Advantages of Center Shafted Putter?

5UnderPar5UnderPar Members Posts: 906 ✭✭
Thinking about trying Bettinardi BH Hawk
Seems to have great weight and balance in the pro shop. Other than that, never tried a center-shafted putter before. Any advantages over, say, heel-shafted?
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Comments

  • KDMullinsKDMullins Members Posts: 3,391 ✭✭
    There aren't any "advantages" per se. I putt best with heel shafted putters with significant toe hang, so it would be a huge disadvantage for me if I had to putt with a center shaft. It's just a question of whether it fits your stroke style or not. IMO, there's not a great way to know one way or the other without trying one, and with any putter, it's got to feel right, and you need to be able to hit it where you're aiming.



    For example, because I putt better with a heavier toed putter (meaning I hit those where I'm aiming with my normal stroke), so if you handed me a true center shafted putter (i.e. face balanced), and I putted with my normal stroke, I would consistently miss left because the toe is "lighter," and the face closes much faster.
  • herbst20herbst20 Members Posts: 164 ✭✭
    Great post Kris! I on the other hand have a straight back and straight through stroke so the Centershaft has helped me tremendously. I am in the process of converting my collection over so that it is only Centershaft putters. Just received a 007 Spud from Byron Morgan and I love it!.



    Scott
  • hebron1427hebron1427 Older. Slower. Weaker. AtlJeff Members Posts: 3,720
    KDMullins wrote:


    There aren't any "advantages" per se. I putt best with heel shafted putters with significant toe hang, so it would be a huge disadvantage for me if I had to putt with a center shaft. It's just a question of whether it fits your stroke style or not. IMO, there's not a great way to know one way or the other without trying one, and with any putter, it's got to feel right, and you need to be able to hit it where you're aiming.



    For example, because I putt better with a heavier toed putter (meaning I hit those where I'm aiming with my normal stroke), so if you handed me a true center shafted putter (i.e. face balanced), and I putted with my normal stroke, I would consistently miss left because the toe is "lighter," and the face closes much faster.




    +1. couldn't say it better. well done.
  • gr8blueheronbirdgr8blueheronbird Members Posts: 1,322 ✭✭
    It has been explained to me that center shafted putters are for those who have a straight back and straight through stroke where as a heel shafted putter is for those who go back to the right slightly and then come through the ball and follow through to the left. Hope that explanation helps.



  • kiwiikiwii Members Posts: 712 ✭✭
    In addition to the "difference" of CS being ideal for straight strokes I think another significance is that CS lines up with your eyes, the ball and line of your stroke in a slightly different location. So again it applies that this might feel more comfortable for some.
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  • ClemsonfanClemsonfan Members Posts: 79
    edited Jan 22, 2015 #7
    I believe center shafted putters fit more than SBST. Seemore promotes a slight arc based on their putting ambassador's, Pat O'Brien, method. If you tend to miss right, then the offset models would work.
  • BarronDDSBarronDDS Members Posts: 901 ✭✭
    Also CS putters are supposed to be better for left eye dominant golfers, like me. Dont know if it helps, i just like the look!
  • Chief71Chief71 Members Posts: 339 ✭✭
    edited Jan 22, 2015 #9
    KDMullins wrote:


    There aren't any "advantages" per se. I putt best with heel shafted putters with significant toe hang, so it would be a huge disadvantage for me if I had to putt with a center shaft. It's just a question of whether it fits your stroke style or not. IMO, there's not a great way to know one way or the other without trying one, and with any putter, it's got to feel right, and you need to be able to hit it where you're aiming.



    For example, because I putt better with a heavier toed putter (meaning I hit those where I'm aiming with my normal stroke), so if you handed me a true center shafted putter (i.e. face balanced), and I putted with my normal stroke, I would consistently miss left because the toe is "lighter," and the face closes much faster.




    Great explanation. I putt better with a straight back, straight thru compared to your stroke. Random, but I lived in Lexington when I was in elementary in the early 80's before moving to Razorback country. image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' /> Nice city Lexington..



