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3 Lessons, 3 instructors, All said the same thing

JStangJStang Members Posts: 2,556 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
edited Sep 6, 2019 8:08pm in Instruction & Academy #1

I have always fought an inside takeaway and have had three different lessons over the past 5 years or so with 3 different instructors. Two were in person and one was an online lesson. All three of them said that I need to hinge my wrists early in the takeaway to get the club working back on the correct plane and in front of me opposed to under the plane and behind me. Has anyone had success implementing this idea and what drills / ideas worked for you?

'16 M2 Rogue Fairway | 915H 2 & 3 | 718 AP2 | Vokey SM6 52, 58 | Scotty SS Newport 2 350
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Comments

  • RichieHuntRichieHunt Members Posts: 3,753 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    We would have to see your swing. Not all inside takeaways are bad.

    And you don't have to hinge the wrists to prevent the inside takeaway. Just don't roll the wrists.

    RH

  • glkglk send it in jerome Kodak, Tn/Chucktown, Sc via Chicago & BurghMembers Posts: 3,590 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 6, 2019 9:00pm #4

    Sounds like your issue is rolling the forearm too early in takeaway. Hinging first can help correct cause if you roll and hinge the club head goes behind your hands - my suggestion would be to hinge at a 45* angle and not straight up ( this extendeds the lead wrist and doesn’t extend the trail wrist enough) then take the club back to hands at trail thigh and from their up.
    Here is a good video on the wrists.
    The alignment stick drill also works to stop early forearm roll - keep stick touching your side until hands at trail thigh then drag it down your lead leg.

  • JStangJStang Members Posts: 2,556 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @tatertot said:
    Maybe you should listen to them?

    Listening is one thing. Doing it is another.

    '16 M2 Rogue Fairway | 915H 2 & 3 | 718 AP2 | Vokey SM6 52, 58 | Scotty SS Newport 2 350
  • BottleCapBottleCap Members Posts: 1,437 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    i was standing way too close to the ball, once my instructor pulled me back it went away

    Titleist TS2 GD TourAD DI 7S  or  Taylormade M5 Diamana DF 70 S
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  • MadGolfer76MadGolfer76 Admiration is the state furthest from understanding. Members Posts: 20,139 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Titleist 915d3 9.5
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  • Krt22Krt22 East BayMembers Posts: 7,496 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Here you go. As simple as the takeaway seems, it's not easy undoing something you've done for so long. You need to go slow, take video, mirror work, etc

  • HeckleHeckle Members Posts: 76 ✭✭✭

    @Krt22 said:
    Here you go. As simple as the takeaway seems, it's not easy undoing something you've done for so long. You need to go slow, take video, mirror work, etc

    This was very helpful

  • MyherobobhopeMyherobobhope hey there, blimpy boy. Flying through the sky so fancy free. Members Posts: 2,369 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    Current Bag (Rebuilding as of 5/6/19)
    Driver: Adams Fast 12 LS with Matrix Black Tie (to be replaced)
    3W: Adams Fast 12 with Excalibur (to be replaced)
    Hybrid: Bridgestone j40 with Excalibur (to be replaced)
    4-9: Taylor Made Oversize (to be replaced)
    PW: Mizuon HMP with DG120 Stiff (5/6)
    50 degree Vokey with DG120 Stiff (5/6)
    56 and 60 degree Cleveland Wedges (to be replaced)
    Odyssey Tank #7 (only club I'm keeping this season)

  • RobertBaronRobertBaron Members Posts: 847 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @MadGolfer76 said:

    The concept of this drill has revolutionized my swing. Especially as someone who crosses the line at the top and gets too in to out

  • JStangJStang Members Posts: 2,556 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Myherobobhope said:
    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    The reason that I scheduled the lesson today was because my ball striking was hot garbage. Zero divots and lots of thin pulls. I'm an 8 handicap and going the wrong direction. Usually there is a cause and effect in the backswing and my poor striking is due to me getting stuck and swinging way inside out. The last time I was on Trackman I was about 10 degrees in to out.

