Watch Enthusiasts

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  • RJRJRJRJRJRJ Members Posts: 5,935 ✭✭
    LeoKal wrote:


    But the notion of paying thousands, tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands for a wrist watch is, in my opinion, pretty silly.




    Are you also against expensive art, cars, clothing, electronics...?
    Ping G25 w/ RIP Phenom
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  • MattTheTaffMattTheTaff Oh, I used to be disgusted.. and now I try to be amused Members Posts: 2,252 ✭✭
    Casio POS for work (I'm always carrying large objects so I'm forever bumping my wrist on the edges of desks, door frames, equipment, etc)



    Titleist 905R - 10.5°
    Titleist 904f - 17°
    Cleveland Mashie - 20.5°
    Mizuno MP32 - 3-PW
    Cleveland 588 Forged 54°/60°
    Wilson Staff 8882
  • hogan234hogan234 Members Posts: 2,380 ✭✭✭✭✭✭


    Casio POS for work (I'm always carrying large objects so I'm forever bumping my wrist on the edges of desks, door frames, equipment, etc)







    My perspective on nice watches have changed with 2 boys under 6. No use having a nice watch on your wrist if you're wrestling 2 kids around. My G-Shock is perfect for everyday life. My nice watch get used less and less these days.
    TaylorMade R9 SuperTri 10.5* 
    Adams Tightlies 16* Matrix Code 6.2
    Adams A7 19* AxivCore 85
    Adams A7 22* AxivCore 85
    Mizuno MX25 5-PW Exsar IS-2
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    TaylorMade TPA X
    ProV1x/KSig
  • hogan234hogan234 Members Posts: 2,380 ✭✭✭✭✭✭


    There are a lot of options. Omegas and Rolexes are nice middle of the road/second tier daily drivers $-$$ (and Rolex $$$ depending upon how pimped out (ice) you want your bezel). Rolex is not really renowned for its complications though. The upper level/boutique brands Patek, IWC etc also have baseline simple watches $$-$$$ in addition to their others that span all tax brackets $$$$$$$$$ and mind boggling complications. <br />

    <br />

    The s/s Daytona is my travel & hunting watch, the gold Daytona is my everyday watch & the Rose Gold Moonphase Patek is my work/evening watch (the

    dial is in Italian).




    Beautiful collection and good for you for using your Daytona for hunting. I see too many people spend a lot of money on Rolexes and not use it for what they're meant for. I have a friend who is an avid outdoorsman. He's not a huge watch guy, but got a Submariner years ago as a gift. It was really beat up, but he USED it (fishing, hunting, diving, chopping wood, etc.). The Rolex company would be proud of how his watch was being used.
    TaylorMade R9 SuperTri 10.5* 
    Adams Tightlies 16* Matrix Code 6.2
    Adams A7 19* AxivCore 85
    Adams A7 22* AxivCore 85
    Mizuno MX25 5-PW Exsar IS-2
    Mizuno MP-T 51* Exsar IS-2
    Mizuno MP-T 58* SteelFiber i85
    TaylorMade TPA X
    ProV1x/KSig
  • hogan234hogan234 Members Posts: 2,380 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    spazo wrote:


    can someone provide a primer on watch buying? I've been thinking about getting something soon but don't know enough to pony up money. I know Rolex is understood to be overpriced but that's about it




    I don't know what you're currently wearing, but many higher-end watches will have automatic movements. If you decide to purchase an automatic, don't be surprised if it's not as accurate as a Timex or Casio quartz (battery) watch.
    TaylorMade R9 SuperTri 10.5* 
    Adams Tightlies 16* Matrix Code 6.2
    Adams A7 19* AxivCore 85
    Adams A7 22* AxivCore 85
    Mizuno MX25 5-PW Exsar IS-2
    Mizuno MP-T 51* Exsar IS-2
    Mizuno MP-T 58* SteelFiber i85
    TaylorMade TPA X
    ProV1x/KSig
  • 12tamale12tamale Members Posts: 961
    edited Mar 14, 2014 #37
    A understated great watch I've had a long time, that keeps perfect time is this rose gold Mido.

