Parents communicating on sidelines

tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,152 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
edited Jun 10, 2019 3:36pm in Juniors/College Golf Talk #1

Something I am noticing more and more is parents who are using signals on the sidelines. Some are much better than others at it. In some cases it so obvious it is almost comical. In other cases it is very very subtle but very very effective. I wonder if others have seen similar things.

I also figured out that in long run it's probably better to just not worry about it as it almost certainly will stunt player development.

«1

Comments

  • wlmwlm Members Posts: 98 ✭✭✭

    As the parent of a player who just graduated high school, I 100% agree with your last sentence.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,237 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I wouldn't worry about it. If it is a conversation or coaching say something. $5 says it isn't influencing what they do on the course unless they are signing in club selections, which I highly doubt is worthwhile information considering they should be 50 yards away from their kid.

    I am finding it more effective for the parents not to follow their kids at all and just to let them go play.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,208 ✭✭✭✭✭✭


    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,152 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Jun 10, 2019 5:24pm #5

    @heavy_hitter said:
    I wouldn't worry about it. If it is a conversation or coaching say something. $5 says it isn't influencing what they do on the course unless they are signing in club selections, which I highly doubt is worthwhile information considering they should be 50 yards away from their kid.

    I am finding it more effective for the parents not to follow their kids at all and just to let them go play.

    I believe this is worse for girls than boys especially when it comes to kids under 12. In one case it I am pretty sure it was club selections as the girl would look to the dad and then change clubs. It was a little too obvious and they were a lot closer than 50 yards most of the time. It also was effective because the girl did well. I think the officials caught on from the tone of recent emails from that tour.

    In another case a parent will walk off in front and stand near where they need to land on every hole then stand on the side or back of the green where they need to land. I had no clue they were doing this until my kid pointed out how a certain player always points the laser finder at her dad as a target so I watched them the next time we were paired up. For a young girl who does not have a caddy that could be a real big help in course management and explained a lot things.

    I don't think this gives any long term advantage because it really only works on easy course setups. It does however help them for sure. Also in the case of the last one it's really hard to call them out because technically I am not sure a rule is being broken because it is not breaking any rules just standing on the sideline.

    Post edited by tiger1873 on
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,237 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @tiger1873 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:
    I wouldn't worry about it. If it is a conversation or coaching say something. $5 says it isn't influencing what they do on the course unless they are signing in club selections, which I highly doubt is worthwhile information considering they should be 50 yards away from their kid.

    I am finding it more effective for the parents not to follow their kids at all and just to let them go play.

    I believe this is worse for girls than boys especially when it comes to kids under 12. In one case it I am pretty sure it was club selections as the girl would look to the dad and then change clubs. It was a little too obvious and they were a lot closer than 50 yards most of the time. It also was effective because the girl did well. I think the officials caught on from the tone of recent emails from that tour.

    In another case a parent will walk off in front and stand near where they need to land on every hole then stand on the side or back of the green where they need to land. I had no clue they were doing this until my kid pointed out how a certain player always points the laser finder at her dad as a target so I watched them the next time we were paired up. For a young girl who does not have a caddy that could be a real big help in course management and explained a lot things.

    I don't think this gives any long term advantage because it really only works on easy course setups. It does however help them for sure. Also in the case of the last one it's really hard to call them out because technically I am not sure a rule is being broken because it is not breaking any rules just standing on the sideline.

    At one time someone told me of a phenom's dad doing this. I was able to walk with the phenom's dad several times and never saw it. I honestly didn't see how it will help anyway. Parents don't know how much they are moving the ball unless they are standing directly behind them on any given day. Also don't know if they are going to play a fade or draw into the hole. I just don't see how that is going to help. If it is choosing clubs, that is different.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,152 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @heavy_hitter said:

    At one time someone told me of a phenom's dad doing this. I was able to walk with the phenom's dad several times and never saw it. I honestly didn't see how it will help anyway. Parents don't know how much they are moving the ball unless they are standing directly behind them on any given day. Also don't know if they are going to play a fade or draw into the hole. I just don't see how that is going to help. If it is choosing clubs, that is different.

