Swing weight factors in relation to parts

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  • IvanDragoIvanDrago Members Posts: 450 ✭✭
    just bought a SW scale, did my irons and they are d6 with with the pw D7.25.



    they have tour issue x100 1/4 long.



    Is this normal for thm to be this high straight in as the 1/4 should only add 1.5 sw points?



    how can I reduce the sw to d4?
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 22,925 ✭✭
    edited Jul 28, 2018 #453
    Well, it's not very typical. (with a lack of standards in the industry, I don't like to use the term 'normal').



    Do they feel too heavy to you? Is there something about the feel or results that makes you think the swing weight needs to be lowered? Remember it's not about the SW value, it's about the results.



    How do you measure length? What grips? Who did the build (is it a factory build, local builder or yourself)? Any chance there are tip weights in place?



    If it really is needed, the two effective ways to lower the swing weight would be to reduce the head weight or reduce the length. If there are no tip weights in place to remove, then reducing the head weight is possible but not always easy. Finding a machine shop to drill some material out of the bottom of the hosels is the most common way. Another way to help is to use 3/8" length increments instead of 1/2". That would reduce the SW for the longer clubs - where the heavier value is potentially more problematic.



    And no, increasing the grip weight is not usually a very effective way if the SW/MOI really is too high for you and your swing. And if the static weight is a good fit, ideally you really don't want to reduce the shaft weight.
  • HuskerDevil_1HuskerDevil_1 Members Posts: 107 ClubWRX
    Great info thanks
  • IvanDragoIvanDrago Members Posts: 450 ✭✭
    Thanks for the reply.



    The shafts are straight in with no weights. Tour Velvet Grips with one tape.



    I like the feel of them but now im questioning if my bad shots are du tot he SW being too high.



    I tink maybe used too much epoxy, if 2g head weight is 1 SW then that could be the reason.



    I will take them out and try and get them to D4.



    just out of interest how much epoxy is enough? eg 2 pea sized blobs mixed together?
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 22,925 ✭✭
    edited Jul 29, 2018 #456
    Couldn't hurt to try it with one club but It would take a lot of epoxy to do that. If you do, get the raw head weight after it's cleaned up and before you do the reshafting. And make sure you clean out all epoxy in the shaft.
  • DriveToArriveDriveToArrive Members Posts: 1
    aliikane wrote:


    Is there a rule of thumb about how much an increase or decrease of swingweights changes flex of shaft?


    Great question. I've always felt like a lighter swingweight plays stiffer. There may not be anything behind that. Just my feeling.
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 22,925 ✭✭
    edited Aug 1, 2018 #458

    aliikane wrote:


    Is there a rule of thumb about how much an increase or decrease of swingweights changes flex of shaft?


    Great question. I've always felt like a lighter swingweight plays stiffer. There may not be anything behind that. Just my feeling.




    It's not the swing weight that affects the way the shaft plays, it's strictly the total head weight (including any adjustments for swing weight and adapters for adjustable drivers/woods). And that value is compared to 'standard' head weights to determine how the shaft might be affected - which is also very dependent on the swing mechanics and the original profile of the shaft. Other factors than can effect swing weight will have no affect on the way the shaft will play.
  • ulmndnzulmndnz Members Posts: 4
    joey3108 wrote:


    Remember, this is just a ball park figure for normal most case.



    Some shaft have tip or butt weight balance point that can not be applied on this rules.



    1/2" = 3 swing weight points



    2 gr club head weight = 1 swing weight point



    5 gr grip = 1 swing weight point



    9 gr shaft weight differences = 1 swing weight point



    4* flatter lie or more up right lie = increase or decrease 1 swing weight point



    Joe


    I have a 915d2 that i want to take 1" off the butt of the club. It has the red 9 gram weight in it from Titleist. What weight do i need to keep the same swing weight, (or better) Do I need to move to the 14 or 17 g weight titleist makes?

    Thanks in advance for the advice
  • dcopp7dcopp7 Members Posts: 936 ✭✭
    edited Aug 14, 2018 #460
    You are removing 6 sw points. You need 12gr more weight on the head to compensate. Do they have a 21gr weight? Buy the biggest of not and use tape for the rest of the weight.
    Callaway Hyper X 9* what's the point?

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    Orlimar putter
  • ulmndnzulmndnz Members Posts: 4
    dcopp7 wrote:


    You are removing 6 sw points. You need 12gr more weight on the head to compensate. Do they have a 21gr weight? Buy the biggest of not and use tape for the rest of the weight.




    i prematurely got a 14g weight to replace the 9g weight, guess i need more.

