How good in order to homeschool?

CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 472 ✭✭✭✭

Have heard of yet another family taking their kid out of school to home-school and focus on sports. Kid is not top-ranked (not even one of the best in the state).

Question: how good would a kid need to be for home-schooling (specifically in order to free up time/schedule to practice a sport) to make sense?

Comments

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,230 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Doesn't help that FCG promoted Laurel Springs on the back of the bag tags they gave the kids this year.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • SkiSchoolProSkiSchoolPro Members Posts: 729 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It depends...imo, depending on the specific situation, there can be valid, non-sports reasons to homeschool. So it could be the right move even if the kid can't break 100. (I know you asked specifically about homeschooling to free up practice time, but hopefully the parents and kid looked at all the pros and cons).

  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 472 ✭✭✭✭

    I have no problem with home-schooling if that's what parents think is best for the development of their kids overall. That is a separate discussion topic.

    But doing so specifically to focus on sports when the child probably doesn't have a strong chance of even playing at a high college level (which is what is happening in this instance) seems a bit off to me.

  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Posts: 9,077 ClubWRX

    Better be one of the top players in their class or there must be another reason for the home schooling?

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    There are lots of reasons to do home schooling. The sports or golf part is most likely only part of the equation. With technology it doesn’t make sense to attend a physical classroom as much.

    For us we did not like the local middle school and were not impressed with charter schools either. Local private school was also expensive and far away. Doing online classes was the best option for us. Also is it not really home schooling either more like working from home. As parents we have nothing to do with subject matter and they do the same coursework at a public school. If your kid is self motivated it a very good option.

    Doing school like this also frees up a lot time for golf. Home school on the other hand is not really good because in a lot cases the parents have to make up everything and grade the kids scores and this is where things go wrong.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,230 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Reminds me of School of the Air from Australia. Kids were so far apart in the outback that it was impossible to go to a 'local' school so they participated over two way radio. Students did everything a normal classroom would do except they were thousands of miles apart.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Posts: 9,077 ClubWRX

    @tiger1873 said:

    There are lots of reasons to do home schooling. The sports or golf part is most likely only part of the equation. With technology it doesn’t make sense to attend a physical classroom as much.

    For us we did not like the local middle school and were not impressed with charter schools either. Local private school was also expensive and far away. Doing online classes was the best option for us. Also is it not really home schooling either more like working from home. As parents we have nothing to do with subject matter and they do the same coursework at a public school. If your kid is self motivated it a very good option.

    Doing school like this also frees up a lot time for golf. Home school on the other hand is not really good because in a lot cases the parents have to make up everything and grade the kids scores and this is where things go wrong.

    Dont forget the lacking of social skills that can be a direct result of home schooling. I believe this to be the most serious repercussion of home schooling.
    I was just discussing this with a co-worker at lunch. He has friends who home schooled their kids due to bullying and guess what? He kid finished high school at home and has zero friends. He's in his late 20's now and still at home with no clue how to get on his own two feet. I'm not saying this is the absolute norm as I also know of a few golf phenoms who went the home schooling route and will likely make it to the big show one day.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Jul 25, 2019 10:45pm #10

    @kekoa said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    There are lots of reasons to do home schooling. The sports or golf part is most likely only part of the equation. With technology it doesn’t make sense to attend a physical classroom as much.

    For us we did not like the local middle school and were not impressed with charter schools either. Local private school was also expensive and far away. Doing online classes was the best option for us. Also is it not really home schooling either more like working from home. As parents we have nothing to do with subject matter and they do the same coursework at a public school. If your kid is self motivated it a very good option.

    Doing school like this also frees up a lot time for golf. Home school on the other hand is not really good because in a lot cases the parents have to make up everything and grade the kids scores and this is where things go wrong.

    Dont forget the lacking of social skills that can be a direct result of home schooling. I believe this to be the most serious repercussion of home schooling.
    I was just discussing this with a co-worker at lunch. He has friends who home schooled their kids due to bullying and guess what? He kid finished high school at home and has zero friends. He's in his late 20's now and still at home with no clue how to get on his own two feet. I'm not saying this is the absolute norm as I also know of a few golf phenoms who went the home schooling route and will likely make it to the big show one day.

