Pepsi Duck's "9-to-3" Thread...COVID Golf (#111)...!

 PepsiDuck ·  
PepsiDuckPepsiDuck Members  1988WRX Points: 207Posts: 1,988 Platinum Tees
Joined:  edited Today @ 5:14pm in Instruction & Academy #1

I've been debating for a while about posting something like this on WRX again, but here we go...a lot has happened since I've last posted about my golf game: I moved from DC back to San Diego, CA where I have year-round golf and a nice variety of courses and practice facilities; less time for golf and post-work practice with a new job and longer hours; a new local scratch golf buddy who I play with regularly; and a golf game that has stagnated at around a 9 handicap.

This year's Armed Forces Championship is scheduled for June 2020, which gives me about six months to get down from a "9-to-3" handicap so I can try out for the Marine Corps golf team. Since I first posted about trying this in 2015, I haven't come close, fluctuating between 7 and 15 over the last few years. Although I'm no longer a full-time student able to spend 30+ hours a week at an amazing golf facility, my mind is a very different place than it was five years ago. There is a lot less pressure to reach my goals, and I'm just as happy shooting a 79 at a tough course as I am shooting a 97 in a casual round with my wife. If I never get to a 3 handicap, I hope I'll at least have fun trying.

As far as my swing, I've been going at it alone for the last nine months or so, experimenting with things I've been taught in the past. Most recently, I've been working on my own with Tony Luczak's Reactionary Golf approach, simply because it makes sense to me and produces the best results on the golf ball with the least effort. Long story short, I've been doing great on the range and not so great on the course. It's a ton of fun repeatedly hitting solid shots on the range and having so much control of my swing that I can hit snap hooks, wipes, and blocks on command and then go back to striping the next shot. Unfortunately, the course is a different story; my swing never feels the same and I feel like I have no control of anything. Sure, it can get frustrating, but I'm in a better place mentally that I can keep playing the round with a smile on my face even after snap hooking my fifth tee shot in a row. No more quitting tournaments after 9 holes or throwing clubs and snapping $400 shafts.

I feel one of the problems in my past threads was the focus on the swing; rather than on golf. I spent too much time reading and writing about fixing my golf swing rather than learning to just take the swing I know works on the range onto the course and improving my ability to play golf. I'd like to write more about what I was thinking during my good (and bad) rounds and things I work on in practice and play. I've played with enough old dudes with sh*tty swings that kick my **** on the golf course to realize that I can still play better golf with a sh*tty swing.

I don't have any expectations for this thread, as I've noticed that WRX hasn't been the same since the update, but I'm just hoping to share my story and pick up a thing or two about the game of golf along the way. As always, thanks for reading.

Posted:
Post edited by PepsiDuck at
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Comments

  • MadGolfer76MadGolfer76 MaineMembers  20333WRX Points: 899Posts: 20,333 Titanium Tees
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    Welcome to the club.

    I don't have a lot of time to actually play, but I can sneak out for a half hour or hour after work for range time and maybe get in a little playing on the weekend. At least when there isn't snow on the ground. Obviously, the lack of actual playing time has an effect on my golf. I can't just go out and autopilot a par round. I really have to think my way around the course now, and especially pay attention in any events I play in. I don't take many risks anymore, and really put an emphasis in controlling my ball late last season. I don't make bad choices, and I don't three putt (the one thing I can practice year round). I've learned to play to safe areas, and try to save par with my wedge and putter than with long irons and fairways. With all that, my big numbers (when I do play) have virtually disappeared, even though I play less.

    Maturity (such as it is for me) has taught patience, and in most of the humble events I play in, I'm prepared for a war of attrition and don't push until the end if there are a couple others left standing. Doesn't always work, but it produces generally good finishes in the division I am in and wins. I also don't get quite as frustrated anymore, because I don't play enough to have expectations. Even a competitive round is enjoyable now, and I appreciate my time on the course more whereas before I took some of it for granted.

    Got about a decade before I stray into legit "old ****" territory, but I'm warming into it nicely so far, I think.

