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4 Years Playing (frustration, observations, and what I've learned)

wayoverparwayoverpar Members Posts: 5 ✭✭
edited Sep 5, 2019 8:44pm in Instruction & Academy #1

This post is part frustration with the golf industry, and some help for those that are just starting out (or play a few times a year with their buddies) .

For reference, I started 4 years ago at age 46, first round was 130 or probably higher, can now play competitive at low to mid 80's. and slowly improving. And legit scores, no one is harder on me than me.

Quick notes for the new person to golf; (this will save you time and money)
That $500 driver will NOT help. My son hits a legit 285-290 carry (with an R5) and turns a 385 par 4 into a 7 because he won't practice **his wedges **

DO NOT go to the range, it's a waste of time, money, promotes poor habits, and doesn't translate to what you'll run across on the course. I've seen plenty of range champions turn into jelly when standing at the tee in sub 40* weather with several people watching, no breakfast ball, and NOW every shot counts. HA!, lets see that 300 yrd to the net now...not a chance...duff it into the woods after 4 practice swings. It's not to say that a warm up at the range is bad when you've already developed good habits (and hit off the grass)...I'm saying stay away from the range when you first start to learn.
I've learned more about my swing never hitting a ball. Swing your clubs in the yard, over, over, over, and over again. Try difference stances, grips, speed, etc....all the time watch your divot and or interaction with the ground. Practice in the rain, after the rain, on the hardest dirt you can find, uneven lies, high winds etc. I even took a junk wedge and practiced hitting shots off the driveway. Do everything you can to be proficient in the worst conditions, and the worst lies, woods, sand, pine needles, in a thunderstorm (not recommended), the list of stuff I've practiced in and on is endless. How about tile floor in the kitchen..got an earful about that one. Or a fractured arm hitting balls off of ice...almost forgot about that one.

The BS that's regurgitated by the "pros" of the local clubs and or golf stores. My lord the things I've heard from these "experts" at the local retail chains. Below is just the tip of the iceberg. They are KILLING their own industry and business. I have numerous examples of misinformation, contradiction, harmful to your game advice. Heck, I don't even allow them to grip ANY of my clubs..they even mess that up.
Unless you're 5'11" to 6" and 175lbs, the "standard" knee flex, and shoulder width are worthless. I'm 5'11" and built like an off season linebacker. My shoulder width is a 1/3 wider than the average golfer...it killed me standing like that for the better part of 6 months. Thank you to the "expert" at the local golf store....the same goes for knee flex with an inseam of 31" AT MY HEIGHT!..yes, you know what their recommended "knee flex" did for my swing plane? Find a genuine and experienced fitter, NOT the guy trying to sell you a $500 driver. If the first words out of the "experts" mouth is "stand with your feet shoulder width apart", RUN. A good teacher will adjust your setup with your body type.

SIMPLE and EFFECTIVE fixes for the causal golfer trying to improve.
GET FITTED for your putter first, and a driver last
YOUR PUTTER is too long.....I don't have to ask the length, I already know it's too long for you. When I'm asked how I putt so well, I respond, "length really does matter". And I play with a ladies Ping after owning 5 SC putters.
DON'T worry about how far you hit your 9 iron....practice hitting your clubs the same distance all the time, no matter how far.
SETUP PROPERLY before you swing...again, SETUP PROPERLY before you swing. it's 80% or more of it
STAND CLOSER TO THE BALL ..if you think you're too close, you're probably not.
SLOW and SHORTEN your back swing
PRACTICE YOUR WEDGES from 100 in PRACTICE YOUR WEDGES from 90 yards in PRACTICE YOUR WEDGES from 80 yards in ...you getting the theme here....PRACTICE YOUR WEDGES. The ONLY thing that separates me from the single digits is the distance they hit their drive and approach. They get to their scoring clubs with fewer swings.... not ONE of the single digit league members in my league can beat me from 100 in..NOT one...but they are at that distance with a less swings...I'm working on it...but Tiger may be right, you are the distance you are.

If it's a bit of rant, it is.......and there's more in days to come.....just all I felt like typing today.

Post edited by wayoverpar on
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Comments

  • NCLancerNCLancer from Northern New York to The Triangle Members Posts: 216 ✭✭✭

    You didn't lose all of us...preach brother!

