Extreme Pressure

heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭
edited Mar 22, 2019 5:37pm in Juniors/College Golf Talk #1

Under Extreme pressure, what part of the game falters or deteriorates the fastest? Putting, Short Game, Driving, Mental Decision making, something else?

Comments

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭

    i think this could be different for a lot people. I would say that putting goes first followed by the swing.

    Putting is crucial because it will help cover short comings in your short game if your good enough at it. Also if your unsure of your swing that can hurt as well for obvious reasons.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 963 ✭✭

    For my son I think I see him make some stupid decisions after hitting a bad shot or two. I've also seen him take some relatively easy / non challenging shots when he's pretty clear of the field which then puts pressure on other parts of his game. That being said, I'd say it's mental decision making. To take this further I'd like to hear from others on what they're doing around decision making skills.

    Great topic HH!

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • cwglumcwglum Members Posts: 1,554 ✭✭

    The weakest parts of your game are exposed under pressure. Will be different for each player.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 963 ✭✭

    @cwglum Good observation. What have you seen in yourself or your junior golfer and how have you addressed it?

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭

    I am with you Leezer. I think it is mental decision making.

  • wildcatdenwildcatden China Cat Sunflower Members Posts: 827 ✭✭

    Another vote for mental aspects of the game succumbing to pressure. Either decisions or focus tend to go.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 963 ✭✭

    @wildcatden do you do anything actively to reign it back in?

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • wildcatdenwildcatden China Cat Sunflower Members Posts: 827 ✭✭

    @leezer99 - Although I would prefer to be less involved, as my 8YO's caddy, I'm feel like I am constantly reminding him to go through his pre-shot routine every shot. So, if he had a bad shot due to "pressure", although he may not even recognize that is what is happening, our next shot would be me reminding him to stick to routine.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭

    We all know it is a mental thing that triggers it but the reason for the breakdown is there not able reproduce the shot under pressure. A lot times this means routines are a problem begin with. If your able reproduce under pressure you will be just fine.

    Getting someone to that state is not easy. Many times I have found with my Own daughter is the more confidence the easier it gets.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭

    This new format is so hard to read and write on a phone.

    I forgot to add that a lot people have swings that do not hold up under pressure. You know it is an issue when you kid is suddenly slicing it or chunking the ball or something else you just never see them do.

    The only fix I have seen is get a routine down that is easy to follow.

  • darter79darter79 Members Posts: 682 ✭✭

    To me emotions/mental can get to you pretty easily and impact all parts of your game but in my experience what I've seen from my kid and others its putting. Nothing like a 4 footer to win a tournament that has little to no break only to see you badly pull or push that put. I was watching an event recently on Tv and they stated the easiest way to see pressure in putting is when you leave it painfully short. Who seen their kids do that?

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭

    @darter79 said:
    To me emotions/mental can get to you pretty easily and impact all parts of your game but in my experience what I've seen from my kid and others its putting. Nothing like a 4 footer to win a tournament that has little to no break only to see you badly pull or push that put. I was watching an event recently on Tv and they stated the easiest way to see pressure in putting is when you leave it painfully short. Who seen their kids do that?

    Mine spend hours and hours every week on 4-6 footers. Honestly have never seen him leave one of those short.

  • darter79darter79 Members Posts: 682 ✭✭

    @heavy_hitter more of the lines of the longer putts that are left short at least what I've seen both local and on one of the pro tours. 4 -6 footer short I might go jump in a lake.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭
    edited Mar 25, 2019 2:33pm #15

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @darter79 said:
    To me emotions/mental can get to you pretty easily and impact all parts of your game but in my experience what I've seen from my kid and others its putting. Nothing like a 4 footer to win a tournament that has little to no break only to see you badly pull or push that put. I was watching an event recently on Tv and they stated the easiest way to see pressure in putting is when you leave it painfully short. Who seen their kids do that?

    Mine spend hours and hours every week on 4-6 footers. Honestly have never seen him leave one of those short.

    So many little things can go wrong. With putting speed it is always an issue especially under pressure but I think most kids get a handle on that and figure out a way to deal with it. To me the hardest part of putting is the urge to not try and see the ball go in especially on shorter putt. It is just human nature to look.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭

    @tiger1873 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @darter79 said:
    To me emotions/mental can get to you pretty easily and impact all parts of your game but in my experience what I've seen from my kid and others its putting. Nothing like a 4 footer to win a tournament that has little to no break only to see you badly pull or push that put. I was watching an event recently on Tv and they stated the easiest way to see pressure in putting is when you leave it painfully short. Who seen their kids do that?

    Mine spend hours and hours every week on 4-6 footers. Honestly have never seen him leave one of those short.

    So many little things can go wrong. With putting speed it is always an issue especially under pressure but I think most kids get a handle on that and figure out a way to deal with it. To me the hardest part of putting is the urge to not try and see the ball go in especially on shorter putt. It is just human nature to look.

    If you control the pace of your back swing the more likely you are to control distance better. If you work on back swing time and pace the less likely you are to have issues with putting speed.

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