    The guy at Ed Watts said not to worry about the swing weight??
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 22,925 ✭✭
    edited Aug 18, 2018 #462
    ulmndnz wrote:


    i prematurely got a 14g weight to replace the 9g weight, guess i need more.

    The guy at Ed Watts said not to worry about the swing weight??




    You should not worry about trying to restore the original swing weight. But you should play around with some lead tape and make the determination of how much to add back with a little range time. It should be based on feel and results, not a SW value that it had at a different length and that you were never fit for in the first place.



    You can try by just starting out with that 14 gm and adding lead tape from there (it might even be plenty as it is).
  • dwh24dwh24 Members Posts: 63
    Just ordered a TS3 with Evenflow T1100 at 44.5" and it came back at C9 after telling them I wanted it at D3. Not even sure if i want it now. Guess I will find out Monday when it comes in.
    Titleist TS3 9.5* Evenflow T1100 6.5
    Taylormade M2 (2016) Atmos Black 8TX
    Titleist 818h2 19* Fuji Atmos Black 9X
    Titleist AP2 716 (4-P) X100
    Titleist SM7 50/8 F X100
    Titleist SM6 56/10 S X100
    Titleist SM6 60/10 S X100
    Scotty Cameron Select Newport 2 Custom (34")
    ProV1x #24
  • SCOTT4099SCOTT4099 Members Posts: 980 ✭✭
    Generally would C8 be considered too light of a swingweight for a driver that is 45 inches with a shaft weight of 75 grams?
    Callaway epic 9.0
    Cobra bio cell 3/4
    Ping G 19 degree hybrid
    Ping ie1 4-AW modus 105
    Callaway MD3 54/58 wedges
    Cleveland HB soft 11 putter 35
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 22,925 ✭✭
    SCOTT4099 wrote:


    Generally would C8 be considered too light of a swingweight for a driver that is 45 inches with a shaft weight of 75 grams?




    It's lighter than what many would find a good fit but everyone is different. At what point it might become too light or too heavy is something each individual has to figure out for themselves.
  • AJDeffGolfAJDeffGolf Members Posts: 17 ✭✭
    joey3108 wrote:


    Remember, this is just a ball park figure for normal most case.



    Some shaft have tip or butt weight balance point that can not be applied on this rules.



    1/2" = 3 swing weight points



    2 gr club head weight = 1 swing weight point



    5 gr grip = 1 swing weight point



    9 gr shaft weight differences = 1 swing weight point



    4* flatter lie or more up right lie = increase or decrease 1 swing weight point



    Joe


    this is fantastic, thanks
  • CTCCTC Members Posts: 65
    When club builders assemble a set of irons with the manufacturer's standard specs, do the weight differences in the heads of the irons compensate for the different lengths, so that if all else equal (same grip, same amount of glue, or whatever), the swingweight of all the irons naturally end being the same?
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 22,925 ✭✭
    CTC wrote:


    When club builders assemble a set of irons with the manufacturer's standard specs, do the weight differences in the heads of the irons compensate for the different lengths, so that if all else equal (same grip, same amount of glue, or whatever), the swingweight of all the irons naturally end being the same?




    That's the intent with the designed (intended) head weights but the manufacturing process isn't perfect and will result in variations that builders will generally need to compensate for (as well as the need to compensate for the shaft lengths being cut imperfectly).
  • JI3JI3 OrlandoMembers Posts: 148 ✭✭
    Assuming all the spec is same between two shafts (length, flex, grip, grip weight, adapter, adapter weight, same driver head) except for the weight of the counterbalanced shaft (60g vs. 70g), which shaft is going to have higher swing weight and what would be the approximate swing weight difference? The particular shaft I'm referring to is Tensei Pro Orange. Since this is counter-balanced shaft, and the majority of the weight distribution is towards the butt-end of the shaft, would that mean it would lower the swing weight as the weight of the shaft increase from 60g to 70g?
    Cobra F9 Speedback 7.5° - Mitsubishi Chemical Tensei Pro Orange 60 45" / Elite Y360S Grip
    Cobra KING LTD Black 13.5° - Mitsubishi Chemical Fubuki Tour 73 43" (tipped 1") / Star Sidewinder Grip STD
    Cobra KING F6 Baffler 17.5° - Project X HZRDUS Black 75 42" (tipped 1") / Star Sidewinder Grip STD
    Cobra KING F7 Hybrid 17.5° - Graphite Design Tour AD DI Hybrid 85 41" / Star Sidewinder Grip STD
    Epon AF-903 18° - Graphite Design Tour AD DI Hybrid 95 39.75" / Elite Y360S Grip
    Epon AF-Tour CB 4~PW - Oban CT-115 S+ / Iomic Sticky 1.8
    Epon Tour Wedge - F Grind 50°/10°, N Grind 54°/10°, O Grind 60°/9° - Oban CT-115 S+ / Iomic Sticky 1.8
    EVNROLL ER7 - Breakthrough Golf Technology Stability EI GJ 1.0 34" (75g Counter Balanced) / Garsen Tour Proto Grip
    Taylormade TP5X
    Epon Dead or Alive Stand Bag
    Footjoy Pure Touch Limited Glove / GFore Competition Stripe Onyx Glove