    It is interesting you say that all these kids have some things in common some are probaly what most would call phenom's. It helps them for sure choose the correct club and with handling mental part of the game.

  • TripleBogeysrbetterTripleBogeysrbetter Members Posts: 128 ✭✭✭

    Only seen once when a Dad would shake off the club selection from a player.
    I do believe it will hurt the player's development.

    Cobra F8+ - Fujikura Regular
    Taylormade M1 5 Wood - Kuro Kage Regular
    Cobra Tour Forged 4-PW KBS Tour 90 R
    Fourteen 52 (Bent to 50) - Nippon R
    Fourteen 56 - Nippon R
    Vokey SM7 60 - Dynamic Gold
    Ray Cook Blue Goose BG40
    Titleist AVX
  • Palmetto GolferPalmetto Golfer Members Posts: 160 ✭✭✭

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:
    I wouldn't worry about it. If it is a conversation or coaching say something. $5 says it isn't influencing what they do on the course unless they are signing in club selections, which I highly doubt is worthwhile information considering they should be 50 yards away from their kid.

    I am finding it more effective for the parents not to follow their kids at all and just to let them go play.

    I believe this is worse for girls than boys especially when it comes to kids under 12. In one case it I am pretty sure it was club selections as the girl would look to the dad and then change clubs. It was a little too obvious and they were a lot closer than 50 yards most of the time. It also was effective because the girl did well. I think the officials caught on from the tone of recent emails from that tour.

    In another case a parent will walk off in front and stand near where they need to land on every hole then stand on the side or back of the green where they need to land. I had no clue they were doing this until my kid pointed out how a certain player always points the laser finder at her dad as a target so I watched them the next time we were paired up. For a young girl who does not have a caddy that could be a real big help in course management and explained a lot things.

    I don't think this gives any long term advantage because it really only works on easy course setups. It does however help them for sure. Also in the case of the last one it's really hard to call them out because technically I am not sure a rule is being broken because it is not breaking any rules just standing on the sideline.

    At one time someone told me of a phenom's dad doing this. I was able to walk with the phenom's dad several times and never saw it. I honestly didn't see how it will help anyway. Parents don't know how much they are moving the ball unless they are standing directly behind them on any given day. Also don't know if they are going to play a fade or draw into the hole. I just don't see how that is going to help. If it is choosing clubs, that is different.

    A dad behind our group was walking very suspiciously around the course. It was very awkward and just didn't look right. We were playing a very difficult course with lots of hazards and bunkers. A parent in our group said something to me about it looking weird as well. Then I noticed he walked in front of a fairway bunker and looked back at his kid on the tee box. The kid shot the dad with his rangefinder. After some very deep breathes and fighting ever urge in my body to go up to this guy, I flagged down an official and told him about it. Figured it was best if they took care of it.

    I have come to find out that the dad is extremely hard on the kid. No shocker there if he is willing to cheat for him.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,152 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Jun 12, 2019 1:32am #10

    @Palmetto Golfer said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:
    I wouldn't worry about it. If it is a conversation or coaching say something. $5 says it isn't influencing what they do on the course unless they are signing in club selections, which I highly doubt is worthwhile information considering they should be 50 yards away from their kid.

    I am finding it more effective for the parents not to follow their kids at all and just to let them go play.

    I believe this is worse for girls than boys especially when it comes to kids under 12. In one case it I am pretty sure it was club selections as the girl would look to the dad and then change clubs. It was a little too obvious and they were a lot closer than 50 yards most of the time. It also was effective because the girl did well. I think the officials caught on from the tone of recent emails from that tour.

    In another case a parent will walk off in front and stand near where they need to land on every hole then stand on the side or back of the green where they need to land. I had no clue they were doing this until my kid pointed out how a certain player always points the laser finder at her dad as a target so I watched them the next time we were paired up. For a young girl who does not have a caddy that could be a real big help in course management and explained a lot things.

    I don't think this gives any long term advantage because it really only works on easy course setups. It does however help them for sure. Also in the case of the last one it's really hard to call them out because technically I am not sure a rule is being broken because it is not breaking any rules just standing on the sideline.