    For me, I also tend to see the line and line up my putter better with a center shafted putter. The offset of most heel shafted putters mess with me and I never feel confident in my line.
  • dbleagdbleag Members Posts: 2,876 ✭✭
    FYI, this is from an older thread. I saved it for my general knowledge of center-shafted putters vs. others. I'm pretty sure the author posts on GolfWRX quite regularly.





    Here's a brief "center-shafted putter" theory by Putting Guru, Geoff Mangum:Center Shafted vs. Heel Shafted: Why should you use a center-shafted model ????



    The key word here is "tastes." A taste is a habit. The Chinese eat dog meat. Some folks in South America eat bug larvae. Some folks in southeast Asia eat monkey brains. Historically, putters were usually heel-shafted, mostly because other clubs are heel-shafted and also because the Brits (R&A) banned center-shafted putters for about 50 years. The humorous thing is that center-shafted putters now have such success in the market, that even some designers who previously swore never to make a center-shafted putter have jumped on the bandwagon after abandoning all self-respect and principle. If you use a heel-shafted putter, the tool will teach you the "habit" of success with it, or else you will discard it. So if you keep the heel-shafted putter, its inherent physics has trained you into a habit. The habit consists partially of habitual patterns of perception and partially of patterns of movement and feelings. For example, a heel-shafted putter looks and feels a bit more like swinging a bat around your stance, with certain implications for how you perceive the stroke and ball impact, and how you expect things to look and feel in the movement. The instincts rely upon these habits.



    If you use a center-shafted putter, the tool will teach you the "habit" of success with it, or else you will discard it. A center-shafted putter swings more vertically up thru a ball, unlike a baseball-style swing with a heel-shafted putter sideways thru a ball. This implies a different set of visual and kinesthetic "habits" in using the center-shafted putter.



    You can use a heel-shafted putter with the same habits appropriate to a center-shafted putter if you add a trick or two, and vice versa. (Many if not most belly putters are center-shafted, yet swung around the stance more like a bat than a pendulum.) The bottom-line question is which is better, and what is required for you to unlearn inappropriate habits and to learn new, appropriate habits if you switch?



    In my view the center-shafted putter is better in general than heel-shafted putters, because heel-shafted putters have physics in them that promote action of the putter separate and apart from what the golfer is deliberately intending. In particular, the typical hoseling and balancing of a heel-shafted putter promotes so-called "toe flow." This is an EXTRA opening of the putter going back that may or may not be matched coming forward. The physics of "toe-flow" is the added inertia in the stroke of the toe about the axis of the hosel. This physics opens the toe going back, and tends to KEEP the toe open coming thru impact. This doesn't make a lot of sense.



    The golfer who gets trained by his heel-shafted putter has to learn how to manipulate the physics of the putter correctly. This obviously can be accomplished over time -- witness Ben Crenshaw. But why engage in a battle that is not compelled? Just don't get a heel-shafted putter. The center-shafted, face-balanced (or reality balanced) putter doesn't have these same tendencies from physics. Then the golfer's task in getting trained by the tool is a little easier and simpler.



    Heel-shafted putters are an historical accident that some people seek to justify with a bogus rationale. What the physics really does is make the putter designer an unwitting partner in every stroke: you do this and the designer adds that. I prefer to putt alone.



    So when you switch from heel-shafted to center-shafted, you get a slight unburdening, but you are temporarily stuck with old heel-shafted habits. It takes a while to learn the new "look and feel" of the center-shafted putter, and thus "acquire the taste" for the tool.



    A compromise is a putter with the actual hoseling towards the heel, but for which the shaft AIMS at the center. These putters are face balanced, and appear to be heel-shafted, but are really center-shafted with heel-hoseling. This would be a good transition putter, allowing you to ease into the tool's training of you without a lot of contrast with old habits.



