Putting tempo

 caviar ·  
caviarcaviar Members  68WRX Points: 0Posts: 68
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Influence of head weight
I am trying to determine my optimal putting tempo. So far 60 bpms feels best, but I understand that tour player tempo is rather 65-70. Will my heavy putter head (400g for a shaft length of 33") contribute to a slower tempo? Would be interested in thoughts and numbers from others.
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  • sharkharksharkhark Members  1691WRX Points: 129Posts: 1,691 Platinum Tees
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    I apologize, cannot get technical along with you on my beats, but i do know that i mistakingly experimented with heavier putters, thinking a smoother tempo would result, on shorter putts, however i have found a tendency to brin the putter back too far due to the weight. I realized in going back to a lighter weight head, its easier to slow down and smooth out a shorter back stroke and stronger follow thru.
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  • Ogriv83Ogriv83 Members  106WRX Points: 0Posts: 106
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    I have fiund that with heavier putters I struggle to keep a short rythmical stroke.



    I use a lighter putter for this reason esp. on the real slippry greens.



    Just go out and try things as were all different
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  • frozen_ropefrozen_rope Banned  1987WRX Points: 0Posts: 1,987
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    Traditional putter head weight is in the 295 to 310 gram range, and this is ideal for making a smooth, rhythmic swing, with a traditional length putter of 34" to 35".



    Several years ago, extra long length 48" stand up style putters emerged as a way to combat the yips some players had with a traditional length putter. When making an extra long putter , to achieve overall balance and swingability, the putter heads had to be much heavier, so heads were manufactured in the 340 gram to 375 gram plus range to be used on the extra long shafts.



    More recently in an effort to stimulate putter sales by introducing the new and different, some putter manufacturers have begun producing traditional length 34" to 35" putters using extra heavy 340 to 350 gram range head weights. These putters are off balance , reduce the players sense of touch, and counter productive to making a good rhythmic putting stroke.




    caviar wrote on Oct 11 2008, 01:02 PM:
    I am trying to determine my optimal putting tempo. So far 60 bpms feels best, but I understand that tour player tempo is rather 65-70. Will my heavy putter head (400g for a shaft length of 33") contribute to a slower tempo? Would be interested in thoughts and numbers from others.
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  • 502 to Right502 to Right Badds Members  8110WRX Points: 2Handicap: 8.3Posts: 8,110 Titanium Tees
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    frozen_rope wrote on Oct 11 2008, 03:39 PM:
    More recently in an effort to stimulate putter sales by introducing something new and different, some putter manufacturers have begun producing traditional length 34" to 35" putters using extra heavy 340 to 350 gram range head weights. These putters are off balance , reduce the players sense of touch, and counter productive to making a good rhythmic putting stroke.




    I disagree. I think a golfer can retain a lot of feel, especially when playing a putter at less than 34 inches, when the headweight is in the 340 to 350 gram range. 300 grams is just way too light at 33 inches, for example.
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  • Juan73Juan73 JuanTheGolfer Members  559WRX Points: 121Handicap: 7.3Posts: 559 Golden Tee
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    I would suggest watching the video I have linked below. Mike Shannon has been Tiger Woods' putting coach for a number of years.



    It will give you an idea on Tempo.





    http://www.golfersmd.com/Experts/tabid/977...lt.aspx?VID=214





    Hope it helps... and yes Mike is also my putting coach... so I am just not sending you to someone who is out there in the internet talking about putting. He is very knowledgeable and helpful.
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  • caviarcaviar Members  68WRX Points: 0Posts: 68
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    Thanks, that video cites some really high bpm numbers for good players. Still interested to hear more personal numbers from members out there, especially those with heavier putters.
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  • QWKDTSNQWKDTSN Dreaming of Bandon Members  2999WRX Points: 3Posts: 2,999 Titanium Tees
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    Funny, I was just thinking about posting a topic about putting tempo.