    At one time someone told me of a phenom's dad doing this. I was able to walk with the phenom's dad several times and never saw it. I honestly didn't see how it will help anyway. Parents don't know how much they are moving the ball unless they are standing directly behind them on any given day. Also don't know if they are going to play a fade or draw into the hole. I just don't see how that is going to help. If it is choosing clubs, that is different.

    A dad behind our group was walking very suspiciously around the course. It was very awkward and just didn't look right. We were playing a very difficult course with lots of hazards and bunkers. A parent in our group said something to me about it looking weird as well. Then I noticed he walked in front of a fairway bunker and looked back at his kid on the tee box. The kid shot the dad with his rangefinder. After some very deep breathes and fighting ever urge in my body to go up to this guy, I flagged down an official and told him about it. Figured it was best if they took care of it.

    I have come to find out that the dad is extremely hard on the kid. No shocker there if he is willing to cheat for him.

    Did the rules official do anything about it?

  • Palmetto GolferPalmetto Golfer Members Posts: 160 ✭✭✭

    @tiger1873 said:

    @Palmetto Golfer said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:
    I wouldn't worry about it. If it is a conversation or coaching say something. $5 says it isn't influencing what they do on the course unless they are signing in club selections, which I highly doubt is worthwhile information considering they should be 50 yards away from their kid.

    I am finding it more effective for the parents not to follow their kids at all and just to let them go play.

    I believe this is worse for girls than boys especially when it comes to kids under 12. In one case it I am pretty sure it was club selections as the girl would look to the dad and then change clubs. It was a little too obvious and they were a lot closer than 50 yards most of the time. It also was effective because the girl did well. I think the officials caught on from the tone of recent emails from that tour.

    In another case a parent will walk off in front and stand near where they need to land on every hole then stand on the side or back of the green where they need to land. I had no clue they were doing this until my kid pointed out how a certain player always points the laser finder at her dad as a target so I watched them the next time we were paired up. For a young girl who does not have a caddy that could be a real big help in course management and explained a lot things.

    I don't think this gives any long term advantage because it really only works on easy course setups. It does however help them for sure. Also in the case of the last one it's really hard to call them out because technically I am not sure a rule is being broken because it is not breaking any rules just standing on the sideline.

    At one time someone told me of a phenom's dad doing this. I was able to walk with the phenom's dad several times and never saw it. I honestly didn't see how it will help anyway. Parents don't know how much they are moving the ball unless they are standing directly behind them on any given day. Also don't know if they are going to play a fade or draw into the hole. I just don't see how that is going to help. If it is choosing clubs, that is different.

    A dad behind our group was walking very suspiciously around the course. It was very awkward and just didn't look right. We were playing a very difficult course with lots of hazards and bunkers. A parent in our group said something to me about it looking weird as well. Then I noticed he walked in front of a fairway bunker and looked back at his kid on the tee box. The kid shot the dad with his rangefinder. After some very deep breathes and fighting ever urge in my body to go up to this guy, I flagged down an official and told him about it. Figured it was best if they took care of it.

    I have come to find out that the dad is extremely hard on the kid. No shocker there if he is willing to cheat for him.

    Did the rules official do anything about it?

    I never saw the official talking with that Dad but also never saw him do it again.

  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Posts: 9,052 ClubWRX

    I’ve given my son the bird a few times. Does that count?

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,208 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @kekoa said:
    I’ve given my son the bird a few times. Does that count?

    With how many other kids he beats, I'm sure you're not the only one. :D

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,208 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Witnessed the opposite this past weekend. The boy played in an event with three other kids (14 years old) and none of them had parent spectators. I walked and watched them play and there were so many rule violations by two of the kids. One kid hit three balls OB on a par 3 and decided he should just walk down the fairway and take a drop. Another kid hit four balls near OB but hadn't marked any of his balls so there was no way to identify which ball we found was in play. Of course all we can do as parents is help find balls or offer food / water so there's nobody following up with those kids after the round. I let my son know about the two instances so he was able to learn from it but those two kids will continue to play their way. The other thing I noticed was that one of the 14 year olds was still playing US Kids clubs and he was way too strong to be swinging those clubs... even the driver was one of the US Kids drivers. Unless he timed it perfectly those clubs were going straight right. Neither of these kids were good players and had limited tournament experience... I get that parents can't always be there to watch their kids but these guys needed some support after the round.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,152 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Jun 17, 2019 3:07pm #15

