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Would a classic classroom setting help golfers?

 BB28403 ·  
BB28403BB28403 Members  4519WRX Points: 901Handicap: This post may not be here soon as moderators may delete it to free up space. Be concerned... you may be next...Posts: 4,519 Titanium Tees
Joined:  edited Mar 15, 2019 in Instruction & Academy #1
I have always found it easiest to study in a class I enjoyed. Such as History.<br />
<br />
It seems we golfers are all in a self study environment and we see the teach maybe 4 times a year. <br />
<br />
If someone gave a class in your area to explore the game more, would you take it?<br />
<br />
Such as Golf for Beginners<br />
Rules of the game<br />
Golf History<br />
Scoring 101<br />
Course Management 101<br />
Course Management 201<br />
Masters Class (learning types of grass and effects)<br />
Golf Fitness<br />
<br />
They could have special professors in such as tour pros or swing coaches. Just to draw on a dry erase board, discuss strategy, and have a Q and A. As well as tests to see if you are retaining the knowledge. <br />
<br />
Or does a classroom environment not help a golfer at all?
Posted:
1

Comments

  • YrrdeadYrrdead Better Living Through Chemistry Members  1647WRX Points: 154Handicap: 8.9Posts: 1,647 Platinum Tees
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    I think for the majority of golfers we could benefit from some focused classroom time prior to some hands on. I mean that's what golf instruction type books are really. What you are saying is instead of reading that stuff in a book you would rather have someone in person tell you the information??<br />
    <br />
    Sounds like a good idea to me as very few people are any good at self directed learning.....Yet we keep buying golf books.
    Posted:
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  • RobertBaronRobertBaron Members  900WRX Points: 211Posts: 900 Golden Tee
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    I don’t think it would help with the swing unless it were like gym class setting but certainly advanced golfers could benefit from a classroom setting learning how to play a course or something like a Dave Pelz classroom clinic on the intricacies of putting.
    Posted:
  • YrrdeadYrrdead Better Living Through Chemistry Members  1647WRX Points: 154Handicap: 8.9Posts: 1,647 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #4
    <br />
    I don’t think it would help with the swing unless it were like gym class setting but certainly advanced golfers could benefit from a classroom setting learning how to play a course or something like a Dave Pelz classroom clinic on the intricacies of putting.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    I feel like the majority of the normal players I randomly get paired up with have zero clue about "basic" things like ball flight laws and the huge effect lie has on a golf shot.<br />
    <br />
    I feel like a 30 min class covering those two things could help almost every golfer play better golf.
    Posted:
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  • RobertBaronRobertBaron Members  900WRX Points: 211Posts: 900 Golden Tee
    Joined:  edited Mar 15, 2019 #5
    Yrrdead wrote:
    <br />
    <br />
    I don’t think it would help with the swing unless it were like gym class setting but certainly advanced golfers could benefit from a classroom setting learning how to play a course or something like a Dave Pelz classroom clinic on the intricacies of putting.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    I feel like the majority of the normal players I randomly get paired up with have zero clue about "basic" things like ball flight laws and the huge effect lie has on a golf shot.<br />
    <br />
    I feel like a 30 min class covering those two things could help almost every golfer play better golf.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    I guess I feel like knowing something vs how to physically do that something don’t really translate to one another. <br />
    <br />
    You could probably ask 100 hackers at the mats what they should doing in their swing and 99 of them will repeat back all the right answers that they’re not doing.
    Posted:
  • YrrdeadYrrdead Better Living Through Chemistry Members  1647WRX Points: 154Handicap: 8.9Posts: 1,647 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #6
    <br />
    Yrrdead wrote:
    <br />
    <br />
    I don't think it would help with the swing unless it were like gym class setting but certainly advanced golfers could benefit from a classroom setting learning how to play a course or something like a Dave Pelz classroom clinic on the intricacies of putting.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    I feel like the majority of the normal players I randomly get paired up with have zero clue about "basic" things like ball flight laws and the huge effect lie has on a golf shot.<br />
