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Where to move for year round golf ?

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  • smashdnsmashdn Let's cut them trees down. Members Posts: 1,468 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 15, 2019 8:25pm #32

    Pinehurst, NC area or Alabama gulf coast or Florida Panhandle. It would be year round. Though with the second two locations I have found the architecture to be sort of the same from course to course.

    TN and Florida have no state income taxes. Property taxes are pretty low in TN as well. Not exactly a golf mecca though.

  • az2auaz2au Members Posts: 1,915 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    You’ll never meet a bigger fan of living in AZ than me but I’m going to assume that the person that suggested Flagstaff hasn’t actually spent any time there. I have no desire to be rude or insulting but there’s nothing there and it is not a place that anyone should move to that wants any sort of opportunity.

    If you want to live there in the summer as a second home, awesome. It is beautiful. You also better be wealthy if you want to play golf. Otherwise there’s no golf to speak of there. There’s also nothing else there. At all. And it is also miserably cold in the winter. PHX is theoretically 2 hours but can also be 4. Again, second home, great. Any other reason, basically a white collar prison ;)

  • RSinSGRSinSG ClubWRX Posts: 3,220 ClubWRX

    I'm a retired LEO from Palm Springs and moved to St. George, UT soon after retiring. Cost of living (taxes, housing, food, etc.) and quality of life made it an easy choice. We have a couple of hot months, but typically it's not humid like it was in SoCal. It's been quite a while since I haven't been able to play due to weather.

    Another WRX'r (@podunker) who is soon to be a retired LEO came out and stayed here and played several rounds and I wouldn't be surprised if he ends up here. It has the best of everything and is only 35 minutes from Mesquite if you're into gambling and night life.

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  • tideridertiderider Members Posts: 2,289 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Philomathesq said:

    @vallygolf said:

    @hybrid25 said:
    I think a person should remember how hot it gets in the summer months in some of the prime winter golf locations.

    I live in Gilbert Az (phx suburb). Last thursday I was done with work at 12:15. Got a haircut, stopped by the course 109 degrees, played 18 holes wet towel, ice cold water, was home with my feet up by 3 pm (actually closer to 2:45). With the exception of the poorish greens summer/ early fall are my favorite time to golf. May not be for everyone, but as long as it is under 110 im good to go. (The reality is that it is over 110 very infrequently, regardless of the 120 degree norm bantered about)

    To piggy back off this, heat in the AZ desert is vastly different than heat in humid areas like Houston/San Antonio/Austin/DFW. For instance, when I was in the Corps, we had a flag system that was used to determine what type of physical activity would could perform, where black flag essentially meant no strenuous work outside. The flag system used back then (and apparently still in use today: https://www.ready.marines.mil/Stay-Informed/Natural-Hazards/Extreme-Heat/Flag-Conditions/) is based on the Wet Bulb, Globe Temperature used by the National Weather Service (see the image below).

    What this chart tells us is that in a place like Houston, where the average relative humidity is easily 75% during the summer months, you get a black flag day at 86 degrees. In Phoenix, though, where the average relative humidity is around 25%, you don't get a black flag day until 100 degrees. Sure, you'll definitely get black flag days in Phoenix, but there will be fewer and those days will be lower on the black flag scale than those in Houston. As an example, to get close to a 98 rating (high black flag) in an area with 20% relative humidity (e.g. Phoenix), the temperature would need to be around 115. These days happen, for sure, but rarely. Per the National Weather Service, Phoenix averages only 18 days per year where the max temperature on a given day tops 110. On the flip side, to get a 98 rating in an area with relative humidity near 80% (like the aforementioned major cities in Texas), the temperature would only need to be around 93 degrees, which happens pretty much every day in the traditional summer months. And, per NOAA, Houston averages 106.5 per year where temperatures top 90 degrees.

    houston is as miserable as it gets for summer weather ...

  • sui generissui generis Members Posts: 4,099 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Take a look at the Smoky Mountain areas in Tennessee and North Carolina. It's good to live in the 2000 to 3000 foot band. Below can be too hot in the summer, above can get a little too cold in the winter.

