Partial Scholarships and other issues that college players face

tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,152 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
edited Aug 5, 2019 12:25pm in Juniors/College Golf Talk #1

We all know there are full scholarships out there and all the great stories of college golf. How about the downsides. When it comes to college players there are few things no one ever talks about.

The new trend (or Maybe I am just more aware of it) I am noticing is schools are splitting up the money.

I believe there are 6 full time scholarships given out for women and 4.5 for men. The problem is a lot teams are moving to at least a 9-12 person roster. This means that getting a 100% full ride is not going to be easy and the money your offered will not be that much.

Also with a 12 person roster the chance to play is greatly diminished and resources will be spread around.

Also some coaches tell there kids or push what majors they need to do. This is not a great prospect to me and would actually be a reason to turn down even a full ride.

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Comments

  • BloctonGolf11BloctonGolf11 Members Posts: 294 ✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 5, 2019 12:20pm #2

    The splitting up of scholarships is not a new trend. It has been very common for many years and the only sports you are likely to see a full scholarship at, at the D-1 level, are football and basketball. At the D-2 level they literally operate under the idea of only giving out partial athletic scholarships.

    Just a father and son on a journey together through golf....
  • LlortamaiseyLlortamaisey Members Posts: 6,016 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 5, 2019 12:22pm #3

    When I played in college 20 years ago, they were splitting up the money then. I got a partial ride on a 9 to 10 man roster. Meanwhile the girls teams had scholarship(s) that went unused. Thanks Title IX!

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,208 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Copy Paste - NCAA Golfing Scholarships
    The NCAA provides golf scholarship administration guidance for men’s and women’s programs. The NCAA sponsors 289 Division I and 210 Division II Men’s golf programs. To regulate access to higher education funding, the NCAA places scholarship limits on athletic programs. Each D1 men’s golf program is permitted 4.5 scholarships and each D2 men’s program is permitted 3.6 scholarships. That’s just over 2056 annual men’s golf scholarships.

    Women’s golfing scholarships are governed in a similar way. The NCAA sponsors 235 D1 and 128 D2 Women’s golf programs. D1 women’s golf teams are limited to 6 scholarships and D2 teams to 5.4. Just over 2101 women’s golf scholarships are permitted annually for NCAA teams.

    Golf is an equivalency sport; meaning coaches have flexibility in the way scholarship funds are distributed. For example, Coach “Abe” at University of Z has 4.5 scholarships for his D1 men’s golf team. He is only limited by the dollar amount comprising the 4.5 scholarships – not by the actual number of scholarship recipients. If it benefits his or her particular program to do so, a coach can split the awards; offering partial scholarships to multiple promising golfers

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,152 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Llortamaisey said:
    When I played in college 20 years ago, they were splitting up the money then. I got a partial ride on a 9 to 10 man roster. Meanwhile the girls teams had scholarship(s) that went unused. Thanks Title IX!

    I noticed a few years ago it much easier to get a women golf scholarship most teams were only 6 members some like you said were actually less. Recently though teams I noticed are getting larger.

  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,926 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @tiger1873 said:

    @Llortamaisey said:
    When I played in college 20 years ago, they were splitting up the money then. I got a partial ride on a 9 to 10 man roster. Meanwhile the girls teams had scholarship(s) that went unused. Thanks Title IX!

    I noticed a few years ago it much easier to get a women golf scholarship most teams were only 6 members some like you said were actually less. Recently though teams I noticed are getting larger.

    I’ve been around golf a long time. I’ve never known a time where girls teams only had 6 players and certainly never “less”. 8-10 players is and has been pretty standard for 20+ years. Full rides have always only gone to the best of the best. And it’s still pretty easy IMO to get a scholarship in women’s golf

  • admorkadmork Orlando, FlMembers Posts: 72 ✭✭

    Junior golfers are getting better and coaches recruit internationally, so it is not easy to get a full scholarship. I have played D1 golf about 15 years ago and we were 12 players for 4.5 scholarships, not everybody could be on a full ride, nothing has changed.
    Some coaches like to give full scholarships and others almost never, it depends on their strategies and their schools. Smaller schools need to offer full rides to beat Power 5 roster spots.
    There are more than 2,000 full scholarships for men and women per year in D1 and D2.
    The best advice for a prospect college golfer is to find a place where he would make the traveling team (top 5) to compete in tournaments.