    I'm searching for the perfect band, as the original was a tad small, and I wore it a few years with the band on my Heuer currently. It needs the crystal polished a little, its pre world war 2 I think 30s

    C95DC19D-0096-4BDF-8F87-4530D92731F6_zpsuworf4ov.jpg
    Cobra ZL Encore 8.5 Matrix 6Q3
    TEE CB4 tour 15 RIP 70 Sigma
    Titleist 909h 19 Voodoo
    Mizuno Mp-53 4-pw DG progressive shafts
    Odyssey Black ProType 10 Sm 4.5 TP ball
    Mizuno raw haze 50, 56 Scratch 60
  • hogan234hogan234 Members Posts: 2,380 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    12tamale wrote:


    A understated great watch I've had a long time, that keeps perfect time is this rose gold Mido.

    I'm searching for the perfect band, as the original was a tad small, and I wore it a few years with the band on my Heuer currently. It needs the crystal polished a little, its pre world war 2 I think 30s

    C95DC19D-0096-4BDF-8F87-4530D92731F6_zpsuworf4ov.jpg




    I'm a fan of antiques. I have an old gold-filled Universal Geneve Polerouter. Awesome, but needs some servicing.
    TaylorMade R9 SuperTri 10.5* 
    Adams Tightlies 16* Matrix Code 6.2
    Adams A7 19* AxivCore 85
    Adams A7 22* AxivCore 85
    Mizuno MX25 5-PW Exsar IS-2
    Mizuno MP-T 51* Exsar IS-2
    Mizuno MP-T 58* SteelFiber i85
    TaylorMade TPA X
    ProV1x/KSig
  • Jim ClarkJim Clark Banned Posts: 2,264
    Check out Chase-Durer if you want an accurate watch. Many models to choose from, not dressy but functional.
  • LeoKalLeoKal Members Posts: 214 ✭✭✭
    RJRJRJ wrote:

    LeoKal wrote:


    But the notion of paying thousands, tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands for a wrist watch is, in my opinion, pretty silly.




    Are you also against expensive art, cars, clothing, electronics...?




    Well art is a different question. Arguably the best art, the highest quality is the most expensive. The masters. And in my little world that is worth owning. Cars is fine because the best performing cars also are the most expensive. One of my best friends has a couple of Porches and they are terrific cars. And I own the best clothing I can afford simply because it looks better and lasts longer. Where the watch thing gets me is that the purpose of the watch is to keep time and inexpensive watches do that just as well as a Rolex. I understand that in the big city a fine watch is part of the culture in some circles. And if you are a professional or a successful businessman you are expected to have a fine watch and after all it is the only significant piece of jewelry a man typically wears. So I get why some do it and am fine with it and say it is silly only for myself. I am not a car person either. But I own some rare books that I have paid thousands for and some would say that is silly as well.
    Callaway XR, 10.5. Fujikura Pro, R
    Callaway XR, 15*
    Taylormade SLDR 19*
    Mizuno MP 64 4-PW, Project X 5.0
    Cameron Studio Selecot Newport 2
    Mizuno 52, Titleist Vokey 56, 60
  • tocinotocino Members Posts: 2,298 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    my everyday "nice" watch is a tissot PRC 200 that my older brother bought me for my birthday. Otherwise I wear my black g-shock
  • hogan234hogan234 Members Posts: 2,380 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Seems like you like books like some like watches or cars. We all have our passions and we are all willing to spend more on them.
    TaylorMade R9 SuperTri 10.5* 
    Adams Tightlies 16* Matrix Code 6.2
    Adams A7 19* AxivCore 85
    Adams A7 22* AxivCore 85
    Mizuno MX25 5-PW Exsar IS-2
    Mizuno MP-T 51* Exsar IS-2
    Mizuno MP-T 58* SteelFiber i85
    TaylorMade TPA X
    ProV1x/KSig
  • LancejokerLancejoker Members Posts: 788
    My wife has been buying me watches for the last couple of years for holidays and birthdays. 4 Bulovas and 2 Citizens so far. She swears once we get her through Vet school that she is going to get me an Omega SeaMaster Planet Ocean Chrono. I'll try to get a pic of mine up later tonight.
  • LeoKalLeoKal Members Posts: 214 ✭✭✭
    hogan234 wrote:


    Seems like you like books like some like watches or cars. We all have our passions and we are all willing to spend more on them.




