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My Experience Gaming Blades as a Mid-High Handicapper

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  • nsxguynsxguy Just anudder user FloridaMembers  7064WRX Points: 1,340Handicap: 3.9-9.3-7.7 (Health issue)Posts: 7,064 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  edited Aug 13, 2019 #1442

    On -, @chippa13 said:

    Problem: "I've been struggling off the tee."
    Solution: "Get to the range and work on your woods, maybe take some lessons"
    Problem: "I'm wasting a lot of strokes on and around the green."
    Solution: "Spend more time on the practice green, do XXXXX drills to sharpen your putting."
    Problem: "My ball striking with irons isn't where it should be."
    Solution: "Buy blades, you clearly aren't focused enough with your current set."

    Posted:

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  • GolfjackGolfjack All about the rotation Members  1584WRX Points: 488Posts: 1,584 Platinum Tees
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    So here's the real question... how many strokes do you gain by playing GI clubs vs blades and/or vice versa? I don't think (might have missed it) people have tried to quantify this rather just use their common sense. **** has used a similar approach when evaluating similar clubs. Would be interesting to see it used across a spectrum just for demonstration purposes.

    Posted:
    Callaway Epic SZ Driver 9
    TM Aeroburner TP 3 wood
    3H (19), 4H (22) Aeroburner TP
    Mizuno MP-15 5 iron, Project X LZ 6.5
    Mizuno MP-5 6-PW, Project X LZ 6.5
    Wedges Mizuno T7 50, 56, 60
    Scotty Phantom X6 STR
  • TigerInTheWoodsTigerInTheWoods Members  2647WRX Points: 1,663Handicap: 5Posts: 2,647 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #1444

    On -, @Golfjack said:

    So here's the real question... how many strokes do you gain by playing GI clubs vs blades and/or vice versa? I don't think (might have missed it) people have tried to quantify this rather just use their common sense. **** has used a similar approach when evaluating similar clubs. Would be interesting to see it used across a spectrum just for demonstration purposes.

    It would be a tough experiment to do with any kind of accuracy. Some days we feel like we're swinging it well and others we're just try to get around. Not to mention what set are you playing? The drop-offs in forgiveness magnify as you go up the bag to long irons. Only playing blades in 9 or 8-PW? Next to no difference. Playing them all the way to 2 or 3 iron? Massive difference to something with help. Strokes gained .. how many extra strokes is a mid capper losing to a tour pro or scratch by using blades? It probably makes a difference - again hard to test.

    Even this test seems very borderline in terms of validity. Starts @ 8 min. They try to quantify drop-offs in ball speed.

    Posted:
  • MelloYelloMelloYello Upstate, SCMembers  3842WRX Points: 1,032Handicap: 3.9Posts: 3,842 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  edited Aug 13, 2019 #1445

    I think it's mostly about feel and I think that feel is a massive distraction for most amateurs.

    My buddy is thinking about moving from small CBs over to a full-blown blade and I told him, 'you probably won't see a difference in scoring but you're going to feel more on every shot both good and bad.'

    I can see why somebody might be tickled by the feel of a blade here and there but on the whole, I think someone wanting to score optimally would prefer the dullest feeling club possible with which they could still get the necessary feedback.

    Based on my experience, it's not a good thing when your 6-iron flashes a red alert in your hands simply because you struck it a quarter-inch out on the toe. A CB simply hands you a memo without acting like the shot was a complete meltdown. :)

    Not surprisingly, my buddy who's played small CBs for years and been a low single-digit doing so is telling me he's considering the blades more or less '...because they look cool.'

    It's all about looks. Always has been. Don't forget that.

    Posted:
    Driver: M3 w. Tensei CK Pro Org.
    Fairway: M6 (3w)
    Dr-Iron: 718 T-MB (2)
    Irons: 716 CB (3-Pw)
    Wedges: SM6 52-F / 56-F / 60-S
    Putter: Newport 2 Select
  • BubbtubbsBubbtubbs Members  571WRX Points: 145Handicap: 7Posts: 571 Golden Tee
    Joined:  #1446

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    I think it's mostly about feel and I think that feel is a massive distraction for most amateurs.

    My buddy is thinking about moving from small CBs over to a full-blown blade and I told him, 'you probably won't see a difference in scoring but you're going to feel more on every shot both good and bad.'

    I can see why somebody might be tickled by the feel of a blade here and there but on the whole, I think someone wanting to score optimally would prefer the dullest feeling club possible with which they could still get the necessary feedback.

    Based on my experience, it's not a good thing when your 6-iron flashes a red alert in your hands simply because you struck it a quarter-inch out on the toe. A CB simply hands you a memo without acting like the shot was a complete meltdown. :)

    Not surprisingly, my buddy who's played small CBs for years and been a low single-digit doing so is telling me he's considering the blades more or less '...because they look cool.'

    It's all about looks. Always has been. Don't forget that.

    I'm currently gaming '94 Hogan blades right down to 3i and I haven't had a single shot that "flashes a red alert". The club twists a bit more and you can definitely feel thin shots, but not in a painful way.

    Posted:
  • MelloYelloMelloYello Upstate, SCMembers  3842WRX Points: 1,032Handicap: 3.9Posts: 3,842 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  edited Aug 13, 2019 #1447

    On -, @Bubbtubbs said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    I think it's mostly about feel and I think that feel is a massive distraction for most amateurs.

    My buddy is thinking about moving from small CBs over to a full-blown blade and I told him, 'you probably won't see a difference in scoring but you're going to feel more on every shot both good and bad.'

    I can see why somebody might be tickled by the feel of a blade here and there but on the whole, I think someone wanting to score optimally would prefer the dullest feeling club possible with which they could still get the necessary feedback.

    Based on my experience, it's not a good thing when your 6-iron flashes a red alert in your hands simply because you struck it a quarter-inch out on the toe. A CB simply hands you a memo without acting like the shot was a complete meltdown. :)

    Not surprisingly, my buddy who's played small CBs for years and been a low single-digit doing so is telling me he's considering the blades more or less '...because they look cool.'

    It's all about looks. Always has been. Don't forget that.

    I'm currently gaming '94 Hogan blades right down to 3i and I haven't had a single shot that "flashes a red alert". The club twists a bit more and you can definitely feel thin shots, but not in a painful way.

    I didn't say painful. Don't misconstrue the point.

    If you play blades you know precisely the kind of feedback they provide. Amateurs do not need that level of feedback to play decent golf and in general (or at least with me) it tends to over-inflate the significance of misses to the point that amateurs are not happy with shots that are in all actuality perfectly sufficient and well within the bounds of acceptability.