  • RoodyRoody You ride her until she bucks you or don't ride at all Rochester, NYMembers Posts: 1,111 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I sorda agree with the "stay away from the range" comment. But it's one of those things that is good for some golfers, not so good for others. My experience this season is I've maybe gone to the range 1-2 times all season with the sole purpose of only practicing. I'd say I go to the range to warm up before teeing off for a round maybe 25% of the time, and when I say "warm up" I don't usually hit more than 20-25 balls. I bring 4 semi-random clubs that range from LW to DR.

    I'm currently trending to my lowest handicap in years - 6.9. I think some range time is necessary especially for warming up, but I am on board with the idea that you don't necessarily need to be a range warrior either.

    HOWEVER, you do say "don't hit the range", but then follow up with "PRACTICE YOUR WEDGES". If you don't go to the range, how do you practice your wedges?

    Titleist ProV1x
    Titleist 915 D2
    Titleist 716 T-MB 2-iron
    Callaway Apex irons 3-PW
    Odyssey Black Series #7
    Callaway Jaws and Mack Daddy Wedges
  • dmecca2dmecca2 Scranton, PAMembers Posts: 80 ✭✭✭

    "stay away from the range" is probably not the best advise. As the saying goes, "Practice does NOT make perfect, PERFECT practice makes perfect." You are correct in that just beating balls will most likely not help, but going to the range with an idea of what you need to do to get better will definitely help you. For example a beginner golfer, I would advise them to work on contact at the range. Try to hit as many solid shots in a row as possible.

    As for stance, the typical advise should be to get into an "athletic position". Golf is a sport and sports require athleticism.

    "GET FIT." yes. do this.

  • youfromjoiseyyoufromjoisey Members Posts: 223 ✭✭✭

    Awesome advice and I wish I'd followed that 30 years ago when i took up golf. I agree with all of your points, short game is key. Driver is a driver if you hit it right. THe fact that you shoot in the 80s regularly after only 4 years bears out your practice plan and approach (little pun there) work. Thanks for the tips.

  • SecondandGoalSecondandGoal South Shore MAMembers Posts: 324 ✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 6, 2019 1:35pm #8

    @jvincent said:

    @youfromjoisey said:
    Awesome advice and I wish I'd followed that 30 years ago when i took up golf. I agree with all of your points, short game is key. Driver is a driver if you hit it right.

    You'd think by now that the myth of short game being key would have disappeared with all the data we have now.

    If you cannot get the ball in play consistently with driver no amount of short game will help you to go low. Scratching out doubles and bogies because you can't keep the ball in play off the tee is not good golf.

    I have hovered between a 6 and 7 for years until early last year when my driving went south. Index balloned to an 11 because I was losing 3-4 shots per round off the tee. Once I got the driver sorted out I got back into the 7's.

    There's definitely a lot of truth to this. A mis-hit driver that leaves you 50 yards off-target in the woods is FAR more detrimental than a mis-hit wedge that leaves you 20 yards short right of the green in some rough. Generally speaking, it's much easier to recover from a badly struck wedge shot than a badly struck drive. I've dropped a lot of strokes off my index this year, and the biggest thing has been correcting a couple minor swing flaws that added distance and helped keep my ball in the fairway off the tee.

    Putting? That's a different story. Fastest way to shave strokes off your score is to become a better putter.

  • SecondandGoalSecondandGoal South Shore MAMembers Posts: 324 ✭✭✭✭

    Oh, and as to the OP... There's some good advice in there, but a lot of things stated as absolutes that the only absolute thing about them is they absolutely do not work for everybody. He talks about running away from fitters who use the stock stance of "feet shoulder width apart", but then proceeds to give stock advice about stance, ball positioning, putter length, etc. as though everyone's swing is the same. These things work for the OP, but just like everything else in golf, they're not applicable to everyone.

  • dayvei214dayvei214 Members Posts: 98 ✭✭✭

    @jvincent said:

    @youfromjoisey said:
    Awesome advice and I wish I'd followed that 30 years ago when i took up golf. I agree with all of your points, short game is key. Driver is a driver if you hit it right.

    You'd think by now that the myth of short game being key would have disappeared with all the data we have now.

    If you cannot get the ball in play consistently with driver no amount of short game will help you to go low. Scratching out doubles and bogies because you can't keep the ball in play off the tee is not good golf.