    If the kid was bullied he had no social skills to begin with. They never addressed the issue. If your local high school has gang members then what benefit is it to send your kid to socialize with them. The parents are to blame as much as anyone if a kid doesn’t mix with other kids. There are plenty of way to interact with other kids their own age. Everything from golf to volunteering activities. The difference is a kid at home has to work at meeting other kids and learn to make friends. If a kid isn’t self motivated leave them in school.

    Lots of kids go to a school and couldn’t carry on a normal conversation too.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,230 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @kekoa said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    There are lots of reasons to do home schooling. The sports or golf part is most likely only part of the equation. With technology it doesn’t make sense to attend a physical classroom as much.

    For us we did not like the local middle school and were not impressed with charter schools either. Local private school was also expensive and far away. Doing online classes was the best option for us. Also is it not really home schooling either more like working from home. As parents we have nothing to do with subject matter and they do the same coursework at a public school. If your kid is self motivated it a very good option.

    Doing school like this also frees up a lot time for golf. Home school on the other hand is not really good because in a lot cases the parents have to make up everything and grade the kids scores and this is where things go wrong.

    Dont forget the lacking of social skills that can be a direct result of home schooling. I believe this to be the most serious repercussion of home schooling.
    I was just discussing this with a co-worker at lunch. He has friends who home schooled their kids due to bullying and guess what? He kid finished high school at home and has zero friends. He's in his late 20's now and still at home with no clue how to get on his own two feet. I'm not saying this is the absolute norm as I also know of a few golf phenoms who went the home schooling route and will likely make it to the big show one day.

    Are these kids that went the home school route under 12?

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @leezer99 said:

    @kekoa said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    There are lots of reasons to do home schooling. The sports or golf part is most likely only part of the equation. With technology it doesn’t make sense to attend a physical classroom as much.

    For us we did not like the local middle school and were not impressed with charter schools either. Local private school was also expensive and far away. Doing online classes was the best option for us. Also is it not really home schooling either more like working from home. As parents we have nothing to do with subject matter and they do the same coursework at a public school. If your kid is self motivated it a very good option.

    Doing school like this also frees up a lot time for golf. Home school on the other hand is not really good because in a lot cases the parents have to make up everything and grade the kids scores and this is where things go wrong.

    Dont forget the lacking of social skills that can be a direct result of home schooling. I believe this to be the most serious repercussion of home schooling.
    I was just discussing this with a co-worker at lunch. He has friends who home schooled their kids due to bullying and guess what? He kid finished high school at home and has zero friends. He's in his late 20's now and still at home with no clue how to get on his own two feet. I'm not saying this is the absolute norm as I also know of a few golf phenoms who went the home schooling route and will likely make it to the big show one day.

    Are these kids that went the home school route under 12?

    I am talking about older kids it is hard to imagine elementary kids not going to a local school at younger ages. I can some exceptions but in general it doesn’t make sense.

  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Posts: 9,077 ClubWRX

    @leezer99 said:

    @kekoa said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    There are lots of reasons to do home schooling. The sports or golf part is most likely only part of the equation. With technology it doesn’t make sense to attend a physical classroom as much.

    For us we did not like the local middle school and were not impressed with charter schools either. Local private school was also expensive and far away. Doing online classes was the best option for us. Also is it not really home schooling either more like working from home. As parents we have nothing to do with subject matter and they do the same coursework at a public school. If your kid is self motivated it a very good option.

    Doing school like this also frees up a lot time for golf. Home school on the other hand is not really good because in a lot cases the parents have to make up everything and grade the kids scores and this is where things go wrong.

    Dont forget the lacking of social skills that can be a direct result of home schooling. I believe this to be the most serious repercussion of home schooling.
    I was just discussing this with a co-worker at lunch. He has friends who home schooled their kids due to bullying and guess what? He kid finished high school at home and has zero friends. He's in his late 20's now and still at home with no clue how to get on his own two feet. I'm not saying this is the absolute norm as I also know of a few golf phenoms who went the home schooling route and will likely make it to the big show one day.

