Fixing Spike Marks on Line of Putt

I've seen a few discussions on the "flagstick in while putting" rule, but haven't seen one on the "fixing spike marks" rule. I apologize if this has already been discussed to the point that we should put this post in the graveyard with all of the other dead horses.
Personally, when we were all wearing those shoes with a dozen icepicks on the soles, I thought it was crazy to not be able to fix a spike mark. Then one year I played in a local tournament that rotated courses for 3 days, and the last course was in poor condition so the committee allowed spike mark repairs. The experience completely changed my mind about the issue.
First of all it slowed us down as we repaired every imperfection to the best of our ability. Secondly, I noticed one player leaning pretty hard on his putter, either on the toe or the heel, and I was pretty sure that he was making sure the putt was going to break a certain way as it got close to the hole. For the **** of it, the next day on the practice green I experimented with the technique and by-golly, I never missed a 4 footer because I had hand sculpted the line.

I'm not accusing the pros of doing this, but I have noticed, more and more, that essentially every inch of the 10 foot putt has been tapped down. Professional golfers are OCD by assignment, and this is just not going in the right direction.
In my own opinion, of course.

FORE RIGHT!!!!
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Comments

  • antipantip Members Posts: 446 ✭✭

    The rules principles here are not complicated. You can repair damage such as spike marks by taking reasonable actions to restore to the original condition. But you cannot improve the green by going beyond restoring to the original condition. The key reference is R13.1c(2).
    The challenge is enforcing the rule and penalising behaviour that is not consistent with these requirements.

  • LodestoneLodestone Members Posts: 3,255 ✭✭

    @antip said:
    The rules principles here are not complicated. You can repair damage such as spike marks by taking reasonable actions to restore to the original condition. But you cannot improve the green by going beyond restoring to the original condition. The key reference is R13.1c(2).
    The challenge is enforcing the rule and penalising behaviour that is not consistent with these requirements.

    Yes, well, what is the "original" condition? I think most folks envisioned the repair of an obvious snag up in the grass from a spike. I doubt there are 20 of those on a 15 foot putt during a PGA event. Watch how many times these guys (and ladies) tap the line. By no means am I suggesting they are attempting to alter the break. That point was made as an aside.
    My main point is that the pros are spending a lot of time tapping even the slightest irregularities. Obsessively so IMO. I don't think that was envisioned when the rule was changed.
    Frankly, I wouldn't be surprised to see this rule changed back. Much more likely IMO than reversing the flagstick run.

    FORE RIGHT!!!!
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 23,066 ✭✭

    @Lodestone said:
    Yes, well, what is the "original" condition?

    The clarification in the rules is done by providing examples of what types of "damage" can be fixed and what can not. IMO, it's plenty clear but you have to make your own decision after reading it yourself.

    @Lodestone said:
    My main point is that the pros are spending a lot of time tapping even the slightest irregularities. Obsessively so IMO. I don't think that was envisioned when the rule was changed.

    Not nearly as much time as they are still taking reading the greens and looking at their books and notes. And it's usually being done while they are reading the greens so not really adding any significant time. And I also doubt very much that anyone in the ruling bodies is surprised about how it's turned out. But again, those are just my observations and opinions.

    P.S. Soft vs Hard spikes hasn't changed anything. I generally see more spike damage now then I did when metal spikes were common. Lots of today's "soft" spikes can do some decent damage and people tend to be a lot less careful now then they used to.

  • antipantip Members Posts: 446 ✭✭
    edited Apr 19, 2019 1:31am #5

    The history is interesting. My understanding is soft v hard spikes change over wasn't predominantly about player's feet damaging the greens. The big issue was that hard spikes had evolved into titanium/super strong metals but when they eventually started coming out of the shoes on the course, the stronger metals were doing untold damage to course equipment mowing blades that were becoming finer and finer (stimp readings now 30 per and more faster than 30-40 years ago).