    '16 M2 Rogue Fairway | 915H 2 & 3 | 718 AP2 | Vokey SM6 52, 58 | Scotty SS Newport 2 350
  • Ping's DuckPing's Duck Members Posts: 204 ✭✭✭

    @Myherobobhope said:
    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    You are absolutely correct but should include using common sense as a barometer. History is replete with professionals emphasizing impact conditions over back swing positions. If your timing is good, your balance is good, and you come back to the same conditions good players do then a serviceable back swing will basically find you, you won't have to find it.

  • MyherobobhopeMyherobobhope hey there, blimpy boy. Flying through the sky so fancy free. Members Posts: 2,369 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:
    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    That is like saying I am not a race car driver, but who cares how you enter a corner if you eventually make it through. Getting way out of position early leads to compensations that can make getting your weight shifted and hands where they need to be inconsistent at best or next to impossible.

    I have found that if I focus too much on my back swing, my impact suffers. I don’t think you can make a good swing with a terrible back swing, but I think focusing on your impact position is more beneficial.

    In a racecar, where and how you come out of a turn is the important part. So focusing on that is the first step to entering the turn correctly.

    Current Bag (Rebuilding as of 5/6/19)
    Driver: Adams Fast 12 LS with Matrix Black Tie (to be replaced)
    3W: Adams Fast 12 with Excalibur (to be replaced)
    Hybrid: Bridgestone j40 with Excalibur (to be replaced)
    4-9: Taylor Made Oversize (to be replaced)
    PW: Mizuon HMP with DG120 Stiff (5/6)
    50 degree Vokey with DG120 Stiff (5/6)
    56 and 60 degree Cleveland Wedges (to be replaced)
    Odyssey Tank #7 (only club I'm keeping this season)

  • Krt22Krt22 East BayMembers Posts: 7,496 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 7, 2019 3:44pm #16

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:
    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    That is like saying I am not a race car driver, but who cares how you enter a corner if you eventually make it through. Getting way out of position early leads to compensations that can make getting your weight shifted and hands where they need to be inconsistent at best or next to impossible.

    I have found that if I focus too much on my back swing, my impact suffers. I don’t think you can make a good swing with a terrible back swing, but I think focusing on your impact position is more beneficial.

    In a racecar, where and how you come out of a turn is the important part. So focusing on that is the first step to entering the turn correctly.

    I think you found what works for you, in reality how you get to impact is directly impacted by everything else prior too it. If someone has been told by 3 professionals that there is a backswing problem causing impact issues, focusing on impact alone might not be fruitful. In racing, how you exit a turn is directly impacted by how you enter it, so if you are continuously entering it incorrectly, why not directly fix the underlying issue?

  • MyherobobhopeMyherobobhope hey there, blimpy boy. Flying through the sky so fancy free. Members Posts: 2,369 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:
    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    That is like saying I am not a race car driver, but who cares how you enter a corner if you eventually make it through. Getting way out of position early leads to compensations that can make getting your weight shifted and hands where they need to be inconsistent at best or next to impossible.

    I have found that if I focus too much on my back swing, my impact suffers. I don’t think you can make a good swing with a terrible back swing, but I think focusing on your impact position is more beneficial.

    In a racecar, where and how you come out of a turn is the important part. So focusing on that is the first step to entering the turn correctly.

    I think you found what works for you, in reality how you get to impact is directly impacted by everything else prior too it. If someone has been told by 3 professionals that there is a backswing problem causing impact issues, focusing on impact alone might not be fruitful. In racing, how you exit a turn is directly impacted by how you enter it, so if you are continuously entering it incorrectly, why not directly fix the underlying issue?

    I don’t disagree, but if he’s been to three different professionals and is still asking for help, maybe he needs to change the way he thinks about the problem?

    Current Bag (Rebuilding as of 5/6/19)
    Driver: Adams Fast 12 LS with Matrix Black Tie (to be replaced)
    3W: Adams Fast 12 with Excalibur (to be replaced)
    Hybrid: Bridgestone j40 with Excalibur (to be replaced)
    4-9: Taylor Made Oversize (to be replaced)
    PW: Mizuon HMP with DG120 Stiff (5/6)
    50 degree Vokey with DG120 Stiff (5/6)
    56 and 60 degree Cleveland Wedges (to be replaced)
    Odyssey Tank #7 (only club I'm keeping this season)

  • mulliganman30mulliganman30 Members Posts: 1,106 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:
    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    That is like saying I am not a race car driver, but who cares how you enter a corner if you eventually make it through. Getting way out of position early leads to compensations that can make getting your weight shifted and hands where they need to be inconsistent at best or next to impossible.