    Are these kids that went the home school route under 12?

    Yes. Started home school in the 4th grade.

  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Posts: 9,077 ClubWRX

    @tiger1873 said:

    @kekoa said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    There are lots of reasons to do home schooling. The sports or golf part is most likely only part of the equation. With technology it doesn’t make sense to attend a physical classroom as much.

    For us we did not like the local middle school and were not impressed with charter schools either. Local private school was also expensive and far away. Doing online classes was the best option for us. Also is it not really home schooling either more like working from home. As parents we have nothing to do with subject matter and they do the same coursework at a public school. If your kid is self motivated it a very good option.

    Doing school like this also frees up a lot time for golf. Home school on the other hand is not really good because in a lot cases the parents have to make up everything and grade the kids scores and this is where things go wrong.

    Dont forget the lacking of social skills that can be a direct result of home schooling. I believe this to be the most serious repercussion of home schooling.
    I was just discussing this with a co-worker at lunch. He has friends who home schooled their kids due to bullying and guess what? He kid finished high school at home and has zero friends. He's in his late 20's now and still at home with no clue how to get on his own two feet. I'm not saying this is the absolute norm as I also know of a few golf phenoms who went the home schooling route and will likely make it to the big show one day.

    If the kid was bullied he had no social skills to begin with. They never addressed the issue. If your local high school has gang members then what benefit is it to send your kid to socialize with them. The parents are to blame as much as anyone if a kid doesn’t mix with other kids. There are plenty of way to interact with other kids their own age. Everything from golf to volunteering activities. The difference is a kid at home has to work at meeting other kids and learn to make friends. If a kid isn’t self motivated leave them in school.

    Lots of kids go to a school and couldn’t carry on a normal conversation too.

    Look, i disagree with most of what you said, but lets stay on topic. Im just saying the kid better already be **** good if home schooling is an option to concentrate on golf. My opinion of course.

  • BertGABertGA Members Posts: 316 ✭✭✭✭

    @tiger1873 said:
    If the kid was bullied he had no social skills to begin with.

    I sincerely hope you don’t believe this.

    Or apply this flawed logic to victims of other difficult situations.

  • farmerfarmer Members Posts: 8,079 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I agree with Ness. There's lots of reasons to home school, but just for sports is not a good reason.

  • wkuo3wkuo3 RELEASE Members Posts: 4,196 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Nessism said:
    I would not home school my kid just so he could play sports, I don't care how good he was.

    That's my thought.
    Kids learn from their peer, figuring out how to be with others just like they would be later on in life when they get out into the society. The parents need to think carefully before they put their kids into home school program or small private schools.
    I would consider home schooling if my kid is one of the best in his/her peer regionally. Of course I'd explain to them of the potential injury and the impact of the injury to their life before I put them enroute to become a professional athlete.
    Kids don't have the life experience to make decision for themselves, the parents / guardian should look after the kids benefit. Not their won.

  • yellowlover519yellowlover519 Members Posts: 334 ✭✭✭✭

    Biggest cons to homeschooling IMO for golf: no comprehension of teamwork (working with others) and lack of accountability for learning what needs to be learned as a basis for future academic success may be hindered. Having said that, if a kid is homeschooled and finishes their learning from 7-noon and then practices golf everyday from noon to dinner, I can see how that kid could get really good at the game. Even if that kid is not top of his class, golf is a sport where the right practice (assuming you have good fundamentals) can yield results (i.e., hours in correlates to lower scores).

  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,932 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Here it’s not even required. A bunch of the kids I teach get out of school at 12 everyday by taking one classes online.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,230 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @kekoa said:

    @leezer99 said:

    Are these kids that went the home school route under 12?

    Yes. Started home school in the 4th grade.

    I only know one dad locally that is crazy enough to do this.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,254 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @BertGA said:

    @tiger1873 said:
    If the kid was bullied he had no social skills to begin with.