    Keep your tastes -- just get rid of unhelpful physics.
  • wooleebooleewooleeboolee Members Posts: 239
    dbleag wrote:


    FYI, this is from an older thread. I saved it for my general knowledge of center-shafted putters vs. others. I'm pretty sure the author posts on GolfWRX quite regularly.





    Here's a brief "center-shafted putter" theory by Putting Guru, Geoff Mangum:Center Shafted vs. Heel Shafted: Why should you use a center-shafted model ????



    The key word here is "tastes." A taste is a habit. The Chinese eat dog meat. Some folks in South America eat bug larvae. Some folks in southeast Asia eat monkey brains. Historically, putters were usually heel-shafted, mostly because other clubs are heel-shafted and also because the Brits (R&A) banned center-shafted putters for about 50 years. The humorous thing is that center-shafted putters now have such success in the market, that even some designers who previously swore never to make a center-shafted putter have jumped on the bandwagon after abandoning all self-respect and principle. If you use a heel-shafted putter, the tool will teach you the "habit" of success with it, or else you will discard it. So if you keep the heel-shafted putter, its inherent physics has trained you into a habit. The habit consists partially of habitual patterns of perception and partially of patterns of movement and feelings. For example, a heel-shafted putter looks and feels a bit more like swinging a bat around your stance, with certain implications for how you perceive the stroke and ball impact, and how you expect things to look and feel in the movement. The instincts rely upon these habits.



    If you use a center-shafted putter, the tool will teach you the "habit" of success with it, or else you will discard it. A center-shafted putter swings more vertically up thru a ball, unlike a baseball-style swing with a heel-shafted putter sideways thru a ball. This implies a different set of visual and kinesthetic "habits" in using the center-shafted putter.



    You can use a heel-shafted putter with the same habits appropriate to a center-shafted putter if you add a trick or two, and vice versa. (Many if not most belly putters are center-shafted, yet swung around the stance more like a bat than a pendulum.) The bottom-line question is which is better, and what is required for you to unlearn inappropriate habits and to learn new, appropriate habits if you switch?



    In my view the center-shafted putter is better in general than heel-shafted putters, because heel-shafted putters have physics in them that promote action of the putter separate and apart from what the golfer is deliberately intending. In particular, the typical hoseling and balancing of a heel-shafted putter promotes so-called "toe flow." This is an EXTRA opening of the putter going back that may or may not be matched coming forward. The physics of "toe-flow" is the added inertia in the stroke of the toe about the axis of the hosel. This physics opens the toe going back, and tends to KEEP the toe open coming thru impact. This doesn't make a lot of sense.



    The golfer who gets trained by his heel-shafted putter has to learn how to manipulate the physics of the putter correctly. This obviously can be accomplished over time -- witness Ben Crenshaw. But why engage in a battle that is not compelled? Just don't get a heel-shafted putter. The center-shafted, face-balanced (or reality balanced) putter doesn't have these same tendencies from physics. Then the golfer's task in getting trained by the tool is a little easier and simpler.



    Heel-shafted putters are an historical accident that some people seek to justify with a bogus rationale. What the physics really does is make the putter designer an unwitting partner in every stroke: you do this and the designer adds that. I prefer to putt alone.



    So when you switch from heel-shafted to center-shafted, you get a slight unburdening, but you are temporarily stuck with old heel-shafted habits. It takes a while to learn the new "look and feel" of the center-shafted putter, and thus "acquire the taste" for the tool.



    A compromise is a putter with the actual hoseling towards the heel, but for which the shaft AIMS at the center. These putters are face balanced, and appear to be heel-shafted, but are really center-shafted with heel-hoseling. This would be a good transition putter, allowing you to ease into the tool's training of you without a lot of contrast with old habits.



    Keep your tastes -- just get rid of unhelpful physics.