  • Aaronwilson_95Aaronwilson_95 Members Posts: 883 ✭✭✭✭✭

    On top off those numbers , that’s what the ncaa allows your school to fund , now your school may not actually choose to fund that many scholarships for that particular program. Which could easily drop men’s or women’s team to the 1.5-4 range

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,237 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 6, 2019 4:27pm #9

    Tiger, there is nothing new that you are stating. It is well documented in these forums and I have said it several times. The likely hood of anyone getting a full ride is slim to none. Most girl teams are 10 players. Men's teams are 10-12. Duke is one of the few teams that will carry 6 full ride players and then walk-ons if they want them Each coach splits up the amount of money they see fit.

    Head Count Sports are sports where the only option is to give a full ride. Men's head count sports are football and basketball. Women's head count sports are basketball, volleyball, gymnastics and Tennis.

    The other sports are known as equivalency sports and their are limits to how many scholarships there are per team.

    The other part of all this to consider is that although the NCAA sets the limits, if the University doesn't fully fund the sport the school may not have as many scholarships as you think. The other part is that a coach can take away money or give money year to year up to a certain percentage.

    I have said often times that if you are playing sports, especially Equivalency Sports, for a college scholarship then you are doing so for the wrong reason. Boy's top 25 might get full rides. Girl's top 50 might get full rides. Anything outside of those ranges are pure luck receiving a full ride. Often time for boy's they will get a full ride the first year if they are good and have a reduction every year after that so the coach can bring in top notch talent and offer a full ride again for a year. You are better off investing money in tutors for your children if you are looking for scholarship money. Easier to get a full ride being smart than it is being athletic.

    Usually for girl's, everyone outside the top 8 are getting no money. Usually for boy's everyone outside of the top 6 are getting no money. Brooks Koepka went to FSU and only had his books paid for.

  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Posts: 9,052 ClubWRX

    @heavy_hitter
    You say it is easier to get a full ride being smart then athletic, but sometimes this isn't the case either. Everyday I speak to an associate who has a kid entering college they tell me how insanely competitive it is on the scholastic side. I mean there are kids where I live who have 4.4 GPA's and solid SAT's who can't get into state schools let alone get any scholarship money unless they are underprivileged. With that said, I also feel like these same kids have spent so much time on their studies that they forgot to round themselves out by being involved in anything else but scholastics.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,208 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    .> @heavy_hitter said:

    Tiger, there is nothing new that you are stating. It is well documented in these forums and I have said it several times. The likely hood of anyone getting a full ride is slim to none. Most girl teams are 10 players. Men's teams are 10-12. Duke is one of the few teams that will carry 6 full ride players and then walk-ons if they want them Each coach splits up the amount of money they see fit.

    Head Count Sports are sports where the only option is to give a full ride. Men's head count sports are football and basketball. Women's head count sports are basketball, volleyball, gymnastics and Tennis.

    The other sports are known as equivalency sports and their are limits to how many scholarships there are per team.

    The other part of all this to consider is that although the NCAA sets the limits, if the University doesn't fully fund the sport the school may not have as many scholarships as you think. The other part is that a coach can take away money or give money year to year up to a certain percentage.

    I have said often times that if you are playing sports, especially Equivalency Sports, for a college scholarship then you are doing so for the wrong reason. Boy's top 25 might get full rides. Girl's top 50 might get full rides. Anything outside of those ranges are pure luck receiving a full ride. Often time for boy's they will get a full ride the first year if they are good and have a reduction every year after that so the coach can bring in top notch talent and offer a full ride again for a year. You are better off investing money in tutors for your children if you are looking for scholarship money. Easier to get a full ride being smart than it is being athletic.

    Usually for girl's, everyone outside the top 8 are getting no money. Usually for boy's everyone outside of the top 6 are getting no money. Brooks Koepka went to FSU and only had his books paid for.

    Adding two things to what HH said, you want to find your 'best fit' school as if you weren't getting any money but also has all of the classes, culture, etc. that you want in a school. Secondly, you want to find a school that you can make the playing team on. Nothing worse than being on a team and watching your friends travel to play competitions while you're home studying for an econ test.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • TripleBogeysrbetterTripleBogeysrbetter Members Posts: 128 ✭✭✭

    @kekoa said:
    @heavy_hitter
    You say it is easier to get a full ride being smart then athletic, but sometimes this isn't the case either. Everyday I speak to an associate who has a kid entering college they tell me how insanely competitive it is on the scholastic side. I mean there are kids where I live who have 4.4 GPA's and solid SAT's who can't get into state schools let alone get any scholarship money unless they are underprivileged. With that said, I also feel like these same kids have spent so much time on their studies that they forgot to round themselves out by being involved in anything else but scholastics.

