Best Driver of 2019 | Full Article _HERE_ | Discussion Thread _HERE_

How many have found their "utopia" golf ball?

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Comments

  • rwbloom93rwbloom93 Members Posts: 20 ✭✭

    @storm319 said:

    @Twin2L said:

    @Red4282 said:

    @Twin2L said
    ...........
    Ironically, I may never have looked for another ball if it didn’t have that giant “B” on the sides.

    Hate to burst your bubble but it was just likely in your head- that or a bad ball. All these balls are so close to each other in performance, its really splitting hairs. That being said i agree with you on the giant “B”...
    "......."........."...............................................................>>>>.

    No bubble to burst. I do agree that I have a decided level of confidence in the BRX that allows me to relax over a shot.

    I agree that most so-called premium balls are in the same compression range + or - 15%, resulting in comparable feel and effort required for comparable results.

    However, there is a significant difference in the balls. With a difference in compression of 22#, fully 1/3 of the BRX’s 66 compression, the Z-Star compression is 88, there is a significant difference in feel off all clubs.

    I turned 60 a week ago Saturday. I learned to play in the early 70’s in the era of the wound ball, even pre balata. Back then the choices were all soft except for the old “rockflights”. Even later when Titleist came out with the 80 compression, followed by the 90, those differences were noticeable. I did play the 80’s well and often, but didn’t like he 90’s at all.

    Ironically, 35 years later I played the v1x and B330, but a 2nd significant neck injury and a dozen years later, I prefer the feel and sense if control of a softer ball. (It’s also less stressful on a once repaired then reinjured cervical spine), resulting in far less pain post round.

    I’m a very tactile person and an admitted “feel” player. I even struggle with the lack of feedback sensation of the oversized putter grips. While I still have enough club head speed to compress most balls well enough,I simply love the soft feel of a ball that compresses on the face. Yes, I can tell the difference.

    Comparing compression numbers across different OEMs is not an apples to apples comparison since there is no strictly followed industry standard measurement for compression anymore. Most of the OEMs (including Bridgestone) only measure the compression of the core. Srixon is one of the few OEMs that measure the entire ball. The only way to really compare across companies is for a 3rd party to measure in a consistent manner. In the MyGolfSpi ball test, this is what they found using a former industry standard Atti tester:

    Bridgestone Tour BRX = 99.6 avg
    Srixon Z Star = 100.8 avg

    Ultimately this measured difference is negligible between these two models, so the difference you perceived was either sensitivity to the relative hardness of specific layers of the ball or simply a placebo effect based on your comparison of the OEM stated numbers.

    When I read the robot testers ball guide page, and reviewed their data, doubt started to creep into my mind about those guys and the testing especially when I read the compression data.

    GBT.org has been publishing ATTI compression data for years (most recent public info is 2016...can't find their 2018 info). They have the 2016 TourB330 RX overall compression at 82 (atti) and the 2015 Srixon z-star 94 (atti).

    I'm sure the robot testers used the newest of each brand so probably the 2017 TourB RX and the 2019 Z-Star....but Bridgestone's sales team and spokespeople both claim the 2017 cover is softer than the 2016 and also the graduated core is softer. So....after making the ball softer for 2017 the overall the ATTI compression goes from up from 82 to 100??? Somebody's not using the ATTI correctly IMHO.

  • storm319storm319 Members Posts: 3,867 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 5, 2019 11:26am #123

    @rwbloom93 said:

    @storm319 said:

    @Twin2L said:

    @Red4282 said:

    @Twin2L said
    ...........
    Ironically, I may never have looked for another ball if it didn’t have that giant “B” on the sides.

    Hate to burst your bubble but it was just likely in your head- that or a bad ball. All these balls are so close to each other in performance, its really splitting hairs. That being said i agree with you on the giant “B”...
    "......."........."...............................................................>>>>.

    No bubble to burst. I do agree that I have a decided level of confidence in the BRX that allows me to relax over a shot.

    I agree that most so-called premium balls are in the same compression range + or - 15%, resulting in comparable feel and effort required for comparable results.

    However, there is a significant difference in the balls. With a difference in compression of 22#, fully 1/3 of the BRX’s 66 compression, the Z-Star compression is 88, there is a significant difference in feel off all clubs.

    I turned 60 a week ago Saturday. I learned to play in the early 70’s in the era of the wound ball, even pre balata. Back then the choices were all soft except for the old “rockflights”. Even later when Titleist came out with the 80 compression, followed by the 90, those differences were noticeable. I did play the 80’s well and often, but didn’t like he 90’s at all.

    Ironically, 35 years later I played the v1x and B330, but a 2nd significant neck injury and a dozen years later, I prefer the feel and sense if control of a softer ball. (It’s also less stressful on a once repaired then reinjured cervical spine), resulting in far less pain post round.

    I’m a very tactile person and an admitted “feel” player. I even struggle with the lack of feedback sensation of the oversized putter grips. While I still have enough club head speed to compress most balls well enough,I simply love the soft feel of a ball that compresses on the face. Yes, I can tell the difference.