    That is an accurate observation. I didn't mean to demean nice watches really.....just that a half million is rather much. I follow Larry Fitzgerald on Twitter (Arizona, wr). He once asked his followers to guess what he collected. The answer was watches. He is a good guy, btw.
    Callaway XR, 10.5. Fujikura Pro, R
    Callaway XR, 15*
    Taylormade SLDR 19*
    Mizuno MP 64 4-PW, Project X 5.0
    Cameron Studio Selecot Newport 2
    Mizuno 52, Titleist Vokey 56, 60
  • RJRJRJRJRJRJ Members Posts: 5,935 ✭✭
    LeoKal wrote:

    RJRJRJ wrote:

    LeoKal wrote:


    But the notion of paying thousands, tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands for a wrist watch is, in my opinion, pretty silly.




    Are you also against expensive art, cars, clothing, electronics...?




    Well art is a different question. Arguably the best art, the highest quality is the most expensive. The masters. And in my little world that is worth owning. Cars is fine because the best performing cars also are the most expensive. One of my best friends has a couple of Porches and they are terrific cars. And I own the best clothing I can afford simply because it looks better and lasts longer. Where the watch thing gets me is that the purpose of the watch is to keep time and inexpensive watches do that just as well as a Rolex. I understand that in the big city a fine watch is part of the culture in some circles. And if you are a professional or a successful businessman you are expected to have a fine watch and after all it is the only significant piece of jewelry a man typically wears. So I get why some do it and am fine with it and say it is silly only for myself. I am not a car person either. But I own some rare books that I have paid thousands for and some would say that is silly as well.




    I get what you're saying, but a lot of people also put a different emphasis on what a nice watch means. I have a few cheap G-Shocks that I wear to get knocked around, and I love them for what they are. I like that they can get thrown across the room and still work. I set them once or twice per year and the time is pretty much spot on whenever I grab one. And I know that when it breaks one day, ill toss it in the garbage and go buy another one.



    But then I like my nice watches for the opposite reasons. I like that theres a little engine in there working away. The engine relies on me to function. If I don't tend to it, it stops working. Hundreds of tiny little wheels and springs are all whizzing away in harmony just so that I can look down and see the time easily. Its a very complex way of doing something very simple. Sort of like a Rube Goldberg device--it might not be the most effective way to get the job done, but its fascinating all in itself. You look at a complication like a perpetual calendar, and you think about the fact that there is a little wheel in there who's only job is to rotate one single time every four years--all so that the owner doesn't have to adjust his date for the leap year! Im telling you, crazy maybe, but fascinating nonetheless. I like that a nice watch can easily outlive me if I take good care of it. If I ever have kids, they might one day be looking down at the exact watch that I have on my arm now and appreciate it just as much as I currently do.



    Enough waxing poetic for me, since the truth is that I just strap on any watch I choose for the day and be done with it, but that doesn't change the fact that these things are miniature mechanical marvels.
    Ping G25 w/ RIP Phenom
    Adams Super LS Hybrid 17*
    Adams SS Super Hybrid 19*
    i20 4-UW
    Taylormade TM-110
    Cleveland CG14 56 & 60
  • LeoKalLeoKal Members Posts: 214 ✭✭✭
    RJRJRJ wrote:

    LeoKal wrote:

    RJRJRJ wrote:

    LeoKal wrote:


    But the notion of paying thousands, tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands for a wrist watch is, in my opinion, pretty silly.




    Are you also against expensive art, cars, clothing, electronics...?




    Well art is a different question. Arguably the best art, the highest quality is the most expensive. The masters. And in my little world that is worth owning. Cars is fine because the best performing cars also are the most expensive. One of my best friends has a couple of Porches and they are terrific cars. And I own the best clothing I can afford simply because it looks better and lasts longer. Where the watch thing gets me is that the purpose of the watch is to keep time and inexpensive watches do that just as well as a Rolex. I understand that in the big city a fine watch is part of the culture in some circles. And if you are a professional or a successful businessman you are expected to have a fine watch and after all it is the only significant piece of jewelry a man typically wears. So I get why some do it and am fine with it and say it is silly only for myself. I am not a car person either. But I own some rare books that I have paid thousands for and some would say that is silly as well.




    I get what you're saying, but a lot of people also put a different emphasis on what a nice watch means. I have a few cheap G-Shocks that I wear to get knocked around, and I love them for what they are. I like that they can get thrown across the room and still work. I set them once or twice per year and the time is pretty much spot on whenever I grab one. And I know that when it breaks one day, ill toss it in the garbage and go buy another one.