    Knowledge of the Rules is part of the applied skill set which a player must use to play a round of competitive golf.
  • Zac1321Zac1321 Members Posts: 146 ✭✭✭

    @az2au said:
    You’ll never meet a bigger fan of living in AZ than me but I’m going to assume that the person that suggested Flagstaff hasn’t actually spent any time there. I have no desire to be rude or insulting but there’s nothing there and it is not a place that anyone should move to that wants any sort of opportunity.

    If you want to live there in the summer as a second home, awesome. It is beautiful. You also better be wealthy if you want to play golf. Otherwise there’s no golf to speak of there. There’s also nothing else there. At all. And it is also miserably cold in the winter. PHX is theoretically 2 hours but can also be 4. Again, second home, great. Any other reason, basically a white collar prison ;)

    you do probably know better so i will defer but i had plenty of friends and a girlfriend who went to college there so spent a decent amount of time there on weekends and breaks all throughout the year. Weather was never a problem when I went and no one I know would call the winters "miserably cold". do temperatures drop and do they get snow, sure, but compare that to the winters in the Midwest and northern parts of the country and its a huge step up. Definitely spans of time where it would be too cold to get out on the course and that was my point for heading down to phoenix here and there when that happens. Considering OP is retired and just wanting to do part time security work it didnt seem like a lot of "opportunity" was a requirement

    thanks for clarifying about the golf, it being the main focus of his question seems like that would take it off the list

  • az2auaz2au Members Posts: 1,915 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Zac1321 said:

    @az2au said:
    You’ll never meet a bigger fan of living in AZ than me but I’m going to assume that the person that suggested Flagstaff hasn’t actually spent any time there. I have no desire to be rude or insulting but there’s nothing there and it is not a place that anyone should move to that wants any sort of opportunity.

    If you want to live there in the summer as a second home, awesome. It is beautiful. You also better be wealthy if you want to play golf. Otherwise there’s no golf to speak of there. There’s also nothing else there. At all. And it is also miserably cold in the winter. PHX is theoretically 2 hours but can also be 4. Again, second home, great. Any other reason, basically a white collar prison ;)

    you do probably know better so i will defer but i had plenty of friends and a girlfriend who went to college there so spent a decent amount of time there on weekends and breaks all throughout the year. Weather was never a problem when I went and no one I know would call the winters "miserably cold". do temperatures drop and do they get snow, sure, but compare that to the winters in the Midwest and northern parts of the country and its a huge step up. Definitely spans of time where it would be too cold to get out on the course and that was my point for heading down to phoenix here and there when that happens. Considering OP is retired and just wanting to do part time security work it didnt seem like a lot of "opportunity" was a requirement

    thanks for clarifying about the golf, it being the main focus of his question seems like that would take it off the list

    We may not have the same definition of miserably cold. :) I also have a place in NYC so I get it isn't as bad as other places can be. Still way too freaking cold for me 4-5 months of the year. Some people feel trapped when it is hot outside, I feel trapped when it is cold.

    All good though, definitely didn't want to be rude. I just don't think it would be all that easy, even as a retiree, to make enough money to play even decent golf and then driving down to PHX to play golf in the winter is only going to increase that.

  • Zac1321Zac1321 Members Posts: 146 ✭✭✭

    @az2au said:

    @Zac1321 said:

    @az2au said:
    You’ll never meet a bigger fan of living in AZ than me but I’m going to assume that the person that suggested Flagstaff hasn’t actually spent any time there. I have no desire to be rude or insulting but there’s nothing there and it is not a place that anyone should move to that wants any sort of opportunity.