    Comparing compression numbers across different OEMs is not an apples to apples comparison since there is no strictly followed industry standard measurement for compression anymore. Most of the OEMs (including Bridgestone) only measure the compression of the core. Srixon is one of the few OEMs that measure the entire ball. The only way to really compare across companies is for a 3rd party to measure in a consistent manner. In the MyGolfSpi ball test, this is what they found using a former industry standard Atti tester:

    Bridgestone Tour BRX = 99.6 avg
    Srixon Z Star = 100.8 avg

    Ultimately this measured difference is negligible between these two models, so the difference you perceived was either sensitivity to the relative hardness of specific layers of the ball or simply a placebo effect based on your comparison of the OEM stated numbers.

    When I read the robot testers ball guide page, and reviewed their data, doubt started to creep into my mind about those guys and the testing especially when I read the compression data.

    GBT.org has been publishing ATTI compression data for years (most recent public info is 2016...can't find their 2018 info). They have the 2016 TourB330 RX overall compression at 82 (atti) and the 2015 Srixon z-star 94 (atti).

    I'm sure the robot testers used the newest of each brand so probably the 2017 TourB RX and the 2019 Z-Star....but Bridgestone's sales team and spokespeople both claim the 2017 cover is softer than the 2016 and also the graduated core is softer. So....after making the ball softer for 2017 the overall the ATTI compression goes from up from 82 to 100??? Somebody's not using the ATTI correctly IMHO.

    Given that the MyGolf$py results are consistently higher my guess is that the variance is a calibration issue (who is actually more accurate is anyone’s guess). I don’t recommend comparing numbers across tests as there is no way to eliminate the measurement variables/methodologies. What is helpful is comparing balls from different OEMs within the same consistent test.

    Post edited by storm319 on
  • Red4282Red4282 Members Posts: 424 ✭✭✭✭

    @rwbloom93 said:

    @storm319 said:

    @Twin2L said:

    @Red4282 said:

    @Twin2L said
    ...........
    Ironically, I may never have looked for another ball if it didn’t have that giant “B” on the sides.

    Hate to burst your bubble but it was just likely in your head- that or a bad ball. All these balls are so close to each other in performance, its really splitting hairs. That being said i agree with you on the giant “B”...
    "......."........."...............................................................>>>>.

    No bubble to burst. I do agree that I have a decided level of confidence in the BRX that allows me to relax over a shot.

    I agree that most so-called premium balls are in the same compression range + or - 15%, resulting in comparable feel and effort required for comparable results.

    However, there is a significant difference in the balls. With a difference in compression of 22#, fully 1/3 of the BRX’s 66 compression, the Z-Star compression is 88, there is a significant difference in feel off all clubs.

    I turned 60 a week ago Saturday. I learned to play in the early 70’s in the era of the wound ball, even pre balata. Back then the choices were all soft except for the old “rockflights”. Even later when Titleist came out with the 80 compression, followed by the 90, those differences were noticeable. I did play the 80’s well and often, but didn’t like he 90’s at all.

    Ironically, 35 years later I played the v1x and B330, but a 2nd significant neck injury and a dozen years later, I prefer the feel and sense if control of a softer ball. (It’s also less stressful on a once repaired then reinjured cervical spine), resulting in far less pain post round.

    I’m a very tactile person and an admitted “feel” player. I even struggle with the lack of feedback sensation of the oversized putter grips. While I still have enough club head speed to compress most balls well enough,I simply love the soft feel of a ball that compresses on the face. Yes, I can tell the difference.

    Comparing compression numbers across different OEMs is not an apples to apples comparison since there is no strictly followed industry standard measurement for compression anymore. Most of the OEMs (including Bridgestone) only measure the compression of the core. Srixon is one of the few OEMs that measure the entire ball. The only way to really compare across companies is for a 3rd party to measure in a consistent manner. In the MyGolfSpi ball test, this is what they found using a former industry standard Atti tester:

    Bridgestone Tour BRX = 99.6 avg
    Srixon Z Star = 100.8 avg

    Ultimately this measured difference is negligible between these two models, so the difference you perceived was either sensitivity to the relative hardness of specific layers of the ball or simply a placebo effect based on your comparison of the OEM stated numbers.

    When I read the robot testers ball guide page, and reviewed their data, doubt started to creep into my mind about those guys and the testing especially when I read the compression data.

    GBT.org has been publishing ATTI compression data for years (most recent public info is 2016...can't find their 2018 info). They have the 2016 TourB330 RX overall compression at 82 (atti) and the 2015 Srixon z-star 94 (atti).

    I'm sure the robot testers used the newest of each brand so probably the 2017 TourB RX and the 2019 Z-Star....but Bridgestone's sales team and spokespeople both claim the 2017 cover is softer than the 2016 and also the graduated core is softer. So....after making the ball softer for 2017 the overall the ATTI compression goes from up from 82 to 100??? Somebody's not using the ATTI correctly IMHO.

    I dont think what your saying really matters...scientifically. They said in disclaimer that methods for compression testing varied from manufacturers. What really matters is they tested the compressions on ALL balls, the same way every time. Whether or not they were close to manufacturers claim is irrelevant, but what is-the direct comparison between balls using same testing methods.