    When I say "red alert" I mean it's distracting, not that it's going to drop you to your knees in pain. It has nothing to do with pain.

    I'll say up front I have no tolerance for those who believe golf is about perfect shots or anyone trying to sell golf as anything less than trying to finish the round in as few strokes as possible whether that's beating a 90 with an 89 or something far more impressive.

    Advice to amateurs should be towards helping them enjoy the game more and ideally accomplishing that with respect to one having more control of their game than they might. Blades do not give the average player more control over their game. In my experience they will not make things more predictable. Quite the opposite in fact. And I'm really not interested in arguments based on theoretical whimsy. If it's not good for the average player, then why are we talking about it, right?

    Posted:
    Driver: M3 w. Tensei CK Pro Org.
    Fairway: M6 (3w)
    Dr-Iron: 718 T-MB (2)
    Irons: 716 CB (3-Pw)
    Wedges: SM6 52-F / 56-F / 60-S
    Putter: Newport 2 Select
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  • TigerInTheWoodsTigerInTheWoods Members  2647WRX Points: 1,663Handicap: 5Posts: 2,647 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #1448

    On -, @Bubbtubbs said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    I think it's mostly about feel and I think that feel is a massive distraction for most amateurs.

    My buddy is thinking about moving from small CBs over to a full-blown blade and I told him, 'you probably won't see a difference in scoring but you're going to feel more on every shot both good and bad.'

    I can see why somebody might be tickled by the feel of a blade here and there but on the whole, I think someone wanting to score optimally would prefer the dullest feeling club possible with which they could still get the necessary feedback.

    Based on my experience, it's not a good thing when your 6-iron flashes a red alert in your hands simply because you struck it a quarter-inch out on the toe. A CB simply hands you a memo without acting like the shot was a complete meltdown. :)

    Not surprisingly, my buddy who's played small CBs for years and been a low single-digit doing so is telling me he's considering the blades more or less '...because they look cool.'

    It's all about looks. Always has been. Don't forget that.

    I'm currently gaming '94 Hogan blades right down to 3i and I haven't had a single shot that "flashes a red alert". The club twists a bit more and you can definitely feel thin shots, but not in a painful way.

    Re: face opening and MOI etc. The first hole on the track I play up at my cottage is a shortish par 4 dog left with a pond on the corner. Basically makes it impossible to hit anything but iron off the tee as there is OB right and a 30 yard wide fairway between pond on left and trees/OB right. The water is also 220 out and doesn't end until 300 so virtually impossible to succeed with driver. I hit 5 iron off the tee with a bit of wind behind but with the blade and a slight miss hit (first swing of the day with no warm up) I go the distance I needed but I felt the face open a touch. This lead to the ball being under a tree and a restricted swing for me. That same swing with my other players CBs I have/now use goes straight and leaves me on the fairway. That isn't imagination it's a fact and THAT is a difference in hitting a green or not.

    Posted:
  • BubbtubbsBubbtubbs Members  571WRX Points: 145Handicap: 7Posts: 571 Golden Tee
    Joined:  #1449

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    On -, @Bubbtubbs said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    I think it's mostly about feel and I think that feel is a massive distraction for most amateurs.

    My buddy is thinking about moving from small CBs over to a full-blown blade and I told him, 'you probably won't see a difference in scoring but you're going to feel more on every shot both good and bad.'

    I can see why somebody might be tickled by the feel of a blade here and there but on the whole, I think someone wanting to score optimally would prefer the dullest feeling club possible with which they could still get the necessary feedback.

    Based on my experience, it's not a good thing when your 6-iron flashes a red alert in your hands simply because you struck it a quarter-inch out on the toe. A CB simply hands you a memo without acting like the shot was a complete meltdown. :)

    Not surprisingly, my buddy who's played small CBs for years and been a low single-digit doing so is telling me he's considering the blades more or less '...because they look cool.'

    It's all about looks. Always has been. Don't forget that.

    I'm currently gaming '94 Hogan blades right down to 3i and I haven't had a single shot that "flashes a red alert". The club twists a bit more and you can definitely feel thin shots, but not in a painful way.

    I didn't say painful. Don't misconstrue the point.

    If you play blades you know precisely the kind of feedback they provide. Amateurs do not need that level of feedback to play decent golf and in general (or at least with me) it tends to over-inflate the significance of misses to the point that amateurs are not happy with shots that are in all actuality perfectly sufficient and well within the bounds of acceptability.

    When I say "red alert" I mean it's distracting, not that it's going to drop you to your knees in pain. It has nothing to do with pain.

    I'll say up front I have no tolerance for those who believe golf is about perfect shots or anyone trying to sell golf as anything less than trying to finish the round in as few strokes as possible whether that's beating a 90 with an 89 or something far more impressive.

    Advice to amateurs should be towards helping them enjoy the game more and ideally accomplishing that with respect to one having more control of their game than they might. Blades do not give the average player more control over their game. In my experience they will not make things more predictable. Quite the opposite in fact. And I'm really not interested in arguments based on theoretical whimsy. If it's not good for the average player, then why are we talking about it, right?

    But tell us how you really feel.

    Posted:
  • neillmacparguyneillmacparguy Members  76WRX Points: 75Posts: 76 Fairways
    Joined:  edited Aug 13, 2019 #1450

    Played Titleist and Mizuno blades for years because I like the look and feel of a well hit shot with a forged club. Recently hit a playing partners GI 4 iron and crushed it effortlessly. A week later I’m getting fitting and left Golf Town with TM M4s. (They were 50% off the original MSRP). All I can say is man what was I waiting for all these years. My scores have dropped and my consistency and Greens in Regulation has improved substantially since hanging up the blades.

    I agree they (blades) feel AMAZING when you find the sweet spot but I GUARANTEE that the outcome of a toe shot with a GI iron still comes out better than the blade.

    Let’s not even mention ease of swing and distance gains. (Yea, the new lofts...I got it but ****)

    Good luck with your blades OP. I too love them but have recently decided lower scores and consistency are more important to me.

    Posted:

    Neill A. MacLeod III
    Greenwood, NS
    Callaway Epic 9 deg
    Callaway Epic Flash 15 deg
    Adams Black Super Hybrid 15deg
    Miura CB-501 irons
    Scotty Cameron Fastback 34”

  • revanantrevanant Members  422WRX Points: 329Posts: 422 Greens
    Joined:  edited Aug 13, 2019 #1451

    On -, @balls_deep said:

    On -, @Bubbtubbs said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    I think it's mostly about feel and I think that feel is a massive distraction for most amateurs.