  • LeoLeo99LeoLeo99 Members Posts: 3,979 ✭✭

    @antip said:
    The history is interesting. My understanding is soft v hard spikes change over wasn't predominantly about player's feet damaging the greens. The big issue was that hard spikes had evolved into titanium/super strong metals but when they eventually started coming out of the shoes on the course, the stronger metals were doing untold damage to course equipment mowing blades that were becoming finer and finer (stimp readings now 30 per and more faster than 30-40 years ago).

    As a young lad learning the ways of golf, always thought it peculiar that the older gentlemen admonished us kids and reinforced the sanctity and purity of the green all the while we wore sneakers ( aka trainers aka tennis shoes) while they wore metal spikes dress shoes. All spikes impact the green negatively. We should all wear smooth soled putting shoes

  • LodestoneLodestone Members Posts: 3,255 ✭✭

    @antip said:
    The history is interesting. My understanding is soft v hard spikes change over wasn't predominantly about player's feet damaging the greens. The big issue was that hard spikes had evolved into titanium/super strong metals but when they eventually started coming out of the shoes on the course, the stronger metals were doing untold damage to course equipment mowing blades that were becoming finer and finer (stimp readings now 30 per and more faster than 30-40 years ago).

    I'd never heard that line of thinking but it makes some sense. When I look at the aggressive plastic clawlike spikes on my shoes now, compared with the old metal spikes, I do wonder how the can be kinder to the green. But when I play golf I don't think I see as many of the pulled up spike marks as before. Unless of course you have someone who can't seem to pick their feet up when they walk.

    FORE RIGHT!!!!
  • Mr. BeanMr. Bean Members Posts: 3,873 ✭✭
    edited Apr 19, 2019 12:40pm #8

    In my country the main reason for steel spike extinction has been the floors at the clubhouses. Many clubs started to forbid entrance with metal spikes as they tended to ruin wooden floors and be extremely slippery on stone floors. It made much more sense than forbidding them on the course as in my experience they caused much less damage especially on moist greens than current plastic roses.

    In fact, many courses allowed spikes on the course but not in the restaurant or office premises. Unfortunately only few clubs have separate entrances to the dressing rooms so gradually everyone dispensed with spikes due to simplicity. Besides, they are better suited for driving a car...

  • Mr. BeanMr. Bean Members Posts: 3,873 ✭✭
    edited Apr 19, 2019 12:45pm #9

    @antip said:
    The history is interesting. My understanding is soft v hard spikes change over wasn't predominantly about player's feet damaging the greens. The big issue was that hard spikes had evolved into titanium/super strong metals but when they eventually started coming out of the shoes on the course, the stronger metals were doing untold damage to course equipment mowing blades that were becoming finer and finer (stimp readings now 30 per and more faster than 30-40 years ago).

    That sounds like the story of plastic tees I was told when I started to play golf. According to that story plastic tees were not allowed here because they damaged the very same cutting blades. It is funny to see we are using millions of plastic tees and the same cutting machines 25 years later...

    I was later told that wooden tees were forbidden in a certain country for the very same reason 😁

  • Roadking2003Roadking2003 AustinMembers Posts: 5,268 ✭✭

    @Lodestone said:
    My main point is that the pros are spending a lot of time tapping even the slightest irregularities. Obsessively so IMO. I don't think that was envisioned when the rule was changed.

    I've watched quite a bit of golf this year and have not seen any Tour Pro spending a lot of time tapping irregularities. You can tap down a handful of irregularities in 10 seconds.

  • sui generissui generis Members Posts: 3,800 ✭✭

    @Roadking2003 said:

    @Lodestone said:
    My main point is that the pros are spending a lot of time tapping even the slightest irregularities. Obsessively so IMO. I don't think that was envisioned when the rule was changed.

    I've watched quite a bit of golf this year and have not seen any Tour Pro spending a lot of time tapping irregularities. You can tap down a handful of irregularities in 10 seconds.