    I have found that if I focus too much on my back swing, my impact suffers. I don’t think you can make a good swing with a terrible back swing, but I think focusing on your impact position is more beneficial.

    In a racecar, where and how you come out of a turn is the important part. So focusing on that is the first step to entering the turn correctly.

    I think you found what works for you, in reality how you get to impact is directly impacted by everything else prior too it. If someone has been told by 3 professionals that there is a backswing problem causing impact issues, focusing on impact alone might not be fruitful. In racing, how you exit a turn is directly impacted by how you enter it, so if you are continuously entering it incorrectly, why not directly fix the underlying issue?

    I don’t disagree, but if he’s been to three different professionals and is still asking for help, maybe he needs to change the way he thinks about the problem?

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:
    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    That is like saying I am not a race car driver, but who cares how you enter a corner if you eventually make it through. Getting way out of position early leads to compensations that can make getting your weight shifted and hands where they need to be inconsistent at best or next to impossible.

    I have found that if I focus too much on my back swing, my impact suffers. I don’t think you can make a good swing with a terrible back swing, but I think focusing on your impact position is more beneficial.

    In a racecar, where and how you come out of a turn is the important part. So focusing on that is the first step to entering the turn correctly.

    I think you found what works for you, in reality how you get to impact is directly impacted by everything else prior too it. If someone has been told by 3 professionals that there is a backswing problem causing impact issues, focusing on impact alone might not be fruitful. In racing, how you exit a turn is directly impacted by how you enter it, so if you are continuously entering it incorrectly, why not directly fix the underlying issue?

    I don’t disagree, but if he’s been to three different professionals and is still asking for help, maybe he needs to change the way he thinks about the problem?

    Or maybe he is looking for someone who has been there and done that and came out on the other side. I know I’ve been battling this for well over a year and still can’t fix it.

  • RohlioRohlio Members Posts: 2,437 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:
    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    That is like saying I am not a race car driver, but who cares how you enter a corner if you eventually make it through. Getting way out of position early leads to compensations that can make getting your weight shifted and hands where they need to be inconsistent at best or next to impossible.

    I have found that if I focus too much on my back swing, my impact suffers. I don’t think you can make a good swing with a terrible back swing, but I think focusing on your impact position is more beneficial.

    In a racecar, where and how you come out of a turn is the important part. So focusing on that is the first step to entering the turn correctly.

    I think you found what works for you, in reality how you get to impact is directly impacted by everything else prior too it. If someone has been told by 3 professionals that there is a backswing problem causing impact issues, focusing on impact alone might not be fruitful. In racing, how you exit a turn is directly impacted by how you enter it, so if you are continuously entering it incorrectly, why not directly fix the underlying issue?

    I don’t disagree, but if he’s been to three different professionals and is still asking for help, maybe he needs to change the way he thinks about the problem?

    Or maybe he is here asking for drills because he hasn't really tried to make the change and now wants to commit to it. Just a thought.

    WITB:
    Driver: Ping G400 LST 8.5* Kuro Kage Silver TINI 70s
    FW: Ping G25 4 wood Kuro Kage Silver TINI 80s
    Utility: 20* King Forged Utility One Length C Taper Lite S
    Irons: King Forged One Length 4-PW C Taper Lite S
    Wedges: Cleveland 588 RTX 2.0 Black Satin 50, 54, 58
    Putter: Custom Directed Force Reno 2.0 48" 80* Lie Side Saddle
  • oikos1oikos1 Members Posts: 2,361 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 8, 2019 1:11am #20

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:
    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    That is like saying I am not a race car driver, but who cares how you enter a corner if you eventually make it through. Getting way out of position early leads to compensations that can make getting your weight shifted and hands where they need to be inconsistent at best or next to impossible.

    I have found that if I focus too much on my back swing, my impact suffers. I don’t think you can make a good swing with a terrible back swing, but I think focusing on your impact position is more beneficial.

    In a racecar, where and how you come out of a turn is the important part. So focusing on that is the first step to entering the turn correctly.

