Walking vs Riding

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  • jnradioactivejnradioactive JNRadio Banned Posts: 2,676
    scunny wrote:


    Interesting in the UK, where its the norm to walk and in many cases carry, slow play is still a real huge problem




    what is considered a slow round in the UK though?
  • PepperturboPepperturbo Midwest and SouthwestMembers Posts: 15,520 ✭✭
    edited Apr 7, 2014 #63
    mantan wrote:


    I live in Dallas and other than a few municipal courses, most nicer public tracks require all customers use a cart. Many are so spread out that walking isn't a realistic option if they hope to maintain any kind of pace of play. (Not to mention the health risks when the temps are in the triple digits.)



    The last time I walked a golf course is when I lived up north. I didn't notice any difference with my game either way. With the advent of the push-cart....and the electric push cart, the exercise part of golf is pretty much gone anyway. I workout to get exercise....not walk a golf course.




    If there is a game difference between walking and riding, it has to depend on game skill and basic conditioning? For my age, I am in good shape and really enjoy walking. At times, like yesterday though, I tend to relax too much, and ended 3 over. In a cart, for some reason, I don't relax as much; hence best rounds. Walking with a caddie gives the best golf experience though. Thankfully my wife loves golf and walking 18, and my Clicgear sports a comfortable seat and creature comforts.



    Walking by definition is exercise in today's health climate. The vast majority of golfers do not visit a gym and sport spare tires, so walking for them would be good; only they don't walk, and worse yet, I believe its by choice. If only more people wanted to walk, and were willing to pay a tad more for green fees to cover the pro, maybe more courses would allow walking, and we'd be one step closer to a healthier society; fewer spare tires and more golfers would see their feet.
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  • RRFirebladeRRFireblade AKA Jay. Members Posts: 4,782
    Generally the difference for many is the pace of play between the two options.



    A decent golfer can probably ride a round in 1/2 to 2/3rds of the time walking pretty easily.



    That change of pace either helps or hurts alot of people.
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  • BillyZ2BillyZ2 Members Posts: 5,248


    Generally the difference for many is the pace of play between the two options.



    A decent golfer can probably ride a round in 1/2 to 2/3rds of the time walking pretty easily.



    That change of pace either helps or hurts alot of people.
    If there is a group in front of you, you are at the mercy of their playing pace whether you walk or ride.
  • Fourmyle of CeresFourmyle of Ceres Unregistered Posts: 7,829 ✭✭

    scunny wrote:


    Interesting in the UK, where its the norm to walk and in many cases carry, slow play is still a real huge problem




    what is considered a slow round in the UK though?




    I can only speak to the pace of play at certain private clubs in England and Scotland. No idea about local pay-and-play courses.



    The places I've visited, club members would expect to play in anywhere from 2-1/2 hours at some of the "twoball only" courses (that's only a relatively small number of courses in the entire UK) to more like 3 or 3-1/2 hours when fourball games are allowed. At least the sort of elite private clubs I've tended to visit would universally consider a 4-hour round somewhat on the slow side. At a few clubs it would even be unacceptable.



    The exception would be on a course with tall grass in the rough on a windy day. Pace of play can get very slow when every group is searching for balls in the waist deep hay on nearly every hole. But even then, I've not encountered any places where the members would be playing USA-style scorecard-keeping golf under those conditions. So we're not talking 5-hour rounds or any nonsense like that.
  • sdandreasdandrea Steve Members Posts: 2,383 ✭✭
    I prefer to walk, play better when I walk, but sadly, physical issues are catching up with me and I ride most of the time. The ocassional walking 9 and carrying the bag over my shoulder is a nice fling, tho!

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  • jnradioactivejnradioactive JNRadio Banned Posts: 2,676


    scunny wrote:


    Interesting in the UK, where its the norm to walk and in many cases carry, slow play is still a real huge problem




    what is considered a slow round in the UK though?




    I can only speak to the pace of play at certain private clubs in England and Scotland. No idea about local pay-and-play courses.



    The places I've visited, club members would expect to play in anywhere from 2-1/2 hours at some of the "twoball only" courses (that's only a relatively small number of courses in the entire UK) to more like 3 or 3-1/2 hours when fourball games are allowed. At least the sort of elite private clubs I've tended to visit would universally consider a 4-hour round somewhat on the slow side. At a few clubs it would even be unacceptable.



    The exception would be on a course with tall grass in the rough on a windy day. Pace of play can get very slow when every group is searching for balls in the waist deep hay on nearly every hole. But even then, I've not encountered any places where the members would be playing USA-style scorecard-keeping golf under those conditions. So we're not talking 5-hour rounds or any nonsense like that.




