Adapt to iron shaft weights?

-Ned--Ned- Members Posts: 21 ✭✭
edited Apr 19, 2019 5:35am in WRX Club Techs #1

I'm currently looking to replace my ancient irons with something easier, new, etc.

I'm on the smaller and shorter side in weight and height, and swing driver at about 100-105mph. My current MP-32s have stock shafts in them I think (no stickers/labels) and one was re-shafted with a TT Dynamic Gold. I think that's what the rest of the set is too. Point being, they are on the heavier side compared to what you hit in stores and what seems to be more standard/stock now. Going into the process I really was thinking that dropping some shaft weight to pick up some speed was going to be great.

However, when I started testing some clubs, I was pretty awful with the 100-105 gram shafts. I did a fitting recently with Taylormade and started with XP100 hitting the M5, and then switched to the DG S300 which is 130 grams I think. Made it significantly better for me.

So... is there any merit in trying to still drop some weight and let myself adapt to lighter shafts... or should I just stick with what seems to work?

I've played heavier stiff shafts since I started golf as a teenager (just turned 35 for reference), for no reason but that's just what I ended up with for clubs. I'm wondering if that's the big reason I do well with them, as that's all I've known. Maybe after an adjustment period the lighter shafts would be way better?

My other theory is that it's really just the swing weight. I seem to like the lighter head feel and have midsize grips on my irons. I find the slightly larger grips help me from turning my hands and flipping over (although that's still my big miss). I'm confident in the comparison, as my wedges and woods have standard grips so I'm constantly using both regular and standard. I think I just feel a lighter head as being more in control.

AMT shafts are also intriguing, maybe that's the best of it all... or the worst?!

Any thoughts for a confused guy who just wants to figure out what sticks to upgrade to?! Thanks :smile:

Comments

  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 23,075 ✭✭
    edited Apr 19, 2019 8:31am #2

    @-Ned- said:
    So... is there any merit in trying to still drop some weight and let myself adapt to lighter shafts... or should I just stick with what seems to work?

    Nope, no advantage at all. The results are all that matters.

    @-Ned- said:
    I've played heavier stiff shafts since I started golf as a teenager (just turned 35 for reference), for no reason but that's just what I ended up with for clubs. I'm wondering if that's the big reason I do well with them, as that's all I've known. Maybe after an adjustment period the lighter shafts would be way better?

    Some people can adapt better than others but not everyone can so it's possible but there is no guarantees - nor is there any significant reason to try. Increasing swing weight (head weight) is generally one way to help out though - more on that below.

    @-Ned- said:
    My other theory is that it's really just the swing weight. I seem to like the lighter head feel and have midsize grips on my irons. I find the slightly larger grips help me from turning my hands and flipping over (although that's still my big miss). I'm confident in the comparison, as my wedges and woods have standard grips so I'm constantly using both regular and standard. I think I just feel a lighter head as being more in control.

    Swing weight can be just as important as the shaft weight but not enough details here to see how it might be effecting things. The lighter stock shafts will generally end up with similar SW's as the sets built with heavier shafts, so you likely have not done enough testing with different SW values to know how it will effect your results. However, going heavier with the swing weight (adding head weight - like lead tape) can sometimes improve the results and compensate a little bit when the shaft weight gets too light. It's not exactly the same thing - shaft weight and head weight have slightly different effects on the swing. But in the same light, a heavier shaft weight can help compensate for a swing weight that's too light. So whether your issue really is shaft weight or swing weight (or a combination of both) is impossible to tell w/o more testing of various combinations.

    And BTW - heavier grips don't make the heads any lighter (the SW scale was not designed to manage grip weight changes do don't believe what it says when a heavier grip is used). Generally they just add to the total weight of the club so it's more like adding to the shaft weight than doing anything to the head weight.

    BUT grip size is important as well. If you are used to mid-size grips and demo with standard size grips, that could be influencing the results as well as the possible weight issues.,

    @-Ned- said:
    AMT shafts are also intriguing, maybe that's the best of it all... or the worst?!

    The biggest difference is in the longer irons - to find out whether you see the same issue there with going lighter in the shafts (or not) you'd have to do some testing with the longer clubs.

  • -Ned--Ned- Members Posts: 21 ✭✭

    Thanks, lots of good info there. Sounds like yet more to consider... As fun as trying new stuff is, I kind of just want to be done and have a new set!

    Also, I get that grip weight does not affect head weight, but an increase in weight near the handle must make the head feel lighter by comparison, or is it really not enough to be noticed?

  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 23,075 ✭✭

    @-Ned- said:
    Sounds like yet more to consider...

    That certainly wasn't the message I was trying to send. Don't over think things. If you got the best results with the TT DG's what else is there to consider?

    @-Ned- said:
    Also, I get that grip weight does not affect head weight, but an increase in weight near the handle must make the head feel lighter by comparison, or is it really not enough to be noticed?

    Everyone is different but for most, especially when we are dealing with 'feels' so there are always exceptions. But it's not the case that it isn't enough to be noticed, it's that no, it really not something that 'must' make the head feel lighter. The swing weight scale fulcrum balance point really plays no part in the actual dynamics of a golf swing. It's just a point that was found could be useful to help match MOI of the club with head weight changes and small length changes (with nothing else like grip weight or shaft weight changing). And grip weight has a very minimal effect on the MOI of the club.

  • johnnythundersjohnnythunders ClubWRX Posts: 1,696 ✭✭

    As I’ve aged, I’m 67 now, I have tried to go lighter but I started starting from playing 100 gram iron shafts 10 years ago. I’m at around 85 with midsize grips, anything lower and it messes with my rhythm.
    Fairway woods is 65 and hybrids also.

    For a driver I’m best with heavy head over 200, midsize 63 gram grips and 63-67 stiff shaft. And my swing speed is around 85-90, anything lighter goes nowhere.

    We are all different, there are no rules.

    2019bag<br />Callaway Fusion 10.5 Fuji evo 3 661 stiff <br />Ping g400 5/7 fw<br />hybrids Rogue x 5,6<br>Cobra f-max Smackwrap one length 6-gw,Speedback one length sand wedg<br />Taylormade Copper Mullen 2 <br />backup driver Mizuno St 190 10.5 with Fuji V 661 stiff-regular. Ball: Supersoft, Kirkland 3-piece and Cut Grey and White
  • -Ned--Ned- Members Posts: 21 ✭✭

    @Stuart_G said:
    Everyone is different but for most, especially when we are dealing with 'feels' so there are always exceptions. But it's not the case that it isn't enough to be noticed, it's that no, it really not something that 'must' make the head feel lighter.

    This is what I was looking for.

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