    I don't know anything about numbers but I recently realized that I putt much better when I have a quick tempo. Not FAST - but not swing.... swing.



    My tempo is like click-click. One-two. If I slow down and start going ooone.... twoooo... I push and pull the putts like crazy.



    I just went on a putter binge and bought a few putters... switching between all of them, I tried to slow my tempo down to let each one open and close with its natural 'toe flow' but I started pushing and pulling putts so badly I lost all my confidence.



    When I got my TP Mills the other day I decided to copy my buddy Gene, who putts absolutely lights out with a quick tempo, and just putt with a little faster and more natural tempo. My distance control is amazing again and the ball goes exactly where I aim.



    I KNOW that my tempo is a lot quicker than tour pros, and I have read plenty of putting advice about smoothing out your rhythm, but slowing my rhythm means taking a longer backswing for the same length of putt, and there is just too much that can go wrong when you are moving the putter back and through twice the distance for the same speed of putt.
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  • Bogie HokieBogie Hokie Members  154WRX Points: 0Posts: 154
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    Juan73 wrote on Oct 11 2008, 10:50 PM:
    I would suggest watching the video I have linked below. Mike Shannon has been Tiger Woods' putting coach for a number of years.



    It will give you an idea on Tempo.





    http://www.golfersmd.com/Experts/tabid/977...lt.aspx?VID=214





    Hope it helps... and yes Mike is also my putting coach... so I am just not sending you to someone who is out there in the internet talking about putting. He is very knowledgeable and helpful.




    That's pretty cool. Have you ever met Tiger or heard any good stories about him?
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  • 8thehardway8thehardway Members  1907WRX Points: 69Handicap: 8Posts: 1,907 Platinum Tees
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    caviar wrote on Oct 11 2008, 02:02 PM:
    I am trying to determine my optimal putting tempo. So far 60 bpms feels best, but I understand that tour player tempo is rather 65-70. Will my heavy putter head (400g for a shaft length of 33") contribute to a slower tempo? Would be interested in thoughts and numbers from others.






    The Mike Shannon video rec. is a great idea -- using different metronome settings, roll a bunch of balls a minimum of 25 feet and select the tempo that provides the best grouping.



    OTOH, the problem with instructional videos and articles is you have no idea if you are who the instructor has in mind. It's interesting that 90% of tour players have a 76 b/m tempo, but that has no meaning for me.



    Because my putting stroke and the greens I putt on are crude in comparison to the tour, my 425g, 34-inch mallet provides the best solution for me. I have a very slow tempo with this putter, but the heavy head keeps my stroke more stable then lighter heads and the MOI forgives off-center contact.



    I have lots of blades, cavity-backed and mallet putters - when I try out new strokes with them it seems I always need a faster tempo.
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  • wishbonewishbone Members  80WRX Points: 60Posts: 80 Bunkers
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    Interesting topic. My putting has been absolutely horrible this year. I have been experimenting with heavier heads and backweighting to improve my stroke, it feels very good on practice strokes and on carpets. But I find in the real life, the long, slow stroke and heavier head kills my sense of touch.



    I recently put an old Ping Anser back in the bag (head weight is 310 grams, I think), and went with a much quicker pace, and putted very well. It's only been two rounds, but one of very quick greens and one very slow, so far so good.



    I did mess around on the practice green with the same pace and a heavier head (350 grams), and felt like I was fighting the putter head to much to stop it and start it forward again.



    I do think tempo is an important part of putter fitting.
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  • 8thehardway8thehardway Members  1907WRX Points: 69Handicap: 8Posts: 1,907 Platinum Tees
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    Heavy heads = stability and forgiveness, light heads = feel and touch and somewhere along that continuum is a point where each of us will find maximum effectiveness. (FWIW, I don't find a long, slow stroke reduces feel but a heavy head is definitely a feel killer.)