    My buddy is thinking about moving from small CBs over to a full-blown blade and I told him, 'you probably won't see a difference in scoring but you're going to feel more on every shot both good and bad.'

    I can see why somebody might be tickled by the feel of a blade here and there but on the whole, I think someone wanting to score optimally would prefer the dullest feeling club possible with which they could still get the necessary feedback.

    Based on my experience, it's not a good thing when your 6-iron flashes a red alert in your hands simply because you struck it a quarter-inch out on the toe. A CB simply hands you a memo without acting like the shot was a complete meltdown. :)

    Not surprisingly, my buddy who's played small CBs for years and been a low single-digit doing so is telling me he's considering the blades more or less '...because they look cool.'

    It's all about looks. Always has been. Don't forget that.

    I'm currently gaming '94 Hogan blades right down to 3i and I haven't had a single shot that "flashes a red alert". The club twists a bit more and you can definitely feel thin shots, but not in a painful way.

    Re: face opening and MOI etc. The first hole on the track I play up at my cottage is a shortish par 4 dog left with a pond on the corner. Basically makes it impossible to hit anything but iron off the tee as there is OB right and a 30 yard wide fairway between pond on left and trees/OB right. The water is also 220 out and doesn't end until 300 so virtually impossible to succeed with driver. I hit 5 iron off the tee with a bit of wind behind but with the blade and a slight miss hit (first swing of the day with no warm up) I go the distance I needed but I felt the face open a touch. This lead to the ball being under a tree and a restricted swing for me. That same swing with my other players CBs I have/now use goes straight and leaves me on the fairway. That isn't imagination it's a fact and THAT is a difference in hitting a green or not.

    So, I guess the difference is that I'm actually ok with putting the ball behind a tree occasionally, because it shows me that I made a mistake that needs to be cleaned up. For me, at this point in my growth, the best thing I can get from a round is a lesson that I can take with me down the road.

    I'm not worried about the scores I shot last month--I'm much more interested in making sure I build good habits so that I'm a better golfer in a few years. To the extent my irons give me exactly what I put into them, I like them as a learning tool. And what I have found practically is that I have a lot of small and big successes during rounds, and I can look back and measure my improvement with full knowledge that there's no static in the line.


    I'm also not at the point where I can look at my iron play and be angry over a single lost stroke. The thing that deserves my serious attention is my putting, so that's what I've been focusing on.

    I got to go to the Northern Trust this weekend. The thing that seriously stood out to me, by seeing great players up close, is just the fact that everyone is an excellent lag putter. You see it on TV all the time, but seeing the actual distances and performances (and not just seeing featured groups) in person puts it into a different perspective.

    One thing that was really memorable was watching Justin Rose on hole #16 on Sunday. It was a driveable par 4, but he put his drive onto the #17 tee box. He then hit a 40-yard pitch that left him 24 feet to the hole. He made the putt for birdie.

    If I'm in that spot with a 40-yard pitch, there's a decent chance I lose a stroke on the pitch and a very high chance that I will 3-putt from 24 feet. That's where I can start to really shave strokes. Compared to that, my irons are pretty irrelevant.

    Posted:

    Cobra King LTD
    Cobra F8 3W
    Cobra F6 Baffler 5W
    Callaway Apex MB 4-PW (Nippon Modus 120)
    Mizuno MP-4 4-PW
    Titleist Vokey SM5 54-10 M
    Mizuno JPX 58-14
    Ping Redwood D66

  • bodhi555bodhi555 Members  966WRX Points: 335Handicap: 8Posts: 966 Golden Tee
    Joined:  #1452

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    On -, @Bubbtubbs said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    I think it's mostly about feel and I think that feel is a massive distraction for most amateurs.

    My buddy is thinking about moving from small CBs over to a full-blown blade and I told him, 'you probably won't see a difference in scoring but you're going to feel more on every shot both good and bad.'

    I can see why somebody might be tickled by the feel of a blade here and there but on the whole, I think someone wanting to score optimally would prefer the dullest feeling club possible with which they could still get the necessary feedback.

    Based on my experience, it's not a good thing when your 6-iron flashes a red alert in your hands simply because you struck it a quarter-inch out on the toe. A CB simply hands you a memo without acting like the shot was a complete meltdown. :)

    Not surprisingly, my buddy who's played small CBs for years and been a low single-digit doing so is telling me he's considering the blades more or less '...because they look cool.'

    It's all about looks. Always has been. Don't forget that.

    I'm currently gaming '94 Hogan blades right down to 3i and I haven't had a single shot that "flashes a red alert". The club twists a bit more and you can definitely feel thin shots, but not in a painful way.

    I didn't say painful. Don't misconstrue the point.

    If you play blades you know precisely the kind of feedback they provide. Amateurs do not need that level of feedback to play decent golf and in general (or at least with me) it tends to over-inflate the significance of misses to the point that amateurs are not happy with shots that are in all actuality perfectly sufficient and well within the bounds of acceptability.

    When I say "red alert" I mean it's distracting, not that it's going to drop you to your knees in pain. It has nothing to do with pain.

    I'll say up front I have no tolerance for those who believe golf is about perfect shots or anyone trying to sell golf as anything less than trying to finish the round in as few strokes as possible whether that's beating a 90 with an 89 or something far more impressive.

    Advice to amateurs should be towards helping them enjoy the game more and ideally accomplishing that with respect to one having more control of their game than they might. Blades do not give the average player more control over their game. In my experience they will not make things more predictable. Quite the opposite in fact. And I'm really not interested in arguments based on theoretical whimsy. If it's not good for the average player, then why are we talking about it, right?

    I dunno, maybe I'm not your average player, but one of the main reasons I use blades is precisely because they are so damned predictable. If I have a 7 iron in my hand, I know if I hit it out the middle it's going to go around 165 yards, if I catch it a little fat, probably about 10 yards less. If I don;t turn properly it'll go 165 yards but around 20 yards left, if I block it, the same right.

    With CB's, I saw a much bigger variance in all those figures, which made scoring more difficult. Your mileage may vary, but that's why I've stuck with blades for 15 years or so.

    Posted:
    The Dee Three: Titleist 917 D3 9.5 degree - Aldila Rogue Max 65X
    The Stenson: Titleist 917 F3 15 degree - Aldila Rogue Max 75X
    The Walking Stick: Titleist 818 H2 19 degree - Aldila Rogue Max 85X
    The Blades: Nike VR Pro 4i - PW - DG S400 TI Shaft
    The Rusties: Nike Engage 50, 54 Square Sole, 58 Toe Sweep
    The Putter: Nike "The Oven" Method 003
    Balls: Nike RZN Tour Black/Platinum, Bridgestone Tour B XS, Titleist AVX
    Bag: Sun Mountain Four Five


  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
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  • BiggErnBiggErn Members  2904WRX Points: 777Posts: 2,904 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #1453

    On -, @bodhi555 said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    On -, @Bubbtubbs said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    I think it's mostly about feel and I think that feel is a massive distraction for most amateurs.