    Wow. Great excerpt, DB. Thanks for sharing it. I'm a center shaft fan but have a couple of heel shafted putters too. The excerpt fully explained why I tend to manipulate my putts with a heel shaft. I'm a SBST and left eye dominant putter. No wonder I putt better with the CS putters. But I'm now going to have swing thoughts of bug larvae infested dog meat and monkey brains every time I use my putter!! Thanks a lot!!!
  • dinglebdingleb Members Posts: 19
    I've used face balanced CS putters for years. Now I know why my miss was always left. Darn toe could have been closing too fast. Recently, switched to heel shafted. Putts seem to go in more.
  • Manz60Manz60 Members Posts: 1,782 ✭✭
    there is no dilenation between shaft insertion and putter stroke path. You can use a face balance on both straight back and through stroke and curved screen door; you can use toe hang putter on SBST or curved path.



    The face balance will not add dynamic forses during the transition and toe hang may compliment or correct a curved path (2 schools of thought).



    No performance advantages even when you consider the use of straight or offset shaft in either shaft insertion point. Offset sets the ball position slightly back.



    Hope this helps

    M60
  • canyoudigitcanyoudigit Members Posts: 8
    dbleag wrote:


    FYI, this is from an older thread. I saved it for my general knowledge of center-shafted putters vs. others. I'm pretty sure the author posts on GolfWRX quite regularly.





    Here's a brief "center-shafted putter" theory by Putting Guru, Geoff Mangum:Center Shafted vs. Heel Shafted: Why should you use a center-shafted model ????



    The key word here is "tastes." A taste is a habit. The Chinese eat dog meat. Some folks in South America eat bug larvae. Some folks in southeast Asia eat monkey brains. Historically, putters were usually heel-shafted, mostly because other clubs are heel-shafted and also because the Brits (R&A) banned center-shafted putters for about 50 years. The humorous thing is that center-shafted putters now have such success in the market, that even some designers who previously swore never to make a center-shafted putter have jumped on the bandwagon after abandoning all self-respect and principle. If you use a heel-shafted putter, the tool will teach you the "habit" of success with it, or else you will discard it. So if you keep the heel-shafted putter, its inherent physics has trained you into a habit. The habit consists partially of habitual patterns of perception and partially of patterns of movement and feelings. For example, a heel-shafted putter looks and feels a bit more like swinging a bat around your stance, with certain implications for how you perceive the stroke and ball impact, and how you expect things to look and feel in the movement. The instincts rely upon these habits.



    If you use a center-shafted putter, the tool will teach you the "habit" of success with it, or else you will discard it. A center-shafted putter swings more vertically up thru a ball, unlike a baseball-style swing with a heel-shafted putter sideways thru a ball. This implies a different set of visual and kinesthetic "habits" in using the center-shafted putter.



    You can use a heel-shafted putter with the same habits appropriate to a center-shafted putter if you add a trick or two, and vice versa. (Many if not most belly putters are center-shafted, yet swung around the stance more like a bat than a pendulum.) The bottom-line question is which is better, and what is required for you to unlearn inappropriate habits and to learn new, appropriate habits if you switch?



    In my view the center-shafted putter is better in general than heel-shafted putters, because heel-shafted putters have physics in them that promote action of the putter separate and apart from what the golfer is deliberately intending. In particular, the typical hoseling and balancing of a heel-shafted putter promotes so-called "toe flow." This is an EXTRA opening of the putter going back that may or may not be matched coming forward. The physics of "toe-flow" is the added inertia in the stroke of the toe about the axis of the hosel. This physics opens the toe going back, and tends to KEEP the toe open coming thru impact. This doesn't make a lot of sense.



    The golfer who gets trained by his heel-shafted putter has to learn how to manipulate the physics of the putter correctly. This obviously can be accomplished over time -- witness Ben Crenshaw. But why engage in a battle that is not compelled? Just don't get a heel-shafted putter. The center-shafted, face-balanced (or reality balanced) putter doesn't have these same tendencies from physics. Then the golfer's task in getting trained by the tool is a little easier and simpler.



    Heel-shafted putters are an historical accident that some people seek to justify with a bogus rationale. What the physics really does is make the putter designer an unwitting partner in every stroke: you do this and the designer adds that. I prefer to putt alone.