    I've just finished refereeing my third tournament (a women's D1 invitational, a men's D1 invitational and an AJGA event) of 2019 and can report that I saw no abuse of this new Rule.

    Knowledge of the Rules is part of the applied skill set which a player must use to play a round of competitive golf.
  • antipantip Members Posts: 446 ✭✭

    @Mr. Bean said:
    In my country the main reason for steel spike extinction has been the floors at the clubhouses. Many clubs started to forbid entrance with metal spikes as they tended to ruin wooden floors and be extremely slippery on stone floors. It made much more sense than forbidding them on the course as in my experience they caused much less damage especially on moist greens than current plastic roses.

    In fact, many courses allowed spikes on the course but not in the restaurant or office premises. Unfortunately only few clubs have separate entrances to the dressing rooms so gradually everyone dispensed with spikes due to simplicity. Besides, they are better suited for driving a car...

    As a youngster, I played many courses and never knew a single club that allowed metal spikes anywhere in clubhouse, restaurants, bars etc. The only exception it was an outdoor "spike" bar (themselves not common). So that reason had no relevance to banning metal spikes here.

  • nsxguynsxguy Just anudder user FloridaMembers Posts: 5,582 ✭✭

    @Lodestone said:

    @antip said:
    The history is interesting. My understanding is soft v hard spikes change over wasn't predominantly about player's feet damaging the greens. The big issue was that hard spikes had evolved into titanium/super strong metals but when they eventually started coming out of the shoes on the course, the stronger metals were doing untold damage to course equipment mowing blades that were becoming finer and finer (stimp readings now 30 per and more faster than 30-40 years ago).

    I'd never heard that line of thinking but it makes some sense. When I look at the aggressive plastic clawlike spikes on my shoes now, compared with the old metal spikes, I do wonder how the can be kinder to the green. But when I play golf I don't think I see as many of the pulled up spike marks as before. Unless of course you have someone who can't seem to pick their feet up when they walk.

    They're kinder to the green because the plastic cleats clawlike or otherwise, "fold over" as you walk on the green so the green isn't punctured and no spike marks pop up. The slight depressions of the plastic cleats are there for a relatively short time before that grass, slightly pushed down, comes back up,,,,,,,,,,,,,, at least that's the story I recall.

    Of course the spike supporters came up with "The punctures help aerate the greens naturally",,,,,,,,, ¯\_(ツ)_/¯


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  • BrianMcGBrianMcG Members Posts: 2,260 ✭✭

    @Lodestone said:

    @antip said:
    The history is interesting. My understanding is soft v hard spikes change over wasn't predominantly about player's feet damaging the greens. The big issue was that hard spikes had evolved into titanium/super strong metals but when they eventually started coming out of the shoes on the course, the stronger metals were doing untold damage to course equipment mowing blades that were becoming finer and finer (stimp readings now 30 per and more faster than 30-40 years ago).

    I'd never heard that line of thinking but it makes some sense. When I look at the aggressive plastic clawlike spikes on my shoes now, compared with the old metal spikes, I do wonder how the can be kinder to the green. But when I play golf I don't think I see as many of the pulled up spike marks as before. Unless of course you have someone who can't seem to pick their feet up when they walk.

    Plastic spikes were adopted for two reasons. Greens keepers liked them as they were less likely to implant seeds from rough/fairways into the greens. And also the pro shops and clubs saved thousands per year on carpet, steps and concrete repair.
    I remember pro shops having to replace carpet every year, or they always had runners down the paths that golfer took through the pro shop to the bar. Wooden steps on the course would get obliterated after just a few years. It was crazy how much damage those spikes caused.

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  • BrianMcGBrianMcG Members Posts: 2,260 ✭✭
    edited Apr 20, 2019 1:45am #15

    @BrianMcG said:

    @Lodestone said:

    @antip said:
    The history is interesting. My understanding is soft v hard spikes change over wasn't predominantly about player's feet damaging the greens. The big issue was that hard spikes had evolved into titanium/super strong metals but when they eventually started coming out of the shoes on the course, the stronger metals were doing untold damage to course equipment mowing blades that were becoming finer and finer (stimp readings now 30 per and more faster than 30-40 years ago).

