Question for you grounds keepers, superintendents or landscape enthusiast!

sociedsocied GameCocks2011Members Posts: 1,247 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

Hey guys, quick question here. Can I used golf course aeration plugs to plant a lawn? In this situation, there is no existing grass. They would be spread out on top of soil.

Comments

  • SNIPERBBBSNIPERBBB Hit Ball Hard SE OhioMembers Posts: 2,667 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    You could but I prefer starting gardens instead. Lawns are just time and money sucks. You can eat the garden and sell the excess...

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  • 2putttom2putttom # 1 Oregon Duck fan Members Posts: 10,087 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    hmmmm.... we used to fill in low spots, cover with soil, level and irrigate.

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  • sociedsocied GameCocks2011 Members Posts: 1,247 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @SNIPERBBB said:
    You could but I prefer starting gardens instead. Lawns are just time and money sucks. You can eat the garden and sell the excess...

    Yeah I get that for sure but this would be for a whole back yard.

  • jbljbl Members Posts: 119 ✭✭✭

    It will work depending on type of grass, bent from greens won't do well. Anything else should do fine, we use the plugs to fill spots on the course.

  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,737 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @socied said:
    Hey guys, quick question here. Can I used golf course aeration plugs to plant a lawn? In this situation, there is no existing grass. They would be spread out on top of soil.

    Yes just don’t let them dry out.

  • larrybudlarrybud Members Posts: 11,356 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I want pictures as you line up millions of aeration plugs side by side..

  • HabrownleeHabrownlee Habrownlee Members Posts: 54 ✭✭

    They have companies that do yards this way but it’s expensive

  • rufus manglerrufus mangler Members Posts: 1,693 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    If the plugs are from greens, you'll have a costly lawn to maintain... that is, if they take.

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  • PepperturboPepperturbo Midwest and SouthwestMembers Posts: 15,810 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @socied said:
    Hey guys, quick question here. Can I used golf course aeration plugs to plant a lawn? In this situation, there is no existing grass. They would be spread out on top of soil.

    Having recently went through the turf learning process before having a new turf installed at our home on a golf course, I would not suggest it. Typically, golf course grass seed is not the same nor maintained the same as what we use and how we maintain a beautiful lawn. Plus, by the time you accumulate enough plugs to do a lawn, the plugs will be all but dead. Unplanted turf is dead by the end of a day.

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  • sociedsocied GameCocks2011 Members Posts: 1,247 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Yeah I have been doing more and more research and its not looking like a great option. Now the decision becomes seed or sod. A debate for the ages.

  • James the Hogan FanJames the Hogan Fan Members Posts: 635 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Answer: Yes.
    More detailed answer: Maybe. Depends on a number of factors, and is certainly not impossible. Our course has last year's aeration plugs in a large pile behind the maintenance shack. One side of it (the shade side that didn't dry out) is covered in long, vibrant bentgrass. Understand that is in a dirtpile with no watering, fertilizer, or tending, just rainwater. So yes, just throwing them on the ground, putting some dirt on them, and watering them from time to time can produce grass.

    Personally, if I had the patience (@BNGL give me your opinion on this) I would plant the aeration cores in a grid of say 2"x2" or so (or as tightly as your cores and patience allow) and then seed the rest. As the cores grow they will thicken and provide protection to your seedlings when they are at their weakest. Depending on the heights involved you're not going to see that much lateral growth (unless this is bermuda) but over time the grasses will start blending together.

    Also, if you can find the fairway aeration plugs of a course that uses rye or fescue, those are fairly common lawn grasses.

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  • sociedsocied GameCocks2011 Members Posts: 1,247 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @James the Hogan Fan said:
    Answer: Yes.
    More detailed answer: Maybe. Depends on a number of factors, and is certainly not impossible. Our course has last year's aeration plugs in a large pile behind the maintenance shack. One side of it (the shade side that didn't dry out) is covered in long, vibrant bentgrass. Understand that is in a dirtpile with no watering, fertilizer, or tending, just rainwater. So yes, just throwing them on the ground, putting some dirt on them, and watering them from time to time can produce grass.

    Personally, if I had the patience (@BNGL give me your opinion on this) I would plant the aeration cores in a grid of say 2"x2" or so (or as tightly as your cores and patience allow) and then seed the rest. As the cores grow they will thicken and provide protection to your seedlings when they are at their weakest. Depending on the heights involved you're not going to see that much lateral growth (unless this is bermuda) but over time the grasses will start blending together.

    Also, if you can find the fairway aeration plugs of a course that uses rye or fescue, those are fairly common lawn grasses.

    Thanks for the detailed response. The plugs that I have access to are actually FW plugs of Bermuda. I might do a small patch this year and see how that goes.

