Jason and Stevie

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  • LICCLICC Members Posts: 893 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @munichop said:
    Without a healthy back he will never regain the form he once had. He is another example of what I believe is the biggest legacy of Tiger's career- the shortening of golf careers due to the all out commitment to bomb and gouge golf. Certain guys will last longer than others but in general the bodies will wear out sooner from the speeds these guys generate.

    I think you are seeing a movement away from the swing that these guys were using for years that has been killing their backs. Rotating against your hips is an injury waiting to happen.

  • jimb6golfjimb6golf Members Posts: 1,614 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Bottom line the caddie doesn't make the player. The player controls how he plays and that includes practice, etc. to getting better. JD has a few younger kids and probably can't practice as much as he'd like and combining that with injuries he's just not as good as he once was. All understandable. If he wants to get better then he needs to recommit to the game and maybe even get his original caddie/ coach back on the bag. The others at the top of the ranking are all fully committed to the game and getting physically ready to play but it takes a lot of time and it's hard to do with a family I would imagine. Either that or he's just not that good anymore (ha ha).

  • North ButteNorth Butte Members Posts: 10,965 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @physasst said:

    @wkuo3 said:
    This sports wears on you at the competitive level, next to American football. Recreational play is fine if not done excessively.

    Ummm...No....not even close. Football players are done physically for the most part by 32-35. Many of them have ailments including CTE, memory loss, very arthritic joints, etc. by their mid forties. I'm not saying that competitive tour golf isn't taxing physically and mentally, but it's closer to tennis than football. It's not even a close comparison.

    All sports which do NOT involve being slammed up against the head thousands of times in a career are less damaging than American football.

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  • Cincy_KenCincy_Ken Members Posts: 167 ✭✭✭

    @physasst said:

    @wkuo3 said:
    This sports wears on you at the competitive level, next to American football. Recreational play is fine if not done excessively.

    Ummm...No....not even close. Football players are done physically for the most part by 32-35. Many of them have ailments including CTE, memory loss, very arthritic joints, etc. by their mid forties. I'm not saying that competitive tour golf isn't taxing physically and mentally, but it's closer to tennis than football. It's not even a close comparison.

    Not trying to turn this into a which debate is more taxing argument but tennis is very high up there as far as as physical demand. They play all around the world in a sport that you are constantly starting and stopping, each time putting stress on the joints. Most of their tournaments are played on concrete and when they get to the summer in the US they often play in oppressive heat. I could make an argument it's got a strong argument for #2 most physically demanding sport behind football. Now's a bad time because there are some exceptions to the rule with Roger, Rafa, Serena but you historically saw fewer good players in their 30s than most other sports.

  • farmerfarmer Members Posts: 8,081 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Cincy_Ken said:

    @physasst said:

    @wkuo3 said:
    This sports wears on you at the competitive level, next to American football. Recreational play is fine if not done excessively.

    Ummm...No....not even close. Football players are done physically for the most part by 32-35. Many of them have ailments including CTE, memory loss, very arthritic joints, etc. by their mid forties. I'm not saying that competitive tour golf isn't taxing physically and mentally, but it's closer to tennis than football. It's not even a close comparison.

    Not trying to turn this into a which debate is more taxing argument but tennis is very high up there as far as as physical demand. They play all around the world in a sport that you are constantly starting and stopping, each time putting stress on the joints. Most of their tournaments are played on concrete and when they get to the summer in the US they often play in oppressive heat. I could make an argument it's got a strong argument for #2 most physically demanding sport behind football. Now's a bad time because there are some exceptions to the rule with Roger, Rafa, Serena but you historically saw fewer good players in their 30s than most other sports.

    I'm sure tennis is physically taxing, but it does not include having a very large, angry man hit you. Although some tennis players grunt and scream like they are being hit.

  • physasstphysasst Rochester, MNMembers Posts: 95 ✭✭✭

    @Cincy_Ken said:

    @physasst said:

    @wkuo3 said:
    This sports wears on you at the competitive level, next to American football. Recreational play is fine if not done excessively.

    Ummm...No....not even close. Football players are done physically for the most part by 32-35. Many of them have ailments including CTE, memory loss, very arthritic joints, etc. by their mid forties. I'm not saying that competitive tour golf isn't taxing physically and mentally, but it's closer to tennis than football. It's not even a close comparison.

    Not trying to turn this into a which debate is more taxing argument but tennis is very high up there as far as as physical demand. They play all around the world in a sport that you are constantly starting and stopping, each time putting stress on the joints. Most of their tournaments are played on concrete and when they get to the summer in the US they often play in oppressive heat. I could make an argument it's got a strong argument for #2 most physically demanding sport behind football. Now's a bad time because there are some exceptions to the rule with Roger, Rafa, Serena but you historically saw fewer good players in their 30s than most other sports.