    I think you found what works for you, in reality how you get to impact is directly impacted by everything else prior too it. If someone has been told by 3 professionals that there is a backswing problem causing impact issues, focusing on impact alone might not be fruitful. In racing, how you exit a turn is directly impacted by how you enter it, so if you are continuously entering it incorrectly, why not directly fix the underlying issue?

    I don’t disagree, but if he’s been to three different professionals and is still asking for help, maybe he needs to change the way he thinks about the problem?

    Probably why he came here in the first place, although like most golfers he probably is a stubborn cuss.

    When you leave your home, if you turn left when you should've turned right, it really doesn't mater where you planned on ending up, even if you spent hours before talking about how awesome it will be when you get there. You're just not going to get there in the quickest and most efficient way. In golf, that is not a good thing.

  • wkuo3wkuo3 RELEASE Members Posts: 4,333 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    At least half of the proessionals shouldn't be on the Tour if the near perfect golf swing is a requirement. Especially the back swing.
    We are, Monday quarter back.
    Find a way to groove in the ball trajectory, and the way to maximize what your physical frame allows you to do in the sport.

  • Krt22Krt22 East BayMembers Posts: 7,496 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @wkuo3 said:
    At least half of the proessionals shouldn't be on the Tour if the near perfect golf swing is a requirement. Especially the back swing.
    We are, Monday quarter back.
    Find a way to groove in the ball trajectory, and the way to maximize what your physical frame allows you to do in the sport.

    "Imperfect" professionals and imperfect amateurs are honestly not at all related. > @mulliganman30 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:
    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    That is like saying I am not a race car driver, but who cares how you enter a corner if you eventually make it through. Getting way out of position early leads to compensations that can make getting your weight shifted and hands where they need to be inconsistent at best or next to impossible.

    I have found that if I focus too much on my back swing, my impact suffers. I don’t think you can make a good swing with a terrible back swing, but I think focusing on your impact position is more beneficial.

    In a racecar, where and how you come out of a turn is the important part. So focusing on that is the first step to entering the turn correctly.

    I think you found what works for you, in reality how you get to impact is directly impacted by everything else prior too it. If someone has been told by 3 professionals that there is a backswing problem causing impact issues, focusing on impact alone might not be fruitful. In racing, how you exit a turn is directly impacted by how you enter it, so if you are continuously entering it incorrectly, why not directly fix the underlying issue?

    I don’t disagree, but if he’s been to three different professionals and is still asking for help, maybe he needs to change the way he thinks about the problem?

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:

    @Krt22 said:

    @Myherobobhope said:
    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    That is like saying I am not a race car driver, but who cares how you enter a corner if you eventually make it through. Getting way out of position early leads to compensations that can make getting your weight shifted and hands where they need to be inconsistent at best or next to impossible.

    I have found that if I focus too much on my back swing, my impact suffers. I don’t think you can make a good swing with a terrible back swing, but I think focusing on your impact position is more beneficial.

    In a racecar, where and how you come out of a turn is the important part. So focusing on that is the first step to entering the turn correctly.

    I think you found what works for you, in reality how you get to impact is directly impacted by everything else prior too it. If someone has been told by 3 professionals that there is a backswing problem causing impact issues, focusing on impact alone might not be fruitful. In racing, how you exit a turn is directly impacted by how you enter it, so if you are continuously entering it incorrectly, why not directly fix the underlying issue?

    I don’t disagree, but if he’s been to three different professionals and is still asking for help, maybe he needs to change the way he thinks about the problem?

    Or maybe he is looking for someone who has been there and done that and came out on the other side. I know I’ve been battling this for well over a year and still can’t fix it.

    Indeed. It also goes to show when it comes to the golf swing, old habits die hard. You can know what the issue is, but finding the feel/fix that clicks can be daunting at times

  • wkuo3wkuo3 RELEASE Members Posts: 4,333 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Krt22 said:

    "Imperfect" professionals and imperfect amateurs are honestly not at all related. >

    Of course, the weekend golfer's imperfect golf swing look different each time, the better golfer's imperfect golf swing is repeaqted eaqch and every time, and producing perfect results.
    That is the difference.