    Back-up Set
    Cobra KING LTD Black 9.0° - Project X HZRDUS Black 65 44" / Star Sidewinder Grip STD
    Cobra Bio Cell+ 14.5° - Mitsubishi Diamana Kai'li 70 43" (tipped 1.5") / Star Sidewinder Grip STD
    Callaway Apex UT 18° - Aerotech SteelFiber i95 40" / Star Sidewinder Grip STD
    Srixon Z745 4~PW - Nippon N.S.Pro Modus³ TOUR120 / Star Sidewinder Grip STD
    Titleist Vokey SM6 F Grind 50°/12°, SM6 F Grind 54°/14°, SM6 K Grind 60°/12° - Dynamic Gold / Star Sidewinder Grip STD
    Bettinardi BB1F - 34" / Flat Cat Solution Grip STD
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 22,925 ✭✭
    JI3 wrote:


    Assuming all the spec is same between two shafts (length, flex, grip, grip weight, adapter, adapter weight, same driver head) except for the weight of the counterbalanced shaft (60g vs. 70g), which shaft is going to have higher swing weight and what would be the approximate swing weight difference?

    ....

    Since this is counter-balanced shaft, and the majority of the weight distribution is towards the butt-end of the shaft, would that mean it would lower the swing weight as the weight of the shaft increase from 60g to 70g?




    "counterbalanced" in the context of a shaft design could mean anything as far as how the balance point of the shaft was affected. There is no standard for balance point either with respect to counterbalanced shafts or non-counterbalanced shafts. So the only accurate way to find out how the swing weight might be affected relative to another shaft, is to install it and check the swing weight on a scale.



    Well, if you want to take the time to measure the cut weight and balance point of both shafts (uninstalled), there are some online swing weight calculators that take the individual component specs (head weight, shaft weight, length and balance pt, and grip weight) and output an estimate of the swing weight.
  • JustinTanJustinTan Members Posts: 16


    still lost... if i put a 71 gram shaft in my 3 wood that had a 82 gram shaft what titleist weight would i need to make it sw factory?




    Try to imagine a see-saw.



    Headweight on one end, Butt-End Grip weight on the other.



    In general, putting a lighter shaft into your 3 wood, would result in a lower swing weight.



    But what must be considered is the balance point.



    Back to the see-saw, your shaft may be 71grams with a low balance point. As such, even at 71grams, you may have too high a swing weight.



    On the other hand, if you have a counter balance shaft, ie: Mitsubishi Tensei cK Pro Orange/Hzrdus T1100 Handcrafted/Fujilkura Tour Spec 2.0, the shaft will have a high balance point, resulting in a very neutral or too low a swing weight.



    So what you need to do, is put the 71gram shaft into your 3-wood head, get the swing weight measured.



    If its too low, you need to add head weight.



    You could add head weight by changing the weights in your 3-wood if it has any changeable weights.



    You could add head weight by adding lead tape to the bottom of the 3-wood.



    You could add head weight by putting tungsten powder or a head pin at the tip.



    With every 3 grams you should get back 1 swing weight point, but it all comes down to the balance point of the shaft as described above.
    Ping G400 Max 9*, Tensei Ck Pro Orange 60 TX, Butt Trimmed to 44.5", D-2 SW
    Ping G400 5 Wood 17.5*, Fujikura Atmos Tour Spec Blue 7X, Tipped 0.5", Butt Trimmed to 41.75", D-2 SW
    Titleist 818 H1 Hybrid 21*, Project X Evenflo Blue 8X, Butt Trimmed to 39.5", D-2 SW
    Titleist AP3 Irons 5-G, Project X LZ 6.0, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Cleveland RTX-4 52*, 56* & 60*, KBS Custom Wedge Series 130X