  • rwbloom93rwbloom93 Members Posts: 20 ✭✭

    @Red4282 said:

    @rwbloom93 said:

    @storm319 said:

    @Twin2L said:

    @Red4282 said:

    @Twin2L said
    ...........
    Ironically, I may never have looked for another ball if it didn’t have that giant “B” on the sides.

    Hate to burst your bubble but it was just likely in your head- that or a bad ball. All these balls are so close to each other in performance, its really splitting hairs. That being said i agree with you on the giant “B”...
    "......."........."...............................................................>>>>.

    No bubble to burst. I do agree that I have a decided level of confidence in the BRX that allows me to relax over a shot.

    I agree that most so-called premium balls are in the same compression range + or - 15%, resulting in comparable feel and effort required for comparable results.

    However, there is a significant difference in the balls. With a difference in compression of 22#, fully 1/3 of the BRX’s 66 compression, the Z-Star compression is 88, there is a significant difference in feel off all clubs.

    I turned 60 a week ago Saturday. I learned to play in the early 70’s in the era of the wound ball, even pre balata. Back then the choices were all soft except for the old “rockflights”. Even later when Titleist came out with the 80 compression, followed by the 90, those differences were noticeable. I did play the 80’s well and often, but didn’t like he 90’s at all.

    Ironically, 35 years later I played the v1x and B330, but a 2nd significant neck injury and a dozen years later, I prefer the feel and sense if control of a softer ball. (It’s also less stressful on a once repaired then reinjured cervical spine), resulting in far less pain post round.

    I’m a very tactile person and an admitted “feel” player. I even struggle with the lack of feedback sensation of the oversized putter grips. While I still have enough club head speed to compress most balls well enough,I simply love the soft feel of a ball that compresses on the face. Yes, I can tell the difference.

    Comparing compression numbers across different OEMs is not an apples to apples comparison since there is no strictly followed industry standard measurement for compression anymore. Most of the OEMs (including Bridgestone) only measure the compression of the core. Srixon is one of the few OEMs that measure the entire ball. The only way to really compare across companies is for a 3rd party to measure in a consistent manner. In the MyGolfSpi ball test, this is what they found using a former industry standard Atti tester:

    Bridgestone Tour BRX = 99.6 avg
    Srixon Z Star = 100.8 avg

    Ultimately this measured difference is negligible between these two models, so the difference you perceived was either sensitivity to the relative hardness of specific layers of the ball or simply a placebo effect based on your comparison of the OEM stated numbers.

    When I read the robot testers ball guide page, and reviewed their data, doubt started to creep into my mind about those guys and the testing especially when I read the compression data.

    GBT.org has been publishing ATTI compression data for years (most recent public info is 2016...can't find their 2018 info). They have the 2016 TourB330 RX overall compression at 82 (atti) and the 2015 Srixon z-star 94 (atti).

    I'm sure the robot testers used the newest of each brand so probably the 2017 TourB RX and the 2019 Z-Star....but Bridgestone's sales team and spokespeople both claim the 2017 cover is softer than the 2016 and also the graduated core is softer. So....after making the ball softer for 2017 the overall the ATTI compression goes from up from 82 to 100??? Somebody's not using the ATTI correctly IMHO.

    I dont think what your saying really matters...scientifically. They said in disclaimer that methods for compression testing varied from manufacturers. What really matters is they tested the compressions on ALL balls, the same way every time. Whether or not they were close to manufacturers claim is irrelevant, but what is-the direct comparison between balls using same testing methods.

    But > @Red4282 said:

    @rwbloom93 said:

    @storm319 said:

    @Twin2L said:

    @Red4282 said:

    @Twin2L said
    ...........
    Ironically, I may never have looked for another ball if it didn’t have that giant “B” on the sides.

    Hate to burst your bubble but it was just likely in your head- that or a bad ball. All these balls are so close to each other in performance, its really splitting hairs. That being said i agree with you on the giant “B”...
    "......."........."...............................................................>>>>.

    No bubble to burst. I do agree that I have a decided level of confidence in the BRX that allows me to relax over a shot.

    I agree that most so-called premium balls are in the same compression range + or - 15%, resulting in comparable feel and effort required for comparable results.

    However, there is a significant difference in the balls. With a difference in compression of 22#, fully 1/3 of the BRX’s 66 compression, the Z-Star compression is 88, there is a significant difference in feel off all clubs.

    I turned 60 a week ago Saturday. I learned to play in the early 70’s in the era of the wound ball, even pre balata. Back then the choices were all soft except for the old “rockflights”. Even later when Titleist came out with the 80 compression, followed by the 90, those differences were noticeable. I did play the 80’s well and often, but didn’t like he 90’s at all.

    Ironically, 35 years later I played the v1x and B330, but a 2nd significant neck injury and a dozen years later, I prefer the feel and sense if control of a softer ball. (It’s also less stressful on a once repaired then reinjured cervical spine), resulting in far less pain post round.

    I’m a very tactile person and an admitted “feel” player. I even struggle with the lack of feedback sensation of the oversized putter grips. While I still have enough club head speed to compress most balls well enough,I simply love the soft feel of a ball that compresses on the face. Yes, I can tell the difference.