  • Krt22Krt22 East BayMembers Posts: 7,496 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 8, 2019 6:01am #24

    @wkuo3 said:

    @Krt22 said:

    "Imperfect" professionals and imperfect amateurs are honestly not at all related. >

    Of course, the weekend golfer's imperfect golf swing look different each time, the better golfer's imperfect golf swing is repeaqted eaqch and every time, and producing perfect results.
    That is the difference.

    Thats actually not remotely the case. Most mid/high index ams THINK because the outcome of each shot is a wild card that their swings changes dramatically from shot to shot. The reality is they have the same exact (and repeatable) flaw and the outcome varies on based solely on how well they compensate. If you were to overlay videos of good and bad shots they would be astonishing similar.

    The difference is pros (or elite ams) have much better swings with far fewer compensations, thus the outcome is far more consistent

  • LambLamb LondonMembers Posts: 342 ✭✭✭✭

    They are no good just like many so called instructors.

  • Krt22Krt22 East BayMembers Posts: 7,496 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Lamb said:
    They are no good just like many so called instructors.

    How can you say such and absurd thing without even seeing the OPs swing?

  • wkuo3wkuo3 RELEASE Members Posts: 4,333 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Krt22 said:

    @wkuo3 said:

    @Krt22 said:

    "Imperfect" professionals and imperfect amateurs are honestly not at all related. >

    Of course, the weekend golfer's imperfect golf swing look different each time, the better golfer's imperfect golf swing is repeaqted eaqch and every time, and producing perfect results.
    That is the difference.

    Thats actually not remotely the case. Most mid/high index ams THINK because the outcome of each shot is a wild card that their swings changes dramatically from shot to shot. The reality is they have the same exact (and repeatable) flaw and the outcome varies on based solely on how well they compensate. If you were to overlay videos of good and bad shots they would be astonishing similar.

    The difference is pros (or elite ams) have much better swings with far fewer compensations, thus the outcome is far more consistent

    Imperfect golf swing ?
    In who's eyes ?
    As long as the golf ball is doing what you expected, do you really care what your golf swing looks like ? Not a dance contest.
    BEFOER the video analyzing the every little fragment of a golfer's golf swing, there is but one way to groove in a dependable golf swing to each and every golfer.
    Some will try the method others had success with but not always the techn> @Krt22 said:

    @wkuo3 said:

    @Krt22 said:

    "Imperfect" professionals and imperfect amateurs are honestly not at all related. >

    Of course, the weekend golfer's imperfect golf swing look different each time, the better golfer's imperfect golf swing is repeaqted eaqch and every time, and producing perfect results.
    That is the difference.

    Thats actually not remotely the case. Most mid/high index ams THINK because the outcome of each shot is a wild card that their swings changes dramatically from shot to shot. The reality is they have the same exact (and repeatable) flaw and the outcome varies on based solely on how well they compensate. If you were to overlay videos of good and bad shots they would be astonishing similar.

    The difference is pros (or elite ams) have much better swings with far fewer compensations, thus the outcome is far more consistent

    @Krt22 said:

    @wkuo3 said:

    @Krt22 said:

    "Imperfect" professionals and imperfect amateurs are honestly not at all related. >

    Of course, the weekend golfer's imperfect golf swing look different each time, the better golfer's imperfect golf swing is repeaqted eaqch and every time, and producing perfect results.
    That is the difference.

    Thats actually not remotely the case. Most mid/high index ams THINK because the outcome of each shot is a wild card that their swings changes dramatically from shot to shot. The reality is they have the same exact (and repeatable) flaw and the outcome varies on based solely on how well they compensate. If you were to overlay videos of good and bad shots they would be astonishing similar.

    The difference is pros (or elite ams) have much better swings with far fewer compensations, thus the outcome is far more consistent

    You want to win the arguement / debate ? Go do it as you please because life is not always run on one set of rules. See if it works for you down the road. Maybe it will.
    To me, a good golf swing is a golf swing works for the individual to explore the potential of the golfer's athletic ability without harming the human body to the extent of needing repair in the near future.
    One'll pay a hefty price for the 200 + yards 5 irons, our body is not made for that. The weekend golfers is better off learn to enjoy the game instead of pushing the physical limit. Because your livelihood is not depending on that golf shot, risk of injury is not worth the seconds of pleasure from watching the ball flight.