    Titleist TS2 9.5*, Evenflow White T1100 6.0, Butt Trimmed to 44.5", D-2 SW
    Taylormade M4 3 Wood 15*, Tour AD MJ 7X, Tipped 0.5", Butt Trimmed to 42.5", D-2 SW
    Callaway GBB Epic Hybrid 20*, UST Mamiya Recoil F4, Butt Trimmed to 39.5", D-2 SW
    Mizuno MP18 MMC Fli-Hi 4 Iron, True Temper AMT Red S300, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Mizuno MP18 MMC 5-6 Iron, True Temper AMT Red S300, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Mizuno MP18 SC 7-8 Iron, True Temper AMT Red S300, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Mizuno MP18 Blade 9-P Iron, True Temper AMT Red S300, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Titleist Vokey SM7 Wedges, 50*, 54* & 58*, N.S. Pro Modus Wedge Series Limited Edition Augusta Green 130X
  • JustinTanJustinTan Members Posts: 16
    JI3 wrote:


    Assuming all the spec is same between two shafts (length, flex, grip, grip weight, adapter, adapter weight, same driver head) except for the weight of the counterbalanced shaft (60g vs. 70g), which shaft is going to have higher swing weight and what would be the approximate swing weight difference? The particular shaft I'm referring to is Tensei Pro Orange. Since this is counter-balanced shaft, and the majority of the weight distribution is towards the butt-end of the shaft, would that mean it would lower the swing weight as the weight of the shaft increase from 60g to 70g?




    As long as you have a counter balanced shaft, the swing-weight will surely be lower than a low balanced shaft.



    I game the Tensei cK Pro Orange 60TX and the balance point is almost 55%. Its the most counter balanced shaft in the market, which allows the player to put more head-weight onto the driver height to bring up the mass/swing weight.



    Also do understand how heavy is your driver head(incl. adapter), every head weighs differently even if its the same brand & model. Like my Ping G400LST head weighed in at around 204 grams with the adapter and the stock head weight. With the Tensei cK Pro Orange 60TX butt trimmed to 43", the Swing Weight was D0. I had to change the weight in the head to a 13gram weight to bring up the swingweight just shy of D4.



    To understand the balance point, like my above post, imagine a see-saw and instead of having it in the middle, the weight is biased to the back.



    If you have a 60gram shaft with a low balance point, the swing weight with it might still be higher than a 70gram shaft with a super high balance point (counter-balanced shaft). But of course, alot of assumptions have to be made with regards to club-head weight, adapter weight etc.
    Ping G400 Max 9*, Tensei Ck Pro Orange 60 TX, Butt Trimmed to 44.5", D-2 SW
    Ping G400 5 Wood 17.5*, Fujikura Atmos Tour Spec Blue 7X, Tipped 0.5", Butt Trimmed to 41.75", D-2 SW
    Titleist 818 H1 Hybrid 21*, Project X Evenflo Blue 8X, Butt Trimmed to 39.5", D-2 SW
    Titleist AP3 Irons 5-G, Project X LZ 6.0, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Cleveland RTX-4 52*, 56* & 60*, KBS Custom Wedge Series 130X

    Titleist TS2 9.5*, Evenflow White T1100 6.0, Butt Trimmed to 44.5", D-2 SW
    Taylormade M4 3 Wood 15*, Tour AD MJ 7X, Tipped 0.5", Butt Trimmed to 42.5", D-2 SW
    Callaway GBB Epic Hybrid 20*, UST Mamiya Recoil F4, Butt Trimmed to 39.5", D-2 SW
    Mizuno MP18 MMC Fli-Hi 4 Iron, True Temper AMT Red S300, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Mizuno MP18 MMC 5-6 Iron, True Temper AMT Red S300, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Mizuno MP18 SC 7-8 Iron, True Temper AMT Red S300, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Mizuno MP18 Blade 9-P Iron, True Temper AMT Red S300, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Titleist Vokey SM7 Wedges, 50*, 54* & 58*, N.S. Pro Modus Wedge Series Limited Edition Augusta Green 130X
  • Bobcat43 wrote:


    Why isn't this pinned anymore? This is one of my goto posts.



    Thanks Mods! image/good.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':good:' />




    Always nice to read posts with intel like this, very educational. J
  • CTCCTC Members Posts: 65
    Stuart G. wrote:

    CTC wrote:


    When club builders assemble a set of irons with the manufacturer's standard specs, do the weight differences in the heads of the irons compensate for the different lengths, so that if all else equal (same grip, same amount of glue, or whatever), the swingweight of all the irons naturally end being the same?