    For golfers who putt well, I believe green speed has the most influence on tempo. I think 90% of tour players have the same tempo because that's the speed that works best on tour greens, and I'd imagine there would be a similar cluster among pro bowlers, Olympic curlers, etc.
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    Jones/Ortiz 4 wood 17*
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    8thehardway wrote on Oct 12 2008, 08:06 PM:
    For golfers who putt well, I believe green speed has the most influence on tempo. I think 90% of tour players have the same tempo because that's the speed that works best on tour greens, and I'd imagine there would be a similar cluster among pro bowlers, Olympic curlers, etc.






    That is an interesting point you bring up! The faster the green the more feel involved. I think there is a good relationship between tempo and green speed, I think that the faster the green, the slower the tempo should be for the same amount of speed. I putt pretty well on lighting fast greens when I play them a couple of times a year, but it always takes some practice on the practice green beforehand to get my tempo down to where it needs to be.



    At my home course, which has bermuda greens that probably stimp out at 8.5 - 9.5, I like a bit shorter stroke with quicker tempo and stronger accelleration through the putt.
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  • TigerfanOneTigerfanOne Members  85WRX Points: 0Posts: 85
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    I was just thinking about this. I tried the one-two rhythm and it is somewhat quick. Do any of you guys, when yo do this feel as if you're jabbing at the ball, instead of a same back-same forward type stroke? I know there's the type of putting stroke where you "hit" at it, but I prefer the equal on both sides, so what do you guys think?
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  • frozen_ropefrozen_rope Banned  1987WRX Points: 0Posts: 1,987
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    Textbook putting technique is proper posture/alignment/grip. These good address fundamentals promotes the correct shoulder powered stroke, which then makes good rhythm/tempo naturally happen.

    Heavy head putters more than about 315 grams are counter productive to good putting touch. A heavy head putter is similar to using a sledgehammer to nail in a small nail to hang a picture, it's a terrible idea.




    caviar wrote on Oct 11 2008, 01:02 PM:
    I am trying to determine my optimal putting tempo. So far 60 bpms feels best, but I understand that tour player tempo is rather 65-70. Will my heavy putter head (400g for a shaft length of 33") contribute to a slower tempo? Would be interested in thoughts and numbers from others.
    Posted:
  • frozen_ropefrozen_rope Banned  1987WRX Points: 0Posts: 1,987
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    33" is the correct finished length putter for a player about 5'6" tall. In this case, for male players in the 5'5" to 5'6" height range, a 33" finished length putter with 325 to 330 gram head is a balanced and playable putter.


    502 to Right wrote on Oct 11 2008, 06:41 PM:
    frozen_rope wrote on Oct 11 2008, 03:39 PM:
    More recently in an effort to stimulate putter sales by introducing something new and different, some putter manufacturers have begun producing traditional length 34" to 35" putters using extra heavy 340 to 350 gram range head weights. These putters are off balance , reduce the players sense of touch, and counter productive to making a good rhythmic putting stroke.




    I disagree. I think a golfer can retain a lot of feel, especially when playing a putter at less than 34 inches, when the headweight is in the 340 to 350 gram range. 300 grams is just way too light at 33 inches, for example.
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  • nobreak1970nobreak1970 Members  586WRX Points: 0Posts: 586
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    502 to Right wrote on Oct 11 2008, 05:41 PM:
    frozen_rope wrote on Oct 11 2008, 03:39 PM:
    More recently in an effort to stimulate putter sales by introducing something new and different, some putter manufacturers have begun producing traditional length 34" to 35" putters using extra heavy 340 to 350 gram range head weights. These putters are off balance , reduce the players sense of touch, and counter productive to making a good rhythmic putting stroke.




    I disagree. I think a golfer can retain a lot of feel, especially when playing a putter at less than 34 inches, when the headweight is in the 340 to 350 gram range. 300 grams is just way too light at 33 inches, for example.