    So when you switch from heel-shafted to center-shafted, you get a slight unburdening, but you are temporarily stuck with old heel-shafted habits. It takes a while to learn the new "look and feel" of the center-shafted putter, and thus "acquire the taste" for the tool.



    A compromise is a putter with the actual hoseling towards the heel, but for which the shaft AIMS at the center. These putters are face balanced, and appear to be heel-shafted, but are really center-shafted with heel-hoseling. This would be a good transition putter, allowing you to ease into the tool's training of you without a lot of contrast with old habits.



    Keep your tastes -- just get rid of unhelpful physics.




    I have been using the Odyssey #9 for the past 2 years and have seen an improvement in my putting overall, except for putts in the 3-6' range where I find myself "pulling" to the left. Perhaps its just an overzealous toe that causes this. I did bring my Dad's old TP Mills to the course last year and had some success, but who uses a 65 year old putter!.Just purchased an Odyssey 2csPro on clearance at Golf Galaxy, same visual feel as the TP Mills but a 21st century club. I am left eye dominant.
  • KDMullinsKDMullins Members Posts: 3,391 ✭✭
    edited Feb 7, 2015 #15
    dbleag wrote:


    FYI, this is from an older thread. I saved it for my general knowledge of center-shafted putters vs. others. I'm pretty sure the author posts on GolfWRX quite regularly.





    Here's a brief "center-shafted putter" theory by Putting Guru, Geoff Mangum:Center Shafted vs. Heel Shafted: Why should you use a center-shafted model ????



    The key word here is "tastes." A taste is a habit. The Chinese eat dog meat. Some folks in South America eat bug larvae. Some folks in southeast Asia eat monkey brains. Historically, putters were usually heel-shafted, mostly because other clubs are heel-shafted and also because the Brits (R&A) banned center-shafted putters for about 50 years. The humorous thing is that center-shafted putters now have such success in the market, that even some designers who previously swore never to make a center-shafted putter have jumped on the bandwagon after abandoning all self-respect and principle. If you use a heel-shafted putter, the tool will teach you the "habit" of success with it, or else you will discard it. So if you keep the heel-shafted putter, its inherent physics has trained you into a habit. The habit consists partially of habitual patterns of perception and partially of patterns of movement and feelings. For example, a heel-shafted putter looks and feels a bit more like swinging a bat around your stance, with certain implications for how you perceive the stroke and ball impact, and how you expect things to look and feel in the movement. The instincts rely upon these habits.



    If you use a center-shafted putter, the tool will teach you the "habit" of success with it, or else you will discard it. A center-shafted putter swings more vertically up thru a ball, unlike a baseball-style swing with a heel-shafted putter sideways thru a ball. This implies a different set of visual and kinesthetic "habits" in using the center-shafted putter.



    You can use a heel-shafted putter with the same habits appropriate to a center-shafted putter if you add a trick or two, and vice versa. (Many if not most belly putters are center-shafted, yet swung around the stance more like a bat than a pendulum.) The bottom-line question is which is better, and what is required for you to unlearn inappropriate habits and to learn new, appropriate habits if you switch?



    In my view the center-shafted putter is better in general than heel-shafted putters, because heel-shafted putters have physics in them that promote action of the putter separate and apart from what the golfer is deliberately intending. In particular, the typical hoseling and balancing of a heel-shafted putter promotes so-called "toe flow." This is an EXTRA opening of the putter going back that may or may not be matched coming forward. The physics of "toe-flow" is the added inertia in the stroke of the toe about the axis of the hosel. This physics opens the toe going back, and tends to KEEP the toe open coming thru impact. This doesn't make a lot of sense.



    The golfer who gets trained by his heel-shafted putter has to learn how to manipulate the physics of the putter correctly. This obviously can be accomplished over time -- witness Ben Crenshaw. But why engage in a battle that is not compelled? Just don't get a heel-shafted putter. The center-shafted, face-balanced (or reality balanced) putter doesn't have these same tendencies from physics. Then the golfer's task in getting trained by the tool is a little easier and simpler.