    That's the intent with the designed (intended) head weights but the manufacturing process isn't perfect and will result in variations that builders will generally need to compensate for (as well as the need to compensate for the shaft lengths being cut imperfectly).




    Thanks!
  • JustinTanJustinTan Members Posts: 16
    edited Feb 2, 2019 6:04am #475
    CTC wrote:


    When club builders assemble a set of irons with the manufacturer's standard specs, do the weight differences in the heads of the irons compensate for the different lengths, so that if all else equal (same grip, same amount of glue, or whatever), the swingweight of all the irons naturally end being the same?




    In general yes. I personally think club head manufacturers tolerances are quite tight. So the weight differences are quite naturally progressive. Hence, in this equation, that leaves the shaft manufacturers.



    Club builders inherently depend on the consistency of shaft manufacturers to accurately fit an average golfer.



    Theres been a big debate about parallel tip shafts being more advantageous to the average golfer (compared to taper tips) because it allows for tip trimming to modify the flex & CPM frequency or EI profile of the shaft.



    However, in terms of consistency in weight and weight distribution, taper tip shafts have the advantage here. This is because every shaft is made specifically to spec for each club.



    This being said, only tour players will get such service of custom-made taper tip shafts from shaft manufacturers. Hence, commercially it still makes more sense for the average golfer to get parallel tip shafts.



    So to answer your question, its a yes. They should be the same swing weight. but then sometimes, due to tolerances of parallel tip shafts and human error, there can be slight differences.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
    Ping G400 Max 9*, Tensei Ck Pro Orange 60 TX, Butt Trimmed to 44.5", D-2 SW
    Ping G400 5 Wood 17.5*, Fujikura Atmos Tour Spec Blue 7X, Tipped 0.5", Butt Trimmed to 41.75", D-2 SW
    Titleist 818 H1 Hybrid 21*, Project X Evenflo Blue 8X, Butt Trimmed to 39.5", D-2 SW
    Titleist AP3 Irons 5-G, Project X LZ 6.0, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Cleveland RTX-4 52*, 56* & 60*, KBS Custom Wedge Series 130X

    Titleist TS2 9.5*, Evenflow White T1100 6.0, Butt Trimmed to 44.5", D-2 SW
    Taylormade M4 3 Wood 15*, Tour AD MJ 7X, Tipped 0.5", Butt Trimmed to 42.5", D-2 SW
    Callaway GBB Epic Hybrid 20*, UST Mamiya Recoil F4, Butt Trimmed to 39.5", D-2 SW
    Mizuno MP18 MMC Fli-Hi 4 Iron, True Temper AMT Red S300, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Mizuno MP18 MMC 5-6 Iron, True Temper AMT Red S300, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Mizuno MP18 SC 7-8 Iron, True Temper AMT Red S300, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Mizuno MP18 Blade 9-P Iron, True Temper AMT Red S300, Butt Trimmed 0.5", D-2 SW
    Titleist Vokey SM7 Wedges, 50*, 54* & 58*, N.S. Pro Modus Wedge Series Limited Edition Augusta Green 130X
  • Hester65Hester65 Members Posts: 602 ✭✭
    edited Feb 18, 2019 1:42am #476
    Got a bit of a dilemma. Recently switched from a driver playing d5 (razr fit xtreme with ahina 70x 43.5”) to one playing c7-8 (910d3 with kaili 70x 44”). I quite liked the feel of d5 but the feel of the new driver doesn’t really bother me. Didn’t really seem to affect my performance, either.



    The dilemma is that the 3 wood (910 kaili 80x 42ish”) that’s playing c7-8 does feel a little light in the head. It’s most likely the Indian not the arrow. My hybrid is d1, irons d2, wedges d3. I just don’t feel in control of the 3 wood to the degree I would like.



    Weights for the Titleist 910 are hard to come by. Id love to get my hands on the 12g weight (I think all the titleists came with a 7g weight). That would get the head weight up a touch.



    I was told adding a tip weight would make the club a little more draw bias. I’d like to make the head feel heavier without lead tape or hot melt but I’m cautious of the tip weight. I like the sound/feel of the club as it is.



    Does anyone have experience to share on tip weighting?
    There's nothing in the rule book that says you can't play drunk.
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 22,925 ✭✭
    edited Feb 18, 2019 4:35am #477
    Hester65 wrote:


    Weights for the Titleist 910 are hard to come by. Id love to get my hands on the 12g weight (I think all the titleists came with a 7g weight). That would get the head weight up a touch.