    That's what i thought
  • VegamanVegaman Members Posts: 1,082
    A very typical american phenomena, riding in a cart. maybe in Japan it's quite common too. In Sweden, where I'm from,nearly all courses demand a note from your doctor to let you use a cart. I spend alot of time in Asia, and even in Thailand, a tropical country, where I live a large part of the year people usually walk.

    The need to be able to drink "cold beer" on the golf course is also alien to me, weird even. For it to be such an important part of the game as it seems to be to some people..I don't get it. You can't enjoy a round of golf without drinking alcohol? "I ride a cart because I don't want to carry around a six pack during the round" I mean, seriously?
  • PepperturboPepperturbo Midwest and SouthwestMembers Posts: 15,520 ✭✭
    Tom Gski wrote:



    Generally the difference for many is the pace of play between the two options.



    A decent golfer can probably ride a round in 1/2 to 2/3rds of the time walking pretty easily.



    That change of pace either helps or hurts alot of people.
    If there is a group in front of you, you are at the mercy of their playing pace whether you walk or ride.




    You're right. That was the case for us this past weekend. It was a beautiful walk, but the doofuses in front of us in carts, were slower than a dump. Thankfully I had 3 cigars and a comfy seat to enjoy. I finally reached out to the marshal though, and told him to fix it. I said its a serious problem when walkers complain about pace of play of "slow minded" cart golfers. He got the message, and thankfully had cojones, and did move them.
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  • BillyZ2BillyZ2 Members Posts: 5,248
    Vegaman wrote:


    A very typical american phenomena, riding in a cart. maybe in Japan it's quite common too. In Sweden, where I'm from,nearly all courses demand a note from your doctor to let you use a cart. I spend alot of time in Asia, and even in Thailand, a tropical country, where I live a large part of the year people usually walk.

    The need to be able to drink "cold beer" on the golf course is also alien to me, weird even. For it to be such an important part of the game as it seems to be to some people..I don't get it. You can't enjoy a round of golf without drinking alcohol? "I ride a cart because I don't want to carry around a six pack during the round" I mean, seriously?
    I'm with you, Vegaman, on the drinking part. I don't drink, but like the taste of beer, but still choose to only drink an NA beer when I want. Drinking in the day time while golfing seems a little foolish to me, wandering around the course without full capacity of your coordination? As far as carts, I like them, it gives me the opportunity to play 18 holes without carrying the heavy clubs. I had ankle recon 5 years ago and the arthritis flares up somethimes.

    Good luck!

    Tom Gski wrote:



    Generally the difference for many is the pace of play between the two options.



    A decent golfer can probably ride a round in 1/2 to 2/3rds of the time walking pretty easily.



    That change of pace either helps or hurts alot of people.
    If there is a group in front of you, you are at the mercy of their playing pace whether you walk or ride.




    You're right. That was the case for us this past weekend. It was a beautiful walk, but the doofuses in front of us in carts, were slower than a dump. Thankfully I had 3 cigars and a comfy seat to enjoy. I finally reached out to the marshal though, and told him to fix it. I said its a serious problem when walkers complain about pace of play of "slow minded" cart golfers. He got the message, and thankfully had cojones, and did move them.
    Slow play, one of the biggest problems in golf, and it ruins your 'groove'. I don't like fast play either, but slow play ruins the game. In Florida this year(golf vac), we were playing behind a "slow fivesome" as the sun was setting. We called the clubhose and they finally made it out there to hurry them up and we JUST finished our round.
  • blink3665blink3665 #TwistFaceExperience Members Posts: 6,077 ✭✭
    I prefer to walk. It is better for the mental state of my game. I enjoy being about to get a really good look at the shot as I approach my ball. It also gives me time to forget about bad shots while I walk. The exercise is great too!



    If I am playing with my drinking buddies I will normally ride because that is what they do. Also, there are a few courses here that are very hilly and have long walks from green to tee. Those courses are better to ride.



    Overall, I would say that I walk 85% of the time.
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  • atlambert2atlambert2 Members Posts: 604 ✭✭
    Wish I could find it, but read a study last year that showed on average people who walked played quicker than riders. It was not SUPER scientific, but I always think (when playing in a group at least) walking is quicker. I tend to ride though, as I am usually going out by myself and joing another twosome/threesome who is riding. Hate being the lone walker in a group of carts, especially at the course I play where there are long green-to-tee walks with no shortcuts for the walkers
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  • Fourmyle of CeresFourmyle of Ceres Unregistered Posts: 7,829 ✭✭
    I don't care whether riding or walking is faster, as long as the group ahead of me keeps moving at a steady pace.