    If you want to live there in the summer as a second home, awesome. It is beautiful. You also better be wealthy if you want to play golf. Otherwise there’s no golf to speak of there. There’s also nothing else there. At all. And it is also miserably cold in the winter. PHX is theoretically 2 hours but can also be 4. Again, second home, great. Any other reason, basically a white collar prison ;)

    you do probably know better so i will defer but i had plenty of friends and a girlfriend who went to college there so spent a decent amount of time there on weekends and breaks all throughout the year. Weather was never a problem when I went and no one I know would call the winters "miserably cold". do temperatures drop and do they get snow, sure, but compare that to the winters in the Midwest and northern parts of the country and its a huge step up. Definitely spans of time where it would be too cold to get out on the course and that was my point for heading down to phoenix here and there when that happens. Considering OP is retired and just wanting to do part time security work it didnt seem like a lot of "opportunity" was a requirement

    thanks for clarifying about the golf, it being the main focus of his question seems like that would take it off the list

    We may not have the same definition of miserably cold. :) I also have a place in NYC so I get it isn't as bad as other places can be. Still way too freaking cold for me 4-5 months of the year. Some people feel trapped when it is hot outside, I feel trapped when it is cold.

    All good though, definitely didn't want to be rude. I just don't think it would be all that easy, even as a retiree, to make enough money to play even decent golf and then driving down to PHX to play golf in the winter is only going to increase that.

    fair points all around hah I didn't want to sound rude either. Realistically I think everyone can agree some kind of concession would have to be made one way or another in order to get year round golf unless they have some sort of wealth

  • nuttinbutapeanutnuttinbutapeanut Members Posts: 198 ✭✭✭

    Now all i need to do is pick a few of these areas and check indeed for job opportunities.

  • Schley Schley Love ya don't tell ya enough! Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaMembers Posts: 1,223 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I have continually checked out areas for retirement myself, although I have 5 more years at least. I will have the two home model with one in Chicago area most likely for a few months in the summer, so not entirely the same situation as my family is there. I'm down to AZ, La Quinta, NC area (yet to check out), Austin. Florida perhaps as I would want to have no state income taxes (presently TX). Austin has been the darkhorse for milder winters than I thought and not as much humidity as Houston and others. As you are working I'm sure your job prospects would guide you a little more and probably several places that would suit your needs. Check out some other threads with quite a bit of data that are within the last year.

  • nuttinbutapeanutnuttinbutapeanut Members Posts: 198 ✭✭✭

    Applied for Deputy Chief of Tempe ? Looks like it's between Phoenix and Scottsdale.

  • az2auaz2au Members Posts: 1,915 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @nuttinbutapeanut said:
    Applied for Deputy Chief of Tempe ? Looks like it's between Phoenix and Scottsdale.

    Tempe is where ASU and a large number of buildings are going up around the lake. It is right next to the airport, east of PHX, south of Scottsdale and west of Mesa.

  • mallratmallrat Members Posts: 3,035 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Wherever you end up find a course you really like and look into the grounds crew. Most supers would love to have a guy like you who just wants free golf. You can work 2-3 4 hour shifts a week and just come in and do bunkers or learn a specific piece of equipment and go home. Great way to play some private courses without being a member

  • dpb5031dpb5031 Jupiter, FLMembers Posts: 5,471 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Philomathesq said:

    @vallygolf said:

    @hybrid25 said:
    I think a person should remember how hot it gets in the summer months in some of the prime winter golf locations.

    I live in Gilbert Az (phx suburb). Last thursday I was done with work at 12:15. Got a haircut, stopped by the course 109 degrees, played 18 holes wet towel, ice cold water, was home with my feet up by 3 pm (actually closer to 2:45). With the exception of the poorish greens summer/ early fall are my favorite time to golf. May not be for everyone, but as long as it is under 110 im good to go. (The reality is that it is over 110 very infrequently, regardless of the 120 degree norm bantered about)

    To piggy back off this, heat in the AZ desert is vastly different than heat in humid areas like Houston/San Antonio/Austin/DFW. For instance, when I was in the Corps, we had a flag system that was used to determine what type of physical activity would could perform, where black flag essentially meant no strenuous work outside. The flag system used back then (and apparently still in use today: https://www.ready.marines.mil/Stay-Informed/Natural-Hazards/Extreme-Heat/Flag-Conditions/) is based on the Wet Bulb, Globe Temperature used by the National Weather Service (see the image below).