    But then I like my nice watches for the opposite reasons. I like that theres a little engine in there working away. The engine relies on me to function. If I don't tend to it, it stops working. Hundreds of tiny little wheels and springs are all whizzing away in harmony just so that I can look down and see the time easily. Its a very complex way of doing something very simple. Sort of like a Rube Goldberg device--it might not be the most effective way to get the job done, but its fascinating all in itself. You look at a complication like a perpetual calendar, and you think about the fact that there is a little wheel in there who's only job is to rotate one single time every four years--all so that the owner doesn't have to adjust his date for the leap year! Im telling you, crazy maybe, but fascinating nonetheless. I like that a nice watch can easily outlive me if I take good care of it. If I ever have kids, they might one day be looking down at the exact watch that I have on my arm now and appreciate it just as much as I currently do.



    Enough waxing poetic for me, since the truth is that I just strap on any watch I choose for the day and be done with it, but that doesn't change the fact that these things are miniature mechanical marvels.




    One of my earlier responses suggested just the same detail you provide here. I like old stuff, antiques, first editions, fountain pens, etc., etc. So for me the very embodiment of the engine and the wheels you speak of is a well tended Hamilton wind watch from the twenties or thirties. In their day they were easily as well made as the Swiss super stars today. And.........it was an American company that was superior at a critical time in our history. I can say the same about our fountain pens. For that reason I value them and have about a half dozen and rotate them from day to day. They are superior time pieces if you service them. And they are completely mechanical, like Breitling as I understand it.
    Callaway XR, 10.5. Fujikura Pro, R
    Callaway XR, 15*
    Taylormade SLDR 19*
    Mizuno MP 64 4-PW, Project X 5.0
    Cameron Studio Selecot Newport 2
    Mizuno 52, Titleist Vokey 56, 60
  • esketoresesketores Members Posts: 2,069
    edited Mar 14, 2014 #47
    My well worn 19 year old Omega. That does not keep perfect time. It needs its second return for TLC. Which I'm not happy about. The first refurb only lasted about 6 years.

    Note the wear on the band.

    Had to replace the clasp at the first referb. The replacement clasp is still great.


    PING G25 12 degree w/S+ @ 45"
    Titleist 910F 17° / 910h 24° & 27°
    Titleist 913Hd 20°
    PING G25's 6-U KBS Tour - V
    Cleveland RTX 53 / 588 56°
    Callaway ProType ix 9ht
  • WrigglesWriggles Members Posts: 3,249 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    LeoKal wrote:

    RJRJRJ wrote:

    LeoKal wrote:

    RJRJRJ wrote:

    LeoKal wrote:


    But the notion of paying thousands, tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands for a wrist watch is, in my opinion, pretty silly.




    Are you also against expensive art, cars, clothing, electronics...?




    Well art is a different question. Arguably the best art, the highest quality is the most expensive. The masters. And in my little world that is worth owning. Cars is fine because the best performing cars also are the most expensive. One of my best friends has a couple of Porches and they are terrific cars. And I own the best clothing I can afford simply because it looks better and lasts longer. Where the watch thing gets me is that the purpose of the watch is to keep time and inexpensive watches do that just as well as a Rolex. I understand that in the big city a fine watch is part of the culture in some circles. And if you are a professional or a successful businessman you are expected to have a fine watch and after all it is the only significant piece of jewelry a man typically wears. So I get why some do it and am fine with it and say it is silly only for myself. I am not a car person either. But I own some rare books that I have paid thousands for and some would say that is silly as well.




    I get what you're saying, but a lot of people also put a different emphasis on what a nice watch means. I have a few cheap G-Shocks that I wear to get knocked around, and I love them for what they are. I like that they can get thrown across the room and still work. I set them once or twice per year and the time is pretty much spot on whenever I grab one. And I know that when it breaks one day, ill toss it in the garbage and go buy another one.



    But then I like my nice watches for the opposite reasons. I like that theres a little engine in there working away. The engine relies on me to function. If I don't tend to it, it stops working. Hundreds of tiny little wheels and springs are all whizzing away in harmony just so that I can look down and see the time easily. Its a very complex way of doing something very simple. Sort of like a Rube Goldberg device--it might not be the most effective way to get the job done, but its fascinating all in itself. You look at a complication like a perpetual calendar, and you think about the fact that there is a little wheel in there who's only job is to rotate one single time every four years--all so that the owner doesn't have to adjust his date for the leap year! Im telling you, crazy maybe, but fascinating nonetheless. I like that a nice watch can easily outlive me if I take good care of it. If I ever have kids, they might one day be looking down at the exact watch that I have on my arm now and appreciate it just as much as I currently do.