    My buddy is thinking about moving from small CBs over to a full-blown blade and I told him, 'you probably won't see a difference in scoring but you're going to feel more on every shot both good and bad.'

    I can see why somebody might be tickled by the feel of a blade here and there but on the whole, I think someone wanting to score optimally would prefer the dullest feeling club possible with which they could still get the necessary feedback.

    Based on my experience, it's not a good thing when your 6-iron flashes a red alert in your hands simply because you struck it a quarter-inch out on the toe. A CB simply hands you a memo without acting like the shot was a complete meltdown. :)

    Not surprisingly, my buddy who's played small CBs for years and been a low single-digit doing so is telling me he's considering the blades more or less '...because they look cool.'

    It's all about looks. Always has been. Don't forget that.

    I'm currently gaming '94 Hogan blades right down to 3i and I haven't had a single shot that "flashes a red alert". The club twists a bit more and you can definitely feel thin shots, but not in a painful way.

    I didn't say painful. Don't misconstrue the point.

    If you play blades you know precisely the kind of feedback they provide. Amateurs do not need that level of feedback to play decent golf and in general (or at least with me) it tends to over-inflate the significance of misses to the point that amateurs are not happy with shots that are in all actuality perfectly sufficient and well within the bounds of acceptability.

    When I say "red alert" I mean it's distracting, not that it's going to drop you to your knees in pain. It has nothing to do with pain.

    I'll say up front I have no tolerance for those who believe golf is about perfect shots or anyone trying to sell golf as anything less than trying to finish the round in as few strokes as possible whether that's beating a 90 with an 89 or something far more impressive.

    Advice to amateurs should be towards helping them enjoy the game more and ideally accomplishing that with respect to one having more control of their game than they might. Blades do not give the average player more control over their game. In my experience they will not make things more predictable. Quite the opposite in fact. And I'm really not interested in arguments based on theoretical whimsy. If it's not good for the average player, then why are we talking about it, right?

    I dunno, maybe I'm not your average player, but one of the main reasons I use blades is precisely because they are so damned predictable. If I have a 7 iron in my hand, I know if I hit it out the middle it's going to go around 165 yards, if I catch it a little fat, probably about 10 yards less. If I don;t turn properly it'll go 165 yards but around 20 yards left, if I block it, the same right.

    With CB's, I saw a much bigger variance in all those figures, which made scoring more difficult. Your mileage may vary, but that's why I've stuck with blades for 15 years or so.

    That’s why over 70% of all professionals don’t use them. If you’ve been playing blades for 15 years I’ll assume you’re a plus cap.

    Posted:
  • nsxguynsxguy Just anudder user FloridaMembers  7064WRX Points: 1,340Handicap: 3.9-9.3-7.7 (Health issue)Posts: 7,064 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #1454

    On -, @bodhi555 said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    On -, @Bubbtubbs said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    I think it's mostly about feel and I think that feel is a massive distraction for most amateurs.

    My buddy is thinking about moving from small CBs over to a full-blown blade and I told him, 'you probably won't see a difference in scoring but you're going to feel more on every shot both good and bad.'

    I can see why somebody might be tickled by the feel of a blade here and there but on the whole, I think someone wanting to score optimally would prefer the dullest feeling club possible with which they could still get the necessary feedback.

    Based on my experience, it's not a good thing when your 6-iron flashes a red alert in your hands simply because you struck it a quarter-inch out on the toe. A CB simply hands you a memo without acting like the shot was a complete meltdown. :)

    Not surprisingly, my buddy who's played small CBs for years and been a low single-digit doing so is telling me he's considering the blades more or less '...because they look cool.'

    It's all about looks. Always has been. Don't forget that.

    I'm currently gaming '94 Hogan blades right down to 3i and I haven't had a single shot that "flashes a red alert". The club twists a bit more and you can definitely feel thin shots, but not in a painful way.

    I didn't say painful. Don't misconstrue the point.

    If you play blades you know precisely the kind of feedback they provide. Amateurs do not need that level of feedback to play decent golf and in general (or at least with me) it tends to over-inflate the significance of misses to the point that amateurs are not happy with shots that are in all actuality perfectly sufficient and well within the bounds of acceptability.

    When I say "red alert" I mean it's distracting, not that it's going to drop you to your knees in pain. It has nothing to do with pain.

    I'll say up front I have no tolerance for those who believe golf is about perfect shots or anyone trying to sell golf as anything less than trying to finish the round in as few strokes as possible whether that's beating a 90 with an 89 or something far more impressive.

    Advice to amateurs should be towards helping them enjoy the game more and ideally accomplishing that with respect to one having more control of their game than they might. Blades do not give the average player more control over their game. In my experience they will not make things more predictable. Quite the opposite in fact. And I'm really not interested in arguments based on theoretical whimsy. If it's not good for the average player, then why are we talking about it, right?

    I dunno, maybe I'm not your average player, but one of the main reasons I use blades is precisely because they are so damned predictable. If I have a 7 iron in my hand, I know if I hit it out the middle it's going to go around 165 yards, if I catch it a little fat, probably about 10 yards less. If I don;t turn properly it'll go 165 yards but around 20 yards left, if I block it, the same right.

    With CB's, I saw a much bigger variance in all those figures, which made scoring more difficult. Your mileage may vary, but that's why I've stuck with blades for 15 years or so.

    I don't know exactly what an average player is but,,,,,,,,

    I'm on year 8 of my Ping G20s. I'm a "5".

    If I have a 7 iron in my hand I know if I hit it out the middle it's going to go around 152 yards, (sans any wind effect of course), +/- about 2 yards.

    If I catch it a "little" fat, due to the reduced spin that type of shot typically produces, it may go pretty much the same. A little more fat and I'll lose about 10. Hooks don't hook as much as with a blade and cuts don't cut as much as with a blade but I'm OK with that.

    With blades, I saw a much larger variance with mishits, which occur (in varying degrees of course) about 40-50% of the time, which made scoring more difficult. YMMV but that's why I'm sticking with my GIs. Since a blade isn't likely to produce a better variance that's why I'm sticking with the GIs for 20+ years or so.