    What this chart tells us is that in a place like Houston, where the average relative humidity is easily 75% during the summer months, you get a black flag day at 86 degrees. In Phoenix, though, where the average relative humidity is around 25%, you don't get a black flag day until 100 degrees. Sure, you'll definitely get black flag days in Phoenix, but there will be fewer and those days will be lower on the black flag scale than those in Houston. As an example, to get close to a 98 rating (high black flag) in an area with 20% relative humidity (e.g. Phoenix), the temperature would need to be around 115. These days happen, for sure, but rarely. Per the National Weather Service, Phoenix averages only 18 days per year where the max temperature on a given day tops 110. On the flip side, to get a 98 rating in an area with relative humidity near 80% (like the aforementioned major cities in Texas), the temperature would only need to be around 93 degrees, which happens pretty much every day in the traditional summer months. And, per NOAA, Houston averages 106.5 per year where temperatures top 90 degrees.

    The only problem with making decisions based on this chart is that it leaves out a critical variable, breeze/wind velocity. The Caribbean is often 90 degrees with 90% humidity, but the tradewinds make it quite tolerable during the high sun of the day, and really lovely most evenings. Southeast FL along the coast is similar. The ocean breeze carried by the Gulfstream makes a huge difference.

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  • fore_lifefore_life Swung too hard, hit it too pure. Members Posts: 10,426 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Zac1321 said:

    @az2au said:
    You’ll never meet a bigger fan of living in AZ than me but I’m going to assume that the person that suggested Flagstaff hasn’t actually spent any time there. I have no desire to be rude or insulting but there’s nothing there and it is not a place that anyone should move to that wants any sort of opportunity.

    If you want to live there in the summer as a second home, awesome. It is beautiful. You also better be wealthy if you want to play golf. Otherwise there’s no golf to speak of there. There’s also nothing else there. At all. And it is also miserably cold in the winter. PHX is theoretically 2 hours but can also be 4. Again, second home, great. Any other reason, basically a white collar prison ;)

    you do probably know better so i will defer but i had plenty of friends and a girlfriend who went to college there so spent a decent amount of time there on weekends and breaks all throughout the year. Weather was never a problem when I went and no one I know would call the winters "miserably cold". do temperatures drop and do they get snow, sure, but compare that to the winters in the Midwest and northern parts of the country and its a huge step up. Definitely spans of time where it would be too cold to get out on the course and that was my point for heading down to phoenix here and there when that happens. Considering OP is retired and just wanting to do part time security work it didnt seem like a lot of "opportunity" was a requirement

    thanks for clarifying about the golf, it being the main focus of his question seems like that would take it off the list

    I’ll add that if you like craft beer and smoking herb, then there’s plenty to do in flagstaff lol. More annual snowfall than Denver, too.

    Tempe is a nice location that allows you access to quality affordable golf, close to the muni’s and access to affordable golf year round, don’t think I’ve paid more than $40 to play year round, but I also avoid scottsdale like the plague lol

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  • farmerfarmer Members Posts: 8,126 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @dpb5031 said:

    @Philomathesq said:

    @vallygolf said:

    @hybrid25 said:
    I think a person should remember how hot it gets in the summer months in some of the prime winter golf locations.

    I live in Gilbert Az (phx suburb). Last thursday I was done with work at 12:15. Got a haircut, stopped by the course 109 degrees, played 18 holes wet towel, ice cold water, was home with my feet up by 3 pm (actually closer to 2:45). With the exception of the poorish greens summer/ early fall are my favorite time to golf. May not be for everyone, but as long as it is under 110 im good to go. (The reality is that it is over 110 very infrequently, regardless of the 120 degree norm bantered about)

    To piggy back off this, heat in the AZ desert is vastly different than heat in humid areas like Houston/San Antonio/Austin/DFW. For instance, when I was in the Corps, we had a flag system that was used to determine what type of physical activity would could perform, where black flag essentially meant no strenuous work outside. The flag system used back then (and apparently still in use today: https://www.ready.marines.mil/Stay-Informed/Natural-Hazards/Extreme-Heat/Flag-Conditions/) is based on the Wet Bulb, Globe Temperature used by the National Weather Service (see the image below).