    <br />
    I feel like a 30 min class covering those two things could help almost every golfer play better golf.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    I guess I feel like knowing something vs how to physically do that something don't really translate to one another.<br />
    <br />
    You could probably ask 100 hackers at the mats what they should doing in their swing and 99 of them will repeat back all the right answers that they're not doing.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    In most cases I would agree that just knowing isn't that helpful but the issue that I see is that people's basic feedback loop in golf is flawed. Meaning they don't understand what makes a ball do a thing. And the "natural" reaction to "fix" ballflight is almost always wrong as most of us know. So if I know that swinging left makes the ball go right I won't swing more left to attempt to fix a slice? If that makes sense.<br />
    <br />
    In regards to the underlined portion I 100% disagree with that notion. I feel like most people have no idea or at least no ability to articulate what they are doing wrong. And if they can articulate something that is "wrong" it is usually not the problem at all.<br />
    <br />
    I mean they might spout some babble about keeping their head down or some other terrible cliche but that is about it.
    Posted:
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  • naval2006naval2006 ArgentinaMembers  1026WRX Points: 131Handicap: 7Posts: 1,026 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #7
    I don’t think that by learning swing theorics, rules and and course maintenance you can learn to play the game. Mostly if you can’t move the club in an ok plane, be properly set up and the touch etc., no matter how much stuff you’ve crammed in your mind. Golf is a game, not a school subject. Inversely, the more you play and the better you become you start to figure out most of the useful swing fundamentals to get the shots you need. I’ve run into lots of great amateurs who are not intellectually gifted but they’ve got the game and the experience to manage subpar rounds. Students of the game generally make good journalists but average golfers.
    Posted:
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  • BrianMcGBrianMcG Members  2377WRX Points: 670Posts: 2,377 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #8
    I taught such a class at the University of South Alabama. It was great for beginners. There was a classroom at the course. We would lecture for 30 min or show a short video of what we were working on that day, then go to the range and practice.
    Posted:
    Walter: Tell me Bobby, why do you play this game?
    Bobby: I play because I love it.
    Walter: Well I play for the money. I have to win. That is why every time we face each other I will always beat you.
  • oikos1oikos1 Members  2979WRX Points: 725Posts: 2,979 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  edited Mar 17, 2019 #9
    There are plenty of courses being taught for all of the things you listed. Many universities and community colleges have opportunities to audit such courses.<br />
    <br />
    You just have to seek them out if that's the learning style you prefer.<br />
    <br />
    edit: BrianMcG beat me to it.
    Posted:
  • Conner GolfConner Golf ClubWRX  115WRX Points: 20Handicap: 6Posts: 115 ClubWRX
    Joined:  #10
    Being a believer in the human mechanics in the golf swing. I can not help but believe a little teaching on a smart board would be of great help. When<br />
    it comes to the mechanics the math is always over looked. One example: Square at set up being zero plane means for a straight shot the club must be <br />
    on a 90* swing path(plane)to the ball no matter what the plane height is. Another example: Any in to out or out to in swing, any opening or closing <br />
    or closing of the club or change in the grip can be measured by degree of turn. The difference in swings can be explained with the math. Take Jim <br />
    Furyk's swing. He takes his back swing very steep close to 180 degree and his left arm is under turned less than 90 around 70 degrees, in his down<br />
    swing he drops his plane height to the 67.5 range and he continues his arm turn to 90 degrees for a straight shot or greater for a draw. Just a few examp<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    A demonstration with graphs and displays
    Posted:
  • glkglk send it in jerome Kodak, Tn/Chucktown, Sc via Chicago & BurghMembers  4256WRX Points: 771Posts: 4,256 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #11
    Maybe, maybe not but definitely not if you are  a lefty.
    https://twitter.com/jtedscott/status/1104750930560454660
    Posted:

    Enjoy every sandwich.

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