    Enough waxing poetic for me, since the truth is that I just strap on any watch I choose for the day and be done with it, but that doesn't change the fact that these things are miniature mechanical marvels.




    One of my earlier responses suggested just the same detail you provide here. I like old stuff, antiques, first editions, fountain pens, etc., etc. So for me the very embodiment of the engine and the wheels you speak of is a well tended Hamilton wind watch from the twenties or thirties. In their day they were easily as well made as the Swiss super stars today. And.........it was an American company that was superior at a critical time in our history. I can say the same about our fountain pens. For that reason I value them and have about a half dozen and rotate them from day to day. They are superior time pieces if you service them. And they are completely mechanical, like Breitling as I understand it.




    My earlier post remarked about vintage watches. It's amazing how with all the technology and "improvements" of current times, it seems people lived better in times past. My Rolex, bought in 1978, cost about $300. Pretty much available to most American workers. Same thing with cars. My 78 Eldorado, (bought in year 2000) cost around $11,000 new, well within the means of an American factory worker, usually as the fellows last car to fulfill a part of the American dream.



    I also love fountain pens. I have a couple high end Mont Blancs, but my favorite is a drugstore Parker Parkette that my Dad bought my uncle in 1940. (Remarkably, it still has the original ink sac.) A $10 pen/pencil set, my uncle carried it through out the Pacific in WW2. It found its way back to me when I was a boy. The Duofolds of the 1920's and 30's, which are coveted today, were roughly $5 pens back then.



    I could go on and on. Now, only the well to do can buy a new Cadillac, Rolex or Parker Duofold. Or pay usury with credit card rates that now are considered good business.
  • hogan234hogan234 Members Posts: 2,380 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Mar 15, 2014 #49
    Here's my humble collection. The middle is a Universal Geneve Polerouter circa late 60s - early 70s (I believe) that was my late dad's. Needs some work (date function doesn't work). The G-Shock is fantastic. I've never been a fan, but I am now. Can't beat if for reliability, durability and sheer functionality.

    TaylorMade R9 SuperTri 10.5* 
    Adams Tightlies 16* Matrix Code 6.2
    Adams A7 19* AxivCore 85
    Adams A7 22* AxivCore 85
    Mizuno MX25 5-PW Exsar IS-2
    Mizuno MP-T 51* Exsar IS-2
    Mizuno MP-T 58* SteelFiber i85
    TaylorMade TPA X
    ProV1x/KSig
  • LeoKalLeoKal Members Posts: 214 ✭✭✭
    Now, only the well to do can buy a new Cadillac, Rolex or Parker Duofold. Or pay usury with credit card rates that now are considered good business.



    There are innumerable other examples of this. How about sports? In the golden age a normal person could go to a major league baseball game or pro football game for amounts within their reach. Now, my seat at Coors Field costs $38 per game! (It is a good seat). And pro football.........hundreds. When they built the new Yankee Stadium (completely unnecessary in many folks' opinion, there were club seats behind home plate for $2,000 a game!!
    Callaway XR, 10.5. Fujikura Pro, R
    Callaway XR, 15*
    Taylormade SLDR 19*
    Mizuno MP 64 4-PW, Project X 5.0
    Cameron Studio Selecot Newport 2
    Mizuno 52, Titleist Vokey 56, 60
  • LancejokerLancejoker Members Posts: 788
    It's a shame really. So many dad's who can't afford to take their sons and daughters to a baseball game. Honestly it goes as far as things like movies. I love a good movie as much as anyone but for my wife and I to take to girls (who are practically our daughters) is close to $70 bucks after tickets,popcorn,drinks,etc....
  • Agent JimAgent Jim Members Posts: 2,804
    12tamale wrote:


    A understated great watch I've had a long time, that keeps perfect time is this rose gold Mido.