    I have hovered between a 6 and 7 for years until early last year when my driving went south. Index balloned to an 11 because I was losing 3-4 shots per round off the tee. Once I got the driver sorted out I got back into the 7's.

    I would have to agree here.... Shot my lowest score of 78 when i was bombing my drives that day. If had one bit of advice it would be to know your distances, and practice on achieving the same results through the bag.

    At my local track I'm my shots usually go driver/3w 3W,7,8, or P to get on and I practice hitting exact yardage on those weekly.
    I'm not sure how you would be able to achieve that if you're not on a range.
    I will say however, you can't beat short game practice on course. At the same time if you're just a weekend warrior it's hard to get greenside feel with the short sticks. Just my opinion no one is wrong here... It's your game do what works best for you, and if that means you spin in circles before you hit a fairway finder by all means do what you gotta do. please just don't take 5 mins doing it at the tee box :)

  • wickwosswickwoss Members Posts: 34 ✭✭

    @Loki
    I am with you. The range can be terrible if you aren't conscious about your practice, but if you go in and pay attention to the details, aim for targets/distances, etc. it can be a huge help. More range time has helped me drop my hdcp significantly this year.

  • Hawkeye77Hawkeye77 Countdown to The Open Championship! IowaClubWRX Posts: 18,402 ClubWRX

    More in days to come, lol?

    Seem to have covered it all.

    Over generalizing the staying away from the range for new golfers and way overstating the benefits of running around swinging at no ball in all sorts of lies as if you or any new golfer for heaven’s sake can analyze the results by looking at the ground without the benefit of ball flight like an expert Apache tracker.

    Love the passion!

  • wkuo3wkuo3 RELEASE Members Posts: 4,308 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I'm glad what you're doing, believing is helping you as a golfer.
    Come back in another 4 years and tell us how you progress without practice on the driving range and without a single lesson from the certified PGA professional.
    One thing about this game, is to live and learn. Having limited time on the golf course and the driving range without lessons and you could score consistently in the low 80"s ( would that be a regulation 18 holes ? ) you're certainly doing better than the average golfers, so, you might have something there.
    Golf could be learned with self taught and hard practice. "Find it in the dirt"....... but it'll take such dedication and time and effort, not many could go through that even if their life is depending on it. Taking a lesson from a certified teaching pro will shorten the journey of learning path. Practice on the driving range will refine what's learned during the lesson.
    Most of us will have to use a driving range to practice, unles one has acres of flat back yard to be used for practice. So driving range is a "must" for new golfers and especially those inner City dwellers.
    Yeah ! The expensive driver does not AUTOMATICALLY give a better golf game. no matter how sharp the knive is, in the hands of a novice is not as effective as in the hands of a seasoned chef.
    Have you seen anyone whom does not know how to use the whole length of the 8" chef's knife ? When someone does not even know how to utilize diferent section of the blade for different tasks... you know to stay away from them in the kitchen. But, technoledge does help the game even with the average golfers. Smarter ones will not be the first one to jump at the full retail price and wait for the usual price drop after the newer model is out.
    I do agree that a brand new gofer may not be benefited with the best of what the equipment could offer, but hey, if one could afford it, why not ? Life does not wait for anyone.
    I hope you'll have lots of good rounds of golf without practice and lesson, that means you'll have hours and hours of self taught time available.
    Otherwise, ever heard of regression ? It happens in golf also. Sometimes even with practice and playing time, scores will climb up for no aparent reason. So don;t be surprised when you score in the triple digits once again.

  • RainShadowRainShadow Tucson AZ (for now)Members Posts: 3,916 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 6, 2019 5:33pm #14

    @jvincent said:

    @youfromjoisey said:
    Awesome advice and I wish I'd followed that 30 years ago when i took up golf. I agree with all of your points, short game is key. Driver is a driver if you hit it right.

    You'd think by now that the myth of short game being key would have disappeared with all the data we have now.

    If you cannot get the ball in play consistently with driver no amount of short game will help you to go low. Scratching out doubles and bogies because you can't keep the ball in play off the tee is not good golf.

    I have hovered between a 6 and 7 for years until early last year when my driving went south. Index balloned to an 11 because I was losing 3-4 shots per round off the tee. Once I got the driver sorted out I got back into the 7's.