  • Krt22Krt22 East BayMembers Posts: 7,496 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 8, 2019 3:24pm #28

    Now you are moving the goal posts and going completely off tangent, we are not talking about the body or injuries although lots of folks injure themselves trying to make improper mechanics work for the sake of making them work

    The reality is the OP obviously has a hitch in his swing, so much so that he has gone for lessons to fix it, and isn't happy with how he is hitting the ball. If 3 different professionals spot the same flaw and he is seeing **** poor results, well it's obviously an issue that should be addressed. An inside take away is a well known/common flaw and it causes inconsistency for a ton of golfers. Telling someone the take away doesnt matter when they are obviously struggling with consistently hitting the ball just makes zero sense.

    I agree with you though, if your swing produces repeatable results, then who cares what it looks like. In this case it isn't about aesthetics, it's about getting out of position early in the swing, which makes achieving repeatable results extremely difficult. A lot of people discount use of video thinking it's purely for vanity reasons, completely ignoring its value as a diagnostic tool.

  • MountainKingMountainKing Members Posts: 1,738 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @Myherobobhope said:
    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    Because the swing is often a cause and effect. If you're rolling your wrists going back, unless you make some crazy compensation moves toward the end of the back swing, the only real move you can make coming down is getting steep and releasing early so you don't hit the ground 3 feet behind the ball. With that move, it's almost impossible to get into a good impact position.

    Most of the "bad" back swings you see on tour involve the club being way over the plane going back, it's much easier to recover from that and shallow the club when you're outside the plane line. The very few guys on tour who do come under the plane, Hale Irwin being one that comes to mind and he makes a move right at the top that allows him to get away with it.

    Taylormade M3 8.5* Fujikura Pro Tour Spec 73x
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  • Conner GolfConner Golf ClubWRX Posts: 92 ClubWRX

    @JStang said:
    I have always fought an inside takeaway and have had three different lessons over the past 5 years or so with 3 different instructors. Two were in person and one was an online lesson. All three of them said that I need to hinge my wrists early in the takeaway to get the club working back on the correct plane and in front of me opposed to under the plane and behind me. Has anyone had success implementing this idea and what drills / ideas worked for you?

    A simple drill to center my plane that has worked for me is making sure my club face intersects my right (trail shoulder) height going back. You can incorporate this in a partial swing as part of your preshot routine.

  • MyherobobhopeMyherobobhope hey there, blimpy boy. Flying through the sky so fancy free. Members Posts: 2,369 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @MountainKing said:

    @Myherobobhope said:
    I’m not a golf instructor... but who cares how you take the club back if you are in the correct position on impact? If your weight is shifted and your hands are where they need to be, go with that.

    I’ve found focusing on impact improves your preparation.

    Because the swing is often a cause and effect. If you're rolling your wrists going back, unless you make some crazy compensation moves toward the end of the back swing, the only real move you can make coming down is getting steep and releasing early so you don't hit the ground 3 feet behind the ball. With that move, it's almost impossible to get into a good impact position.

    Most of the "bad" back swings you see on tour involve the club being way over the plane going back, it's much easier to recover from that and shallow the club when you're outside the plane line. The very few guys on tour who do come under the plane, Hale Irwin being one that comes to mind and he makes a move right at the top that allows him to get away with it.

    I am not arguing that you can have a bad backswing and make a good swing.

    What has worked for me is focusing on making good impact... by solely focusing on that, it gets me out of my head on hinging wrists and being on plane, which then helps me have a better backswing.

    Obviously there have been plenty of drills and what not shared here... i just offered another option.

    Current Bag (Rebuilding as of 5/6/19)
    Driver: Adams Fast 12 LS with Matrix Black Tie (to be replaced)
    3W: Adams Fast 12 with Excalibur (to be replaced)
    Hybrid: Bridgestone j40 with Excalibur (to be replaced)
    4-9: Taylor Made Oversize (to be replaced)
    PW: Mizuon HMP with DG120 Stiff (5/6)
    50 degree Vokey with DG120 Stiff (5/6)
    56 and 60 degree Cleveland Wedges (to be replaced)
    Odyssey Tank #7 (only club I'm keeping this season)

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