    Heel-shafted putters are an historical accident that some people seek to justify with a bogus rationale. What the physics really does is make the putter designer an unwitting partner in every stroke: you do this and the designer adds that. I prefer to putt alone.



    So when you switch from heel-shafted to center-shafted, you get a slight unburdening, but you are temporarily stuck with old heel-shafted habits. It takes a while to learn the new "look and feel" of the center-shafted putter, and thus "acquire the taste" for the tool.



    A compromise is a putter with the actual hoseling towards the heel, but for which the shaft AIMS at the center. These putters are face balanced, and appear to be heel-shafted, but are really center-shafted with heel-hoseling. This would be a good transition putter, allowing you to ease into the tool's training of you without a lot of contrast with old habits.



    Keep your tastes -- just get rid of unhelpful physics.




    Sounds somewhat logical, but I don't agree. In general, face balanced putters operate contrary to natural motion IMO. When you're standing stationary to the the side of a ball and are attempting to propel it forward on a straight line, the club naturally arcs inside the ball line on the backstroke and back inside on the through stroke. Anything else is the result of some manipulation of the shoulders and/or hands, intentional or not.
  • dbleagdbleag Members Posts: 2,876 ✭✭
    edited Apr 18, 2015 #16
    Original center-shafted type putter:



    The Schnectady Putter



    SCHENECTADY PUTTER



    The convenient name given to a popular putter design of the very early twentieth century, invented by an engineer who worked at Thomas Edison's Schenectady facility (by then called "General Electric"). A. F. Knight's club was popular because it was effective - not because it was pretty.



    The putter head was a mallet design featuring a flat face cut by crosshatch grooves. The shape alone was not a source of repulsion. Indeed, the wooden prototype (weighted with buckshot) was an attractive weapon. However, production models were crafted of a cheap alloy of aluminum appended to a hickory shaft. And this dull-grey, unpolished casting is what earned the putter such angry stares. Perhaps the center-shafted mount contributed to its shame. At the time, almost all putters were bladed, heel-shafted designs.



    Ugly or not, the market exploded in 1905 after initial units found success in sanctioned events, including the United States Open where Walter Travis finished second with the club.



    Travis (an American) then won the British Amateur, an event sanctioned by R & A. They reacted by banning all center-shafted clubs soon after. It was not until the 1951 power struggle between the USGA and R&A when this prohibition was lifted. By that time, the Schenectady putter was forty-years behind the times - it's marketing prospects severely damaged.



    This did not prevent Knight from gaining considerable fame in the Mohawk Valley. Indeed, he was selected co-designer of the city's municiple course which opened in 1935.



    It's unclear the putter was ever deliberately named "Schenectady". Knight built the prototype for his own use. After allowing others to try the club, requests for copies simply specified "that Schenectady putter" and the name stuck.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • TPDawnPatrol TPDawnPatrol Torrey Pines Dawn Patrol Members Posts: 2,185
    edited Apr 18, 2015 #17
    I like to twirl my putter when I'm waiting my turn to putt. Center-shafted putters are impossible to twirl using only one hand. Putters need toe flow to be twirlable, and thus heel-shafted putters are the easiest to twirl.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
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  • HackerD  HackerD Student of the game Members Posts: 3,143 ✭✭
    BarronDDS wrote:


    Also CS putters are supposed to be better for left eye dominant golfers, like me. Dont know if it helps, i just like the look!


    I read this somewhere too. Left eye dominant goes with center shaft. I am left eye dominant but have only tinkered with CS putters. I have a Seemore in the closet maybe I should try again.
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  • pmcukpmcuk Members Posts: 5,531 ✭✭
    BarronDDS wrote:


    Also CS putters are supposed to be better for left eye dominant golfers, like me. Dont know if it helps, i just like the look!