    I'm searching for the perfect band, as the original was a tad small, and I wore it a few years with the band on my Heuer currently. It needs the crystal polished a little, its pre world war 2 I think 30s

    C95DC19D-0096-4BDF-8F87-4530D92731F6_zpsuworf4ov.jpg
    Just seeing the watch like that makes with think of the scene in Pulp Fiction with Captain Koons and Butch. HAHA



    TM SLDR 460 set to 10.5° 70g Aldila VS Proto 44"
    TM RBZ Stage 2 Tour 14.5° & 19°
    Maltby KE4 Tour 22° Hybrid
    PING G25 4-UW CFS
    Maltby M-Series+ 54° and sometimes 58°
    Odyssey White Ice #7 37" counter balanced and a SpryEvo TeCu insert
    WS FG Tour(2014) or ProV1x
  • RJRJRJRJRJRJ Members Posts: 5,935 ✭✭
    Lancejoker wrote:


    It's a shame really. So many dad's who can't afford to take their sons and daughters to a baseball game. Honestly it goes as far as things like movies. I love a good movie as much as anyone but for my wife and I to take to girls (who are practically our daughters) is close to $70 bucks after tickets,popcorn,drinks,etc....






    As much as the Dodgers are spending, I think we still have seats here for under or around $10. Nosebleeds of course, but they do still exist (although I'm not sure how much longer).
    Ping G25 w/ RIP Phenom
    Adams Super LS Hybrid 17*
    Adams SS Super Hybrid 19*
    i20 4-UW
    Taylormade TM-110
    Cleveland CG14 56 & 60
  • jh19jh19 Members Posts: 2,040 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    I've gotten into collecting just within the last 2 years, and my golf ho'ing has come to a complete stop. Consequently, I am playing the best golf of my life! Collecting watches is very subjective, so I tend to stay out of it.



    Here's a shot of my collection minus a Breitling B1 with UTC module which is on consignment:



    Ping G400 8.5* BB7x
    Titleist TS2 16.5* DI7x
    Ping G400 19* DI8s
    Titleist 716 Combo PX LZ 6.5
    Vokey TVD 52*, 58* 
    Byron Morgan DH89
  • SilverBulletsSilverBullets BMW Members Posts: 5,912 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Wriggles wrote:

    LeoKal wrote:

    RJRJRJ wrote:

    LeoKal wrote:

    RJRJRJ wrote:

    LeoKal wrote:


    But the notion of paying thousands, tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands for a wrist watch is, in my opinion, pretty silly.




    Are you also against expensive art, cars, clothing, electronics...?




    Well art is a different question. Arguably the best art, the highest quality is the most expensive. The masters. And in my little world that is worth owning. Cars is fine because the best performing cars also are the most expensive. One of my best friends has a couple of Porches and they are terrific cars. And I own the best clothing I can afford simply because it looks better and lasts longer. Where the watch thing gets me is that the purpose of the watch is to keep time and inexpensive watches do that just as well as a Rolex. I understand that in the big city a fine watch is part of the culture in some circles. And if you are a professional or a successful businessman you are expected to have a fine watch and after all it is the only significant piece of jewelry a man typically wears. So I get why some do it and am fine with it and say it is silly only for myself. I am not a car person either. But I own some rare books that I have paid thousands for and some would say that is silly as well.




    I get what you're saying, but a lot of people also put a different emphasis on what a nice watch means. I have a few cheap G-Shocks that I wear to get knocked around, and I love them for what they are. I like that they can get thrown across the room and still work. I set them once or twice per year and the time is pretty much spot on whenever I grab one. And I know that when it breaks one day, ill toss it in the garbage and go buy another one.



    But then I like my nice watches for the opposite reasons. I like that theres a little engine in there working away. The engine relies on me to function. If I don't tend to it, it stops working. Hundreds of tiny little wheels and springs are all whizzing away in harmony just so that I can look down and see the time easily. Its a very complex way of doing something very simple. Sort of like a Rube Goldberg device--it might not be the most effective way to get the job done, but its fascinating all in itself. You look at a complication like a perpetual calendar, and you think about the fact that there is a little wheel in there who's only job is to rotate one single time every four years--all so that the owner doesn't have to adjust his date for the leap year! Im telling you, crazy maybe, but fascinating nonetheless. I like that a nice watch can easily outlive me if I take good care of it. If I ever have kids, they might one day be looking down at the exact watch that I have on my arm now and appreciate it just as much as I currently do.



    Enough waxing poetic for me, since the truth is that I just strap on any watch I choose for the day and be done with it, but that doesn't change the fact that these things are miniature mechanical marvels.




    One of my earlier responses suggested just the same detail you provide here. I like old stuff, antiques, first editions, fountain pens, etc., etc. So for me the very embodiment of the engine and the wheels you speak of is a well tended Hamilton wind watch from the twenties or thirties. In their day they were easily as well made as the Swiss super stars today. And.........it was an American company that was superior at a critical time in our history. I can say the same about our fountain pens. For that reason I value them and have about a half dozen and rotate them from day to day. They are superior time pieces if you service them. And they are completely mechanical, like Breitling as I understand it.