    Posted:


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  • PepsiDuckPepsiDuck Members  1988WRX Points: 207Posts: 1,988 Platinum Tees
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    I have found myself playing a lot more "defensive" golf to minimize risk of losing tee shots OB, and it certainly helps, to some extent. For example, at my home course, there are a series of holes that run alongside a road to the left. I'll generally aim my drives into the adjacent holes on the right to minimize the chances of losing a ball in the road. Worst case is a snap hook into the left rough and best case is a straight shot into the next fairway over with an open approach shot. I'll usually hit as short of a club off the tee as I can, just to reduce how far sideways my drives might go, i.e., my hybrid hooks less than my driver...

    And of course expectation management has helped keep things enjoyable on the golf course.

    Posted:
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  • Krt22Krt22 East BayMembers  9036WRX Points: 2,681Posts: 9,036 Titanium Tees
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    Good luck! Glad to see you back as well, as I am no stranger to bi-polar golf

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  • CasualLieCasualLie Do Woodchucks Chuck Wood? Members  1616WRX Points: 240Posts: 1,616 Platinum Tees
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    IIRC from one of your threads long ago, you talked to Jim Waldron on the phone a few times? Did you actually go see him? Anything from that approach stick with you for the long term, or do you not feel the answer is somewhere in there when it comes to on course consistency?

    Posted:
  • PepsiDuckPepsiDuck Members  1988WRX Points: 207Posts: 1,988 Platinum Tees
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    I did do a phone session with him about two years ago, and without getting into details, the discussion centered on mental aspects of the golf swing and various mental foci to employ in the swing. There was very little discussion of mechanics because he wanted to lay the mental framework I needed to successfully improve the physical mechanics.

    Unfortunately, I didn’t get very far with this because I was convinced that mechanics had to be fixed before any of the mental stuff would even be relevant. So I basically set all of that aside as I frustratingly continued experimenting with mechanics. Simply put, I wasn’t in the right mental state to improve my mental game.

    Posted:
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    TaylorMade M5 15* - Fujikura Motore Speeder 7.2TS X
    Callaway 815 Alpha Hybrid 21* - Mitsubishi Tensei Pro White 90TX
    Miura Baby Blade 4-P - KBS $-Taper X
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    Callaway MD4 Tactical 60*
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  • PepsiDuckPepsiDuck Members  1988WRX Points: 207Posts: 1,988 Platinum Tees
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    So I had my first range session since starting this thread and some interesting things happened. I had only one goal/intent in mind for this range session, and it was prompted by another thread about pausing at the top and a quote I remembered from a while back:

    "Your transition is sh*t." - Monte, circa 2015

    So for every ball I hit, I only had one thing in mind: 1-2. It was a drill Monte had given me a few years ago, which was meant to delay my overly aggressive transition. You say it out loud: "1" starts the swing, and "2" starts the transition (not the downswing). I didn't think about any mechanics; only counting 1-2 and feeling like nothing was moving at the top of the swing for that split second, i.e., that I had to finish my backswing before starting the arms back down and out. I did this rotating between a 20 yard chip shot, a 70 yard three-quarter sand wedge, and a full 8-iron. 1-2. 1-2. 1-2. Not surprisingly, it felt easy and resulted in consistently decent shots. As I hit more balls this way, I felt more patient at transition and started building better rhythm with the swing.

    And then something strange happened...to give context, I have not taken video of my swing on the range in nearly eight months. This was mostly out of laziness and apathy, but also because I wanted to rely more on what the ball was doing and what I was feeling with my body. So after about a half bucket of 1-2 shots, I thought I'd take video to see what this shot-producing swing looked like. I cringed as I watched the videos: (1) UGH, the clubhead is almost behind my body at P2! (2) YUCK, the shaft is pointing almost straight up in the air at P5! (3) seriously, how can this terrible looking swing produce such decent shots?!!!

    So of course I start thinking, 'hmmm...well, let me see if I can correct some of these terrible flaws...." And you can probably guess that things went sideways really quick...it only took about 15 balls before I just stopped and realized: 'No. Just no.' So I took a break, went to the bathroom, and grabbed a drink. And I erased the image of my swing on video and went right back to the 1-2 with my "ugly swing." It only took one ball to get back on track and finish out the bucket. 1-2. 1-2. 1-2.