    I second your disagreement here....345g head weight is not uncommon and hasn't been for a while now. PUtting is such a personal experience...it's not really helpful for an instructional video to get someone's "rhythm" in sync. Look at Nicklaus...he got tempo?

    Anyway...not trying to be disrespectful, but honestly, I don't think that far into my putting technique. 2 putts work well for me, it just take trial and error and PRACTICE. Then again, HOW someone practices is personal as well. Catch-22 here it seems. image/wink.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=';)' />

    The big thing that kills the concept of tempo in putting is green speed period. Tempo slows when greens are fast. But I could be wrong.





    Peace.

    Each to his/her own in the realm of putting. image/wink.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=';)' />
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  • djl0657djl0657 Members  353WRX Points: 0Posts: 353
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    I spent the afternoon at a local golf shop here in WILLIAMSBURG. What started out as a putter fitting became a putting lesson and an eye opening experience for me.



    With regard to weight, the pro and I determined that I was getting a smoother "arc" stroke with a putter with a heavier head weight (the overall swingweight of the 35 inch putter was an E-1, most of my personal 34 inch putters were D-3). One putter jumped off the chart for me with a consistent feel, heavier head weight and a smoother stroke. I tried my own putters and several at the shop and left with the E-1 weighted putter (it is a MALTBY M25 INTEGRATED PUTTER SYSTEM with a slant neck and about 3/4 shaft offset, moderate toe weight).



    I would have never believed that a heavier putter would work so well for me, but we made some fairly substantial changes to my stance and stroke. I have been trying to find out the head weight of the new MALTBY, not available so far as it is a discontinued model (and the shop made me a very reasonable deal on the putter).
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  • frozen_ropefrozen_rope Banned  1987WRX Points: 0Posts: 1,987
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    It's a common misconception that putting is "personal". It's not.

    Like all golf shots, correct putting technique promotes consistently sold ball striking. With putting, just like with full shots, it is possible to have success using unorthodox technique. But why do things the hard way ?

    Tour players who have had success with homegrown poor technique methods, like Couples full swings or Nicklaus' putting, do it with extraordinarily good natural rhythm/tempo.But that's not something most people can do. It's much easier to use sound, correct technique.

    The reason putting is misunderstood is because the deficiencies are more subtle than on full swing shots. It's obvious to everyone when a hacker slices his tee ball o.b, right that the guy has poor technique. It's not so obvious when a player misses 10 footers all day long. In this case the player says "oh, I misread it", or" I've been getting lips outs all day", or "these greens are bumpy, can't make anything".

    The truth is that solid ball contact is just as important for a putt as it is for a full swing shot, but since the putt is such a relatively short shot, people do not notice the mishits like they do with fuller shots. Putting is no more "personal" than any golf shot. Good consistent putting is about sound fundamental technique.


    nobreak1970 wrote on Jan 2 2009, 11:30 PM:
    502 to Right wrote on Oct 11 2008, 05:41 PM:
    frozen_rope wrote on Oct 11 2008, 03:39 PM:
    More recently in an effort to stimulate putter sales by introducing something new and different, some putter manufacturers have begun producing traditional length 34" to 35" putters using extra heavy 340 to 350 gram range head weights. These putters are off balance , reduce the players sense of touch, and counter productive to making a good rhythmic putting stroke.




    I disagree. I think a golfer can retain a lot of feel, especially when playing a putter at less than 34 inches, when the headweight is in the 340 to 350 gram range. 300 grams is just way too light at 33 inches, for example.




    I second your disagreement here....345g head weight is not uncommon and hasn't been for a while now. PUtting is such a personal experience...it's not really helpful for an instructional video to get someone's "rhythm" in sync. Look at Nicklaus...he got tempo?

    Anyway...not trying to be disrespectful, but honestly, I don't think that far into my putting technique. 2 putts work well for me, it just take trial and error and PRACTICE. Then again, HOW someone practices is personal as well. Catch-22 here it seems. image/wink.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=';)' />

    The big thing that kills the concept of tempo in putting is green speed period. Tempo slows when greens are fast. But I could be wrong.