    Yeah - I'm left eye dominant. I find centre shafts much easier to line up and look down at.
  • bellairemibellairemi Members Posts: 400 ✭✭
    I think I am odd in that I am right eye dominant but much prefer center-shafted putters. In my case, I think as envision the stoke as straight back and through (not that I manipulate it as such) and the gating motion of a heel-shafted putter runs counter to that perception.
  • Badgergolfer2Badgergolfer2 Members Posts: 1,355
    Ive used quite a lot of center shaft putters and really the only difference is that theres less face rotation with them. In the past, I had much more of a straight back, straight through stroke and theyre great for that. Lately, my stroke has developed more of an arc, so a CS doesnt really suit me anymore. I not like feeling the toe of the putter as it opens and closes throughout the stroke, which is why I not prefer a heel shafted blade.
  • The Tufted PuffinThe Tufted Puffin Tufted Puffin Members Posts: 55
    I am left eye dominant and I can aim the CS putter much more naturally than HS. My stroke is more of a shoulder rock than a shoulder turn. I don't follow the putter head with my eyes - I keep them focused on the contact point on back of the ball - so I don't really know or care if the toe is opening on the backswing and closing on the throughswing. I just care about hitting my contact point with the center of my putter head.
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  • Beastmode BrokerBeastmode Broker Canadian AF Members Posts: 6,317 ✭✭
    after a 2 hour fitting last year, it was determined that a CS was best for me

    played the whole year w the same putter and started this w the same one



    its ugly - but I putt A LOT better w it than anything else
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    Taylormade Milled Collection Mullen 35"
  • dreamwizarddreamwizard Members Posts: 7
    if your a good putter ull notice that if u try out 10 different putters youll make puts with all of em.if your a poor putter you may get some help from a cetain type putter but ull still be an poor putter.my advice is practice.u cant buy anything that will MAKE u good.
  • cj4501cj4501 Members Posts: 518 ✭✭
    Maybe a stupid question but how do you know if you're left eye dominant?
  • KaBoom21KaBoom21 Members Posts: 1,570
    From the internet:



    dominant-triangle.jpg



    Extend both hands forward of your body and place the hands together making a small triangle (approximately 1/2 to 3/4 inch per side) between your thumbs and the first knuckle.

    With both eyes open, look through the triangle and center something such as a doorknob in the triangle.

    Close your left eye. If the object remains in view, you are right eye dominant. If closing your right eye keeps the object in view, you are left eye dominant.
  • cj4501cj4501 Members Posts: 518 ✭✭
    Mind blown. Super left eye dominate. Thanks! Maybe I'll try a cs putter now
  • KaBoom21KaBoom21 Members Posts: 1,570
    I'm legally blind in my right eye, so very left eye dominant. It's the lack of offset, not the CS aspect that works. I've played CS putters for a few years, but generally putt best with zero offset.
  • cj4501cj4501 Members Posts: 518 ✭✭
    I like but don't love my scotty m2, might swing In to a pro shop and try one out. I definitely use a sbst strike too
  • SCOTT4099SCOTT4099 Members Posts: 982 ✭✭
    I’m right eye dominant so does that mean I should sell my Scotty Cameron Newport 2.6 putter?
    Callaway epic 9.0
    Cobra bio cell 3/4
    Ping G 19 degree hybrid
    Ping ie1 4-AW modus 105
    Callaway MD3 54/58 wedges
    Cleveland HB soft 11 putter 35
  • DK<80DK<80 Members Posts: 271 ✭✭
    For those of you who've been gaming a cs putter for a while....have you tried going back to a traditional heel shafted putter?



    I went to PGA superstore recently to try some putters for fun and wow I couldn't hit any of them straight! Grabbed a cs off the rack and it just looked better and I rolled the putts better. Not sure if this is because the cs is right for me or if it just happened over time?
    TaylorMade SLDR 430 12°
    Titleist 917F2 15°
    TaylorMade r9 19°
    Cleveland Classic 4h 23°
    Titleist 712 AP2 (5-PW)
    Cleveland 588 RTG (54°, 60°, 64°)
    Nike Method Core MC-4iX
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