    I was told adding a tip weight would make the club a little more draw bias. I'd like to make the head feel heavier without lead tape or hot melt but I'm cautious of the tip weight. I like the sound/feel of the club as it is.




    No, tip weights will not give the club a draw bias even if you used the biggest ones @10 gm. Sure it's nice to us tip weights during the original build if you know you'll need them but after the fact, quite frankly, the lead tape is just so much easier, it's hard to understand that type of aversion. You can add or remove a little at a time to dial in the weight. Also, no need to pull the shaft and reinstall (which also means replacing the ferrule each time). On the sole, you wont even notice it's there at address.
  • Hester65Hester65 Members Posts: 602 ✭✭
    edited Feb 18, 2019 10:58am #478
    Stuart G. wrote:

    Hester65 wrote:


    Weights for the Titleist 910 are hard to come by. Id love to get my hands on the 12g weight (I think all the titleists came with a 7g weight). That would get the head weight up a touch.



    I was told adding a tip weight would make the club a little more draw bias. I'd like to make the head feel heavier without lead tape or hot melt but I'm cautious of the tip weight. I like the sound/feel of the club as it is.




    No, tip weights will not give the club a draw bias even if you used the biggest ones @10 gm. Sure it's nice to us tip weights during the original build if you know you'll need them but after the fact, quite frankly, the lead tape is just so much easier, it's hard to understand that type of aversion. You can add or remove a little at a time to dial in the weight. Also, no need to pull the shaft and reinstall (which also means replacing the ferrule each time). On the sole, you wont even notice it's there at address.




    Thanks for the info. It needs quite a bit of lead tape to get back to “d” and there isn’t much space for it but maybe just a little will get it feeling better. I was also concerned with turf interaction and the tape.
    There's nothing in the rule book that says you can't play drunk.
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 22,925 ✭✭
    Well you don't really want it very close to the leading edge - not that it will do anything to the performance of the club, but it will increase the risk of the tape getting knocked of during play. Best places can vary depending on the design of the sole. Also can wrap it around the shaft as close to the hosel/ferrule as possible - I do that quite a bit to manage swing weight of multiple shafts used the same head.



    For large amounts of weight, some times a combination can be needed since there are limits when using tip weights.



    Even if you're going to use a tip weight in the long run - the lead tape approach will always be the best way to find out the best amount of weight to add.
  • K13K13 Members Posts: 98 ✭✭




    What you are thinkering with is NOT Swing weight, but Counterweight, and thats a hole different thing.

    When we deal with a SW scale we must use it the way it was designed to be used, with a grip of 50-52 grams

    If you go higher or lower, we do NOT read a correct SW value, but trick the scale by using plus or minus counterweight.






    Thanks for everything in this thread - it's really helpful.



    I've seen here and in another thread (that I'm having a hard time finding) where you've advocated for calculating swing weight without tape or a grip on the shaft, and simply deducting the 9 swing points you'd expect for a standard 50g grip. I love this approach because it seems to help with consistency, and prior to assembly it feels like there are about 984 different variables at play.



    One thing bugging me though is the impact on length - since the cap of the grip will add 1/4" to 1/2", should I not adjust that 9 sw point factor? Or is that what you've already done by making it nine instead of, say, 11 (which would make sense with a 50g shaft and a rule of thumb of 5/g/sw point + one or so for tape)?



    Thanks again.
  • Stuart_GStuart_G New HampshireMembers Posts: 22,925 ✭✭
    edited Feb 20, 2019 5:15am #481
    K13 wrote:


    One thing bugging me though is the impact on length - since the cap of the grip will add 1/4" to 1/2", should I not adjust that 9 sw point factor? Or is that what you've already done by making it nine instead of, say, 11 (which would make sense with a 50g shaft and a rule of thumb of 5/g/sw point + one or so for tape)?



    Thanks again.




    No, not usually. In fact, that's one of the reasons why it's better to use the scale w/o the grip. Variations in grip cap size will effect what the swing weight scale will read with the grip installed but it usually doesn't effect the actual playing length (or effective swing weight) - which is measured to the edge of the grip cap and not the top of any dome on the grip. Remember, It's the edge that will generally determine where we place our hands on the grip and the effective playing length/effective swing weight, not any part that sticks up above it. The GP NDMC is a perfect example where the grip can make the scale think the club is longer than it really is and therefore the SW heavier than it really is.
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