    My takeaways from tonight's range session:

    • Remember, "your transition is sh*t." 1-2.
    • Although I don't deny the value of video, especially during formal instruction, I am not sure how valuable it is for the average golfer trying to figure things out. Some respond well to seeing their swing, while others (like me), go to a dark dark place... Is there even any value in the 'feel the swing and see the shot approach' anymore?
    • Is there a place for sheer athleticism in the golf swing? I'm sure I'm leaving some swing efficiencies (and maybe a few yards) on the table with what appears to be a fundamentally incorrect swing, but it's one that feels natural, is relatively repeatable, and produces consistent results on the range.

    I hope to get out on the course on this weekend to see whether I can take 1-2 out onto the course. As always, thanks for reading!

    Posted:
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    Callaway 815 Alpha Hybrid 21* - Mitsubishi Tensei Pro White 90TX
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  • PepsiDuckPepsiDuck Members  1988WRX Points: 207Posts: 1,988 Platinum Tees
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    After a couple decent range sessions earlier this week, I had the opportunity to play today with my scratch friend. I shot a 99. So at least I broke 100!

    During the drive home, I had some time to think about my approach to the game and the path to improvement. The bottom line is that golf for me over the last five years has been pure trial and error; and you'd probably all agree that that is a dangerous way to learn to play golf. Becoming too focused on results (i.e., ball flight results) often prevents us from really improving. Either:

    1. You experience terrible results as you work on swing changes, become frustrated that you will never get it, give up, and move onto the next thing in hopes that it is your holy grail, or
    2. IMO, the more dangerous issue; you happen to experience great results with something that isn't mechanically correct, but you assume you're doing it right because you get lucky and hit a few good ones. And then when you go back the next day, you get frustrated that you can't hit the ball out of your own shadow. See number 1.

    So when people on here wonder how or why I jump from one instruction set to another or experiment with different swing ideas in a matter of days, or sometimes in the middle of a golf round, it's because of a combination of those two points above. It usually starts with (2); I'm on the range trying to groove something, and eventually I develop some consistent and quality results. I usually jot down some notes on what I did and felt so I can take it to the next range session or round. When I arrive the next day, I try to replicate those feels; sometimes it comes back and I get another session to ingrain the feel (even if it's mechanically wrong). But more often, I experience scenario (1) as I struggle through half a bucket, give up, and start experimenting again until I get back to scenario (2) by the end of the bucket with a different set of feels. Lather, rinse, repeat.

    This is even worse when it happens on the golf course in the middle of the round. Luckily, I've gotten better about this over the years, but the result is consistently higher scores. In the past, after a few bad shots, I'd start experimenting from shot to shot over the course of the round until I found something that worked, usually by the turn, and I can scrape together a 47/39. Now, I'll resist the temptation to experiment, struggle with the same feels through the entire round, and shoot a 47/52.

    So how do you avoid being results-oriented (see 1 and 2 above) when you're trying to figure out how to swing the club? Are you able to separate the ball flight from what you're doing with the club? And should you? Does it matter what your swing looks like if the ball flight is good?

    Posted:
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  • Lincoln_ArcadiaLincoln_Arcadia We're supposed to be having fun here...yeah, right. So. Cal.Members  1106WRX Points: 182Handicap: 7.4Posts: 1,106 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  edited Jan 13, 2020 1:21am #10

    Welcome back. Read some of your posts in the past and wondered what you were up to?

    I thought this thread was going to be about arm and club positions rather than dropping from a 9 to a 3HC.

    If your swing is still good, I don’t see why not? That just means a ton of practice and making to time for focused practice.

    Out of curiosity, which course in SD plays so hard a 9 can barely break 100?

    In any case, Good Luck! You have a chance!