    @leezer99 said:
    Witnessed the opposite this past weekend. The boy played in an event with three other kids (14 years old) and none of them had parent spectators. I walked and watched them play and there were so many rule violations by two of the kids. One kid hit three balls OB on a par 3 and decided he should just walk down the fairway and take a drop. Another kid hit four balls near OB but hadn't marked any of his balls so there was no way to identify which ball we found was in play. Of course all we can do as parents is help find balls or offer food / water so there's nobody following up with those kids after the round. I let my son know about the two instances so he was able to learn from it but those two kids will continue to play their way. The other thing I noticed was that one of the 14 year olds was still playing US Kids clubs and he was way too strong to be swinging those clubs... even the driver was one of the US Kids drivers. Unless he timed it perfectly those clubs were going straight right. Neither of these kids were good players and had limited tournament experience... I get that parents can't always be there to watch their kids but these guys needed some support after the round.

    Something I noticed when kids get older a lot parents just don't care so they drop off the kids for the day. In a lot cases the kids like golf more than their parents. Also not all parents will invest in clubs for their kids.

    If this was a 1 day tournament this is sign you need to move up to 2 day tournaments. If it was a 2 day tournament you should have spoken to an official. Usually talking about rules is ok if limited to rules and in some cases needed.

  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Posts: 9,052 ClubWRX

    @leezer99 said:
    Witnessed the opposite this past weekend. The boy played in an event with three other kids (14 years old) and none of them had parent spectators. I walked and watched them play and there were so many rule violations by two of the kids. One kid hit three balls OB on a par 3 and decided he should just walk down the fairway and take a drop. Another kid hit four balls near OB but hadn't marked any of his balls so there was no way to identify which ball we found was in play. Of course all we can do as parents is help find balls or offer food / water so there's nobody following up with those kids after the round. I let my son know about the two instances so he was able to learn from it but those two kids will continue to play their way. The other thing I noticed was that one of the 14 year olds was still playing US Kids clubs and he was way too strong to be swinging those clubs... even the driver was one of the US Kids drivers. Unless he timed it perfectly those clubs were going straight right. Neither of these kids were good players and had limited tournament experience... I get that parents can't always be there to watch their kids but these guys needed some support after the round.

    Tell me if I'm wrong, but don't some courses have a local rule whereby OB is considered like a lateral so you can take a drop and stroke penalty?
    With regards to the clubs, I'm a believer that a good golfer (kid or otherwise) can pretty much play anything and have success. Sure some clubs may optimize spin, distance, etc... but sounds like the other kids in the group had major swing flaws.....

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,208 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @kekoa I think your talking about the new rule of taking stroke and distance but I've only heard of that on par 4's and par 5's. I suppose it could apply to par 3's as well but haven't heard of such a thing. That aside, this course does not have that as a local rule so it's still played as OB and you have to re-tee. The kid playing US Kids clubs was taller and stronger than my son and had some sort of graphite shaft TS3 set. The problem was mostly with driver in that if he went after it there was no way he was going to get the club back square.

    @tiger1873 You're probably right about the parents just dropping off and not really caring. Both of the kids were good kids... very respectful, pleasant to talk to and courteous. Regarding two day tournaments, coach has already said the same thing... he has a few on the books but these one day events are fun, provide some good competition and are a necessary stepping stone to the top level tour. On top of that we are already playing up a year in the 12-14 age group.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,237 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @kekoa said:

    @leezer99 said:
    Witnessed the opposite this past weekend. The boy played in an event with three other kids (14 years old) and none of them had parent spectators. I walked and watched them play and there were so many rule violations by two of the kids. One kid hit three balls OB on a par 3 and decided he should just walk down the fairway and take a drop. Another kid hit four balls near OB but hadn't marked any of his balls so there was no way to identify which ball we found was in play. Of course all we can do as parents is help find balls or offer food / water so there's nobody following up with those kids after the round. I let my son know about the two instances so he was able to learn from it but those two kids will continue to play their way. The other thing I noticed was that one of the 14 year olds was still playing US Kids clubs and he was way too strong to be swinging those clubs... even the driver was one of the US Kids drivers. Unless he timed it perfectly those clubs were going straight right. Neither of these kids were good players and had limited tournament experience... I get that parents can't always be there to watch their kids but these guys needed some support after the round.