    I'd never heard that line of thinking but it makes some sense. When I look at the aggressive plastic clawlike spikes on my shoes now, compared with the old metal spikes, I do wonder how the can be kinder to the green. But when I play golf I don't think I see as many of the pulled up spike marks as before. Unless of course you have someone who can't seem to pick their feet up when they walk.

    Plastic spikes were adopted for two reasons. Greens keepers liked them as they were less likely to implant seeds from rough/fairways into the greens. And also the pro shops and clubs saved thousands per year on carpet, steps and concrete repair. I had never hear of titanium or ceramic spikes coming of shoes at such a rate as to damage a Toro.

    I remember pro shops having to replace carpet every year, or they always had runners down the paths that golfer took through the pro shop to the bar. Wooden steps on the course would get obliterated after just a few years. It was crazy how much damage those spikes caused.

    Walter: Tell me Bobby, why do you play this game?
    Bobby: I play because I love it.
    Walter: Well I play for the money. I have to win. That is why every time we face each other I will always beat you.
  • Mr. BeanMr. Bean Members Posts: 3,873 ✭✭
    edited Apr 20, 2019 10:08pm #16

    @antip said:

    @Mr. Bean said:
    In my country the main reason for steel spike extinction has been the floors at the clubhouses. Many clubs started to forbid entrance with metal spikes as they tended to ruin wooden floors and be extremely slippery on stone floors. It made much more sense than forbidding them on the course as in my experience they caused much less damage especially on moist greens than current plastic roses.

    In fact, many courses allowed spikes on the course but not in the restaurant or office premises. Unfortunately only few clubs have separate entrances to the dressing rooms so gradually everyone dispensed with spikes due to simplicity. Besides, they are better suited for driving a car...

    As a youngster, I played many courses and never knew a single club that allowed metal spikes anywhere in clubhouse, restaurants, bars etc. The only exception it was an outdoor "spike" bar (themselves not common). So that reason had no relevance to banning metal spikes here.

    Interesting. So 50 years ago in your country everyone had to change their shoes coming off the course before entering the clubhouse? I am truly amazed.

  • antipantip Members Posts: 446 ✭✭
    edited Apr 21, 2019 1:29am #17

    @Mr. Bean said:

    @antip said:

    @Mr. Bean said:
    In my country the main reason for steel spike extinction has been the floors at the clubhouses. Many clubs started to forbid entrance with metal spikes as they tended to ruin wooden floors and be extremely slippery on stone floors. It made much more sense than forbidding them on the course as in my experience they caused much less damage especially on moist greens than current plastic roses.

    In fact, many courses allowed spikes on the course but not in the restaurant or office premises. Unfortunately only few clubs have separate entrances to the dressing rooms so gradually everyone dispensed with spikes due to simplicity. Besides, they are better suited for driving a car...

    As a youngster, I played many courses and never knew a single club that allowed metal spikes anywhere in clubhouse, restaurants, bars etc. The only exception it was an outdoor "spike" bar (themselves not common). So that reason had no relevance to banning metal spikes here.

    Interesting. So 50 years ago in your country everyone had to change their shoes coming off the course before entering the clubhouse? I am truly amazed.

    Absolutely, clubs had signs in the entrance, no spikes allowed in the clubhouse/bar etc. Facilities were established in a way that could provide drinks/food without entering the 'no spikes' area on many courses. And restrictions did not cease 50 years ago. We still do not allow many 'soft spikes' into our clubhouse, basically any screw-in spike is persona non grata in the clubhouse.
    PS This is a bit of a giggle, that four letter word beginning in "scre" is replaced by the website software with "****". I only got around it above by adding the hyphen. And in an earlier post I changed my phrase to foul up rather than the original wording.