    PREACH!!! My oldest wanted nothing to do with athletic scholarships. 4.25 GPA and missed the National Merit by 1% his year. He has received (every thing helps) 1k from the college for 4 years. He won a scholarship from a 3rd party. Academic scholarships are extremely competitive.

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  • double_ddouble_d Members Posts: 338 ✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 6, 2019 5:48pm #13

    I think I know a little about this topic.

    My daughter is entering her senior year in one of the top public high schools in the state.

    Her GPA is 4.4 she was offered NO academic Scholarship
    She recently committed, at the end of her junior year, to swimming at Lehigh University (Division 1) on a 75% Athletic scholarship.

    Lehigh is fully-funded for swimming and NCAA rules allow swimming, as an equivalency sport, 14 full scholarships for women or any fraction adding up to 14 full scholarships.

    After her junior year her best time in her best stroke is .01 (one-hundredth) off of the Lehigh team record.
    This summer she has improved on that time and is very versatile as a sprinter in general. So assuming everything goes as planned she will break the team record her freshman year.

    We are pretty confident she will maintain the 75% scholarship, assuming she keeps her grades up and continues to swim at the same level.

    A lot of what has been said in this thread is true. There are head count sports and equivalency sports as already stated. head count is all or nothing, equivalency is variable.

    Both have limits to the number of scholarships that can be offered under NCAA rules. If a school chooses to max out the number the NCAA allows for a sport, that sport is said to be "fully-funded".

    The best way to ensure your equivalency sport scholarship will remain throughout your eligibility is to be one of the best players on the team. I know, nothing groundbreaking there but, that's how it works.

    and finally, let me tell you, the rules have changed over the last 30 years.....

    Post edited by double_d on
  • double_ddouble_d Members Posts: 338 ✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 6, 2019 5:05pm #14

    You say it is easier to get a full ride being smart then athletic, but sometimes this isn't the case either. Everyday I speak to an associate who has a kid entering college they tell me how insanely competitive it is on the scholastic side. I mean there are kids where I live who have 4.4 GPA's and solid SAT's who can't get into state schools let alone get any scholarship money unless they are underprivileged. With that said, I also feel like these same kids have spent so much time on their studies that they forgot to round themselves out by being involved in anything else but scholastics.

    I agree with 100% of this. I agree so much I could have written it.

  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 468 ✭✭✭✭

    Academic scholarships and golf scholarships for females are both WIDELY AVAILABLE

    The problem is the ones that are easiest to receive are from schools that no one wants to go to

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,237 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    If you have a 4.4 and the correct SAT test score then you didn't do something right. With the correct AP and dual enrollment classes there are ships out there. State of Florida if you have those grades and the proper course you will receive 100% tuition into a state school. Other states in the south have similar programs. My daughter is on scholarship at an out of state school. We would have paid less in Florida because of the Bright Futures program had she walked on to a team.

    Each school also has Academic Scholarships to check into for say "School of Business" or the "School of Law". If you don't do your homework, you won't know about them.

    Schools just won't "Offer" you an academic scholarship. You have to research and apply for them.

  • LlortamaiseyLlortamaisey Members Posts: 6,016 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @iteachgolf said:

    @tiger1873 said:

    @Llortamaisey said:
    When I played in college 20 years ago, they were splitting up the money then. I got a partial ride on a 9 to 10 man roster. Meanwhile the girls teams had scholarship(s) that went unused. Thanks Title IX!

    I noticed a few years ago it much easier to get a women golf scholarship most teams were only 6 members some like you said were actually less. Recently though teams I noticed are getting larger.