    Tell me if I'm wrong, but don't some courses have a local rule whereby OB is considered like a lateral so you can take a drop and stroke penalty?

    I know you can't use this rule for ranked tournaments. It is an automatic DQ.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,208 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Ugh... played in an event yesterday that is spectator only yet one of the boys my son played with had a dad that would follow him and say things like, 'you're steering the ball, you're coming over the top, don't leave it short, etc.'. I only heard him giving advice a couple of times because I was mainly down the fairway keeping an eye on tee shots. The dad is a really nice guy but jeez man, keep the advice to reminding them to drink water.

    Five back going into the final round today in 4th place.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,208 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Following up on previous post... scored worse the second day but there were some great learning moments.

    As for the dad that was helping his kid, he ended up winning. On the second day my son played with a kid that is in the same club as cheater dad. While speaking to the mom she confirmed 100% that the dad is a cheater and the kid goes along with it. Apparently another tactic the dad uses is his cell phone to text his son during the round with swing tips, course management tips, etc.

    I had texted the tournament directors the night after the first round letting them know what my son had said and they didn't do anything about it as I witnessed the assistance continue on during the second day. My son has asked to be partnered with him in future rounds.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,152 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Jul 2, 2019 7:24pm #21

    @leezer99 said:
    Following up on previous post... scored worse the second day but there were some great learning moments.

    As for the dad that was helping his kid, he ended up winning. On the second day my son played with a kid that is in the same club as cheater dad. While speaking to the mom she confirmed 100% that the dad is a cheater and the kid goes along with it. Apparently another tactic the dad uses is his cell phone to text his son during the round with swing tips, course management tips, etc.

    I had texted the tournament directors the night after the first round letting them know what my son had said and they didn't do anything about it as I witnessed the assistance continue on during the second day. My son has asked to be partnered with him in future rounds.

    It amazes me how they get away with it. What is worse most tournament directors will ignore you if you bring it up. If there going to allow this then all kids need to have a caddy to level the playing field not only the kid who won the last round.

    I learned though that I should almost encourage them so it stunts those kids development. At some point they can't plan every shot and the course are going to get long and hard.

    Not helping with course management, tips etc is makes it tough being on the sidelines. It is hard to watch scores that go up a lot for kids who do not have any help. But me personally I rather the mistakes get made at 12 then 15 or 16.

    Post edited by tiger1873 on
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,237 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @leezer99 said:
    Following up on previous post... scored worse the second day but there were some great learning moments.

    As for the dad that was helping his kid, he ended up winning. On the second day my son played with a kid that is in the same club as cheater dad. While speaking to the mom she confirmed 100% that the dad is a cheater and the kid goes along with it. Apparently another tactic the dad uses is his cell phone to text his son during the round with swing tips, course management tips, etc.

    I had texted the tournament directors the night after the first round letting them know what my son had said and they didn't do anything about it as I witnessed the assistance continue on during the second day. My son has asked to be partnered with him in future rounds.

    They allow cell phone use by the players on the course?

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,152 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Jul 2, 2019 2:46pm #23

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @leezer99 said:
    Following up on previous post... scored worse the second day but there were some great learning moments.

    As for the dad that was helping his kid, he ended up winning. On the second day my son played with a kid that is in the same club as cheater dad. While speaking to the mom she confirmed 100% that the dad is a cheater and the kid goes along with it. Apparently another tactic the dad uses is his cell phone to text his son during the round with swing tips, course management tips, etc.

    I had texted the tournament directors the night after the first round letting them know what my son had said and they didn't do anything about it as I witnessed the assistance continue on during the second day. My son has asked to be partnered with him in future rounds.