    Comparing compression numbers across different OEMs is not an apples to apples comparison since there is no strictly followed industry standard measurement for compression anymore. Most of the OEMs (including Bridgestone) only measure the compression of the core. Srixon is one of the few OEMs that measure the entire ball. The only way to really compare across companies is for a 3rd party to measure in a consistent manner. In the MyGolfSpi ball test, this is what they found using a former industry standard Atti tester:

    Bridgestone Tour BRX = 99.6 avg
    Srixon Z Star = 100.8 avg

    Ultimately this measured difference is negligible between these two models, so the difference you perceived was either sensitivity to the relative hardness of specific layers of the ball or simply a placebo effect based on your comparison of the OEM stated numbers.

    When I read the robot testers ball guide page, and reviewed their data, doubt started to creep into my mind about those guys and the testing especially when I read the compression data.

    GBT.org has been publishing ATTI compression data for years (most recent public info is 2016...can't find their 2018 info). They have the 2016 TourB330 RX overall compression at 82 (atti) and the 2015 Srixon z-star 94 (atti).

    I'm sure the robot testers used the newest of each brand so probably the 2017 TourB RX and the 2019 Z-Star....but Bridgestone's sales team and spokespeople both claim the 2017 cover is softer than the 2016 and also the graduated core is softer. So....after making the ball softer for 2017 the overall the ATTI compression goes from up from 82 to 100??? Somebody's not using the ATTI correctly IMHO.

    I dont think what your saying really matters...scientifically. They said in disclaimer that methods for compression testing varied from manufacturers. What really matters is they tested the compressions on ALL balls, the same way every time. Whether or not they were close to manufacturers claim is irrelevant, but what is-the direct comparison between balls using same testing methods.

    Manufacturer data is not used in the comparison. I was comparing tests ran by GBT (an independent golf testing company) to the other testing website (mygolfnerds).

    They both used the same machine (atti), applied the same 200lb force, and measured deflection...yet...came to very different values for compression.

    Admittedly, GBT data is previous generation models but the newer models are supposed to be softer overall....so how does my-golf-nerds record higher compression....there's an answer, but I don't know what it is.

  • Red4282Red4282 Members Posts: 424 ✭✭✭✭

    @rwbloom93 said:

    @Red4282 said:

    @rwbloom93 said:

    @storm319 said:

    @Twin2L said:

    @Red4282 said:

    @Twin2L said
    ...........
    Ironically, I may never have looked for another ball if it didn’t have that giant “B” on the sides.

    Hate to burst your bubble but it was just likely in your head- that or a bad ball. All these balls are so close to each other in performance, its really splitting hairs. That being said i agree with you on the giant “B”...
    "......."........."...............................................................>>>>.

    No bubble to burst. I do agree that I have a decided level of confidence in the BRX that allows me to relax over a shot.

    I agree that most so-called premium balls are in the same compression range + or - 15%, resulting in comparable feel and effort required for comparable results.

    However, there is a significant difference in the balls. With a difference in compression of 22#, fully 1/3 of the BRX’s 66 compression, the Z-Star compression is 88, there is a significant difference in feel off all clubs.

    I turned 60 a week ago Saturday. I learned to play in the early 70’s in the era of the wound ball, even pre balata. Back then the choices were all soft except for the old “rockflights”. Even later when Titleist came out with the 80 compression, followed by the 90, those differences were noticeable. I did play the 80’s well and often, but didn’t like he 90’s at all.

    Ironically, 35 years later I played the v1x and B330, but a 2nd significant neck injury and a dozen years later, I prefer the feel and sense if control of a softer ball. (It’s also less stressful on a once repaired then reinjured cervical spine), resulting in far less pain post round.

    I’m a very tactile person and an admitted “feel” player. I even struggle with the lack of feedback sensation of the oversized putter grips. While I still have enough club head speed to compress most balls well enough,I simply love the soft feel of a ball that compresses on the face. Yes, I can tell the difference.

    Comparing compression numbers across different OEMs is not an apples to apples comparison since there is no strictly followed industry standard measurement for compression anymore. Most of the OEMs (including Bridgestone) only measure the compression of the core. Srixon is one of the few OEMs that measure the entire ball. The only way to really compare across companies is for a 3rd party to measure in a consistent manner. In the MyGolfSpi ball test, this is what they found using a former industry standard Atti tester:

    Bridgestone Tour BRX = 99.6 avg
    Srixon Z Star = 100.8 avg

    Ultimately this measured difference is negligible between these two models, so the difference you perceived was either sensitivity to the relative hardness of specific layers of the ball or simply a placebo effect based on your comparison of the OEM stated numbers.

    When I read the robot testers ball guide page, and reviewed their data, doubt started to creep into my mind about those guys and the testing especially when I read the compression data.

    GBT.org has been publishing ATTI compression data for years (most recent public info is 2016...can't find their 2018 info). They have the 2016 TourB330 RX overall compression at 82 (atti) and the 2015 Srixon z-star 94 (atti).

    I'm sure the robot testers used the newest of each brand so probably the 2017 TourB RX and the 2019 Z-Star....but Bridgestone's sales team and spokespeople both claim the 2017 cover is softer than the 2016 and also the graduated core is softer. So....after making the ball softer for 2017 the overall the ATTI compression goes from up from 82 to 100??? Somebody's not using the ATTI correctly IMHO.

