The ball doesn't matter as much as we think it does

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  • Hat TrickHat Trick  572WRX Points: 77Members Posts: 572 Golden Tee
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    Pick a ball you like in a price range your comfortable with and sick with it. I used to drive myself nuts trying different balls.

    Now I play the Pro V1X because it is consistent hole to hole, round to round, season to season for me. And the buy 3 get a 4th dz free each spring ($36 dz) is cheap enough for me.

    Posted:
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  • munichopmunichop  326WRX Points: 199Members Posts: 326 Greens
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    The ball only matters if you are skilled enough to to be somewhat consistent hitting it. For some people that may be a bogey golfer or an 80's , 70's or scratch. I am +2 and play surlyn because I need help getting the ball in the air. I have played surlyn for over 4 years and actually struggle around the greens with urethane now. I would say if you can't sniff bogey golf on your best day the ball is the least of your issues. However most players regardless of skill would improve if they did stick to one ball and make sure they use it when they practice chipping and putting.

    Posted:
  • chippa13chippa13  2519WRX Points: 326Members Posts: 2,519 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #34

    I don't need horns to recognize vs.

    Posted:
  • bromancebromance  6WRX Points: 7Members Posts: 6 Bunkers
    Joined:  #35

    Ball does matter for players like me where breaking 100 is a lifetime achievement Haha. The most balls i've lost the most are Tour level balls (ProV1/X, Tour B-X, TP5, etc). The best budget ball that works for me is a cheap Nitro Pulsar ball that I purchased for a non- golf related event. $8 bux. I still have 2 sleeves remaining after 12+ rounds. I'm not shooting any "better" but I've been scoring much higher due to not having 20+ penalty strokes (we play local rule with +2 stroke dropping at point to penalty area entry). Not going to lie though, ego always gets the best of me and the tour level balls always come out for play when with"da boyz" on the weekend.

    Posted:
  • bluedotbluedot  3673WRX Points: 377Handicap: 7.5Members Posts: 3,673 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #36

    The ball matters a LOT, make no mistake about it, but it doesn't matter the way the most people think of it, especially since the ProV1/solid core revolution. It doesn't so much matter WHICH ball you play; it matters that you play the SAME ball all the time. I was "educated" to this by one of the better senior amateurs in the country years ago when I couldn't afford balata balls, and while it might be slightly less true today, it's still the way to approach golf ball usage IF you want to consistently shoot your best numbers.

    I play with really good players who use pretty much everything in terms of different balls; I even know some serious senior tournament players using Pinnacles. What I do NOT see is serious players using whatever they find, or whatever is on sale, or whatever they are given, even in practice rounds. If they are playing a different ball in a practice round, it's an experiment, not a casual change. While pretty much everything is the same length off the tee now because of USGA restrictions, the way various balls react of wedges and putters is different, and that's enough to matter over the long run. The difference may be sound and "feel" like the difference between two premium balls, or it might actually be spin and distance, like the difference between a ProV vs. a Noodle vs. a Pinnacle. But it's different, and it matters, at least to serious golfers.

    One way to think of it is that, until you get inside 150 or so, it's all more or less the same. From 150 in, though, it becomes a matter of how much spin you want and how much spin you are willing to PAY for. But you can play good golf with a ball that doesn't spin much around the green IF you are used to it and know how it is going to perform.

    Posted:
  • dlygrissedlygrisse Kansas 13819WRX Points: 1,356Handicap: 8-ishMembers Posts: 13,819 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #37

    If you are serious about getting better playing a urethane covered ball absolutely matters. Playing the same ball helps with consistency, playing a high quality ball will also bring more consistency.

    Urethane just gives more control with the short game. It might only be a few feet difference here or there but that can mean the difference between making or missing 2-3 putts a round. If your goal is just to break 100 and work on keeping the ball on the course then it probably is best to just buy value balls.

    Posted:
    I pick 14 of the following:
    Ping G400
    Callaway Epic Flash 3w 
    Ping G410 5 and 7 wood
    Callaway Apex 23*
    Ping G 4-U
    Ping Glide 2.0 Stealth 54, 58 SS or Vokey M Grind 58
    Grips NDMC +4
    Odyssey Pro #1 black
    Jones Utility
    ProV1x-mostly
    ECCO Biom Hybrid 3
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  • BeerPerHoleBeerPerHole  1494WRX Points: 384Members Posts: 1,494 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #38

    I recently saw the vid of Crossfield comparing the Pro V to the Velocity. Very interesting, only difference really was in chipping. But I didn’t watch the whole video yet...