    Peace.

    Each to his/her own in the realm of putting. image/wink.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=';)' />
    Posted:
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members  17148WRX Points: 1,345Posts: 17,148 Titanium Tees
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    Everything you say I disagree with. You have zero experience fitting or scientific proof of anything and believe stock shafts are superior than say my Whiteboard Diamana. Every post you make seems more and more rediculous.
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  • nobreak1970nobreak1970 Members  586WRX Points: 0Posts: 586
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    Yes putting is personal...everyone's "tempo" as some people put it is not the same(and we are not talking about 1/4 tempo in music either.)



    YOu cannot break putting down into a scientific "principal"....and you cannot do so with a swing of a driver either....I copied EXACTLY the swing recommended in a popular golf magazine by a very money winning Tour Pro....had it compared and contrasted at a Pro Shop here locally, and according to the Pro on duty after reviewing the graphs, and videos and more graphs and speed results and the "elbow angle on the upswing" results, etc I was dead on.....it DID NOT work! Still sliced it. Club was the same as in the instruction article, same loft, same everything....it's called physics...simple physics. Putting is the most chaotic mess in the game. It has been compared to any other golf swing...welp it isn't true.



    Nuff said.







    Peace.
    Posted:
  • Bones01gtBones01gt Members  1001WRX Points: 0Posts: 1,001
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    If you need a metronome to putt you have some issues. If you can't say 1-2-1-2 in your head I feel really bad for you.



    Putting is absolutely personal. That's why there are so many different shapes of putters. Blades, mallets, half mallets, ufo's, etc....

    Irons are all generally the same shape. As are woods. Not putters. You can get something different that fits your stroke and suits your eye. Then you get into weight...that's opening another can of worms. Sure there are fundamentals when it comes to putting, but it is way-y more personal than the tee to green game. Unlike the full swing, I believe that the mind and the mental side of the game plays a larger role than athleticism in putting. Putting is personal. Period. I don't know how else to explain it.



    Putting is personal for me anyway. I know one thing...I don't need a friggin' metronome. 1-2-1-2....see, I got it!
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  • Bones01gtBones01gt Members  1001WRX Points: 0Posts: 1,001
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    My tempo is quicker on fast greens because my stroke is shorter. I like to accelerate through the ball when I putt, whether it's a 30 footer or a 3 footer and whether the greens are rolling 8 or 11 on the stimp. The length of the putt determines the length of my stroke which in turn determines the tempo. Smooth back and smooth through, back is one and through is two!
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  • PuttingDoctorPuttingDoctor The Putting Doctor Members  2119WRX Points: 1Posts: 2,119 Platinum Tees
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    frozen_rope wrote on Jan 2 2009, 10:23 PM:
    33" is the correct finished length putter for a player about 5'6" tall. In this case, for male players in the 5'5" to 5'6" height range, a 33" finished length putter with 325 to 330 gram head is a balanced and playable putter.




    F-R, can you provide some reference to the above opinion? The statement has me wondering if you think all who are 5'5"-5'6" have the same sleeve length and inseam.



    I'm 5'11" and due to an athletic setup and extended arms am best fit to 33.5". My arms hang so low that my iron specs are 4 degrees flat.



    Consistent posture grip and alignment are critical to success in putting but all are variable. Having good tempo and a consistent stroke are key to allowing your subconscious to take over when putting. The only thing you have to fear in putting is "stinkin' thinkin'..." and over thinking tempo is a sure way to allow doubt to creep into your game.



    Tempo analysis is a valid endeavor in training, but leave it on the practice green after you've incorporated it into your putting stroke.... that is assuming you practice putting, giving it as much time as you do on the range beating balls.
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  • frozen_ropefrozen_rope Banned  1987WRX Points: 0Posts: 1,987
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    You did not comprehend the point of my prior posts. That is, a shoulder powered stroke is critical to consistent solid ball contact.