    What this chart tells us is that in a place like Houston, where the average relative humidity is easily 75% during the summer months, you get a black flag day at 86 degrees. In Phoenix, though, where the average relative humidity is around 25%, you don't get a black flag day until 100 degrees. Sure, you'll definitely get black flag days in Phoenix, but there will be fewer and those days will be lower on the black flag scale than those in Houston. As an example, to get close to a 98 rating (high black flag) in an area with 20% relative humidity (e.g. Phoenix), the temperature would need to be around 115. These days happen, for sure, but rarely. Per the National Weather Service, Phoenix averages only 18 days per year where the max temperature on a given day tops 110. On the flip side, to get a 98 rating in an area with relative humidity near 80% (like the aforementioned major cities in Texas), the temperature would only need to be around 93 degrees, which happens pretty much every day in the traditional summer months. And, per NOAA, Houston averages 106.5 per year where temperatures top 90 degrees.

    The only problem with making decisions based on this chart is that it leaves out a critical variable, breeze/wind velocity. The Caribbean is often 90 degrees with 90% humidity, but the tradewinds make it quite tolerable during the high sun of the day, and really lovely most evenings. Southeast FL along the coast is similar. The ocean breeze carried by the Gulfstream makes a huge difference.

    Houston does not have cooling ocean breezes. Neither does any of the Texas cities mentioned. For at least 6 months, Houston is like living with a hot, wet towel wrapped around your head.

  • dpb5031dpb5031 Jupiter, FLMembers Posts: 5,471 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @farmer said:

    @dpb5031 said:

    @Philomathesq said:

    @vallygolf said:

    @hybrid25 said:
    I think a person should remember how hot it gets in the summer months in some of the prime winter golf locations.

    I live in Gilbert Az (phx suburb). Last thursday I was done with work at 12:15. Got a haircut, stopped by the course 109 degrees, played 18 holes wet towel, ice cold water, was home with my feet up by 3 pm (actually closer to 2:45). With the exception of the poorish greens summer/ early fall are my favorite time to golf. May not be for everyone, but as long as it is under 110 im good to go. (The reality is that it is over 110 very infrequently, regardless of the 120 degree norm bantered about)

    To piggy back off this, heat in the AZ desert is vastly different than heat in humid areas like Houston/San Antonio/Austin/DFW. For instance, when I was in the Corps, we had a flag system that was used to determine what type of physical activity would could perform, where black flag essentially meant no strenuous work outside. The flag system used back then (and apparently still in use today: https://www.ready.marines.mil/Stay-Informed/Natural-Hazards/Extreme-Heat/Flag-Conditions/) is based on the Wet Bulb, Globe Temperature used by the National Weather Service (see the image below).

    What this chart tells us is that in a place like Houston, where the average relative humidity is easily 75% during the summer months, you get a black flag day at 86 degrees. In Phoenix, though, where the average relative humidity is around 25%, you don't get a black flag day until 100 degrees. Sure, you'll definitely get black flag days in Phoenix, but there will be fewer and those days will be lower on the black flag scale than those in Houston. As an example, to get close to a 98 rating (high black flag) in an area with 20% relative humidity (e.g. Phoenix), the temperature would need to be around 115. These days happen, for sure, but rarely. Per the National Weather Service, Phoenix averages only 18 days per year where the max temperature on a given day tops 110. On the flip side, to get a 98 rating in an area with relative humidity near 80% (like the aforementioned major cities in Texas), the temperature would only need to be around 93 degrees, which happens pretty much every day in the traditional summer months. And, per NOAA, Houston averages 106.5 per year where temperatures top 90 degrees.

    The only problem with making decisions based on this chart is that it leaves out a critical variable, breeze/wind velocity. The Caribbean is often 90 degrees with 90% humidity, but the tradewinds make it quite tolerable during the high sun of the day, and really lovely most evenings. Southeast FL along the coast is similar. The ocean breeze carried by the Gulfstream makes a huge difference.