    I’ve been around golf a long time. I’ve never known a time where girls teams only had 6 players and certainly never “less”. 8-10 players is and has been pretty standard for 20+ years. Full rides have always only gone to the best of the best. And it’s still pretty easy IMO to get a scholarship in women’s golf

    My original post was a little confusing without some background. I wasn’t trying to insinuate that our girls team had less than 6 players. That would be silly! Our girls team had 8 players but one year 3 or 4 of the freshman had academic scholarships that they used in lieu of an athletic scholarship. Typically any scholarship counts towards athletic scholarships and the athlete is deemed as a ‘counter’, unless the athlete meets a certain set of academic requirements which qualifies them as an exemption. For whatever reason, the athletic department wanted them to use the academic funding instead of the athletic funding. I’m sure there was a good reason but I can’t remember all the details. Regardless, there were scholarships that went unused as far as I know, and we couldn’t use them because of Title IX.

  • double_ddouble_d Members Posts: 338 ✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 6, 2019 7:32pm #18

    Schools just won't "Offer" you an academic scholarship. You have to research and apply for them.
    We didn't really look for academic or expect it at any of the schools she was interested in so, I guess I shouldn't have said she wasn't "offered".

    State of Florida if you have those grades and the proper course you will receive 100% tuition into a state school.
    Maybe, but we are in the North and that just isn't true and she didn't want a state school.
    The in-state tuition for Florida State is not a huge ask for a full scholarship either way I guess:
    This is what I got from googling it just now, albeit a few years old

    **In-state 6,507 USD, Out-of-state 21,673 USD
    2016–17 **

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,237 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @double_d said:
    Schools just won't "Offer" you an academic scholarship. You have to research and apply for them.
    We didn't really look for academic or expect it at any of the schools she was interested in so, I guess I shouldn't have said she wasn't "offered".

    State of Florida if you have those grades and the proper course you will receive 100% tuition into a state school.
    Maybe, but we are in the North and that just isn't true and she didn't want a state school.
    The in-state tuition for Florida State is not a huge ask for a full scholarship either way I guess:
    This is what I got from googling it just now, albeit a few years old

    **In-state 6,507 USD, Out-of-state 21,673 USD
    2016–17 **

    I just did a quick Google search. One of the top results was "Pennsylvania is the worst state to pay your way through college."

  • BloctonGolf11BloctonGolf11 Members Posts: 294 ✭✭✭✭

    GPA is frosting now, what most universities are interested in is either SAT and/or ACT. As a High School teacher and coach who deals with this a lot, Heavy is correct. If you have over a 4.0 GPA, the right extra curricular activities, and most importantly a COMPETITIVE ACT/SAT score you can go to college with large scholarships. They may not be at some elite private school where things are hyper competitive and far more based on anecdotal facts that separate a myriad of applications with 4.0+ GPAs and super high SAT/ACT scores but you can find a place to matriculate for a perfectly fine education at a major cost savings. Auburn (fine institution) for instance will give free tuition to anyone with a 33+ ACT.

    Just a father and son on a journey together through golf....
  • double_ddouble_d Members Posts: 338 ✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 6, 2019 8:05pm #21

    I just did a quick Google search. One of the top results was "Pennsylvania is the worst state to pay your way through college."

    Yes it is. State schools even have high in-state tuition for a state school.

    Penn State
    In-state 17,900 USD, Out-of-state 32,382 USD
    Pitt
    In-state 18,618 USD, Out-of-state 29,758 USD

    Those are about as high as it gets for in-state and a state school. Our state schools are over-priced.

    Lehigh is private so you expect it to be higher and since it's private in or out of state doesn't matter
    48,320 USD

  • BloctonGolf11BloctonGolf11 Members Posts: 294 ✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 6, 2019 8:15pm #22

    @kekoa said:
    @heavy_hitter
    You say it is easier to get a full ride being smart then athletic, but sometimes this isn't the case either. Everyday I speak to an associate who has a kid entering college they tell me how insanely competitive it is on the scholastic side. I mean there are kids where I live who have 4.4 GPA's and solid SAT's who can't get into state schools let alone get any scholarship money unless they are underprivileged. With that said, I also feel like these same kids have spent so much time on their studies that they forgot to round themselves out by being involved in anything else but scholastics.

    I would love to know what state schools you are not getting into with a 4.4 GPA and "solid" (which is a very vague word) SAT scores. You may be talking about some elites like UCLA or Berkley but those are beyond the norm of a typical "state school".

    Just a father and son on a journey together through golf....
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,152 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 7, 2019 2:22am #23

    What no one is mentioning is the fact that some schools also will Dictate what classes you can take and that devalues your degree. In some cases your better off just paying for it on your own.