  • ShilgyShilgy Members Posts: 11,385 ✭✭
    edited Apr 21, 2019 3:34am #18

    @antip said:

    @Mr. Bean said:

    @antip said:

    @Mr. Bean said:
    In my country the main reason for steel spike extinction has been the floors at the clubhouses. Many clubs started to forbid entrance with metal spikes as they tended to ruin wooden floors and be extremely slippery on stone floors. It made much more sense than forbidding them on the course as in my experience they caused much less damage especially on moist greens than current plastic roses.

    In fact, many courses allowed spikes on the course but not in the restaurant or office premises. Unfortunately only few clubs have separate entrances to the dressing rooms so gradually everyone dispensed with spikes due to simplicity. Besides, they are better suited for driving a car...

    As a youngster, I played many courses and never knew a single club that allowed metal spikes anywhere in clubhouse, restaurants, bars etc. The only exception it was an outdoor "spike" bar (themselves not common). So that reason had no relevance to banning metal spikes here.

    Interesting. So 50 years ago in your country everyone had to change their shoes coming off the course before entering the clubhouse? I am truly amazed.

    Absolutely, clubs had signs in the entrance, no spikes allowed in the clubhouse/bar etc. Facilities were established in a way that could provide drinks/food without entering the 'no spikes' area on many courses. And restrictions did not cease 50 years ago. We still do not allow many 'soft spikes' into our clubhouse, basically any ****-in spike is persona non grata in the clubhouse.
    PS This is a bit of a giggle, that four letter word beginning in "scre" is replaced by the website software with "****". I only got around it above by adding the hyphen. And in an earlier post I changed my phrase to foul up rather than the original wording.

    I feel so much safer, and not offended, knowing you foul mouthed posters are getting edited. :wink:

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  • Colin LColin L Members Posts: 1,984 ✭✭

    @Mr. Bean said:

    @antip said:

    @Mr. Bean said:
    In my country the main reason for steel spike extinction has been the floors at the clubhouses. Many clubs started to forbid entrance with metal spikes as they tended to ruin wooden floors and be extremely slippery on stone floors. It made much more sense than forbidding them on the course as in my experience they caused much less damage especially on moist greens than current plastic roses.

    In fact, many courses allowed spikes on the course but not in the restaurant or office premises. Unfortunately only few clubs have separate entrances to the dressing rooms so gradually everyone dispensed with spikes due to simplicity. Besides, they are better suited for driving a car...

    As a youngster, I played many courses and never knew a single club that allowed metal spikes anywhere in clubhouse, restaurants, bars etc. The only exception it was an outdoor "spike" bar (themselves not common). So that reason had no relevance to banning metal spikes here.

    Interesting. So 50 years ago in your country everyone had to change their shoes coming off the course before entering the clubhouse? I am truly amazed.

    I am amazed at the implication that in your country, players were allowed to wander all over the clubhouse wearing spikes!

    I recollect when I was still wearing spikes (being a Scot I wasn't going to buy new shoes till the old ones were worn out!) I went into to pay my fee at the reception desk of a course in France wearing my golf shoes - unaware that they only allowed soft spikes on the course. I was told as soon as I reached the desk, but how did the receptionist know? Perhaps the clue was that the short distance from the entrance was over a tiled floor . :o

  • NewbyNewby Members Posts: 6,492 ✭✭

    @antip said:

    @Mr. Bean said:

    @antip said:

    @Mr. Bean said:
    In my country the main reason for steel spike extinction has been the floors at the clubhouses. Many clubs started to forbid entrance with metal spikes as they tended to ruin wooden floors and be extremely slippery on stone floors. It made much more sense than forbidding them on the course as in my experience they caused much less damage especially on moist greens than current plastic roses.

    In fact, many courses allowed spikes on the course but not in the restaurant or office premises. Unfortunately only few clubs have separate entrances to the dressing rooms so gradually everyone dispensed with spikes due to simplicity. Besides, they are better suited for driving a car...