    Posted:

  • bodhi555bodhi555 Members  966WRX Points: 335Handicap: 8Posts: 966 Golden Tee
    Joined:  #1455

    On -, @BiggErn said:

    On -, @bodhi555 said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    On -, @Bubbtubbs said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    I think it's mostly about feel and I think that feel is a massive distraction for most amateurs.

    My buddy is thinking about moving from small CBs over to a full-blown blade and I told him, 'you probably won't see a difference in scoring but you're going to feel more on every shot both good and bad.'

    I can see why somebody might be tickled by the feel of a blade here and there but on the whole, I think someone wanting to score optimally would prefer the dullest feeling club possible with which they could still get the necessary feedback.

    Based on my experience, it's not a good thing when your 6-iron flashes a red alert in your hands simply because you struck it a quarter-inch out on the toe. A CB simply hands you a memo without acting like the shot was a complete meltdown. :)

    Not surprisingly, my buddy who's played small CBs for years and been a low single-digit doing so is telling me he's considering the blades more or less '...because they look cool.'

    It's all about looks. Always has been. Don't forget that.

    I'm currently gaming '94 Hogan blades right down to 3i and I haven't had a single shot that "flashes a red alert". The club twists a bit more and you can definitely feel thin shots, but not in a painful way.

    I didn't say painful. Don't misconstrue the point.

    If you play blades you know precisely the kind of feedback they provide. Amateurs do not need that level of feedback to play decent golf and in general (or at least with me) it tends to over-inflate the significance of misses to the point that amateurs are not happy with shots that are in all actuality perfectly sufficient and well within the bounds of acceptability.

    When I say "red alert" I mean it's distracting, not that it's going to drop you to your knees in pain. It has nothing to do with pain.

    I'll say up front I have no tolerance for those who believe golf is about perfect shots or anyone trying to sell golf as anything less than trying to finish the round in as few strokes as possible whether that's beating a 90 with an 89 or something far more impressive.

    Advice to amateurs should be towards helping them enjoy the game more and ideally accomplishing that with respect to one having more control of their game than they might. Blades do not give the average player more control over their game. In my experience they will not make things more predictable. Quite the opposite in fact. And I'm really not interested in arguments based on theoretical whimsy. If it's not good for the average player, then why are we talking about it, right?

    I dunno, maybe I'm not your average player, but one of the main reasons I use blades is precisely because they are so damned predictable. If I have a 7 iron in my hand, I know if I hit it out the middle it's going to go around 165 yards, if I catch it a little fat, probably about 10 yards less. If I don;t turn properly it'll go 165 yards but around 20 yards left, if I block it, the same right.

    With CB's, I saw a much bigger variance in all those figures, which made scoring more difficult. Your mileage may vary, but that's why I've stuck with blades for 15 years or so.

    That’s why over 70% of all professionals don’t use them. If you’ve been playing blades for 15 years I’ll assume you’re a plus cap.

    No, I currently play off 6. When I used CBs all the time I was off 11.

    HOW DID THAT HAPPEN???!!?!?! Almost as if there's more to scoring than where the weight is positioned in your irons!

    Posted:
    The Dee Three: Titleist 917 D3 9.5 degree - Aldila Rogue Max 65X
    The Stenson: Titleist 917 F3 15 degree - Aldila Rogue Max 75X
    The Walking Stick: Titleist 818 H2 19 degree - Aldila Rogue Max 85X
    The Blades: Nike VR Pro 4i - PW - DG S400 TI Shaft
    The Rusties: Nike Engage 50, 54 Square Sole, 58 Toe Sweep
    The Putter: Nike "The Oven" Method 003
    Balls: Nike RZN Tour Black/Platinum, Bridgestone Tour B XS, Titleist AVX
    Bag: Sun Mountain Four Five


  • nsxguynsxguy Just anudder user FloridaMembers  7064WRX Points: 1,340Handicap: 3.9-9.3-7.7 (Health issue)Posts: 7,064 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #1456

    On -, @Golfjack said:

    So here's the real question... how many strokes do you gain by playing GI clubs vs blades and/or vice versa? I don't think (might have missed it) people have tried to quantify this rather just use their common sense. **** has used a similar approach when evaluating similar clubs. Would be interesting to see it used across a spectrum just for demonstration purposes.

    How many stars are in the Universe ?

    Same-same. Since NO 2 shots are ever alike you're asking a question that's impossible to answer.

    This real question has been asked and answered many times before even in this thread.

    And the only answer is that it's up to the user to quantify, however inaccurate it may or may not be.

    Kinda like the guy who thinks the psychology of hitting a smaller SS, the center of the face, will somehow cause the player to concentrate more. LMAO

    Posted:

  • TigerInTheWoodsTigerInTheWoods Members  2647WRX Points: 1,663Handicap: 5Posts: 2,647 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #1457

    On -, @revanant said:

    On -, @balls_deep said:

    On -, @Bubbtubbs said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    I think it's mostly about feel and I think that feel is a massive distraction for most amateurs.

    My buddy is thinking about moving from small CBs over to a full-blown blade and I told him, 'you probably won't see a difference in scoring but you're going to feel more on every shot both good and bad.'

    I can see why somebody might be tickled by the feel of a blade here and there but on the whole, I think someone wanting to score optimally would prefer the dullest feeling club possible with which they could still get the necessary feedback.

    Based on my experience, it's not a good thing when your 6-iron flashes a red alert in your hands simply because you struck it a quarter-inch out on the toe. A CB simply hands you a memo without acting like the shot was a complete meltdown. :)

    Not surprisingly, my buddy who's played small CBs for years and been a low single-digit doing so is telling me he's considering the blades more or less '...because they look cool.'

    It's all about looks. Always has been. Don't forget that.

    I'm currently gaming '94 Hogan blades right down to 3i and I haven't had a single shot that "flashes a red alert". The club twists a bit more and you can definitely feel thin shots, but not in a painful way.

    Re: face opening and MOI etc. The first hole on the track I play up at my cottage is a shortish par 4 dog left with a pond on the corner. Basically makes it impossible to hit anything but iron off the tee as there is OB right and a 30 yard wide fairway between pond on left and trees/OB right. The water is also 220 out and doesn't end until 300 so virtually impossible to succeed with driver. I hit 5 iron off the tee with a bit of wind behind but with the blade and a slight miss hit (first swing of the day with no warm up) I go the distance I needed but I felt the face open a touch. This lead to the ball being under a tree and a restricted swing for me. That same swing with my other players CBs I have/now use goes straight and leaves me on the fairway. That isn't imagination it's a fact and THAT is a difference in hitting a green or not.

    So, I guess the difference is that I'm actually ok with putting the ball behind a tree occasionally, because it shows me that I made a mistake that needs to be cleaned up. For me, at this point in my growth, the best thing I can get from a round is a lesson that I can take with me down the road.