    Posted:
    Ping GMax 400, Tour Stiff, 8*
    Mizuno Forged JPX 900 Irons
    A Couple of Ping Glide Wedges
    Ping Anser G Putter
    Ping G400 5-Wood
    Snell MTB-X
    Knee Deep Breaking Bud IPA
  • deepreddeepred  314WRX Points: 92Handicap: 12Members Posts: 314 Greens
    Joined:  #39

    On -, @BeerPerHole said:

    I recently saw the vid of Crossfield comparing the Pro V to the Velocity. Very interesting, only difference really was in chipping. But I didn’t watch the whole video yet...

    It seems that way with most balls. Full iron and wedge shots often generate similar spin numbers.

    Posted:
    Cleveland Classic XL Driver
    KE4 5 wood 17* 43”
    Maltby MXU 23* 
    Maltby Tricept TU 5 Iron
    Wilson Pi5 6-PW
    Wilson JP 55* SW
    Ram Watson Troon Grind 58
    Ray Cook M2 Mallet
  • wantacigarwantacigar  6WRX Points: 8Members Posts: 6 Bunkers
    Joined:  #40

    Funny. I've been "experimenting" with different ball brands and constructions this whole summer. My best rounds came with Top Flite D2 +Feels and Top Flite Gamer Tour urethane balls. I am now looking for the flash sales on these two balls so I can just stock up. I felt the most comfortable and confident with these so these are the balls I will play from now on.

    But who am I kidding. Next time my buddy wants to go dutch on a Snell MTB-X and I can get them at $28/doz I will likely jump on it and use them as well.

    Posted:
  • NoTalentLeftyNoTalentLefty  3640WRX Points: 231Members Posts: 3,640 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #41

    I strictly go by feel mostly. That is all.

    Posted:
    Livin' proof that Lefties are not naturally talented.

    Driver Callaway Epic Flash 10.5 set to 9.5
    3 and 5 Wood Ping G15
    3-5 Hybrids Cobra Baffler XL
    6-PW Titleist AP1s
    50 degree GW Titleist SM4
    56 degree SW Vokey SM7 
    Ping Anser 6 Milled Putter
  • j.a.j.a.  1723WRX Points: 181Members Posts: 1,723 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #42

    Anything in yellow or orange and good priced will suit me.

    The only tour balls I have purchased is the Chrome Soft when is on sale, I feel a slight difference around the greens and when putting.

    Posted:
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  • John_ThomsJohn_Thoms  13WRX Points: 6Members Posts: 13 Bunkers
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    I think you must learn to feel the ball, and different balls feel different. It depends on you how your balls will behave.

    Posted:
  • Tanner25Tanner25  6534WRX Points: 258Members Posts: 6,534 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #44

    On -, @wantacigar said:

    Funny. I've been "experimenting" with different ball brands and constructions this whole summer. My best rounds came with Top Flite D2 +Feels and Top Flite Gamer Tour urethane balls. I am now looking for the flash sales on these two balls so I can just stock up. I felt the most comfortable and confident with these so these are the balls I will play from now on.

    But who am I kidding. Next time my buddy wants to go dutch on a Snell MTB-X and I can get them at $28/doz I will likely jump on it and use them as well.

    Wait until Black Friday to stock up - there will be great deals Top Flite D2 +Feels and Top Flite Gamer Tour urethane balls. I really liked the D2 +Feels in yellow when I played them.

    Posted:
  • BeerPerHoleBeerPerHole  1494WRX Points: 384Members Posts: 1,494 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #45

    Yeah...I used to love playing the D2 Feel.

    Posted:
    Ping GMax 400, Tour Stiff, 8*
    Mizuno Forged JPX 900 Irons
    A Couple of Ping Glide Wedges
    Ping Anser G Putter
    Ping G400 5-Wood
    Snell MTB-X
    Knee Deep Breaking Bud IPA
  • Jackal66Jackal66  280WRX Points: 87Handicap: 22Members Posts: 280 Greens
    Joined:  #46

    Just for me-
    hot weather: chrome soft, tour soft, NXT, Bridgestone 330's.
    Under 80°: super soft, trusoft, Bridgestone E6 soft, Srixon q star.
    Cold weather: Maxfli softfli, Wilson duo, 50 elite, Noodle.