    They allow cell phone use by the players on the course?

    I was going to say the same thing but AGJA has kids enter there scores on golf genius and I know other tours do to. So you really can't say don't use a cell phone even though it is clearly a breach of rules.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,237 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @tiger1873 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @leezer99 said:
    Following up on previous post... scored worse the second day but there were some great learning moments.

    As for the dad that was helping his kid, he ended up winning. On the second day my son played with a kid that is in the same club as cheater dad. While speaking to the mom she confirmed 100% that the dad is a cheater and the kid goes along with it. Apparently another tactic the dad uses is his cell phone to text his son during the round with swing tips, course management tips, etc.

    I had texted the tournament directors the night after the first round letting them know what my son had said and they didn't do anything about it as I witnessed the assistance continue on during the second day. My son has asked to be partnered with him in future rounds.

    They allow cell phone use by the players on the course?

    I was going to say the same thing but AGJA has kids enter there scores on golf genius and I know other tours do to. So you really can't say don't use a cell phone even though it is clearly a breach of rules.

    Using golf Genius is as simple as it gets. Literally takes less than 10 seconds to enter the scores. If they are on the phone longer than that, there is a problem.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,208 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @leezer99 said:
    Following up on previous post... scored worse the second day but there were some great learning moments.

    As for the dad that was helping his kid, he ended up winning. On the second day my son played with a kid that is in the same club as cheater dad. While speaking to the mom she confirmed 100% that the dad is a cheater and the kid goes along with it. Apparently another tactic the dad uses is his cell phone to text his son during the round with swing tips, course management tips, etc.

    I had texted the tournament directors the night after the first round letting them know what my son had said and they didn't do anything about it as I witnessed the assistance continue on during the second day. My son has asked to be partnered with him in future rounds.

    They allow cell phone use by the players on the course?

    I was going to say the same thing but AGJA has kids enter there scores on golf genius and I know other tours do to. So you really can't say don't use a cell phone even though it is clearly a breach of rules.

    Using golf Genius is as simple as it gets. Literally takes less than 10 seconds to enter the scores. If they are on the phone longer than that, there is a problem.

    He kept it in his push cart and would check it before hitting most shots. I noticed what was going on after the other mom mentioned it and then saw the dad on his phone and his son looking at his phone shortly after.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,152 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @leezer99 said:
    Following up on previous post... scored worse the second day but there were some great learning moments.

    As for the dad that was helping his kid, he ended up winning. On the second day my son played with a kid that is in the same club as cheater dad. While speaking to the mom she confirmed 100% that the dad is a cheater and the kid goes along with it. Apparently another tactic the dad uses is his cell phone to text his son during the round with swing tips, course management tips, etc.

    I had texted the tournament directors the night after the first round letting them know what my son had said and they didn't do anything about it as I witnessed the assistance continue on during the second day. My son has asked to be partnered with him in future rounds.

    They allow cell phone use by the players on the course?

    I was going to say the same thing but AGJA has kids enter there scores on golf genius and I know other tours do to. So you really can't say don't use a cell phone even though it is clearly a breach of rules.

    Using golf Genius is as simple as it gets. Literally takes less than 10 seconds to enter the scores. If they are on the phone longer than that, there is a problem.

    I agree my issue is they use it as cover if you bring it up. Plus it only takes a few seconds to see text too. Much better that players just report scores at the turn and not be given a chance.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,152 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Jul 2, 2019 7:52pm #27

    @leezer99 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @leezer99 said:
    Following up on previous post... scored worse the second day but there were some great learning moments.

    As for the dad that was helping his kid, he ended up winning. On the second day my son played with a kid that is in the same club as cheater dad. While speaking to the mom she confirmed 100% that the dad is a cheater and the kid goes along with it. Apparently another tactic the dad uses is his cell phone to text his son during the round with swing tips, course management tips, etc.

    I had texted the tournament directors the night after the first round letting them know what my son had said and they didn't do anything about it as I witnessed the assistance continue on during the second day. My son has asked to be partnered with him in future rounds.

    They allow cell phone use by the players on the course?