    I'm not worried about the scores I shot last month--I'm much more interested in making sure I build good habits so that I'm a better golfer in a few years. To the extent my irons give me exactly what I put into them, I like them as a learning tool. And what I have found practically is that I have a lot of small and big successes during rounds, and I can look back and measure my improvement with full knowledge that there's no static in the line.


    I'm also not at the point where I can look at my iron play and be angry over a single lost stroke. The thing that deserves my serious attention is my putting, so that's what I've been focusing on.

    I got to go to the Northern Trust this weekend. The thing that seriously stood out to me, by seeing great players up close, is just the fact that everyone is an excellent lag putter. You see it on TV all the time, but seeing the actual distances and performances (and not just seeing featured groups) in person puts it into a different perspective.

    One thing that was really memorable was watching Justin Rose on hole #16 on Sunday. It was a driveable par 4, but he put his drive onto the #17 tee box. He then hit a 40-yard pitch that left him 24 feet to the hole. He made the putt for birdie.

    If I'm in that spot with a 40-yard pitch, there's a decent chance I lose a stroke on the pitch and a very high chance that I will 3-putt from 24 feet. That's where I can start to really shave strokes. Compared to that, my irons are pretty irrelevant.

    To be honest you're kind of contradicting yourself. You say you don't care if you're behind a tree because the lesson is more important than your score, but then you're talking about improving other parts of your game which are going to improve your score. If you aren't behind that tree with a 10-20 yard distance loss from the open club face, your strokes gained improve through a much higher percentage of GIR and general proximity to the hole. If I miss hit the ball and get a good result, I still am mad at myself for that bad swing. I'm just going to have a slightly better score at the end. If I had that exact same swing with my iBlade, I guarantee you that ball is on the fairway. I also guarantee you that hitting the green with a PW from the fairway instead of a knockdown 8 iron from under a tree is much more likely. I still feel the miss hit with the other club, I still make adjustments, I'm just not under a d*mn tree. There is no "learning" justification for blades - you can learn just as much playing something with help. You like the way they look and feel. End of story. That isn't a bad thing and as you said you might be shooting the same score because of other reasons. If you're going with that argument you should go buy some persimmon woods, wedges with absolutely no bounce, and a Wilson 8802 putter so that you can learn lessons from all of your clubs at once.

    Posted:
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  • mahoniemahonie EnglandMembers  3012WRX Points: 602Handicap: 11Posts: 3,012 Titanium Tees
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    On -, @balls_deep said:

    On -, @revanant said:

    On -, @balls_deep said:

    On -, @Bubbtubbs said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    I think it's mostly about feel and I think that feel is a massive distraction for most amateurs.

    My buddy is thinking about moving from small CBs over to a full-blown blade and I told him, 'you probably won't see a difference in scoring but you're going to feel more on every shot both good and bad.'

    I can see why somebody might be tickled by the feel of a blade here and there but on the whole, I think someone wanting to score optimally would prefer the dullest feeling club possible with which they could still get the necessary feedback.

    Based on my experience, it's not a good thing when your 6-iron flashes a red alert in your hands simply because you struck it a quarter-inch out on the toe. A CB simply hands you a memo without acting like the shot was a complete meltdown. :)

    Not surprisingly, my buddy who's played small CBs for years and been a low single-digit doing so is telling me he's considering the blades more or less '...because they look cool.'

    It's all about looks. Always has been. Don't forget that.

    I'm currently gaming '94 Hogan blades right down to 3i and I haven't had a single shot that "flashes a red alert". The club twists a bit more and you can definitely feel thin shots, but not in a painful way.

    Re: face opening and MOI etc. The first hole on the track I play up at my cottage is a shortish par 4 dog left with a pond on the corner. Basically makes it impossible to hit anything but iron off the tee as there is OB right and a 30 yard wide fairway between pond on left and trees/OB right. The water is also 220 out and doesn't end until 300 so virtually impossible to succeed with driver. I hit 5 iron off the tee with a bit of wind behind but with the blade and a slight miss hit (first swing of the day with no warm up) I go the distance I needed but I felt the face open a touch. This lead to the ball being under a tree and a restricted swing for me. That same swing with my other players CBs I have/now use goes straight and leaves me on the fairway. That isn't imagination it's a fact and THAT is a difference in hitting a green or not.

    So, I guess the difference is that I'm actually ok with putting the ball behind a tree occasionally, because it shows me that I made a mistake that needs to be cleaned up. For me, at this point in my growth, the best thing I can get from a round is a lesson that I can take with me down the road.

    I'm not worried about the scores I shot last month--I'm much more interested in making sure I build good habits so that I'm a better golfer in a few years. To the extent my irons give me exactly what I put into them, I like them as a learning tool. And what I have found practically is that I have a lot of small and big successes during rounds, and I can look back and measure my improvement with full knowledge that there's no static in the line.


    I'm also not at the point where I can look at my iron play and be angry over a single lost stroke. The thing that deserves my serious attention is my putting, so that's what I've been focusing on.

    I got to go to the Northern Trust this weekend. The thing that seriously stood out to me, by seeing great players up close, is just the fact that everyone is an excellent lag putter. You see it on TV all the time, but seeing the actual distances and performances (and not just seeing featured groups) in person puts it into a different perspective.

    One thing that was really memorable was watching Justin Rose on hole #16 on Sunday. It was a driveable par 4, but he put his drive onto the #17 tee box. He then hit a 40-yard pitch that left him 24 feet to the hole. He made the putt for birdie.

    If I'm in that spot with a 40-yard pitch, there's a decent chance I lose a stroke on the pitch and a very high chance that I will 3-putt from 24 feet. That's where I can start to really shave strokes. Compared to that, my irons are pretty irrelevant.

    To be honest you're kind of contradicting yourself. You say you don't care if you're behind a tree because the lesson is more important than your score, but then you're talking about improving other parts of your game which are going to improve your score. If you aren't behind that tree with a 10-20 yard distance loss from the open club face, your strokes gained improve through a much higher percentage of GIR and general proximity to the hole. If I miss hit the ball and get a good result, I still am mad at myself for that bad swing. I'm just going to have a slightly better score at the end. If I had that exact same swing with my iBlade, I guarantee you that ball is on the fairway. I also guarantee you that hitting the green with a PW from the fairway instead of a knockdown 8 iron from under a tree is much more likely. I still feel the miss hit with the other club, I still make adjustments, I'm just not under a d*mn tree. There is no "learning" justification for blades - you can learn just as much playing something with help. You like the way they look and feel. End of story. That isn't a bad thing and as you said you might be shooting the same score because of other reasons. If you're going with that argument you should go buy some persimmon woods, wedges with absolutely no bounce, and a Wilson 8802 putter so that you can learn lessons from all of your clubs at once.