    My earlier post remarked about vintage watches. It's amazing how with all the technology and "improvements" of current times, it seems people lived better in times past. My Rolex, bought in 1978, cost about $300. Pretty much available to most American workers. Same thing with cars. My 78 Eldorado, (bought in year 2000) cost around $11,000 new, well within the means of an American factory worker, usually as the fellows last car to fulfill a part of the American dream.



    I also love fountain pens. I have a couple high end Mont Blancs, but my favorite is a drugstore Parker Parkette that my Dad bought my uncle in 1940. (Remarkably, it still has the original ink sac.) A $10 pen/pencil set, my uncle carried it through out the Pacific in WW2. It found its way back to me when I was a boy. The Duofolds of the 1920's and 30's, which are coveted today, were roughly $5 pens back then.



    I could go on and on. Now, only the well to do can buy a new Cadillac, Rolex or Parker Duofold. Or pay usury with credit card rates that now are considered good business.




    Ok well factoring in inflation and the numbers change drastically. A $11000 car in 1978 has the buying power of $40000 today. $300 is well over a thousand. A $10 pen in 1940 cost $175 today.



    So it's not necessarily that prices have gone up and it's a shame, it's that inflation has grown. The question, which is not for this forum as political discussions are against the rules, is have wages increased at the same rate?
    Taylormade M6 10.5* - HZRDUS Smoke Black 6.5
    Taylormade '16 M2 15*
    Titleist 816h 21*
    Callaway Apex 4i thru PW - Nippon Modus 125 Tour X
    Vokey SM6 50*, 54*, 58*
    Scotty Cameron Circa 62 No. 2 - Scotty Custom Shop
  • Forged4everForged4ever To See A Man’s True Character, Spend 4+ Hours With Him on a Golf Course⛳️ The Burgh/Hdcp: My gene poolClubWRX Posts: 15,735 ClubWRX
    edited Mar 18, 2014 #56
    My fave dress pieces. I prefer my dress/formal pieces like my irons-



    Understated elegance, lol.



    The Patek is a classic 18k rose Calatrava(ceramic dial), the IWC is 18k rose(My black tie/court good karma "go to" piece, LMAO, though I wear it with jeans and a button down often) and the Breguet's Platinum, and no, it is not a tourbillon, it is just a cut-out dial.



    The bottom piece is a Patek Dual Time Fly Back(18k WG) that the Gentleman of whom I spoke of playing his last round with prior to passing's wife gave to me. I could never afford this piece though she called me and got in touch with my Mother and told her that it was very important to her husband that I accept the piece and all that he asked was that I "pass it forward" as he did.



    I did and I will-





    I do have an A. Lange & Sohne Dual Time Flyback Turbillon, if you all would like to see it.



    Have a great week image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />





    My Best,

    Richard
    Post edited by Unknown User on
    In the end, only three things matter~ <br /><br />How much that you loved...<br /><br />How mightily that you lived...<br /><br />How gracefully that you accepted both victory & defeat...<br /><br /><br /><br />GHIN: Beefeater 24
  • Forged4everForged4ever To See A Man’s True Character, Spend 4+ Hours With Him on a Golf Course⛳️ The Burgh/Hdcp: My gene poolClubWRX Posts: 15,735 ClubWRX
    For sh*ts and giggles, this was Slowhand's piece that fetched $3.6M in a 2012 Christie's auction.





    Fairways & Greens My Friends
    In the end, only three things matter~ <br /><br />How much that you loved...<br /><br />How mightily that you lived...<br /><br />How gracefully that you accepted both victory & defeat...<br /><br /><br /><br />GHIN: Beefeater 24
  • lumberman2462lumberman2462 Members Posts: 5,340 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    My grandmother bought me a Titanium Breitling Aerospace with UTC when I graduated from college. I have no idea how she came up with the idea of a Breitling because in the early 90s - I'd never heard of Breitling.



    Since I'm a little bit a creature of habit - I've added a BreitlingChronomat, SuperOcean Steelfish and a ChronoSpace.



    The Steelfish is probably my favorite and most durable. It's a big piece of steel. Plus, you never know when you're gonna find yourself at 6,000 under water and it's nice to have the confidence that I can go that deep and my watch will still work.