    Post edited by tiger1873 on
  • twidenertwidener TWidener Members Posts: 122 ✭✭✭

    Partial scholarships were around in 1969. I received one at a D1 school. The athletic director offered books, tuition and fees if I could beat everyone on the team in a tournament at the end of my first semester in the fall of '69. I beat all but the top player and I tied him but the AD gave me the partial anyway. As far as women's golf I had a daughter in high school that shot in the 70's and low 80's in 2000 and 2001and she received no offers from any school. In Texas back then you had to shoot around even par or under to get a women's golf coach interested. I don't know how difficult it is nowadays for the girls who want to play in college. Partial scholarships are fine. Any money you can get whether academic, athletic or a combination of the two helps out.

  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Posts: 9,052 ClubWRX
    edited Aug 7, 2019 5:12am #25

    @BloctonGolf11 said:

    @kekoa said:
    @heavy_hitter
    You say it is easier to get a full ride being smart then athletic, but sometimes this isn't the case either. Everyday I speak to an associate who has a kid entering college they tell me how insanely competitive it is on the scholastic side. I mean there are kids where I live who have 4.4 GPA's and solid SAT's who can't get into state schools let alone get any scholarship money unless they are underprivileged. With that said, I also feel like these same kids have spent so much time on their studies that they forgot to round themselves out by being involved in anything else but scholastics.

    I would love to know what state schools you are not getting into with a 4.4 GPA and "solid" (which is a very vague word) SAT scores. You may be talking about some elites like UCLA or Berkley but those are beyond the norm of a typical "state school".

    Ucla, usc, berkely, purdue, penn state. From what I was told the kids sat’s were in the high 1,300’s

  • MadGolfer76MadGolfer76 Admiration is the state furthest from understanding. Members Posts: 20,083 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Not sure which states are allowing schools to inflate their GPA's beyond 4.0, but when I worked in admissions for two large universities, it was interpreted as "padding," and perceived as secondary schools trying to game the 4.0 scale with unscrupulous course weighting. We took those less seriously than a 3.8 or 3.9 with strong course history. Lots of private high schools and academies were weighting courses (like Band or Art) on par with Calculus or Physics, and when that happens you get all kinds of weird reporting **** on the transcript which causes admissions reps to scrutinize the application all the more. SAT's were still in vogue then too, but more and more schools are moving away from them as they stink as indicators of success.

    The other thing to remember, is just because you don't get a full golf scholarship, it doesn't mean that you can't get grants, and other campus based scholarships (Trustee, President's, Alumni, etc.) to cover the remainder, not to mention what your graduating high schools potentially have to give. You need to follow through and apply and wait to see the full aid package before panicking.

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  • MadGolfer76MadGolfer76 Admiration is the state furthest from understanding. Members Posts: 20,083 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 7, 2019 7:30am #27

    @kekoa said:
    @heavy_hitter
    You say it is easier to get a full ride being smart then athletic, but sometimes this isn't the case either. Everyday I speak to an associate who has a kid entering college they tell me how insanely competitive it is on the scholastic side. I mean there are kids where I live who have 4.4 GPA's and solid SAT's who can't get into state schools let alone get any scholarship money unless they are underprivileged. With that said, I also feel like these same kids have spent so much time on their studies that they forgot to round themselves out by being involved in anything else but scholastics.

    Even state schools want to bring in $$. Nothing throws a college or university into a tizzy faster than their attrition (dropout) rates going up. There is crying, fighting, "restructuring," RIF'ing, you name it.

    Most colleges and universities are all reading the same data that points to isolation and lack of social life as reasons admitted freshman drop out. Can't tell you how many college committee meetings I have been in where they were discussing tuition revenue and attrition in the same sentence. What they all figured out is that admitting students who have a better chance of integrating into the campus community (by joining clubs, committees, Greek life, club or intramural sports, etc.) earns them more tuition, fee, and room and board $$ over multiple years, versus the "nerd" with no social life who looks good on paper, but drops out after the first or second semester because mommy and daddy never taught him how to integrate into new social situations. This is why any good high school guidance counselor is going to recommend to the college-minded graduate-to-be to diversify their experiences in high school. Grades and performance count to be sure, but a diverse list of interests, and the ability to articulate those clearly in the admissions letter (meaning " here is what I can add to your particular college campus community through my interests"), is a strong advantage that is often overlooked.