    Well, I hit 70-75 % of my fairways and average 31 putts per round, Per GolfShot app over the past year.
    My index has risen to 10.0 (been as low as 6.6) due to erratic iron play and mediocre pitching and chipping.
    So that goes against your theory.
    If you watch the pros, or even low cap am's, they all get up and down from their bad shots/misses...
    And Drivers are easier to hit than ever....

    Ping G400 10.5 Hzrdus Yellow 75 6.0
    Rogue 17* Atmos Blue TS or Xhot 15* OG Blueboard 73s
    G 410 19* & 22*  Tensei Pro Blue 80s
    Apex 26 Kuro Kage S
    Cobra Forged Tec Black 6-GW Modus 105s 
    RTX4 54/10 and 58/8 2 dots
    Bettinardi BB1/ Toulon Madison H1 neck (L)
    Some kind of 3 or 4 piece urethane covered soft feeling ball
  • jvincentjvincent Members Posts: 799 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @RainShadow said:

    @jvincent said:

    @youfromjoisey said:
    Awesome advice and I wish I'd followed that 30 years ago when i took up golf. I agree with all of your points, short game is key. Driver is a driver if you hit it right.

    You'd think by now that the myth of short game being key would have disappeared with all the data we have now.

    If you cannot get the ball in play consistently with driver no amount of short game will help you to go low. Scratching out doubles and bogies because you can't keep the ball in play off the tee is not good golf.

    I have hovered between a 6 and 7 for years until early last year when my driving went south. Index balloned to an 11 because I was losing 3-4 shots per round off the tee. Once I got the driver sorted out I got back into the 7's.

    Well, I hit 70-75 % of my fairways and average 31 putts per round, Per GolfShot app over the past year.
    My index has risen to 10.0 (been as low as 6.6) due to erratic iron play and mediocre pitching and chipping.
    So that goes against your theory.
    If you watch the pros, or even low cap am's, they all get up and down from their bad shots/misses...
    And Drivers are easier to hit than ever....

    Somebody on another forum had a good way of capturing this.

    Paraphrasing, your tee to green game sets the limit for your scoring potential. Your short game is what maximizes that potential. In your particular case your iron game (the second half of tee to green) is the first problem and then it comes down to short game. So yes, your driver isn't costing you strokes because you are keeping it in play. Work on your irons and chipping. FWIW, my iron play and chipping are what have me back in the 8's right now.

    For the majority of higher handicappers I see, that is not the case. Balls are flying into hazards, forests, and OB all the time. Until you can get the ball either on the green or within 10 yards of it 17/18 times per round, I would argue that you should be focusing more on your long game than short game.

    I'll make an exception for anyone who averages over 34 putts per round. There's no reason for that.

    Cobra F9 9* : Tour AD TP 7-S
    Cobra LTD set at 16* : Tour AD TP 8-S
    Cobra 3U set at 19.5* : Nippon Modus3 130-S
    Wishon 565MC 4-PW : Nippon Modus3 130-S
    Cleveland RTX3 50, 54, 58 : Nippon Modus3 130-S
    Piretti Potenza 370g : Breakthrough Technology Stability Shaft - 34"

  • bordercitygolferbordercitygolfer Members Posts: 89 ✭✭✭

    GET FITTED for your putter first, and a driver last - I guess I agree with this to a point as putting is pretty critical, but I also know that some of us are very much feel players and may switch putters up from time to time to get the juices and mojo kicked started again.
    YOUR PUTTER is too long - agreed, understanding swingweight is also crucial to proper putter fitting.
    SETUP PROPERLY before you swing - heel to toe balance, good posture not hunched... REALLY important
    STAND CLOSER TO THE BALL - YES! If you are reaching its either going to get yanked left on an overcompensated pull swing, or short and right when you toe it.
    SLOW and SHORTEN your back swing - fast tempo increases the likelihood that you will MISS the center of the clubface.
    PRACTICE YOUR WEDGES - mid distances, knockdowns, 3/4 shots.... this is were the money is made. Putting yourself 10' out for bird vs 20' is a gamechanger. Not science.

    I've been playing for over 30 years and still figuring this stuff out.