    Umm, again no. While I suck at golf, I was a very good tennis player as a junior, and played D1 in college. Sports similar to football include hockey, MMA/UFC, boxing, etc. Basketball is up there as well. I've seen more than my fair share of professional athletes as patients, and basketball players are almost as bad as football players in their older years...and by older years, I mean 50's. I do agree that tennis is definitely higher than golf in physical wear from load and demand. Point is, golf is behind all of them. Doesn't mean you can't get injured or that there is no physical wear and tear from golf, there is...but let's keep a realistic perspective is all.

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  • Cincy_KenCincy_Ken Members Posts: 167 ✭✭✭

    @physasst said:

    @Cincy_Ken said:

    @physasst said:

    @wkuo3 said:
    This sports wears on you at the competitive level, next to American football. Recreational play is fine if not done excessively.

    Ummm...No....not even close. Football players are done physically for the most part by 32-35. Many of them have ailments including CTE, memory loss, very arthritic joints, etc. by their mid forties. I'm not saying that competitive tour golf isn't taxing physically and mentally, but it's closer to tennis than football. It's not even a close comparison.

    Not trying to turn this into a which debate is more taxing argument but tennis is very high up there as far as as physical demand. They play all around the world in a sport that you are constantly starting and stopping, each time putting stress on the joints. Most of their tournaments are played on concrete and when they get to the summer in the US they often play in oppressive heat. I could make an argument it's got a strong argument for #2 most physically demanding sport behind football. Now's a bad time because there are some exceptions to the rule with Roger, Rafa, Serena but you historically saw fewer good players in their 30s than most other sports.

    Umm, again no. While I suck at golf, I was a very good tennis player as a junior, and played D1 in college. Sports similar to football include hockey, MMA/UFC, boxing, etc. Basketball is up there as well. I've seen more than my fair share of professional athletes as patients, and basketball players are almost as bad as football players in their older years...and by older years, I mean 50's. I do agree that tennis is definitely higher than golf in physical wear from load and demand. Point is, golf is behind all of them. Doesn't mean you can't get injured or that there is no physical wear and tear from golf, there is...but let's keep a realistic perspective is all.

    Yeah, I don't disagree with you that tennis doesn't compare to football. And I completely agree on the combat sports, i was thinking more along the lines of the higher profile sports. Two boxers just died recently so if we're including boxing it would be top of the list.

    There is really no comparison to golf. Watson almost won the British at 59. Phil is 49 and hasn't been out of the top 50 since his early 20s. You can pick up injuries that can derail your career, mostly back, but it's the only sport you have any real chance of competing at at an advanced age.

  • QuigleyDUQuigleyDU Members Posts: 7,490 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    so can we chalk Steve up as over rated now??

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  • wkuo3wkuo3 RELEASE Members Posts: 4,201 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Let's not vompare American Football to other non- contact sports, please.
    Any competitive sports will be taxing if one trys hard at it. American Football add another dimension to the sports with full contact element.
    Don;t need to look far to find evidence that competitive golf can cause debilitating injury. Count all those whom showed up on the tournament leader board, almost all of them have serious injury with surgery repairs. Especially in the last couple decades when "science" maximized the human potential thus maximized the harm could have done to human body.

  • bspnbspn Members Posts: 134 ✭✭✭

    @Cincy_Ken said:

    @physasst said:

    @wkuo3 said:
    This sports wears on you at the competitive level, next to American football. Recreational play is fine if not done excessively.

    Ummm...No....not even close. Football players are done physically for the most part by 32-35. Many of them have ailments including CTE, memory loss, very arthritic joints, etc. by their mid forties. I'm not saying that competitive tour golf isn't taxing physically and mentally, but it's closer to tennis than football. It's not even a close comparison.

    Not trying to turn this into a which debate is more taxing argument but tennis is very high up there as far as as physical demand. They play all around the world in a sport that you are constantly starting and stopping, each time putting stress on the joints. Most of their tournaments are played on concrete and when they get to the summer in the US they often play in oppressive heat. I could make an argument it's got a strong argument for #2 most physically demanding sport behind football. Now's a bad time because there are some exceptions to the rule with Roger, Rafa, Serena but you historically saw fewer good players in their 30s than most other sports.

    I've always thought tennis must be one of the more mentally taxing professional sports. I can't imagine playing such a repetitive sport like that week-in-week-out for years without losing my mind. Add in the physical toll and it's amazing any of the players make it out of their 20s. At least with a sport like golf you're playing new courses every week and get to enjoy a nice walk even on your bad days

  • KRAMER1997KRAMER1997 Members Posts: 212 ✭✭✭

    Jason Day is a sissy who fakes an injury almost every season. If he had to work 40 hours a week and couldn't afford a fancy physio, I bet that back wouldn't hurt as much.

  • Sleeky_DSleeky_D ClubWRX Posts: 72 ClubWRX

    I can see why JD wanted him as a caddie (i.e. experience) but I thought from the beginning it wouldn't be a good matchup. I felt as if JD would feel like he had to live up to some unreachable expectations. Not sure if this was the case or not, but it doesn't surprise me that it didn't work out.

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