    I was going to say the same thing but AGJA has kids enter there scores on golf genius and I know other tours do to. So you really can't say don't use a cell phone even though it is clearly a breach of rules.

    Using golf Genius is as simple as it gets. Literally takes less than 10 seconds to enter the scores. If they are on the phone longer than that, there is a problem.

    He kept it in his push cart and would check it before hitting most shots. I noticed what was going on after the other mom mentioned it and then saw the dad on his phone and his son looking at his phone shortly after.

    You should have used your phone to record him and then showed it the officials to get him DQ especially if he is a leader.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,208 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @tiger1873 said:

    @leezer99 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @leezer99 said:
    Following up on previous post... scored worse the second day but there were some great learning moments.

    As for the dad that was helping his kid, he ended up winning. On the second day my son played with a kid that is in the same club as cheater dad. While speaking to the mom she confirmed 100% that the dad is a cheater and the kid goes along with it. Apparently another tactic the dad uses is his cell phone to text his son during the round with swing tips, course management tips, etc.

    I had texted the tournament directors the night after the first round letting them know what my son had said and they didn't do anything about it as I witnessed the assistance continue on during the second day. My son has asked to be partnered with him in future rounds.

    They allow cell phone use by the players on the course?

    I was going to say the same thing but AGJA has kids enter there scores on golf genius and I know other tours do to. So you really can't say don't use a cell phone even though it is clearly a breach of rules.

    Using golf Genius is as simple as it gets. Literally takes less than 10 seconds to enter the scores. If they are on the phone longer than that, there is a problem.

    He kept it in his push cart and would check it before hitting most shots. I noticed what was going on after the other mom mentioned it and then saw the dad on his phone and his son looking at his phone shortly after.

    You should have used your phone to record him and then showed it the officials to get him DQ especially if he is a leader.

    There are a lot of things I wish I had done. I know the kids coach and was thinking about talking to him.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,152 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Jul 3, 2019 12:22am #29

    @leezer99 said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    @leezer99 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @leezer99 said:
    Following up on previous post... scored worse the second day but there were some great learning moments.

    As for the dad that was helping his kid, he ended up winning. On the second day my son played with a kid that is in the same club as cheater dad. While speaking to the mom she confirmed 100% that the dad is a cheater and the kid goes along with it. Apparently another tactic the dad uses is his cell phone to text his son during the round with swing tips, course management tips, etc.

    I had texted the tournament directors the night after the first round letting them know what my son had said and they didn't do anything about it as I witnessed the assistance continue on during the second day. My son has asked to be partnered with him in future rounds.

    They allow cell phone use by the players on the course?

    I was going to say the same thing but AGJA has kids enter there scores on golf genius and I know other tours do to. So you really can't say don't use a cell phone even though it is clearly a breach of rules.

    Using golf Genius is as simple as it gets. Literally takes less than 10 seconds to enter the scores. If they are on the phone longer than that, there is a problem.

    He kept it in his push cart and would check it before hitting most shots. I noticed what was going on after the other mom mentioned it and then saw the dad on his phone and his son looking at his phone shortly after.

    You should have used your phone to record him and then showed it the officials to get him DQ especially if he is a leader.

    There are a lot of things I wish I had done. I know the kids coach and was thinking about talking to him.

    We have all been there it’s easy for me or any else to say do stuff but it’s a different story when your out there and see stuff like this happen.

    I would’t Be hard on yourself once you see it the next time it easier to know how to deal with it. That is the main reason your doing tournaments in the first place.

    I personally wouldn’t say anything to the coach. Chances are the coach doesn’t care or will just tip them off. Hopefully there are few other kids your son gets along with and you can warn them if there paired with the same kid. They need a few DQ’s to make it sink in.

  • NolesNoles Members Posts: 1,457 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I saw something interesting recently. Out ahead on a par 4 spotting balls as usual. The players were waiting to hit. OB down the entire right side and wind was blowing hard toward the OB. Father rips off some grass and holds it until its time for the boys to hit. When he sees his son look our way, he tosses the grass in the air and repeats this 3-4 times. Clearly he wanted his son to see what he was doing. Not sure if that is against any specific rule but...

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file