    Driver - TM M6, Matrix Ozik MFS M5 black tie X
    3W - Callaway Epic, Fubuki X
    H - Nike VRS 3&4, Fubuki S
    Irons - Bridgestone J40, ProjectX 6.0
    Wedges - Scratch DD 50/53/58
    Putter - Scotty Cameron Global Limited, Mills Ming

  • smashdnsmashdn Let's cut them trees down. Members Posts: 1,467 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Don't stay away from the range. Go there and get a lesson. Then go there and practice the drills properly until the next lesson. Being properly fit for clubs is like polishing the diamond. Getting a swing with what you have in your bag (provided the clubs fit within reason) is getting the diamond out of the rough.

    Taking up golf at 46 and expecting to be remotely good at only 4 years in is a tall order. I took up golf when I was around 18. Off and on over the years played anywhere from once a month to twice a week. It takes time and swings to get repeatable results. You don't really need perfect results, you need repeatable results that you can play with/for/around. Youtube vids did not exist when I took up golf. I had to read books, magazines and copy the swings I saw around me or on tv. I think a person taking up the game now is in a much better position to create their own swing and self diagnose things that need fixing. That can get you into a swing that a teacher can help you fine tune. Let the teacher help you with clubs as much as he feels comfortable doing so. He shouldn't be selling you clubs but should be savvy enough to tell if you could benefit from a different driver or wedge set up or irons.

  • LICCLICC Members Posts: 1,177 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I would say don't overdo it at the range. Sometimes you need to practice a new technique or feel, so you need to hit at the range. But there are diminishing returns.
    I've found getting lessons from a pro to be useless. Most have their 4 or 5 things that they tell everyone (which is different for each pro) and can't pick out what particularly works or doesn't work for you. They also want to spoon feed you so slowly so you keep having to come back for more lessons. The best way to get better, especially at first, is to go hit balls and figure out what works for you. The contact and ball flight will tell you what is and is not working. It doesn't happen overnight.

  • smashdnsmashdn Let's cut them trees down. Members Posts: 1,467 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    The guy I got lessons from showed me what I was doing on film. Seeing it helped as I simply did not feel it. He was not a club pro but a university golf coach who taught as well.

  • RoodyRoody You ride her until she bucks you or don't ride at all Rochester, NYMembers Posts: 1,111 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @LICC said:
    I've found getting lessons from a pro to be useless. Most have their 4 or 5 things that they tell everyone (which is different for each pro) and can't pick out what particularly works or doesn't work for you. They also want to spoon feed you so slowly so you keep having to come back for more lessons.

    This has been my experience at Golftec. Cookie-cutter lessons, and it seemed like they would limit the flow of information per lesson in order to stretch the lesson package out.

    Now I'm not saying lessons are a bad thing. But I am saying you should find a teacher you like, and is willing to help you with your particular swing tendencies.

    Titleist ProV1x
    Titleist 915 D2
    Titleist 716 T-MB 2-iron
    Callaway Apex irons 3-PW
    Odyssey Black Series #7
    Callaway Jaws and Mack Daddy Wedges
  • MarkripMarkrip Boss fan 62 Members Posts: 1,654 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Lessons do help. Not that my swing will ever be perfect. Before I had lessons and the ball would go all over the place I had no idea why it was happening now I have a pretty good idea what might be off with my swing depending what the ball flight is and I can try and correct it. I also think the range helps but go there with a purpose and I do not hit so many balls that I get fatigued and where my swing get sloppy. I want to leave with the muscle memory of the good swing and hope it carries over to when I play next.

    Driver - Cobra F7
    3w- Adams Tight Lies 2 16
    Hybrid - Cobra F8 19
    Irons- Sub 70 739 5-PW
    Wedges- Tour Edge CB Pro 50, 54 , 58
    Putter- Tour Edge HP Series 01
  • Santiago GolfSantiago Golf I Strive to make you Better Members Posts: 5,055 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Why do you think my putter is too short and i stand too far away from the ball, why you think my backswing is quick? How am i suppose to practice my wedges and irons if i cant go to the range.