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  • double_ddouble_d Members Posts: 338 ✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 7, 2019 9:42am #28

    Auburn (fine institution) for instance will give free tuition to anyone with a 33+ ACT.

    A 33+ on the ACT puts you at or above the 98th percentile of people who took the test, and based on Auburn’s 80% acceptance rate, in general, (wow that is high), I would expect some academic money at Auburn.

    Seriously 80% is one of the highest I have seen. Basically, they take anybody. So a high ACT would boost their numbers, and $ would tempt kids away from more competitive schools with lower acceptance rates.

    Regardless, it may be a good school. What is a good school or the right school can be a very individual thing.

  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 468 ✭✭✭✭

    @double_d said:
    Auburn (fine institution) for instance will give free tuition to anyone with a 33+ ACT.

    A 33+ on the ACT puts you at or above the 98th percentile of people who took the test, and based on Auburn’s 80% acceptance rate, in general, (wow that is high), I would expect some academic money at Auburn.

    Seriously 80% is one of the highest I have seen. Basically, they take anybody. So a high ACT would boost their numbers, and $ would tempt kids away from more competitive schools with lower acceptance rates.

    Regardless, it may be a good school. What is a good school or the right school can be a very individual thing.

    This is spot on

    With respect to the ability to get merit aid (grants for academic excellence, but also athletic scholarships), it's simple economics: much easier to get at schools where there is less competition for admission

  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,926 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @twidener said:
    Partial scholarships were around in 1969. I received one at a D1 school. The athletic director offered books, tuition and fees if I could beat everyone on the team in a tournament at the end of my first semester in the fall of '69. I beat all but the top player and I tied him but the AD gave me the partial anyway. As far as women's golf I had a daughter in high school that shot in the 70's and low 80's in 2000 and 2001and she received no offers from any school. In Texas back then you had to shoot around even par or under to get a women's golf coach interested. I don't know how difficult it is nowadays for the girls who want to play in college. Partial scholarships are fine. Any money you can get whether academic, athletic or a combination of the two helps out.

    I’d say you guys weren’t proactive enough. Coaches aren’t going to eBay down your door with those scores, the player has to reach out to the school. But those scores absolutely would have resulted in college offers and scholarship money up to a full ride depending on the school.

  • dpb5031dpb5031 Jupiter, FLMembers Posts: 5,358 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 7, 2019 12:17pm #31

    The commonly heard statement that "x number of girl's golf scholarships go unused," is very misleading and not entirely accurate. Yes, there are scholarship opportunities for girls who can play reasonably well, but they're not going to be at highly desirable schools. Competition for a spot on the roster at top athletic schools and/or top academic institutions is incredibly fierce.

    My older daughter (not a golfer) went to a very good school in the northeast. She had a 29 on her ACT and a good GPA. Full tuition was $64k and they gave her $14k in academic/merit to attend their business school. I paid $50k the first 2 years. My promise to her was that I'd fund the equivalent of 100% of a state school tuition (NJ). Anything above that total was on her. Well, after realizing that she'd burned through $100k in her first 2 years (nearly all that I'd promised), she became incredibly resourceful and found an additional over $20k in scholarship money for each of her remaining 2 years. Most of it came in smaller increments thru foundations associated with her major. The largest was $10k per year for the remaining 2. She wrote essays, had oral interviews, and rigorous application processes, but she did it all on her own. Sometimes having "skin in the game" can be a real motivator...lol!

    My younger daughter is a rising junior at a really good private school with an excellent academic reputation and a mid-major type D1 athletically. She's on a 100% full athletic scholarship. The coach promised her 4 years at full, and so far has held true to his word.

    USGA Index: ~1

    WITB:
    Ping G410 LST 9 degree - Tour AD IZ 6x
    Taylormade M2 Tour 15 Fujikura Pro TourSpec 73 
    Kasco K2K 33 - UST Axivcore 65 Tour Green 
    Callaway RazrX Tour 4h - Tour 95 shaft
    Ping i200 5-UW (2 flat) - Nippon Modus 105X
    Taylormade HiToe 54 (bent to 55 & 2 flat)
    Taylormade HiToe 64 (Bent to 62 & 2 flat)
    Palmer AP30R putter (circa 1960s)
    Taylormade TP5X Ball

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