    You’re not going to tell me that I have no business putting with an 8802-type putter are you?

    Posted:
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    Radius Classic 8
  • revanantrevanant Members  422WRX Points: 329Posts: 422 Greens
    Joined:  edited Aug 13, 2019 #1459

    On -, @balls_deep said:

    On -, @revanant said:

    On -, @balls_deep said:

    On -, @Bubbtubbs said:

    On -, @MelloYello said:

    I think it's mostly about feel and I think that feel is a massive distraction for most amateurs.

    My buddy is thinking about moving from small CBs over to a full-blown blade and I told him, 'you probably won't see a difference in scoring but you're going to feel more on every shot both good and bad.'

    I can see why somebody might be tickled by the feel of a blade here and there but on the whole, I think someone wanting to score optimally would prefer the dullest feeling club possible with which they could still get the necessary feedback.

    Based on my experience, it's not a good thing when your 6-iron flashes a red alert in your hands simply because you struck it a quarter-inch out on the toe. A CB simply hands you a memo without acting like the shot was a complete meltdown. :)

    Not surprisingly, my buddy who's played small CBs for years and been a low single-digit doing so is telling me he's considering the blades more or less '...because they look cool.'

    It's all about looks. Always has been. Don't forget that.

    I'm currently gaming '94 Hogan blades right down to 3i and I haven't had a single shot that "flashes a red alert". The club twists a bit more and you can definitely feel thin shots, but not in a painful way.

    Re: face opening and MOI etc. The first hole on the track I play up at my cottage is a shortish par 4 dog left with a pond on the corner. Basically makes it impossible to hit anything but iron off the tee as there is OB right and a 30 yard wide fairway between pond on left and trees/OB right. The water is also 220 out and doesn't end until 300 so virtually impossible to succeed with driver. I hit 5 iron off the tee with a bit of wind behind but with the blade and a slight miss hit (first swing of the day with no warm up) I go the distance I needed but I felt the face open a touch. This lead to the ball being under a tree and a restricted swing for me. That same swing with my other players CBs I have/now use goes straight and leaves me on the fairway. That isn't imagination it's a fact and THAT is a difference in hitting a green or not.

    So, I guess the difference is that I'm actually ok with putting the ball behind a tree occasionally, because it shows me that I made a mistake that needs to be cleaned up. For me, at this point in my growth, the best thing I can get from a round is a lesson that I can take with me down the road.

    I'm not worried about the scores I shot last month--I'm much more interested in making sure I build good habits so that I'm a better golfer in a few years. To the extent my irons give me exactly what I put into them, I like them as a learning tool. And what I have found practically is that I have a lot of small and big successes during rounds, and I can look back and measure my improvement with full knowledge that there's no static in the line.


    I'm also not at the point where I can look at my iron play and be angry over a single lost stroke. The thing that deserves my serious attention is my putting, so that's what I've been focusing on.

    I got to go to the Northern Trust this weekend. The thing that seriously stood out to me, by seeing great players up close, is just the fact that everyone is an excellent lag putter. You see it on TV all the time, but seeing the actual distances and performances (and not just seeing featured groups) in person puts it into a different perspective.

    One thing that was really memorable was watching Justin Rose on hole #16 on Sunday. It was a driveable par 4, but he put his drive onto the #17 tee box. He then hit a 40-yard pitch that left him 24 feet to the hole. He made the putt for birdie.

    If I'm in that spot with a 40-yard pitch, there's a decent chance I lose a stroke on the pitch and a very high chance that I will 3-putt from 24 feet. That's where I can start to really shave strokes. Compared to that, my irons are pretty irrelevant.

    To be honest you're kind of contradicting yourself. You say you don't care if you're behind a tree because the lesson is more important than your score, but then you're talking about improving other parts of your game which are going to improve your score. If you aren't behind that tree with a 10-20 yard distance loss from the open club face, your strokes gained improve through a much higher percentage of GIR and general proximity to the hole. If I miss hit the ball and get a good result, I still am mad at myself for that bad swing. I'm just going to have a slightly better score at the end. If I had that exact same swing with my iBlade, I guarantee you that ball is on the fairway. I also guarantee you that hitting the green with a PW from the fairway instead of a knockdown 8 iron from under a tree is much more likely. I still feel the miss hit with the other club, I still make adjustments, I'm just not under a d*mn tree. There is no "learning" justification for blades - you can learn just as much playing something with help. You like the way they look and feel. End of story. That isn't a bad thing and as you said you might be shooting the same score because of other reasons. If you're going with that argument you should go buy some persimmon woods, wedges with absolutely no bounce, and a Wilson 8802 putter so that you can learn lessons from all of your clubs at once.

    So, I have a similar example of something that happened to me a few rounds ago. I had a good lie from about 135 yards to the pin for my second shot on a par 4. It's my perfect 7 iron distance. Only I hit an overcooked draw and put the ball into a greenside bunker that needed about 145 yards of carry to be reached. I now had about 15 yards to the pin, but I made really clean contact with my sand wedge, and wound up in the rough, about 40 yards from where I was standing. Annoyed with myself, I kept my sand wedge in hand and botched the pitch, putting it about 10 feet from where I was standing. Another pitch was called for, which was better but short, leaving me just on the fringe of the green and about 12 feet away. Rather than chip, I used my putter, and got lucky--the putt tracked to the hole and dropped, for a double bogey.

    The whole thing was just an expensive saga of mistakes. It all could have been avoided if I hadn't overcooked my iron shot. But it was a clean strike--I just caught it a little forward and closed, and it's the sort of miss that would happen with any iron. Morevoer, the damage should have been lessened coming out of the bunker, and with all-around better chipping and more focus. I also got the memory of having a fluke putt drop. Looking back, it's a useful memory, and the fact that I made a double bogey when I was in great position for a par or a bogey has zero actual cost or consequence attached to it from a scoring perspective--it's way in the past. The memory and lesson is more important to me.

    Things I learned/was reminded of:
    1) Be careful about ball position with mid-irons;
    2) Be very careful not to catch a ball too cleanly from a bunker;
    3) Don't rush pitches/chips;
    4) Bad shots happen--don't let them compound;
    5) Don't give up on putts.

    Quite frankly, your game is farther along than mine is. You probably are a much better lag putter, and you've cut out most of the mental mistakes from your short game. I'm not there yet, but I look forward to getting there.