    Posted:
  • b_f_c_99b_f_c_99 No Warm Up Needed. Members  287WRX Points: 63Handicap: 4Posts: 287 Greens
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    i have followed your journey on here the last few tears so here are my observations and advice for what it’s worth. You have played golf swing long enough time to try something different

    1. since you have worked with some of the best instructors on here as well as others and nothing that you work on with them seems to help or stick I would stop going to any instructor. You obviously have a disconnect with this approach.
    2. Stop going to the range. From personal experience I can find a way to make any goofy setup, grip, swing idea etc work if I get to pull ball after ball and ge5 in a groove. None of which will work if I walk away for 5 minutes and come back.
    3. Stop filming your swing. You are obsessed with how it looks and this is at odds with producing repeatable results.
    4. Stop hitting balls to warm up roll a few putts and go play. You need to find a way to advance the ball in an acceptable way dead cold, and not in a groove or nice happy rhythm.
    5. When your playing just look at the target or ask yourself where you want the ball to go and with what sort of flight. Then just let your athletic instinct decide how to hold the club and setup as well as produce a swing that will create your intended result. If the result of this approach is not even close then your athletic instinct is dead wrong.
    Posted:
  • PepsiDuckPepsiDuck Members  1988WRX Points: 207Posts: 1,988 Platinum Tees
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    I stayed off posting WRX as I was transitioning to a new location with a new job, and golf took a back seat. Things have normalized in the last month or so, and I discovered a night range near the house which has greatly extended my practice opportunities.

    My last four rounds:

    1. Temecula Creek Inn Blue (72.1/127): 99
    2. Miramar Memorial GC (70.0/119): 87
    3. Boulder Oaks GC (65.5/112): 96
    4. Torrey Pines South (73.1/133): 98
    Posted:
    TaylorMade SIM Max 10.5* - Fujikura Ventus Black 7X
    TaylorMade M5 15* - Fujikura Motore Speeder 7.2TS X
    Callaway 815 Alpha Hybrid 21* - Mitsubishi Tensei Pro White 90TX
    Miura Baby Blade 4-P - KBS $-Taper X
    Miura Wedges - 52*, 56* - KBS $-Taper X
    Callaway MD4 Tactical 60*
    PXG Darkness Operator
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  • Hawkeye77Hawkeye77 IowaClubWRX  20820WRX Points: 4,761Posts: 20,820 ClubWRX
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    Torrey South - fun! I really wanted to break 90 there the time I got to play with my daughter and my dad years ago. I think today I could do it, that day came up just a little short but what a fun morning/afternoon of golf! You've got years to get better and are way too athletic and golf savvy not to get to where you want to get with your goals - keep going!

    Posted:
  • PepsiDuckPepsiDuck Members  1988WRX Points: 207Posts: 1,988 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  edited Jan 13, 2020 7:02am #14

    Great points, and thanks for the post. I'll try to respond to each.

    1. I've had the privilege of working some very good instructors, I would definitely admit that it's me, not them. However, regardless of the instructor or instruction method, I believe the devil is in the details. Even the most minute of details in a swing (that is otherwise sound) can prevent you from hitting the ball. So if that detail is either not identified or just glossed over as insignificant, and the student continues working on the same thing but never getting better, you can see how that can lead to those scenarios of frustration. So when I take instruction to the range or the course, some of these details slip my mind, and by the time I've finished warming up on the range and got to the first tee, I've forgotten a critical detail and I spend the round searching for the "fix."
    2. This would be tough...I think I have more fun on the range than at the course; probably because I'm so bad on the course... 😂
    3. In the modern age, can anyone even improve their game without video? This is a serious question...because I don't think I know a single instructor who teaches without it.
    4. I actually did this at a 9-hole course last Friday night. Went straight from the parking lot to the pro shop to the first tee. Hit a pull hook into the far rough of the adjacent hole. I still birdied the hole. Swing never felt right or natural all night.
    5. My athletic instinct is dead wrong.
    Posted:
    TaylorMade SIM Max 10.5* - Fujikura Ventus Black 7X
    TaylorMade M5 15* - Fujikura Motore Speeder 7.2TS X
    Callaway 815 Alpha Hybrid 21* - Mitsubishi Tensei Pro White 90TX
    Miura Baby Blade 4-P - KBS $-Taper X
    Miura Wedges - 52*, 56* - KBS $-Taper X
    Callaway MD4 Tactical 60*
    PXG Darkness Operator
  • b_f_c_99b_f_c_99 No Warm Up Needed. Members  287WRX Points: 63Handicap: 4Posts: 287 Greens
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    Ok so I’ll comment on your thoughts.