    I dont think what your saying really matters...scientifically. They said in disclaimer that methods for compression testing varied from manufacturers. What really matters is they tested the compressions on ALL balls, the same way every time. Whether or not they were close to manufacturers claim is irrelevant, but what is-the direct comparison between balls using same testing methods.

    But > @Red4282 said:

    @rwbloom93 said:

    @storm319 said:

    @Twin2L said:

    @Red4282 said:

    @Twin2L said
    ...........
    Ironically, I may never have looked for another ball if it didn’t have that giant “B” on the sides.

    Hate to burst your bubble but it was just likely in your head- that or a bad ball. All these balls are so close to each other in performance, its really splitting hairs. That being said i agree with you on the giant “B”...
    "......."........."...............................................................>>>>.

    No bubble to burst. I do agree that I have a decided level of confidence in the BRX that allows me to relax over a shot.

    I agree that most so-called premium balls are in the same compression range + or - 15%, resulting in comparable feel and effort required for comparable results.

    However, there is a significant difference in the balls. With a difference in compression of 22#, fully 1/3 of the BRX’s 66 compression, the Z-Star compression is 88, there is a significant difference in feel off all clubs.

    I turned 60 a week ago Saturday. I learned to play in the early 70’s in the era of the wound ball, even pre balata. Back then the choices were all soft except for the old “rockflights”. Even later when Titleist came out with the 80 compression, followed by the 90, those differences were noticeable. I did play the 80’s well and often, but didn’t like he 90’s at all.

    Ironically, 35 years later I played the v1x and B330, but a 2nd significant neck injury and a dozen years later, I prefer the feel and sense if control of a softer ball. (It’s also less stressful on a once repaired then reinjured cervical spine), resulting in far less pain post round.

    I’m a very tactile person and an admitted “feel” player. I even struggle with the lack of feedback sensation of the oversized putter grips. While I still have enough club head speed to compress most balls well enough,I simply love the soft feel of a ball that compresses on the face. Yes, I can tell the difference.

    Comparing compression numbers across different OEMs is not an apples to apples comparison since there is no strictly followed industry standard measurement for compression anymore. Most of the OEMs (including Bridgestone) only measure the compression of the core. Srixon is one of the few OEMs that measure the entire ball. The only way to really compare across companies is for a 3rd party to measure in a consistent manner. In the MyGolfSpi ball test, this is what they found using a former industry standard Atti tester:

    Bridgestone Tour BRX = 99.6 avg
    Srixon Z Star = 100.8 avg

    Ultimately this measured difference is negligible between these two models, so the difference you perceived was either sensitivity to the relative hardness of specific layers of the ball or simply a placebo effect based on your comparison of the OEM stated numbers.

    When I read the robot testers ball guide page, and reviewed their data, doubt started to creep into my mind about those guys and the testing especially when I read the compression data.

    GBT.org has been publishing ATTI compression data for years (most recent public info is 2016...can't find their 2018 info). They have the 2016 TourB330 RX overall compression at 82 (atti) and the 2015 Srixon z-star 94 (atti).

    I'm sure the robot testers used the newest of each brand so probably the 2017 TourB RX and the 2019 Z-Star....but Bridgestone's sales team and spokespeople both claim the 2017 cover is softer than the 2016 and also the graduated core is softer. So....after making the ball softer for 2017 the overall the ATTI compression goes from up from 82 to 100??? Somebody's not using the ATTI correctly IMHO.

    I dont think what your saying really matters...scientifically. They said in disclaimer that methods for compression testing varied from manufacturers. What really matters is they tested the compressions on ALL balls, the same way every time. Whether or not they were close to manufacturers claim is irrelevant, but what is-the direct comparison between balls using same testing methods.

    Manufacturer data is not used in the comparison. I was comparing tests ran by GBT (an independent golf testing company) to the other testing website (mygolfnerds).

    They both used the same machine (atti), applied the same 200lb force, and measured deflection...yet...came to very different values for compression.

    Admittedly, GBT data is previous generation models but the newer models are supposed to be softer overall....so how does my-golf-nerds record higher compression....there's an answer, but I don't know what it is.

    But again it doesnt matter- unless they just have no clue in what they are doing... if ball A tested at XX and ball B tested at 00...same tester, same methods. Its valuable for a direct comparison between balls. I personally am starting think all this stuff is just so overblown. Play whatever you want. Most of us do anyways lol

  • monks66monks66 Members Posts: 702 ✭✭✭✭✭

    hope to someday find my utopia ball..right now its the Tour BRX..for how long who knows

  • LHGolf4LHGolf4 Lefty Boomers Posts: 480 ✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 5, 2019 11:23am #128

    You guys are really making me want to try the AVX. I do love both Z-Star and XV and I also love that they are gettable for $20/dozen though.

    I really loved Srixons (especially around the green) but I noticed some distance inconsistency. I also tried Q Star Tours and they were better but I did not get quite enough spin on my irons and they would roll out a good bit.