    I sincerely hope you don’t believe this.

    Or apply this flawed logic to victims of other difficult situations.

    I actually understand where Tiger is coming from. I don't think he is meaning every situation is that way, but definitely see where a kid without the proper social skills is easier to be bullied. Kids with poor social skills are very easy targets.

    I have a kid with not the best social skills. He is getting better because we are trying to get him out of his comfort zones and push him into uncomfortable situations. We were strongly considering holding him back this year in school. First thought was to home school him. He wanted to stay back only if he could have been home schooled. He did not want to go to a private school at all. Home schooling would have enabled him to not meet new people and to not have any social interaction. Home schooling was not an option.

    To answer CT's question, I think home schooling at earlier ages would be a detriment to a kids development if the end goal was home schooling to play a sport. Kids need parents to be parents, not coaches , not managers, not teachers. Kids need to have a life beyond sports every day or they will start to hate it. Home Schooling will make the sport a job and more than likely the sport they played for fun won't be fun anymore. In high school I might be able to see homeschooling as a reason into the Junior and Senior years, but I wouldn't do it in that situation. A kid is going to be good because they are good, not because they are home schooled to play golf.

    I have backed away a lot from golf as my kid is going into high school. They need to become their own man or lady. I CAN'T go to the golf course with my kid anymore because it isn't healthy for him or myself. Too much micro management on my part. That doesn't mean I don't push him from home because I do. I am just not at the course with him when he practices. When I do something with him I am doing it to be dad and I can't be dad if I am at the course with him. Golf needs to be me supporting him and then between he and his coach. When I come home, rather than going to the course, we do multiple other activities building father son relationship beyond golf. We enjoy driving the cart out to the course and fishing for bass. Sometimes when we are bored fishing we will throw the football around. Sometimes (not too often) we will have a putting contest on our way home from fishing. Other times we will sit in the front yard and play basketball. He finally beat me in HORSE the other night.

  • NolesNoles Members Posts: 1,457 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Does being home schooled effect a kid's chance at getting into college? It seems like a huge leap to go from attending school at home every day to living away at school and navigating your way through life on campus. It's tough enough for kids from traditional school. I would imagine a coach would have to factor that in the recruiting process.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,254 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 2, 2019 3:28pm #23

    @Noles said:
    Does being home schooled effect a kid's chance at getting into college? It seems like a huge leap to go from attending school at home every day to living away at school and navigating your way through life on campus. It's tough enough for kids from traditional school. I would imagine a coach would have to factor that in the recruiting process.

    When going through the recruiting process with my daughter I was told that they don't care. I asked a lot of general questions just to get an understanding of what they thought. I am sure some care, but at the end of the day it is about being able to put up a number.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 2, 2019 3:34pm #24

    @Noles said:
    Does being home schooled effect a kid's chance at getting into college? It seems like a huge leap to go from attending school at home every day to living away at school and navigating your way through life on campus. It's tough enough for kids from traditional school. I would imagine a coach would have to factor that in the recruiting process.

    Just like regular school it entirely depends on what is being taught. If you do a online course with NCAA accreditation and take the correct courses it not an issue. If you teach at home and make up what you learned I would think a very big issue.

    The same thing with regular school. For instance Live in a very small town they may not even offer classes you need. Had a friend go a school district with less then 200 kids total from k-12 and it was a pretty big issue.

    This why you look at college what they need and chart a path academically at middle school for all kids and plan ahead.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,254 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @tiger1873 said:

    @Noles said:
    Does being home schooled effect a kid's chance at getting into college? It seems like a huge leap to go from attending school at home every day to living away at school and navigating your way through life on campus. It's tough enough for kids from traditional school. I would imagine a coach would have to factor that in the recruiting process.

    Just like regular school it entirely depends on what is being taught. If you do a online course with NCAA accreditation and take the correct courses it not an issue. If you teach at home and make up what you learned I would think a very big issue.

    The same thing with regular school. For instance Live in a very small town they may not even offer classes you need. Had a friend go a school district with less then 200 kids total from k-12 and it was a pretty big issue.