    Address fundamentals including grip, posture, and alignment are critical to promoting a shoulder powered stroke.

    The significant element of the grip is that the player's left thumb is precisely flat/square on the topside (flat part) of the putter grip).

    99% of players do not use this correct grip, or even understand why the top side of their putter grip is flat. It's designed that way for a reason.



    The second critical element of putting is address posture. To find your posture stand straight and tall with feet close together.Hold the putter using the correct grip (as described above). Now push your back trouser pockets out behind you, straight back. When you do this your upper body will tilt forward slightly, your arms will hang down naturally, the putter shaft will fall down towards the address position, and your eyes will be above the ball. Since you're using the correct grip the sole of the putter will end up parallel with the ground, but elevated a few inches. The final move is to relax your knees, and you will notice when you do this the putter head moves down to the ground (your knees have acted as pistons lowering your body down so that the putter is now resting on the ground, the putter sole is flush and parallel with the ground), and your eyes are slightly inside the ball .



    This is textbook correct putting posture. From this position your stroke will be naturally powered by the shoulders.

    Taller players will have more knee bend then shorter players, but the process of getting into correct posture is the same for all body types. Now back to the grip, when the left thumb is correctly placed flat and square on the top flat side of the putter grip, you will notice this holds the wrist fairly high, and it creates a slight bend to the elbow. This is a primary reason why a 33" putter would only be suitable for a player of about 5'5" or 5'6" height. A player of 5'10 to 6' would need severe knee bend to get down to the ground using correct putting grip and putting posture.





    If a player wants to use a bad putting grip and, or, bad posture, then he will be making an arm stroke. The arm stroke can work, but it's inconsistent and unreliable, especially for pressure situations. Inevitably the arm stroke gets fast , mishit ball contact occurs, and the ball does not roll true.

    Conversely, a correct shoulder powered stroke (born naturally from correct grip and posture) will naturally have a good smooth rhythm and tempo, without the player ever having to think about it.




    PuttingDoctor wrote on Jan 3 2009, 02:40 PM:
    frozen_rope wrote on Jan 2 2009, 10:23 PM:
    33" is the correct finished length putter for a player about 5'6" tall. In this case, for male players in the 5'5" to 5'6" height range, a 33" finished length putter with 325 to 330 gram head is a balanced and playable putter.




    F-R, can you provide some reference to the above opinion? The statement has me wondering if you think all who are 5'5"-5'6" have the same sleeve length and inseam.



    I'm 5'11" and due to an athletic setup and extended arms am best fit to 33.5". My arms hang so low that my iron specs are 4 degrees flat.



    Consistent posture grip and alignment are critical to success in putting but all are variable. Having good tempo and a consistent stroke are key to allowing your subconscious to take over when putting. The only thing you have to fear in putting is "stinkin' thinkin'..." and over thinking tempo is a sure way to allow doubt to creep into your game.



    Tempo analysis is a valid endeavor in training, but leave it on the practice green after you've incorporated it into your putting stroke.... that is assuming you practice putting, giving it as much time as you do on the range beating balls.
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  • PuttingDoctorPuttingDoctor The Putting Doctor Members  2119WRX Points: 1Posts: 2,119 Platinum Tees
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    F-R, not to belabor this point but I asked if you could reference your length statement. In fact it would seem we agree on a lot. I've taught a fundamental grip since the 80's. I suggest to students that left hand high and on the putter at all times will have the right hand join without disturbing aim. If the grip is applied to the putter shaft in a square manner then griping with the left hand with thumb down the flat should have the golfer holding the putter square to their body. Re-aim is accomplished by adjusting body aim not putter or hands.



    We differ in that I want your eyes on the intended line of the putt. Would you deliberately aim a gun slightly from the left and expect success?