    1. Perfection is not possible you just need your move to work within a range that produces decent results. Over analyzing tiny details is destructive.
    2. Do you have more fun at the range because random people comment on how awesome your swing looks? This is not a troll only you can answer. Does it stoke your ego and since it’s nice and safe from posting a score you get a thrill out of it?
    3. 100 years ago people could should in the 60s with hickory shafts, and the worst balls you can imagine with no access to video so..... Not saying video is bad It might just be bad for you.
    4. And what kind of score did you shoot? Was it any worse than your good and natural feeling swing?
    5. Here is your answer, I suspect almost everything you think about playing golf is just wrong or mis interpreted. The scores your posting scream out lots and lots of penalty strokes. Have you ever put the driver away and played with something like 5, 7, 9 irons and a putter?
    Posted:
  • PepsiDuckPepsiDuck Members  1988WRX Points: 207Posts: 1,988 Platinum Tees
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    Thanks again for the response!

    1. Agreed. I'm honestly not looking for perfection. Serviceable is more than good enough for me.
    2. I have more fun at the range because I feel like my performance on the range is more reflective of my potential golf ability. Or at least my golf swing potential. And no one actually comments on my golf swing. They comment on my golf shots and the flight of the ball. Sure, it's nice to hear kind words from strangers, but at the end of the day, it's the shots that make me feel good about what I do on the range. The opposite of this has also happened to me. After a few bad holes, the rest of your group realizes how bad you are at golf and basically ignores you for the rest of the round. The three others walk off the tee box, chatting it up and having a great time, leaving you behind on the tee box to go find your ball...on every hole...
    3. Perhaps...
    4. It was a nine hole executive course; I didn't keep score, but I was probably around 7 or 8 over?
    5. Well, I would add that more short game and putting suffered too; it's hard to maintain focus around the greens when you're scrambling for bogey or double on every hole because drives are going sideways or I have 250+ approach shots on par 4s. And to be honest, I spend very little practice time around the greens; too much time and attention is spent on the range. But yes, I take more penalty strokes than I should, and even if I keep my drive in play, I'm rarely in a legitimate position for a GIR. And I usually play from shorter tee boxes than you'd think from someone with my length and rarely use my driver...
    Posted:
    TaylorMade SIM Max 10.5* - Fujikura Ventus Black 7X
    TaylorMade M5 15* - Fujikura Motore Speeder 7.2TS X
    Callaway 815 Alpha Hybrid 21* - Mitsubishi Tensei Pro White 90TX
    Miura Baby Blade 4-P - KBS $-Taper X
    Miura Wedges - 52*, 56* - KBS $-Taper X
    Callaway MD4 Tactical 60*
    PXG Darkness Operator
  • PowderedToastManPowderedToastMan Members  4217WRX Points: 1,390Posts: 4,217 Titanium Tees
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    If you had just stuck to what one teacher was telling you and stuck to what they were saying, your swing would not only be better by now, but feel natural. You’d have that feeling you’re looking for and probably be playing scratch level golf.

    From the outside looking in, your problem in golf has always been an inability to stick to a plan. You can’t get anywhere in golf if you can’t stick to a plan. You’ve proven that it just ends up making you go in circles and you don’t improve. No offence, your swing isn’t good enough to get significantly better at golf, at least from the last time you posted it. There’s weird swings out there, but 99.99% of them have aspects that make them great and repeatable. Yours doesn’t.

    I’d quit whatever it is you’re planning right now, make a vow to Dan Carraher that you’ll listen to him and him only for a year straight, and you can thank me next January when you are finally playing the golf you know you’re capable of. I know you can improve even in your more limited practice schedule IF you stick to a plan and keep up with the drills that the pro gives you.

    I’d tell you the same thing in person if I was giving you a lesson, because you’re someone who actually has the potential to be an excellent golfer but is held back by some destructive habits for your golf game.

    Posted:
    Former professional golfer. Current amateur human being. Reformed club ho.