    I honestly would not have even tried an AVX had I not found one on the course. That being said if you might pick up a sleeve just to see what you think. I have learned there is no one best ball or club. We all have different swings and equipment companies have done a great job of giving us choices (maybe too many) to match what works best for you. If you like the AVX balls you can always buy them used.

  • NailedItNailedIt Members Posts: 76 ✭✭✭

    I’ve been a big supporter of the z star/xv balls the last few years. This year I noticed the durability slipping a little and decided to try the tp5 again. I gave up on them before because of their lack of durability but the ‘19’s seem much improved and I’m loving everything about them right now. I actually hope to not find that utopia ball because like all golf equipment, part of the fun for me is to try new things.

  • Mikey5eMikey5e Members Posts: 969 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 5, 2019 7:05pm #130

    Since I changed to the Bridgestone Tour BRX
    I shaved 7 strokes off my score!
    B)

  • LumpyPocketsLumpyPockets Members Posts: 50 ✭✭

    Wilson fb tour ftw

    In the Sun Mountain Three.Five aka The Bag of Shame:

    XR 16 10.5*
    HiBore XLS 2 Wood
    Epic 5w
    Cleveland Launcher HB 4-SW
    O Works #7
  • monks66monks66 Members Posts: 702 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Mikey5e said:
    Since I changed to the Bridgestone Tour BRX
    I shaved 7 strokes off my score!
    B)

    I just started playing it too...like it

  • hoselrockerhoselrocker Members Posts: 61 ✭✭

    I stumbled on the Srixon Z Star Kelly Green this summer. I love this ball. Very durable and has all the performance a mid capper like me needs. I went to G Town yesterday to buy some more and learned from the manager that he still has cases of them left in the back. At $14 for 6 balls this is a fantastic buy if you don't mind the greenish tinge. I also learned yesterday that Kelly Green is Masters green! Sold!! I might go back and buy the rest.

  • MonacoMonaco Members Posts: 3

    Early this year i started my personal ball journey.
    I was searching for a premium ball - spin, long, feel.- but don‘t want to pay 50€ (Germany) for prov1/x.
    I always like soft balls... Callaway chromesoft was my Ball. Was.

    Tried Vice Pro / Pro Plus
    Pearl Pure pro / x
    Seed 01 / 02
    Cut Blue
    Snell Mtbx
    Srixon Z Star / XV

    I really get a feeling, how different the balls are.
    With the driver, for sure, everyone want the longest ball... me too.
    But i think, there isn‘t much in it. And i learned, that isn‘t the most important point... my drive is about 300 yards total, if 295 or 305... really it doesn‘t matter.

    The longest: Mtbx

    I go to the other end...
    My personal opinion: it‘s all about feel... and what you find a good feel, can be learned. I thought, i will never like a harder ball. But if i have to along my testings, i fall in love with harder balls. Little adjustments on distance controll with each ball.
    But this section isn‘t an important part for me.

    The important parts for me are chipping, pitching and my irons into the greens. I wan‘t attack the flags, no big roll outs. Another part is stability in the wind and durability.

    I have only one ball, i have to say, i will never buy again, because if its durability. Cut Blue! Omg, horrible. Great Performance, but never seen such cuts after one or two irons...

    My utopia ball: longer one with the driver, harder with the putter.
    Perfect spin with my shots into the green, stops on a dime. Even with half swings from 100-30 Meter in... really confident with this ball!
    Around the green the right spin for me, again i like to be a Little more aggressive to the flag.
    And what i realised: how effects wind the different balls! This one is the most stable in the wind, amazing! Again i‘m so confident with this ball.
    (Not with my swing 😂)

    The winner is: Srixon Z Star XV

    The only bad thing: there isn‘t the offer dozen 20$ Or 2 for 1 in Europe..... Dear Srixon: change this! 😜

  • MonacoMonaco Members Posts: 3
    edited Sep 8, 2019 7:34am #135

    Sry

    Post edited by Monaco on
  • MonacoMonaco Members Posts: 3
    edited Sep 8, 2019 7:34am #136

    Sry

    Post edited by Monaco on
  • AmazinBlueAmazinBlue Members Posts: 1,107 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Maxfli Tour. Awesome ball around the greens and long.

    Ping G400 Max 9* - 8* Tour 65 S 44.5"
    Ping G400 14.5* Tour 75 Stiff
    Callaway Apex Hybrid 20* PX LZ 75g Stiff
    Callaway Apex Hybrid 23* Kuro Kage 80 Hy stiff
    Taylormade P770 5-PW Nippon Modus3 120 S
    Vokey SM6 48* F Grind Steel Gray
    Vokey SM6 54*/08* M Grind Steel Gray
    Vokey SM7 58*/14* D Grind Tour Chrome
    TM Tour Spider Black 34.25" 2* flat 2x 14g weight
    Callaway ERC Soft
  • OrlokOrlok ArgentinaMembers Posts: 34 ✭✭

    Bridgestone B330 series (L)

    Driver - Ping G410 Plus 10.0° - Project X EvenFlow Black 75
    3 Wood - Ping G410 Plus 14.5° - Project X EvenFlow Black 85
    2 Iron - Titleist T-MB 718 17° - True Temper AMT Tour White S300
    4-PW - Titleist AP2 718 - True Temper AMT Tour White S300
    Wedges - TaylorMade Hi-Toe 52°/56°/60°
    Putter - Oddysey White Ice
    Ball - Bridgestone B330 RX

  • shotmarkshotmark Members Posts: 842 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @monks66 said:

    @Justsomeguy said:

    @Chadwickog said:
    I found it, it was called the Nike RZN Platinum. I have yet to find its replacement.