    And if the group ahead of me is moving slow, I still don't care whether they're riding or walking.



    To paraphrase Forrest Gump...slow is as slow does.
  • Fellaheen51Fellaheen51 Go Green MichiganMembers Posts: 4,410 ✭✭
    Is it safe to assume, from the postings here, there is nothing inherently different relative to pace of play whether one walks or rides? Its about being prepared to address the ball when its your turn to hit. However, just what is the appropriate pace of play and how it relates duration of time to play? Related but different issues imo.



    I read the postings that state 3 - 3 1/2 hr. rounds. That's great...all for it...if it works for you. The public courses I play may not even state what a recommended time per nine should be. Based on posted times when observed, my estimation is they are on average in the 2:10 - 2:15 range. I try to stay on a 2:00 hr. pace. That is a comfortable pace for me to play well and also enjoy myself. If you are following me (my group) on a 4 hour pace and your on the aforementioned 3 - 3 1/2 hr. pace, wouldn't it feel like we were playing slow? An extra half hour or more on the course can seem like an eternity.



    I would encourage you (your group) to play through if after a hole or two of noticing you are clearly on a faster pace. But, what if the course (i.e groups in front) have settled in to my pace and not yours. In other words no real advanttage from my perspective to let you play through. I have payed my $, just like you. I am playing on a pace under the posted (or commonly accepted) time for the round. Again, am I playing to slow?



    Not wanting to stir up any controversy here. I am curious on this topic and interested in others comments on this matter. And yes, I understand that it depends......on the course, terrain, weather, etc., etc. Therefore what is the appropriate pace of play, or duration of time for a round of golf?



    Note: I pretty much assume that this topic has been broached multiple times and in multiple ways before. No, I didn't use tsearch function to check if, when or where. It was this topic, in this thread that piqued my curiosity. That why I posted here. If it is a problem.....delete it.
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  • PepperturboPepperturbo Midwest and SouthwestMembers Posts: 15,520 ✭✭
    edited Apr 8, 2014 #76
    Yes, that's a safe assumption. And your question about appropriate pace of play can't be answered. If for no other reason than, one crucial factor has not been addressed, least that I have seen. The spread between tee times, which is managements responsibility, and seriously affects pace of play. It also influences whether or not a faster following tee group should be allowed to play though.
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  • JDW3JDW3 Members Posts: 619 ✭✭
    I prefer to walk. I enjoy the exercise and it gives me time to cool down after hitting a bad shot.
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  • BillyZ2BillyZ2 Members Posts: 5,248
    A guy I golf with, while riding the cart, always goes to his ball first, even though his is further up the fairway. Walking does allow for individuality, allowing people to walk to their ball only. Another bane of carts is "cart path only", and in Mich 2013, it was often as it was a rainy season. I still prefer a cart though.
  • Fellaheen51Fellaheen51 Go Green MichiganMembers Posts: 4,410 ✭✭


    Yes, that's a safe assumption. And your question about appropriate pace of play can't be answered. If for no other reason than, one crucial factor has not been addressed, least that I have seen. The spread between tee times, which is managements responsibility, and seriously affects pace of play. It also influences whether or not a faster following tee group should be allowed to play though.




    Thx for your comments. Its been awhile since i've golfed (**** long winter) so I do not recollect what tee time spreads were at my often played courses. I do have two tee times booked this July at a high end course in northern Michigan (Arcadia Bluffs) that are 10 minutes apart. What would be the appropriate spread needed for a 3+ hour group to work there way through groups that are on a 4+ hour pace.. What I have a problem with is how often said fast moving groups, as I mentioned earlier in this thread, exhibit a lot of impatient behavior when there is really nowhere for them to go. Why should I be slowed down (inconvenienced ?) by letting you play through. What is the proper etiquette, let them play through regardless?


    Tom Gski wrote:


    A guy I golf with, while riding the cart, always goes to his ball first, even though his is further up the fairway. Walking does allow for individuality, allowing people to walk to their ball only. Another bane of carts is "cart path only", and in Mich 2013, it was often as it was a rainy season. I still prefer a cart though.




    Oh my yes. I understand the need for cart path only days (course preservation) but are they SLOW. Always seem to be behind the walk to your ball and then back to the cart for clubs guy. Given advanced warning on path only days, usually just stay home.



    Hard to be the only walker in a group of riders. Since everyone wants to ride with those that I frequently golf with, I'm a rider. Walking is regulated to when I'm playing as a single these days which is maybe 10% of the time.