    In the bag:

    PING. Lots of PING.
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  • ebrasmus21ebrasmus21 Serial Shanker CAMembers  6047WRX Points: 1,729Handicap: 2.7Posts: 6,047 Titanium Tees
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    Posted:
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  • PepsiDuckPepsiDuck Members  1988WRX Points: 207Posts: 1,988 Platinum Tees
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    Thanks for the feedback. I don't disagree with anything you've written, and I take no offense. I think my focus on results (i.e., where the ball actually goes), or the lack thereof, is what keeps me from sticking with any plan. As I laid on a post above, I'm often too tempted to try something that produces good results on the range that deviates from "the plan," especially if that plan continues to produce poor results on the course. Another part of it is my misinterpretation or misunderstanding of information in that plan; or a pure physical inability to execute that information. So when I go see an instructor, I might leave with a solid plan, some good feels that produced good results, and confidence that I can stay the course. Inevitably, this goodness lasts between one hour up to a couple weeks before things go awry, and I fall back into the comfort of the "cycle." In any case, I know my swing is jacked up enough that it requires me to defy physics in order to even make contact with the ball.

    That being said, I highly respect Dan and what he offered in my online lesson with him. However, I realize I need constant adult supervision, and online lessons may not fit the bill. Now that I am back in Southern California, Monte is now just a short drive away. Again, I'm torn on whether that's the best option; local weekend clinics fill up too quickly and I can't schedule anything during the week with my new job, so availability is limited. And besides, would fresh eyes with no prior knowledge of my swing and fragile mental state be best? I'm sure he's tired of me after all this time and over it. 😂

    I'm also considering getting a lesson with a relatively well-renown PGA pro at the on-base course (which I can literally walk to from my office). He offers free clinics and reasonably priced private lessons to us active duty bubbas. The biggest advantage is being able to build the local relationship and leverage that ready access to him, even if it's multiple times a week early on to keep myself from straying...

    Posted:
    TaylorMade SIM Max 10.5* - Fujikura Ventus Black 7X
    TaylorMade M5 15* - Fujikura Motore Speeder 7.2TS X
    Callaway 815 Alpha Hybrid 21* - Mitsubishi Tensei Pro White 90TX
    Miura Baby Blade 4-P - KBS $-Taper X
    Miura Wedges - 52*, 56* - KBS $-Taper X
    Callaway MD4 Tactical 60*
    PXG Darkness Operator
  • PowderedToastManPowderedToastMan Members  4217WRX Points: 1,390Posts: 4,217 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  edited Jan 14, 2020 11:01am #20

    Lots of good ideas in here. By the way, I think your “weak fragile state” when it comes to golf goes away quickly once you actually stick to a plan. It will probably actually feel good to give up control, submit to something, because once again, it’s not as if you’re playing the golf you know you’re capable of.

    For the record, I’m a believer in accepting some bad golf and awkward feeling swings for quite a while to eventually get better. I’m someone who knows what it’s like to be a scratch golfer and get whipped by 10 handicaps during a big swing change. It’s frustrating, but it’s worth it if it’s the right change, and it usually is if you’re working with someone halfway decent.

    I think both Monte and the local pro sound great. I’m confident neither would lead you astray. I’d choose one, do whatever they say for, I don’t know, four months without experimenting. Just do their drills and drill in what they say. Everyone wants to go with what feels good during a swing change, but it’s almost always the wrong impulse, because what feels right is actually just swinging with your normal faults. That can produce good shots on the range, or even course, because it’s easier to put a smooth swing on a swing that’s comfortable.

    Anyways, good luck, and thank you for your service!

    Posted:
    Former professional golfer. Current amateur human being. Reformed club ho.

    In the bag:

    PING. Lots of PING.
  • mocokidmocokid Members  2143WRX Points: 341Posts: 2,143 Platinum Tees
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    If you can't see Dan, then go with Monte since he's a short distance away. But stick with ONE pro, maybe stay off this board.

    Posted:
  • glkglk send it in jerome Kodak, Tn/Chucktown, Sc via Chicago & BurghMembers  3926WRX Points: 547Posts: 3,926 Titanium Tees
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    I'd ditto the go with Monte. Guy at the base may be a good guy but does he teach for a living? If not make time to see Monte - you don't need a baby sitter (if you need a crutch you aren't going to get anywhere until you exhibit self discipline) you need someone really knowledgeable - and while you were wander around in the desert, Monte has been refining his craft - can only be a benefit that you already know each other, imo.

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    Enjoy every sandwich.