    Took the words right out of my mouth.
    Platinum the best ball ever made.

    IMHO the Taylor Made LDP RED was the best ball ever made .....who can back me on that?

    I can

  • monks66monks66 Members Posts: 702 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @shotmark said:

    @monks66 said:

    @Justsomeguy said:

    @Chadwickog said:
    I found it, it was called the Nike RZN Platinum. I have yet to find its replacement.

    Took the words right out of my mouth.
    Platinum the best ball ever made.

    IMHO the Taylor Made LDP RED was the best ball ever made .....who can back me on that?

    I can

    it was a great ball

  • MBBGMBBG South of ChicagolandMembers Posts: 1,553 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I feel like the TP (non x) balls have all been quite similar to LDP Red in both performance and feel.

    S Yard T.388 Kuro Kage Dual Core TiNi 
    TaylorMade Original One 13.5* HZRDUS Green
    Titleist TS2 16.5* Kuro Kage XM
    Mizuno MP-20 HMB 3-6 MP-20 Blade 7-P DG AMT
    Mizuno T20 50 and 55 S400 TI 
    Callaway PM Grind 60
    PXG Operator LTD Edition “Darkness”
  • ethan380ethan380 Members Posts: 27 ✭✭
    edited Sep 10, 2019 5:54am #142

    Chrome soft X has been quite good for me. I don't know if its utopia. I'd really like to custom design the ball's aesthetics from the font, to the color to the dimple pattern.

  • monks66monks66 Members Posts: 702 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @MBBG said:
    I feel like the TP (non x) balls have all been quite similar to LDP Red in both performance and feel.

    Now, you are gonna make me go buy some because I am entrigued now lol

  • NoTalentLeftyNoTalentLefty Members Posts: 3,587 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I thought it was the DT TruSoft but liking this gen of the Callaway Supersoft

    Livin' proof that Lefties are not naturally talented.

    Driver Callaway Epic Flash 10.5 set to 9.5
    3 and 5 Wood Ping G15
    3-5 Hybrids Cobra Baffler XL
    6-PW Titleist AP1s
    50 degree GW Titleist SM4
    56 degree SW Vokey SM7 
    Ping Anser 6 Milled Putter
  • North ButteNorth Butte Members Posts: 11,367 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I'm quite aware that my mind accumulates out-of-context experiences and assembles its own version of reality from them. We tend to see what we want to see, yada, yada, yada.

    But having stuck to my long-time "utopia" Pro V1x for quite a few rounds lately, I am definitely accumulating lots of highly encouraging reinforcement towards my belief that it's the ideal ball for me. I had an unusually good round (by my poor standards) my last time out. A few shots stand out in memory and I really do suspect that they might not have played out quite the same with whatever random non-ProV1x ball I might happen to play from time to time.

    One shot was a 6-iron off a tight lie with a bit of a downslope, over a pond to reach the green. With an inconsistent swing, low clubhead speed and generally low ballflight that's not the most inviting prospect. The minute the ball hit the club I just "knew" one of two things were going to happen. I caught it a bit thin and it came out low and hot. It was either going to hit the bank short of the green and maybe kick back into the pond or it was going to reach the green and run into the rough on the back side (really nasty wet rough).

    But the Pro V1x, even with its low trajectory, hung in the air a bit longer than I expected and actually landed 2-3 onto the green. And then the real miracle was, even coming in on a very flat angle, it only rolled about 25 feet and stayed on the back of the green. I had a putt of 10 feet for birdie, getting away with a shot that easily could have resulted in a double-bogey.

    Then later in the round I had to pitch the ball about 15 yards over a bunker, to a green running away from me. I gave it my best swing, popped the ball up in the air and then crossed my fingers that it would stop somewhere near the hole instead of either digging in or rolling over the green. It took one hop, settled down for a nice 10-12 foot rollout and stopped a couple feet from the hole. A similar long bunker shot (35 yards maybe?) on another hole also came out about as I planned it but then the roll worked out perfectly to leave me a tap-in par.

    I really do believe that having played the same ball for hundreds of rounds over the years and for a couple dozen rounds here recently, there's a certain "magic" takes place where I can just hit the shot that I need to hit and my touch and feel will often make it work out just perfectly.

    “1lb beefstak, with
    1pt bitter beer
    every 6 hours.
    1 ten-mile walk every morning.
    1 bed at 11 sharp every night.
    And don't stuff your head with things you don't understand.” 
  • gripandripgripandrip Members Posts: 1,051 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Favorite ball? 2016 Pro V1. But balls are so good these days, there are a number of different balls that I can play and be satisfied.

  • jjfcpajjfcpa Driver - Tour Edge EXS 10.5 Omaha, NEMembers Posts: 499 ✭✭✭✭

    @North Butte said:
    I'm quite aware that my mind accumulates out-of-context experiences and assembles its own version of reality from them. We tend to see what we want to see, yada, yada, yada.