    Also, I did not like carrying (lugging ?) a bag when I was 23, certainly not now at 63. That's why I invested in a good push cart some years ago for those days when I choose to walk. I'm sort of curious on the age of those who profess to play 3 - 3 1/2 hr. walking rounds and whether they carry. I do see early morning senior fellows walking, I NEVER see them carrying a bag.
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  • scunnyscunny Members Posts: 288 ✭✭

    scunny wrote:


    Interesting in the UK, where its the norm to walk and in many cases carry, slow play is still a real huge problem




    what is considered a slow round in the UK though?


    Most clubs would like to be 3.5-4 hours but reality is more 4-4.5, anything over 4.5 is considered slow and over 5 people really kick up a fuss
  • UpgrayeddUpgrayedd Members Posts: 1,222
    edited Apr 9, 2014 #81
    I haven't played on a Saturday or Sunday in years but back when I did we always used a cart because the pace was 4.5 - 5 hours and I wanted a comfortable seated while I waited to hit almost every shot. Last time out I carried seven clubs. It was liberating. My score didn't suffer one bit and I hit a variety of shots that never would have entered my mind with a full bag.
  • TheCityGameTheCityGame Traj like Minaj Members Posts: 15,377 ✭✭
    edited Apr 9, 2014 #82
    Late to the thread. Here's a few points. . .
    1. I think the poll skews "walker" because walkers are a little more interested in the topic than carters. No way there's more walkers than carters at this site, though.
    2. On an open course with scatter AND the carters know what they're doing, no way is walking as fast as riding. However, those conditions are virtually never present. Courses and marshalls need to understand this. If you open up Saturday morning to walkers, the number of walkers you have is going to go from zero to 8.
    3. An interesting resource for The Walking Golfer. . .http://www.thewalkinggolfer.com/ (check out the "walkability ratings" page. Your course is probably on it).
    4. If you prefer a cart, that's fine with me, but most excuses for not walking aren't valid. If ANYONE walks your course, it's walkable. That guy walking isn't a superhero. There are lots of courses that people consider "too hilly" or "too far from green to tee" that I don't think twice about walking.
    5. Walking with a caddie is simply the best. Unfortunately, it's often as expensive as a green fee.
    6. "I paid for a cart, so I'm going to ride." Well, you're not a walker. I'd pay MORE to be able to walk at courses that don't allow it.
    7. This is obviously just personal, but spiritually. . .golf seems like a walking game to me. It's social. It's a part of it. It's beautiful to see a foursome of people with bags on their shoulders strolling down a fairway together. Even prettier when they're with a couple caddies. Cart paths ruin the look and sometimes the play of a course. Could you imagine seeing cart paths running through Augusta this week. . .a big "turnaround" behind the 12th green. We should have more courses doing what Bandon Dunes chose to do (it clearly hasn't suffered from its decision).
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  • BillyZ2BillyZ2 Members Posts: 5,248



    Yes, that's a safe assumption. And your question about appropriate pace of play can't be answered. If for no other reason than, one crucial factor has not been addressed, least that I have seen. The spread between tee times, which is managements responsibility, and seriously affects pace of play. It also influences whether or not a faster following tee group should be allowed to play though.




    Thx for your comments. Its been awhile since i've golfed (**** long winter) so I do not recollect what tee time spreads were at my often played courses. I do have two tee times booked this July at a high end course in northern Michigan (Arcadia Bluffs) that are 10 minutes apart. What would be the appropriate spread needed for a 3+ hour group to work there way through groups that are on a 4+ hour pace.. What I have a problem with is how often said fast moving groups, as I mentioned earlier in this thread, exhibit a lot of impatient behavior when there is really nowhere for them to go. Why should I be slowed down (inconvenienced ?) by letting you play through. What is the proper etiquette, let them play through regardless?


    Tom Gski wrote:


    A guy I golf with, while riding the cart, always goes to his ball first, even though his is further up the fairway. Walking does allow for individuality, allowing people to walk to their ball only. Another bane of carts is "cart path only", and in Mich 2013, it was often as it was a rainy season. I still prefer a cart though.




    Oh my yes. I understand the need for cart path only days (course preservation) but are they SLOW. Always seem to be behind the walk to your ball and then back to the cart for clubs guy. Given advanced warning on path only days, usually just stay home.



    Hard to be the only walker in a group of riders. Since everyone wants to ride with those that I frequently golf with, I'm a rider. Walking is regulated to when I'm playing as a single these days which is maybe 10% of the time.