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  • MyherobobhopeMyherobobhope hey there, blimpy boy. Flying through the sky so fancy free. Members  2709WRX Points: 520Posts: 2,709 Titanium Tees
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    Have you listened to the Chasing Scratch podcast? I highly recommend it... if you don't live on base, I'm sure you have plenty of time in your commute.


    Here are a couple of thoughts, some relevant, hopefully some helpful:

    1. Go get a California Burrito. There is no better place than San Diego for burritos, and I miss them every day... I don't know the hot spots anymore, but even a bad San Diego burrito is better than a good Louisville Burrito. (Sad face)
    2. Make sure you have the local card and take advantage of Torrey Pines! I lived there for a year and only played the North Course once! Still regret that decision.
    3. One of the things Chasing Scratch covers is a golf coach by the name of Adam Young. His mantra is hammer the nail. The only thing that matters to a golf ball is your impact position. If you are correct at impact, how you got there doesn't matter. His episode is a very interesting listen, and I think it might help you keep it simple. Just visualize where you want to hit the golf ball, and swing. It works.

    Good luck! Balancing golf and the real world is a challenge!

    Posted:

    As of 3/5/20
    9.5 Cobra LTD Pro with Aldila Blue X
    13 Degree Adams Speedline with Aldila Alpha X
    18 Degree Adams A12 with Proforce X
    6-PW Adams CMB with Project X 6.0
    50, 54, 58 Vokeys
    2 Ball Putter
    12/14 completed for this season.

  • PutterKilledTheDreamPutterKilledTheDream San DiegoMembers  3337WRX Points: 128Posts: 3,337 Titanium Tees
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  • PepsiDuckPepsiDuck Members  1988WRX Points: 207Posts: 1,988 Platinum Tees
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    Callaway 815 Alpha Hybrid 21* - Mitsubishi Tensei Pro White 90TX
    Miura Baby Blade 4-P - KBS $-Taper X
    Miura Wedges - 52*, 56* - KBS $-Taper X
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  • CasualLieCasualLie Do Woodchucks Chuck Wood? Members  1616WRX Points: 240Posts: 1,616 Platinum Tees
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    Why not go 180 from what you are doing now and give up the full swing stuff for awhile. If you are obsessed with the range, just spend all your time on short game. Start with chips, learn a real chipping motion, it is pretty easy. Keep it simple, learn body rotation to control impact, landing point, roll out, not hand manipulations. When you can chip with the 60, 52, PW, and 8i reliably, then you can move to the chip-pitch motion, when you master that, then you can do pitching. If you cannot build confidence with controlling a 60* wedge with a smooth, controlled, slow pitching motion, then the full swing is not going to happen. Master the simple pitch and you are only a full turn with speed away from playing good golf. Just work on the short game, that is it. You will be surprised by how over time correct mechanics on short game will seep into your long game. And your rounds of golf will be more enjoyable when you can save shots around the green.

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  • Hawkeye77Hawkeye77 IowaClubWRX  20820WRX Points: 4,761Posts: 20,820 ClubWRX
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    Know nothing about the pro at the base and he may be great and maybe PKTD or someone will PM you with some ideas or recommendations, etc.

    No way Monte would ever be tired of you (now he may not go along with the "constant supervision" and likely wouldn't agree with the needing multiple visits a week, that's when the restraining orders get requested, but that's for you and him to explore). I remember being at a clinic a few years ago when you were in the middle of your initial declaration of scratch within so many months and getting lots of "tough love" (from strangers including myself who had never met you) and at someone's house for dinner one night Monte and I visited about you a bit, nothing "secret", and he had a high regard for you then and sure led to me walking in your shoes for a bit - be like Rocky and Apollo on the beach you two.

    I'll bet you don't need multiple visits a week and even though his face has me thinking I'll skip the toast tomorrow, I'm in the following PTM's advice camp (but it is ultimately your call and you've got to actually buy in to the next step).

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  • PepsiDuckPepsiDuck Members  1988WRX Points: 207Posts: 1,988 Platinum Tees
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    I ended up booking an hour with the local pro this Friday. He's an older gentlemen who has been teaching for almost (or over) 20 years and has earned PGA Pro of the Year for San Diego twice. This is a low-cost, no-commitment trial run to see how well we get along and what his thoughts are on my swing and game. Worst case is that it doesn't work out and I'll go in a different direction; and best case is that he can find something and provide a long term plan I can work on over the next few years I'll be in San Diego.