    The ChronoSpace is pretty nifty little timepiece - does all kinds of things.



    My wife has appropriated my Chronomat. Not really sure how I feel about that but...whatareyougonnado?



    My original Aerospace is tiny by comparison to my newer model Breitlings but it has a lot of sentimental value.

    Throughout the years I've inherited my Dad's Oyster Perpetual Rolex, Uncle's Stainless Rolex and Granfather's Rolex. They all sit there side-by-side-side in my watchwinder twirling around.



    About three years ago I loaded my Aerospace, Chronomat & the Rolex and took them to be service/refurbed. Twas not a cheap bill. But they all came out looking great.



    Here's the funny part. Breitling did not really service the AeroSpace or Chronomat. They just replaced the movement in both watches and polished them up and sent them back. New Watches!
    SYard T388
    TaylorMade RBZ 13-15
    Miura CB-57 3-PW
    Miura 51Y, 52K,56K, 57C, 60K
    Old Titleist Blade
  • Forged4everForged4ever To See A Man’s True Character, Spend 4+ Hours With Him on a Golf Course⛳️ The Burgh/Hdcp: My gene poolClubWRX Posts: 15,735 ClubWRX
    edited Mar 17, 2014 #59
    This is my fave casual piece and the one that I have on presently as I'm having a radiation treatment and I traded my Oncologist this for a Breitling Navitimer 5 years ago. I had great results with that bout of Cancer, and I got this karma/superstition thing going so I wear this everytime I hit the hospital, regardless of reason for being there, lol.



    It's a Santos 100, celebrating Cartier's 100 year Anniversery(1904-2004).



    I love this piece, lol.



    Have a great day image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />



    Fairways & Greens My Friends,

    Richard
    Post edited by Unknown User on
    In the end, only three things matter~ <br /><br />How much that you loved...<br /><br />How mightily that you lived...<br /><br />How gracefully that you accepted both victory & defeat...<br /><br /><br /><br />GHIN: Beefeater 24
  • hogan234hogan234 Members Posts: 2,380 ✭✭✭✭✭✭


    My grandmother bought me a Titanium Breitling Aerospace with UTC when I graduated from college. I have no idea how she came up with the idea of a Breitling because in the early 90s - I'd never heard of Breitling.



    Since I'm a little bit a creature of habit - I've added a BreitlingChronomat, SuperOcean Steelfish and a ChronoSpace.



    The Steelfish is probably my favorite and most durable. It's a big piece of steel. Plus, you never know when you're gonna find yourself at 6,000 under water and it's nice to have the confidence that I can go that deep and my watch will still work.



    The ChronoSpace is pretty nifty little timepiece - does all kinds of things.



    My wife has appropriated my Chronomat. Not really sure how I feel about that but...whatareyougonnado?



    My original Aerospace is tiny by comparison to my newer model Breitlings but it has a lot of sentimental value.

    Throughout the years I've inherited my Dad's Oyster Perpetual Rolex, Uncle's Stainless Rolex and Granfather's Rolex. They all sit there side-by-side-side in my watchwinder twirling around.



    About three years ago I loaded my Aerospace, Chronomat & the Rolex and took them to be service/refurbed. Twas not a cheap bill. But they all came out looking great.



    Here's the funny part. Breitling did not really service the AeroSpace or Chronomat. They just replaced the movement in both watches and polished them up and sent them back. New Watches!




    Love the Aerospace. Nice very light watch.
    TaylorMade R9 SuperTri 10.5* 
    Adams Tightlies 16* Matrix Code 6.2
    Adams A7 19* AxivCore 85
    Adams A7 22* AxivCore 85
    Mizuno MX25 5-PW Exsar IS-2
    Mizuno MP-T 51* Exsar IS-2
    Mizuno MP-T 58* SteelFiber i85
    TaylorMade TPA X
    ProV1x/KSig
  • lumberman2462lumberman2462 Members Posts: 5,340 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    My technological limitations are kicking in....can't rotate.



    I consider this Chronospace the replacement to the smaller Aerospace. For some reason I wish it had 12 & 6 to go along with the 9 &3....but Breitling didn't call me up for a consult when designing this model.



    Good watch though. The alarm will wake the dead.
    SYard T388
    TaylorMade RBZ 13-15
    Miura CB-57 3-PW
    Miura 51Y, 52K,56K, 57C, 60K
    Old Titleist Blade

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