    This why you look at college what they need and chart a path academically at middle school for all kids and plan ahead.

    Ehhh...It isn't that part of it. I understand what Noles is saying. A kid home schooled has limited social interaction. You throw them into a top D1 school with 50,000 kids and it could be a nightmare.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 2, 2019 5:59pm #26

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    @Noles said:
    Does being home schooled effect a kid's chance at getting into college? It seems like a huge leap to go from attending school at home every day to living away at school and navigating your way through life on campus. It's tough enough for kids from traditional school. I would imagine a coach would have to factor that in the recruiting process.

    Just like regular school it entirely depends on what is being taught. If you do a online course with NCAA accreditation and take the correct courses it not an issue. If you teach at home and make up what you learned I would think a very big issue.

    The same thing with regular school. For instance Live in a very small town they may not even offer classes you need. Had a friend go a school district with less then 200 kids total from k-12 and it was a pretty big issue.

    This why you look at college what they need and chart a path academically at middle school for all kids and plan ahead.

    Ehhh...It isn't that part of it. I understand what Noles is saying. A kid home schooled has limited social interaction. You throw them into a top D1 school with 50,000 kids and it could be a nightmare.

    Not all kids doing home school do not interact with kids. That is too broad of statement. A good chunk of home school kids are high achievers too and actually might be better equipped.

    For instance a lot home schooled kids volunteer a lot to various organizations and do not need to coddled. Far more kids who go to public school need help being motivated.

    So if a talented kid is going to do fine in a D1 school

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,254 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @tiger1873 said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    @Noles said:
    Does being home schooled effect a kid's chance at getting into college? It seems like a huge leap to go from attending school at home every day to living away at school and navigating your way through life on campus. It's tough enough for kids from traditional school. I would imagine a coach would have to factor that in the recruiting process.

    Just like regular school it entirely depends on what is being taught. If you do a online course with NCAA accreditation and take the correct courses it not an issue. If you teach at home and make up what you learned I would think a very big issue.

    The same thing with regular school. For instance Live in a very small town they may not even offer classes you need. Had a friend go a school district with less then 200 kids total from k-12 and it was a pretty big issue.

    This why you look at college what they need and chart a path academically at middle school for all kids and plan ahead.

    Ehhh...It isn't that part of it. I understand what Noles is saying. A kid home schooled has limited social interaction. You throw them into a top D1 school with 50,000 kids and it could be a nightmare.

    Not all kids doing home school do not interact with kids. That is too broad of statement. A good chunk of home school kids are high achievers too and actually might be better equipped.

    For instance a lot home schooled kids volunteer a lot to various organizations and do not need to coddled. Far more kids who go to public school need help being motivated.

    So if a talented kid is going to do fine in a D1 school

    I said "Limited Social Interaction." Home schooled kids aren't used to dealing with 2,000 other kids at school. When they get to the real world of college their can be some culture shock.

  • munny11munny11 Members Posts: 11 ✭✭

    @kekoa said:
    Better be one of the top players in their class or there must be another reason for the home schooling?

    Well now he can be the top player in his home school class.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,230 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    My son had expressed interest in home schooling until the first day of school this year when he saw that his crush had come back and now he's okay with staying in school. There was a chance she was going to go the home school route for her to get more time in her sport even though she already leaves school at noon every day except Thursday.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • BertGABertGA Members Posts: 316 ✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 22, 2019 12:18pm #30

    @leezer99 said:
    My son had expressed interest in home schooling until the first day of school this year when he saw that his crush had come back and now he's okay with staying in school. There was a chance she was going to go the home school route for her to get more time in her sport even though she already leaves school at noon every day except Thursday.

    That little story just made my morning. I feel like I’ve seen this daytime movie advertised on the Hallmark channel. Two junior sport stars grow up together, he teaches her golf, she teaches him soccer, both become professional athletes, and finally make the relationship work at the height of their stardom because relationships are so much more important than careers.

  • farmerfarmer Members Posts: 8,079 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    HH aced this thread. Spot on.

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