    Houston does not have cooling ocean breezes. Neither does any of the Texas cities mentioned. For at least 6 months, Houston is like living with a hot, wet towel wrapped around your head.

    I played today (Jupiter, FL). Mid-summer, car thermometer read 92 yet it was very pleasant with a nice sea breeze. Don't get me wrong, we obviously get some very hot and humid days, and in the summer it's best to play earlier to dodge the frequent but afternoon thunderstorms, but we usually have enough ocean airflow to keep things tolerable and often better than tolerable (like today). I just got back from a week in NJ and it literally was hotter with more oppressive humidity there. On the upside, down here you get practically perfect weather from late October to about mid May. I complained enough about the cold when I lived up north that I vowed to not complain about the heat since moving south!

    BTW, no state income tax doesn't hurt either!

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    WITB:
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    Callaway RazrX Tour 4h - Tour 95 shaft
    Ping i200 5-UW (2 flat) - Nippon Modus 105X
    Taylormade HiToe 54 (bent to 55 & 2 flat)
    Taylormade HiToe 64 (Bent to 62 & 2 flat)
    Palmer AP30R putter (circa 1960s)
    Taylormade TP5X Ball
  • T-MACT-MAC Members Posts: 1,981 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 25, 2019 9:55pm #49

    I lived in Chicago for nearly 20 years. GREAT golf there, but I don't like to play in the cold (40's or less). My body just doesn't respond well in the cold.
    I moved to Hilton Head Island SC. All kinds of golf here. WInters are fnatastic (Dec and Jan average in the 60's) but summers can be warm (usually 90+ in July and Aug).
    What would be perfect for you is, there are all kinds of security jobs here and many will give you golf priveledges. We have numerous private, gated communities that have security for their neighborhoods. I have a very good friend who lives here and is retired NYPD. He works security here for one of the communities and he not only gets free golf at the community he works at, but he can call the other security personnel in the other communities and play those courses as well. He invites me out to play golf all the time (he's allowed to bring guests with him) and we play in all of the communities for free. We just take care of the cart guys at the end of the day (usually throw them 20.00 to 50.00, depending on the course). Many of these neighborhoods have some absolutely fantastic golf courses if you woulkd like to look them up. Here is a short list of some of the one's I like best: Long Cove, Wexford, Colleton River, Berkeley Hall, Belfair, Hampton Hall, Moss Creek, May River, Callawassie, Spring Island, Oldfield, and of course Sea Pines (where Harbour Town is located).
    If you have any questions, feel free to send me a message.
    Good luck with your search!

  • nuttinbutapeanutnuttinbutapeanut Members Posts: 198 ✭✭✭

    @T-MAC said:
    I lived in Chicago for nearly 20 years. GREAT golf there, but I don't like to play in the cold (40's or less). My body just doesn't respond well in the cold.
    I moved to Hilton Head Island SC. All kinds of golf here. WInters are fnatastic (Dec and Jan average in the 60's) but summers can be warm (usually 90+ in July and Aug).
    What would be perfect for you is, there are all kinds of security jobs here and many will give you golf priveledges. We have numerous private, gated communities that have security for their neighborhoods. I have a very good friend who lives here and is retired NYPD. He works security here for one of the communities and he not only gets free golf at the community he works at, but he can call the other security personnel in the other communities and play those courses as well. He invites me out to play golf all the time (he's allowed to bring guests with him) and we play in all of the communities for free. We just take care of the cart guys at the end of the day (usually throw them 20.00 to 50.00, depending on the course). Many of these neighborhoods have some absolutely fantastic golf courses if you woulkd like to look them up. Here is a short list of some of the one's I like best: Long Cove, Wexford, Colleton River, Berkeley Hall, Belfair, Hampton Hall, Moss Creek, May River, Callawassie, Spring Island, Oldfield, and of course Sea Pines (where Harbour Town is located).
    If you have any questions, feel free to send me a message.
    Good luck with your search!

    That sounds awesome, I'll look into it !!

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