  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,737 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    A lot of cooks in the kitchen it seems, but if you can get them for free just get them, spread them out keep them moist and they’ll grow, don’t expect a golf course but they will grow. As far as seed/sod, go whichever you prefer. Another option is sprigs, I’ve sprigged a yard before it works just fine. But again you’d need to keep the sprigs moist.

  • huskerturfhuskerturf San Antonio, TXMembers Posts: 171 ✭✭✭

    I’m a superintendent. Bermudagrass is fine. Hopefully it’s not an ultradwarf type. You’d be best served with fairway cores as they are likely Tifwat 419 or another type of turf that can be mowed at 0.5-2 inches. I would get a pickup truck full and just spread them in the prepared area. Don’t waste time trying to plant them on centers. Just spread them an inch or two thick and roll them with a lawn roller. Water, water, water. Pop them with fertilizer, maybe a 15-15-15 at 3-4# / 1000 sq ft the first week and then switch over to a quick release fertilizer like 21-0-0 every 2-3 weeks after. I’d also try to get some sand to level it out.

    I’ve grown in a nursery green this way and it took fine. You’d never know it was from aeration cores after a few months.

    @socied said:

    @James the Hogan Fan said:
    Answer: Yes.
    More detailed answer: Maybe. Depends on a number of factors, and is certainly not impossible. Our course has last year's aeration plugs in a large pile behind the maintenance shack. One side of it (the shade side that didn't dry out) is covered in long, vibrant bentgrass. Understand that is in a dirtpile with no watering, fertilizer, or tending, just rainwater. So yes, just throwing them on the ground, putting some dirt on them, and watering them from time to time can produce grass.

    Personally, if I had the patience (@BNGL give me your opinion on this) I would plant the aeration cores in a grid of say 2"x2" or so (or as tightly as your cores and patience allow) and then seed the rest. As the cores grow they will thicken and provide protection to your seedlings when they are at their weakest. Depending on the heights involved you're not going to see that much lateral growth (unless this is bermuda) but over time the grasses will start blending together.

    Also, if you can find the fairway aeration plugs of a course that uses rye or fescue, those are fairly common lawn grasses.

    Thanks for the detailed response. The plugs that I have access to are actually FW plugs of Bermuda. I might do a small patch this year and see how that goes.

  • mallratmallrat Members Posts: 3,014 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 7, 2019 10:12pm #16

    DON’T EVER do a fescue lawn, EVER

    Our plugs grow amazing even when they get a little dry but we are all Poa. Our fairway nursery and a new tee box are plugs. I’ll add a picture.

    If you go seed I would recommend 3 - 4x the recommended rate, just an fyi.

    I should clarify that here, in Oregon, I know of 3 fescue lawns and they are very finicky. They take a long time to grow in and are very thin for a couple years

    Post edited by mallrat on
  • sociedsocied GameCocks2011 Members Posts: 1,247 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @huskerturf said:
    I’m a superintendent. Bermudagrass is fine. Hopefully it’s not an ultradwarf type. You’d be best served with fairway cores as they are likely Tifwat 419 or another type of turf that can be mowed at 0.5-2 inches. I would get a pickup truck full and just spread them in the prepared area. Don’t waste time trying to plant them on centers. Just spread them an inch or two thick and roll them with a lawn roller. Water, water, water. Pop them with fertilizer, maybe a 15-15-15 at 3-4# / 1000 sq ft the first week and then switch over to a quick release fertilizer like 21-0-0 every 2-3 weeks after. I’d also try to get some sand to level it out.

    I’ve grown in a nursery green this way and it took fine. You’d never know it was from aeration cores after a few months.

    @socied said:

    @James the Hogan Fan said:
    Answer: Yes.
    More detailed answer: Maybe. Depends on a number of factors, and is certainly not impossible. Our course has last year's aeration plugs in a large pile behind the maintenance shack. One side of it (the shade side that didn't dry out) is covered in long, vibrant bentgrass. Understand that is in a dirtpile with no watering, fertilizer, or tending, just rainwater. So yes, just throwing them on the ground, putting some dirt on them, and watering them from time to time can produce grass.

    Personally, if I had the patience (@BNGL give me your opinion on this) I would plant the aeration cores in a grid of say 2"x2" or so (or as tightly as your cores and patience allow) and then seed the rest. As the cores grow they will thicken and provide protection to your seedlings when they are at their weakest. Depending on the heights involved you're not going to see that much lateral growth (unless this is bermuda) but over time the grasses will start blending together.

    Also, if you can find the fairway aeration plugs of a course that uses rye or fescue, those are fairly common lawn grasses.

    Thanks for the detailed response. The plugs that I have access to are actually FW plugs of Bermuda. I might do a small patch this year and see how that goes.

    Thanks for the detailed response! This is great.

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