    But having stuck to my long-time "utopia" Pro V1x for quite a few rounds lately, I am definitely accumulating lots of highly encouraging reinforcement towards my belief that it's the ideal ball for me. I had an unusually good round (by my poor standards) my last time out. A few shots stand out in memory and I really do suspect that they might not have played out quite the same with whatever random non-ProV1x ball I might happen to play from time to time.

    One shot was a 6-iron off a tight lie with a bit of a downslope, over a pond to reach the green. With an inconsistent swing, low clubhead speed and generally low ballflight that's not the most inviting prospect. The minute the ball hit the club I just "knew" one of two things were going to happen. I caught it a bit thin and it came out low and hot. It was either going to hit the bank short of the green and maybe kick back into the pond or it was going to reach the green and run into the rough on the back side (really nasty wet rough).

    But the Pro V1x, even with its low trajectory, hung in the air a bit longer than I expected and actually landed 2-3 onto the green. And then the real miracle was, even coming in on a very flat angle, it only rolled about 25 feet and stayed on the back of the green. I had a putt of 10 feet for birdie, getting away with a shot that easily could have resulted in a double-bogey.

    Then later in the round I had to pitch the ball about 15 yards over a bunker, to a green running away from me. I gave it my best swing, popped the ball up in the air and then crossed my fingers that it would stop somewhere near the hole instead of either digging in or rolling over the green. It took one hop, settled down for a nice 10-12 foot rollout and stopped a couple feet from the hole. A similar long bunker shot (35 yards maybe?) on another hole also came out about as I planned it but then the roll worked out perfectly to leave me a tap-in par.

    I really do believe that having played the same ball for hundreds of rounds over the years and for a couple dozen rounds here recently, there's a certain "magic" takes place where I can just hit the shot that I need to hit and my touch and feel will often make it work out just perfectly.

    You are 100% correct when it comes to playing the same ball for a long period of time. You can automatically eliminate the ball as the culprit when you make a bad shot. I played the last couple rounds with the Bridgestone Tour B X because I thought it might be better than the Snell MTB-X, which I've been playing for the last 3-4 months. This is my fault because I'm always looking for a way to improve my game. After a couple 9 holes with the B X, I'm going back to the MTB-X. It ticks more of the boxes for me and I can predict exactly what it's going to do in many different circumstances. I am particularly found of how it behaves from 100 yards and in. Since I'm a senior golfer and not very long, I depend on my short game skills to keep me in the game. The MTB-X is the best ball 100 yards and in and it's not too shabby off the tee either.

  • Mikey5eMikey5e Members Posts: 969 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 12, 2019 5:12pm #148

    @gripandrip said:
    Favorite ball? 2016 Pro V1. But balls are so good these days, there are a number of different balls that I can play and be satisfied.

    I think the above comment is very good. I think all golfers could play a variety of drivers, irons, wedges, putters, and balls and not lose a stroke. Technology is so good and equivalent, between manufacturers, that it makes it very easy to do so.

  • monks66monks66 Members Posts: 702 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I also agree with playing one ball if possible, its hard for me, cuz I love trying new balls, but changing balls out never gives you a chance to get the feel of a ball and its behavior on the course. Playing different balls that may be softer or harder then one another is not good for consistency. I am so a feel player when it comes to my golf game..with that said, I grabbed some BRX's cheaper, i so hope i can stick with this ball :)

  • gwelfgulfergwelfgulfer OnteribleMembers Posts: 258 ✭✭✭✭

    TM balls have been a mainstay in my bag since the LD/LDP Red & Blacks. My most loved ball is/was the Nike One Tour D, but due to lack of them being around and not a fan of NIke balls since they went RZN, TM Tour balls have been my go to. Doesn't hurt I get them as 1 hit wonders for $1 a ball.

    Custom Hoofer Lite Bag:
    Driver - Taylormade R510 TP 9.5* w/ Di6X (black)
    Woods - Taylormade V-Steel 3/5 w/ 80X Kai'Li
    Hybrid - Adams Pro VST 20* w/ DG TI X100
    Irons - Taylormade 300 Forged 4-PW w/ Rifle 6.0
    Wedges - Cleveland 588 RTG 53/58 w/ DG TI S400
    Putter - Yes! Abbie Forged 33"

  • jjfcpajjfcpa Driver - Tour Edge EXS 10.5 Omaha, NEMembers Posts: 499 ✭✭✭✭

    @monks66 said:
    I also agree with playing one ball if possible, its hard for me, cuz I love trying new balls, but changing balls out never gives you a chance to get the feel of a ball and its behavior on the course. Playing different balls that may be softer or harder then one another is not good for consistency. I am so a feel player when it comes to my golf game..with that said, I grabbed some BRX's cheaper, i so hope i can stick with this ball :)

    I like to try different balls because I'm always looking for one better than the one I'm using. I bet I've tried 10-15 different balls during the last year. I'll use one for a couple rounds only to realize that it's not as good as the one I'm using. I should have learned my lesson, but I'm a sucker for a new ball.

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