    Now, as to length. I feel your statement about 33" for 5'6"ish height to be to general. Think of this. A golfer with a 28" inseam (short legs) who has a 35" sleeve length but stands 5'10" may be in relaxed knee posture as indicated but would need 32" of putter. The variations are endless, that could be why we have such a wide selection of lengths available.



    My question again sir, no disrespect intended, how did you come to your conclusion re length? Is this written in a text book? Golf instruction manual? Golf magazine? Or is this an opinion formed through experience?



    I ask as I'm always looking for good information to add to my knowledge base.
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  • golfdog1955golfdog1955 Members  186WRX Points: 55Posts: 186 Bunkers
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    Just to add my 2 cents I have ben intrigued by Geoff Magnum's theories espoused on his Web site the Puttingzone.com. He also has several videos on you tube. No one I know writes in a more scientific manner than Mr Magnum and David Orr seems to find Magnum's work valuable. Magnum argues for a heavier putter and has several thoughts about tempo and set up that I have found very helpful. But as in most things in golf we have to make it our own and fit it to our particular way of thinking and physical perceptions.
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  • tmfool tmfool Members  1831WRX Points: 115Handicap: 3.4Posts: 1,831 Platinum Tees
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    golfdog1955 wrote on Jan 4 2009, 09:22 AM:
    Just to add my 2 cents I have ben intrigued by Geoff Magnum's theories espoused on his Web site the Puttingzone.com. He also has several videos on you tube. No one I know writes in a more scientific manner than Mr Magnum and David Orr seems to find Magnum's work valuable. Magnum argues for a heavier putter and has several thoughts about tempo and set up that I have found very helpful. But as in most things in golf we have to make it our own and fit it to our particular way of thinking and physical perceptions.






    well said....i think we all can benefit from fundamental theories espoused by magnum and orr.

    a few of the basic fundamentals of putting (proper fit, correct aim, and good tempo) need to work in tandem for best results.



    but to excuse poor putting fundamentals under the guise of being "personal" would seem to be a recipe for inconsistency.
    Posted:
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  • caviarcaviar Members  68WRX Points: 0Posts: 68
    Joined:  #29
    QWKDTSN wrote on Oct 13 2008, 04:36 AM:
    8thehardway wrote on Oct 12 2008, 08:06 PM:
    For golfers who putt well, I believe green speed has the most influence on tempo. I think 90% of tour players have the same tempo because that's the speed that works best on tour greens, and I'd imagine there would be a similar cluster among pro bowlers, Olympic curlers, etc.






    That is an interesting point you bring up! The faster the green the more feel involved. I think there is a good relationship between tempo and green speed, I think that the faster the green, the slower the tempo should be for the same amount of speed. I putt pretty well on lighting fast greens when I play them a couple of times a year, but it always takes some practice on the practice green beforehand to get my tempo down to where it needs to be.



    At my home course, which has bermuda greens that probably stimp out at 8.5 - 9.5, I like a bit shorter stroke with quicker tempo and stronger accelleration through the putt.




    This is a point made by David Orr in his most recent Premium Putting Video (www.orrgolf.com), in contrast to most authorthies who seem to advocate one tempo for all conditions. Anyone else who changes tempo depending on green speed?
    Posted:
  • PaulNPaulN Members  164WRX Points: 0Posts: 164
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    I really like heavy putters and slower tempos. I have found that any time I can slow down my swing, from driving to pitching to putting, and still maintain enough momentum to delivery the right ball speed for a particular shot, to more accurate I tend to be. I'll be trying out a new design in about a month or so with a 400 gram head weight. That's porky by any standard, but I think I will really like the change.



    On the other hand I have a friend who crouches over the ball and slaps it with a Bullseye like Arnie used to do. His results are almost identical to mine.



    So, what's the moral of the story? Different strokes for different folks, I suppose.
    Posted:

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