    As a youngster, I played many courses and never knew a single club that allowed metal spikes anywhere in clubhouse, restaurants, bars etc. The only exception it was an outdoor "spike" bar (themselves not common). So that reason had no relevance to banning metal spikes here.

    Interesting. So 50 years ago in your country everyone had to change their shoes coming off the course before entering the clubhouse? I am truly amazed.

    Absolutely, clubs had signs in the entrance, no spikes allowed in the clubhouse/bar etc. Facilities were established in a way that could provide drinks/food without entering the 'no spikes' area on many courses. And restrictions did not cease 50 years ago. We still do not allow many 'soft spikes' into our clubhouse, basically any ****-in spike is persona non grata in the clubhouse.
    PS This is a bit of a giggle, that four letter word beginning in "scre" is replaced by the website software with "****". I only got around it above by adding the hyphen. And in an earlier post I changed my phrase to foul up rather than the original wording.

    Virtually all clubs here forbid spikes in the clubhouse (except locker rooms). Some do have spike bars or occasionally a strip of protection to give access between an outside terrace/patio and the bar.
    Apart from leaving a mess of grass or soil remnants all over the place they tend to destroy the carpet pile. At upwards of £30 /sqm it gets expensive to replace.

  • Mr. BeanMr. Bean Members Posts: 3,873 ✭✭

    @Colin L said:

    @Mr. Bean said:

    @antip said:

    @Mr. Bean said:
    In my country the main reason for steel spike extinction has been the floors at the clubhouses. Many clubs started to forbid entrance with metal spikes as they tended to ruin wooden floors and be extremely slippery on stone floors. It made much more sense than forbidding them on the course as in my experience they caused much less damage especially on moist greens than current plastic roses.

    In fact, many courses allowed spikes on the course but not in the restaurant or office premises. Unfortunately only few clubs have separate entrances to the dressing rooms so gradually everyone dispensed with spikes due to simplicity. Besides, they are better suited for driving a car...

    As a youngster, I played many courses and never knew a single club that allowed metal spikes anywhere in clubhouse, restaurants, bars etc. The only exception it was an outdoor "spike" bar (themselves not common). So that reason had no relevance to banning metal spikes here.

    Interesting. So 50 years ago in your country everyone had to change their shoes coming off the course before entering the clubhouse? I am truly amazed.

    I am amazed at the implication that in your country, players were allowed to wander all over the clubhouse wearing spikes!

    When I started to play golf in 1992 this was the case and still many years after that.

  • NewbyNewby Members Posts: 6,492 ✭✭

    It never ceases to amaze me when I see the number of clubs which have relaxed their dress code and do not realise how much dirt is brought in from the course even from 'non-spike' pimple soled golf shoes. Especially if the grass is wet. They only seem to realise the problem when their new off-white carpet starts to turn brown or grey.
    Most private homes have a doormat for visitors to wipe their feet but try wiping spikes on a doormat.

  • Mr. BeanMr. Bean Members Posts: 3,873 ✭✭
    edited Apr 21, 2019 9:31am #23

    @Newby said:
    It never ceases to amaze me when I see the number of clubs which have relaxed their dress code and do not realise how much dirt is brought in from the course even from 'non-spike' pimple soled golf shoes. Especially if the grass is wet. They only seem to realise the problem when their new off-white carpet starts to turn brown or grey.
    Most private homes have a doormat for visitors to wipe their feet but try wiping spikes on a doormat.

    We have motorized rotating brushes by the entrance of our clubs. Don't you?

  • Mr. BeanMr. Bean Members Posts: 3,873 ✭✭
    edited Apr 21, 2019 9:32am #24
  • NewbyNewby Members Posts: 6,492 ✭✭

    @Mr. Bean said:

    @Newby said:
    It never ceases to amaze me when I see the number of clubs which have relaxed their dress code and do not realise how much dirt is brought in from the course even from 'non-spike' pimple soled golf shoes. Especially if the grass is wet. They only seem to realise the problem when their new off-white carpet starts to turn brown or grey.
    Most private homes have a doormat for visitors to wipe their feet but try wiping spikes on a doormat.

