, healthy and enjoying what little time he has left being a kid.



    As parents, we should be careful not to live our childhood regrets through our children! Let them be who they are, not who we may want them to be!




    Wish I could like this more than once ... Parents, please let your kids be kids. They shouldn't be working on college scholarships at age 6. The they'll never be a kid again. They'll have years and years to earn money and do plenty of "adult" things with adult responsibilities. Give them opportunities, but let them decide if they want to take them.




    Seriously - if college scholarship is the sole goal, that's a problem. You would have spent more money trying to get your youth good enough and playing tournaments than it would cost to go to that certain college. Not to mention that, in most cases, you would have had to ignore a certain level of education necessary to succeed in college and to get a job in certain high paying industries (which provides an income level much more than barely being on any tour or even being at the top of the lpga tour).



    http://www.espn.com/...rt-lower-levels



    Not to mention that golf is not one of those college sports (e.g., basketball and football) where being good and having certain minimums will get you into a desired school.



    http://www.amateurgo...the-IVY-League-



    But nothing wrong if you're in Tiger's camp and supporting your child's dream of playing for a top college program or going pro. If that's the case, you probably do want to focus on a lot of national tournaments and keep up with the arms race of getting your junior to be the best he/she can be starting at younger ages. Hopefully, it's ultimately the child's dream and not the parents, even if it started as the parent's.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭
    edited Mar 5, 2019 2:04pm #30
    tatertot wrote:

    Sixcat wrote:


    I have two examples in my family. My daughter began playing golf at about age 7. She was able to get so far but hanging out with her friends and having other experiences besides golf became more important to her than golf. She took up playing the Mandolin and is on the middle school track team. She has also tried competitive swimming, basketball, soccer and softball. I think it's great. I want her to be happy and couldn't care less if she plays golf. If she is happy and healthy, I am a proud and happy father!



    My nephew began playing baseball at about age 6. It got to the point he was playing 300 games per year all over the country without anything resembling free time. He was an excellent catcher and started getting the attention of some ACC and SEC baseball programs by the beginning of high school. At which point, he burned out and hasn't played baseball since. My brother has been nothing short of supportive. My nephew is happy, healthy and enjoying what little time he has left being a kid.



    As parents, we should be careful not to live our childhood regrets through our children! Let them be who they are, not who we may want them to be!




    Wish I could like this more than once ... Parents, please let your kids be kids. They shouldn't be working on college scholarships at age 6. The they'll never be a kid again. They'll have years and years to earn money and do plenty of "adult" things with adult responsibilities. Give them opportunities, but let them decide if they want to take them.




    I really don't think anyone does golf for college scholarships. I do however think a lot people play golf for many reason and those that play golf have a lot doors opened for them and should take advantage of those opportunities. Those doors can mean a lot things too. Also as the kids get older a lot times it is the kids leading the parents into more competitive golf.



    Believe it not some kids crave the competition and will do anything to play more. I actually think that is the norm more as kids get older. This golf stuff is tough and expensive for parents. Kind of jealous of those california parents who can't be a spectator and drop the kids off for the day to play golf.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭
    raynorfan1 wrote:

    tiger1873 wrote:

    raynorfan1 wrote:

    tiger1873 wrote:


    I agree with that but if you are not ranked and a 2023 graduate then your way behind.




    Way behind what?



    The specific plan that you have for your child may be different for other people. It's undoubtedly true that such kids are behind what you've formulated as your ideal plan.



    But if you had a kid who never played a "ranked" tournament, but came out of nowhere as a Junior/Senior to win everything, it's not like college coaches (and others) are going to ignore them because they haven't been ranked since they were 8 years old.




    I don't think you understand how rankings work. You are not going to come out of nowhere by winning 1 tournament. To be honest your not even going to be allowed to play in the tournament that matter in the first place.



    If you're a senior and have not played in ranked JGS tournaments by then the chances of getting a scholarship is slim to none.




    Just hypothetically. If the first and only tournament you ever play in is the Junior Amateur, and you win it, I think you'll get a few offers.



    Is that going to happen? Probably not. But talent can make up a lot of ground quickly.




    Yeh but you're going to have to qualify for that tournament in the first place. To win a tournament like that your going to have be mentally tournament hardy and if you have even played a 2 day local event I highly doubt anyone could realistically achieve that having only played in 1 day events all they're life. There is more to wining tournaments than just skill.
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