    Driver: Taylormade M2 '17 10.5*; Accura Tour Z Pink, 85 M5 (285, can get one or two to carry 300+ if needed)
    Fairway: Taylormade Aeroburner TP 15*; Diamana Blueboard 72x (255)

    LOOKING FOR A 7 Wood (probably gunna be 230-235 club)
    Irons: Nike Vapor Pro Combo 4-AW; Aldila VS Proto "By You" 100x
    4-5; 38", 61* lie, 5 iron weight (220, 210) 6-8; 37", 62* lie, 8 iron weight (195, 180, 165) 9-AW; 36", 63* lie (150, 130, 110)

    S Wedge: Scratch 1018 DS 57*; Dynamic Gold S400 Onyx; 35.5", 63.5* lie (85): I HARDLY USE IT IN THE BUNKER
    L Wedge: Maltby Third Wedge (Custom Grind) 62*; Dynamic Gold S400 Onyx; 35", 64* lie: THIS IS MY BUNKER CLUB, HARDLY USE FROM OUTSIDE 40 YARDS!!
    Putter: Scotty Cameron Studio Design #5 MB, YES! Tour Tracey (for practice only)

    Ball: Vice Pro
    Grip: Super Stroke S-Tech Cord (Woods +6 wraps, Irons and wedges +8 wraps)
  • naval2006naval2006 ArgentinaMembers Posts: 986 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I assume tour pros who start taking lessons early in life and find the secret in the dirt must be wrong somehow.

  • DivinDaveDivinDave Longview TexasMembers Posts: 571 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This is the best advice Ive read in a long time.

    Experience - What's leaned just after you needed it most
  • jdljdl Masshole MassMembers Posts: 1,929 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @wayoverpar said:
    I've learned more about my swing never hitting a ball. Swing your clubs in the yard, over, over, over, and over again. Try difference stances, grips, speed, etc....all the time watch your divot and or interaction with the ground.

    How do you know if all these "different stances, grips, speed, etc" are working without seeing the effect on the actual shot, which is the ultimate goal? By looking at divots? You can have really nice divots and still hit the ball all over the place.

  • rxk9fanrxk9fan MidwestMembers Posts: 850 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I would respectfully oppose much of the OP.
    Primarily, instead of working on recovery shots from every condition, learn to hit drives that land in the short grass, and par 3 tee shots that hit the green. If I am having to hit very many shots from anything but fairway or first cut, I am playing a game of survival and not going low. It might keep someone out of the nineties or eighties, but they are probably not close to 70. Not to be disrespectful, but I have never played a competitive round where low to mid eighties kept anyone in the hunt. The difference between a three day total of 240 vs a three day total of 208 is.....well it is over 10 shots a round. Many that have played this game discover that going from 120 to 95 is a short sprint, and then from 95 to 80 a brisk run. Then to go from averaging 80 shots a round to 75 is a grind that will test your resolve. Then going from a mid single digit to scratch is a job...a job that includes hitting the range often...a job that is too challenging for most to complete.

    Taylormade M5 driver with Oban Kiyoshi Tour Limited stiff 
    Taylormade M4 tour 3 wood with Oban Kiyoshi Tour Limited stiff
    Taylormade M4 tour 5 wood with Tensei Blue stiff
    Taylormade M6 Rescue 19 degree with Atmos orange stiff
    Taylormade P790 5i with Recoil 95 F4 shaft
    Taylormade P770 6i-AW with Recoil 95 F4 shafts
    Taylormade Hi Toe 54 and 58 with KBS
    Taylormade Spider X

    First single OEM I have played and love it
  • NickcNickc Members Posts: 126 ✭✭✭

    Agree about range if hitting off mats - except for driver (I seldom do this though I really should!) Found hitting off mats with irons can be very misleading and mucked me up for a while - so I now never do.
    Luckily I have options of hiring a practice hole at one local course & there is a hidden grass practice area where I have a season ticket which is usually free.
    But otherwise maybe just play as many practice rounds as possible -(if not busy can also try different shots) if time for full round too much just do 9 holes - only takes 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

  • GolfbeatGolfbeat Swing Lessee Members Posts: 1,695 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I love the range.

  • MudguardMudguard Members Posts: 1,301 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I think the single most important stat in golf is greens hit. Of course, you just have to work out how to do it.

  • Krt22Krt22 East BayMembers Posts: 7,496 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 9, 2019 2:18pm #31

    @Santiago Golf said:
    Why do you think my putter is too short and i stand too far away from the ball, why you think my backswing is quick? How am i suppose to practice my wedges and irons if i cant go to the range.

    Strange paradox indeed. And if the only thing separating shooting in the 80s vs single digits is hitting it longer, how does one break through that barrier not going to the range or taking lessons? Or does one just revel in net victories in league play?

    Otherwise excellent plan to shoot in the 80s!

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