    We have motorized rotating brushes by the entrance of our clubs. Don't you?

    We do but they really don't clean muddy or wet shoes and compressed air hoses which do remove grass and mud clods. But neither do a satisfactory job of cleaning soles sufficiently for walking on a decent luxury carpet.

  • Mr. BeanMr. Bean Members Posts: 3,873 ✭✭

    @Newby said:

    @Mr. Bean said:

    @Newby said:
    It never ceases to amaze me when I see the number of clubs which have relaxed their dress code and do not realise how much dirt is brought in from the course even from 'non-spike' pimple soled golf shoes. Especially if the grass is wet. They only seem to realise the problem when their new off-white carpet starts to turn brown or grey.
    Most private homes have a doormat for visitors to wipe their feet but try wiping spikes on a doormat.

    We have motorized rotating brushes by the entrance of our clubs. Don't you?

    We do but they really don't clean muddy or wet shoes and compressed air hoses which do remove grass and mud clods. But neither do a satisfactory job of cleaning soles sufficiently for walking on a decent luxury carpet.

    I agree. I guess that is the reason why no club around here has luxury carpets on their floors.

  • QEightQEight Members Posts: 3,416 ✭✭

    @Newby said:
    Most private homes have a doormat for visitors to wipe their feet but try wiping spikes on a doormat.

    Luckily most of the visitors remove their shoes (with or without spikes) at our home.

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  • Roadking2003Roadking2003 AustinMembers Posts: 5,268 ✭✭

    @Mr. Bean said:

    @Newby said:
    It never ceases to amaze me when I see the number of clubs which have relaxed their dress code and do not realise how much dirt is brought in from the course even from 'non-spike' pimple soled golf shoes. Especially if the grass is wet. They only seem to realise the problem when their new off-white carpet starts to turn brown or grey.
    Most private homes have a doormat for visitors to wipe their feet but try wiping spikes on a doormat.

    We have motorized rotating brushes by the entrance of our clubs. Don't you?

    An air compressor works much better.

  • NewbyNewby Members Posts: 6,492 ✭✭

    I agree. We have both.

  • Mr. BeanMr. Bean Members Posts: 3,873 ✭✭

    @Roadking2003 said:

    @Mr. Bean said:

    @Newby said:
    It never ceases to amaze me when I see the number of clubs which have relaxed their dress code and do not realise how much dirt is brought in from the course even from 'non-spike' pimple soled golf shoes. Especially if the grass is wet. They only seem to realise the problem when their new off-white carpet starts to turn brown or grey.
    Most private homes have a doormat for visitors to wipe their feet but try wiping spikes on a doormat.

    We have motorized rotating brushes by the entrance of our clubs. Don't you?

    An air compressor works much better.

    We have that as well but not by the entrance of the clubhouse as it tends to spread dirt around. The air compressor cleaning point has been established at the end of the dressing room building right next to the club cleaning devices. And conveniently enough, that happens to be 25 meters behind the 18th green of one of the two courses.

  • Mr. BeanMr. Bean Members Posts: 3,873 ✭✭

    One further comment about spikes vs. roses. In the old days shoe soles did not gather nearly as much stuff from the course as current shoes as the sole was quite smooth. There was no need to have a rough and uneven sole to give friction as the spikes were enough. Furthermore, the spikes did not gather anything except an occasional leave in the fall but these spider -type things carry half a kilo of grass cutting and dirt reducing the friction and carrying the dirt into the clubhouse.

    Current soft spikes are nice to use when walking outside the course but if I could choose I would take steel spikes any day. Besides, soft spikes are expensive and you need to change them a couple of times per season. I had steel spikes that outlasted the shoes...

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