    And I agree Monte's has refined his approach. The differences in his Drive 4 Dough and Efficient Swing videos definitely highlights that. I'm honestly not sure whether Efficient Swing was meant to replace its predecessor. Do you still lead with the right elbow in the Efficient Swing? The last time I saw him was at a clinic in Palm Springs at least a couple years ago.

    Posted:
    TaylorMade SIM Max 10.5* - Fujikura Ventus Black 7X
    TaylorMade M5 15* - Fujikura Motore Speeder 7.2TS X
    Callaway 815 Alpha Hybrid 21* - Mitsubishi Tensei Pro White 90TX
    Miura Baby Blade 4-P - KBS $-Taper X
    Miura Wedges - 52*, 56* - KBS $-Taper X
    Callaway MD4 Tactical 60*
    PXG Darkness Operator
  • PepsiDuckPepsiDuck Members  1988WRX Points: 207Posts: 1,988 Platinum Tees
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    He seems like a good guy just from chatting with him this morning for a few minutes, and people I've met on the course have said good things about him. And my comment about multiple lessons a week was just a half-joke...but going months between seeing an instructor probably wouldn't be enough. I'm looking forward to seeing what results from the initial intake lesson.

    Posted:
    TaylorMade SIM Max 10.5* - Fujikura Ventus Black 7X
    TaylorMade M5 15* - Fujikura Motore Speeder 7.2TS X
    Callaway 815 Alpha Hybrid 21* - Mitsubishi Tensei Pro White 90TX
    Miura Baby Blade 4-P - KBS $-Taper X
    Miura Wedges - 52*, 56* - KBS $-Taper X
    Callaway MD4 Tactical 60*
    PXG Darkness Operator
  • CasualLieCasualLie Do Woodchucks Chuck Wood? Members  1616WRX Points: 240Posts: 1,616 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #30

    Wow, if what you get out of the Efficient Swing video series boils down to lead with right elbow, your thread title "diary of mad man" is spot on.

    I do not think I am far off in saying that if someone took as many lessons from as many people as you have and has some pretty wide knowledge of a golf swing, then what you are suffering the most from is brain overload. The Efficient Swing is supposed to remove all of that and just boil down the swing to a few keys, but not just one. There was another member here, cannot recall at the moment who but a search in the efficient swing video thread will find him, who painstakingly drilled a segment and used video to verify he was nailing the position over and over and over, for weeks, and did not move on to the next segment until he had it nailed. Ask him how it is going many months later. I am guessing he is not standing over the ball and thinking lead with right elbow and hopefully not thinking about anything but instead just let all those drills take over and swing away.

    Hate to say it, but this new pro will not meet your needs for a long term plan for you to work on for the next few years as you put it. I don't think any instructor can impart a long term plan on their own. You have to own that plan, you have to do the work, and most of all have to have the discipline to grind on one thing. The number one player in the world spent a year drilling a shorter backswing, and it was not just a casual year, it must have been some unreal amount of reps, 50,000? 100,000? That drill was worked on in a year after winning the Masters and then spending the next year with only 1 win. Now who forced that? The coach or the player? The coach stood there and said "nope" 99 times out of 100; that's a grind too. The player told themselves every day and every hour, need to work on the same thing again...and again.

    Let's just say you want only 2% of the success. Are you even doing 2% of the work?


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  • Krt22Krt22 East BayMembers  9036WRX Points: 2,681Posts: 9,036 Titanium Tees
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    "Lead with the right elbow" is a specific feel for a specific flaw (as were many of Monte's older youtube video). The efficient swing is a step by step break down of the entire swing with numerous drills/feels to accomplish the key elements of the swing. Less a refinement of his approach and more an evolution.


    IMO all this stuff about mental, visualization, etc etc etc is fluff. You don't go from striping it on the range to struggling to break 100 without some major glaring swing flaw manifesting itself. In reality you likely just manage it on the range when there isnt pressure, and once the pressure is there its enough to throw you off just enough to go off the rails. I bet that major swing flaw hasn't changed much at all in the past few years, which is largely why your long search for some intangible cure to your swing woes has largely been fruitless.

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