    Also, I did not like carrying (lugging ?) a bag when I was 23, certainly not now at 63. That's why I invested in a good push cart some years ago for those days when I choose to walk. I'm sort of curious on the age of those who profess to play 3 - 3 1/2 hr. walking rounds and whether they carry. I do see early morning senior fellows walking, I NEVER see them carrying a bag.
    I'm an older fellow in Michigan(59), and if you have an interest in Detroit Area Golf, check this out:

    http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/topic/993047-detroit-area-golfers/
  • Fellaheen51Fellaheen51 Go Green MichiganMembers Posts: 4,410 ✭✭
    Thx T.G. I'm aware of and have posted in the thread you linked.
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  • PepperturboPepperturbo Midwest and SouthwestMembers Posts: 15,520 ✭✭
    Michigan..my favorite state!
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  • BillyZ2BillyZ2 Members Posts: 5,248


    Michigan..my favorite state!
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  • PepperturboPepperturbo Midwest and SouthwestMembers Posts: 15,520 ✭✭
    Tom Gski wrote:



    Michigan..my favorite state!
    The shape of a golf glove!




    Home state
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  • mantanmantan Members Posts: 2,529 ✭✭


    Late to the thread. Here's a few points. . .
    1. I think the poll skews "walker" because walkers are a little more interested in the topic than carters. No way there's more walkers than carters at this site, though.
    2. On an open course with scatter AND the carters know what they're doing, no way is walking as fast as riding. However, those conditions are virtually never present. Courses and marshalls need to understand this. If you open up Saturday morning to walkers, the number of walkers you have is going to go from zero to 8.
    3. An interesting resource for The Walking Golfer. . .http://www.thewalkinggolfer.com/ (check out the "walkability ratings" page. Your course is probably on it).
    4. If you prefer a cart, that's fine with me, but most excuses for not walking aren't valid. If ANYONE walks your course, it's walkable. That guy walking isn't a superhero. There are lots of courses that people consider "too hilly" or "too far from green to tee" that I don't think twice about walking.
    5. Walking with a caddie is simply the best. Unfortunately, it's often as expensive as a green fee.
    6. "I paid for a cart, so I'm going to ride." Well, you're not a walker. I'd pay MORE to be able to walk at courses that don't allow it.
    7. This is obviously just personal, but spiritually. . .golf seems like a walking game to me. It's social. It's a part of it. It's beautiful to see a foursome of people with bags on their shoulders strolling down a fairway together. Even prettier when they're with a couple caddies. Cart paths ruin the look and sometimes the play of a course. Could you imagine seeing cart paths running through Augusta this week. . .a big "turnaround" behind the 12th green. We should have more courses doing what Bandon Dunes chose to do (it clearly hasn't suffered from its decision).







    Some really good thoughts. I think your spot on in your thinking that the results of this poll are skewed. To a larger degree I also think most polls/posts provide a limited view as this site is populated by the a small segment of the golfing population addicted enough to the game to be part of this type of site.



    Not surprisingly my home course got an 'unwalkable' rating on the site you listed. I'm not surprised..there are some really long distances from green to tee. To your point, some people do walk it - when it's an AJGA competition or something similar, so it's technically 'walkable'. But from a practical standpoint, there is no way the golf course could allow walkers mixed with riders and expect to keep the course running on time. And with temps in the triple digits 3-4 months of the year, you'd better walk it in the morning. image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />
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  • kejoal11kejoal11 IYAOYAS!!! Yokosuka, JapanMembers Posts: 1,118 ✭✭
    I prefer to walk. I use a clicgear push cart and have no issues with being tired or shoulders sore at the end of the day. Plus having knee surgery using the pushcart lightens the load on my knee. Nothing better than being able to establish a rhythm while walking. I also find that I have time to calm myself down after a bad shot or if I have to hit a shot to win a hole for skins. lol
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    Evnroll ER5
    Snell MTB Black/MTB-X
    #insideTMAG 2013
  • Baby BlueBaby Blue loving it... Members Posts: 98
    I enjoy both but feel less hurried when I'm riding.
  • IrrelephantIrrelephant Members Posts: 24
    As someone else said, using a cart is not a definite way to speed up play for a couple reasons.



    With that said I always prefer to walk with my Caddytek push cart but of I see there's going to be some traffic on the course I rent a golf cart.
    Nike Covert VRS Driver
    Taylormade Rocketballz Fairway Woods
    Taylormade Burner 2.0 Hybrids
    Taylormade Rocketbladez Tour Irons
    Rife Trinidad Tropical Putter
    Bridgestone B330RX Balls
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