    I hear your point about persimmons and such. I actually wouldn't be against teeing up a persimmon for a round or two, or playing a hickory-shafted iron. I think it would be fun, even if I don't score as well. My score was much higher than usual when I played Bethpage Black, but I'd do it again in a heartbeat.

    I do want to play my best. But I'm ok with the fact that improvement in golf isn't always linear.

    That being said, my MP-4s are in the bag because--the above anecdote notwithstanding--I'm actually having a lot of success with them. They are my iron set with the flattest lie angle and most narrow sole, and I think it goes a long way towards why I strike the ball well with them. Practically, I find I have good ball flight on the course, even though the shaft is a bad fit on paper. So, I'm a little hesitant to change things up, since things are working well.

    But, while I won't sell my MP-4s, I also won't honestly won't cling to my MP-4s as my primary irons if I can play better golf with a different set. I'm sitting on my 716 CBs, and I am going to pay for a lie adjustment to see if it helps improve their performance in my hands. I''m just waiting for the new T100s/MP20s/etc. to drop. At that point, I'm planning on going in to Club Champion and doing an iron + shaft test. Loft+lie adjustment is included as part of the service, so I can make sure I'm dialing in the 716 CBs exactly. I'll put my MP-4s and 716 CBs up against newer offerings, and if I find a club + shaft combo that gives me improved performance from my current setup, I'll make changes based on my budget.

    But, I'll probably still be out of luck if I overcook a draw. : )

    Posted:
    Post edited by revanant on

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  • farmerfarmer Members  8830WRX Points: 1,213Posts: 8,830 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #1460

    I'm an old guy (69) and I play hybrids through the seven. About a five hdcp. Have the hybrids helped my game? Oh yes, best golf thing I've done in years. I can tell where on the face I make contact, just like I could with the old Walter Hagen's I first played. The Haig's never told me anything I didn't already know, and stubbornly refused to give me any swing advice.

    Posted:
  • mahoniemahonie EnglandMembers  3012WRX Points: 602Handicap: 11Posts: 3,012 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #1461

    I’ll just leave this here. Discuss.

    Posted:
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  • TigerInTheWoodsTigerInTheWoods Members  2647WRX Points: 1,663Handicap: 5Posts: 2,647 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #1462

    On -, @mahonie said:

    I’ll just leave this here. Discuss.

    I mean, yeah. You can hit a ball with them. Again, the guy has an abysmal swing so how much of a difference does it make? Not a ton. There is no consistency whatsoever. He's spraying the ball all over the place. For me, trying to shoot par, I want the cushion of distance retention/MOI when strike isn't perfectly middled. For what it's worth, I hit smaller irons/thinner soles much better so I can see your point from that perspective. I just think you can get every single benefit from a CB that you get from a blade without the downsides.

    Posted:
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  • mahoniemahonie EnglandMembers  3012WRX Points: 602Handicap: 11Posts: 3,012 Titanium Tees
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    On -, @balls_deep said:

    On -, @mahonie said:

    I’ll just leave this here. Discuss.

    I mean, yeah. You can hit a ball with them. Again, the guy has an abysmal swing so how much of a difference does it make? Not a ton. There is no consistency whatsoever. He's spraying the ball all over the place. For me, trying to shoot par, I want the cushion of distance retention/MOI when strike isn't perfectly middled. For what it's worth, I hit smaller irons/thinner soles much better so I can see your point from that perspective. I just think you can get every single benefit from a CB that you get from a blade without the downsides.

    My take from the video is that the P730s are the least playable of the modern blades according to Maltby and yet the results were, you could argue, better than those of the best selling club of the last couple of years even with the guy’s inconsistency. An example of the marketing winning against results on the course?

    Posted:
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    Wilson Staff PMP wedges 50/54/58 KBS Hi-Rev 2.0
    Radius Classic 8
  • BenHoganSlam1953BenHoganSlam1953 Professional Hacker Members  1942WRX Points: 101Handicap: 10.4Posts: 1,942 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #1464

    I've played MBs / CBs and G type irons (Apex FTX, Hogan Edge CFT, MP-32, MP-53) ... played similar with all. Currently, my lowest iron is a 6i so there would be little difference anyways. I can shoot in the 70's or 90's with any of them since location off the tee is a bigger factor in my scores than the type of iron I play.

    Posted:
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  • BMCBMC Members  3921WRX Points: 918Handicap: YESPosts: 3,921 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #1465

    It's fun and recreation for most of us. Yes, a 2018 Lexus drives better in every way than a 1967 Corvette.
    But, given the choice, I'm drivin' the 'Vette.

    Posted:
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  • erikroerikro Massachusetts Members  688WRX Points: 162Posts: 688 Golden Tee
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    It’s probably been said already but I think the proper shaft is much more important than the club head. Anything over a 105 gram shaft and I feel like the club is fighting me whether it’s a mb or a g410.

    Posted:
  • Nard_SNard_S Members  3917WRX Points: 873Handicap: 9Posts: 3,917 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #1467

    ^^^ I agree. ^^^

    I have many MB's and what works and what does not comes down to shaft profile and gross mass. MB's need much more attention on this, the MM's of good hit zone is smaller and you need a higher groove impact to realize benefits of high spin & low launch. Not all blades are good or great. Some factory setups are awful. I've acquired a dozen sets, all used, it's cheap, but only 3 maybe are beautifully specified/built and fit me well even if most all shafts are in the zone a fitter or myself could sign off on. Literally have to hone in on a 5 gram range and a profile that pulls the swing to it's best light. I do that, they become an extension of me. Zero "focus" needed. lol.

    Posted:
  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
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  • LowAndLeft32LowAndLeft32 Members  231WRX Points: 73Posts: 231 Fairways
    Joined:  #1468

    On -, @Nard_S interesting comments. So what are your top three sets that work? Thanks
    Posted:
  • moko jumbymoko jumby Members  41WRX Points: 91Posts: 41 Bunkers
    Joined:  edited Dec 30, 2019 #1469

    .

    Posted:
    Post edited by moko jumby on
  • jpdxjpdx Members  1897WRX Points: 223Posts: 1,897 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #1470

    Hey guys, for the guys who say no one should play blades or that’s say they play cb .... how many of you play cb wedges?

    If you don’t, why don’t you?
    If you do, where do you get them?

    Posted:
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  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
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  • BiggErnBiggErn Members  2904WRX Points: 777Posts: 2,904 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #1471

    On -, @jpdx said:

    Hey guys, for the guys who say no one should play blades or that’s say they play cb .... how many of you play cb wedges?

    If you don’t, why don’t you?
    If you do, where do you get them?

    Omg 🙄

    Posted:
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