    I'm not real particular, but can tell the difference in different temps.

    Posted:
  • agolf1agolf1  1845WRX Points: 1,035Members Posts: 1,845 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #47

    On -, @bluedot said:

    The ball matters a LOT, make no mistake about it, but it doesn't matter the way the most people think of it, especially since the ProV1/solid core revolution. It doesn't so much matter WHICH ball you play; it matters that you play the SAME ball all the time. I was "educated" to this by one of the better senior amateurs in the country years ago when I couldn't afford balata balls, and while it might be slightly less true today, it's still the way to approach golf ball usage IF you want to consistently shoot your best numbers.

    I play with really good players who use pretty much everything in terms of different balls; I even know some serious senior tournament players using Pinnacles. What I do NOT see is serious players using whatever they find, or whatever is on sale, or whatever they are given, even in practice rounds. If they are playing a different ball in a practice round, it's an experiment, not a casual change. While pretty much everything is the same length off the tee now because of USGA restrictions, the way various balls react of wedges and putters is different, and that's enough to matter over the long run. The difference may be sound and "feel" like the difference between two premium balls, or it might actually be spin and distance, like the difference between a ProV vs. a Noodle vs. a Pinnacle. But it's different, and it matters, at least to serious golfers.

    One way to think of it is that, until you get inside 150 or so, it's all more or less the same. From 150 in, though, it becomes a matter of how much spin you want and how much spin you are willing to PAY for. But you can play good golf with a ball that doesn't spin much around the green IF you are used to it and know how it is going to perform.

    This is one of the better replies I've seen on the ball type topic. I contemplated switching to a urethane ball earlier this year but was having problems trying different balls every few rounds. I may still switch later but for now I have just kept playing my supply of Supersofts. If someone can actually control the spin, I would tend to agree that the urethane provides a higher celiing, as there will be some shots you just can't do with a surlyn ball.

    That being said, I am still undecided whether the average golfer (or the majority of them, including myself) can effectively control the spin or would just be better off playing 1 type of shot all the time. Regardless, at my level I believe the advantage of a urethane is at most 1 shot per round (and it may be zero or negative). I have about 10 greenside opportunities per round, and I've tracked that more spin would have been useful on 20%-30% of my shots. So the urethane could help me on 2-3 shots per round, but it's not like I was going to get all of those up and down anyways (on average).

    I understand why some people may want to have the "best" option available at all times. But I think the ball type and it's impact on score is dramatically over-stated for most recreational golfers. Nearly every recreational golfer could cut more shots from their average score via practice than the amount of difference a ball is going to make.

    Posted:
    Titleist 915 D4 10.5*, Diamana S+ Blue 60 S-Flex
    Titleist 915F 16.5* & 21.0*, Diamana S+ Blue 70 S-Flex
    PING G25 5-PW (25*-44*), UW (49*), SW (54*), CFS R-Flex
    PING Zing 2 L/S (57*)
    PING Cadence TR Ketsch Putter
    Backup Lob Wedges:  PING Eye 2+ (58*) or PING Eye 2 XG (60*)
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  • agolf1agolf1  1845WRX Points: 1,035Members Posts: 1,845 Platinum Tees
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    On -, @dlygrisse said:

    If you are serious about getting better playing a urethane covered ball absolutely matters. Playing the same ball helps with consistency, playing a high quality ball will also bring more consistency.

    Urethane just gives more control with the short game. It might only be a few feet difference here or there but that can mean the difference between making or missing 2-3 putts a round. If your goal is just to break 100 and work on keeping the ball on the course then it probably is best to just buy value balls.

    And this is one of the worst replies on the ball type topic. I don't play play a urethane ball but I can guarantee you that I am serious about getting better. There's a +2 handicap that plays a surlyn after evaluating what was best for his game, and apparently per Bluedot there are serious players using Pinnacles (I assume all of these people are serious about playing as well as they can/better). So factually, your statement is just wrong.

    It's hard to know for sure, but I don't think the difference is 2-3 shots a round on average for most people. Switching tomorrow morning for a game or in the short-run, sure. But practice/play with anything consistently, and it's hard to see how it makes that much difference on average for a typical player. Personally, I also find it funny how so many people shooting in the 80s and 90s apparently have tour like control on their short game. Yes, every now and then people hit one perfect and they feel like a pro. But just look at the total stats and scores - the majority of people at this level don't have consistent control of the ball with their short game.

    As I mentioned in my previous post, there's a reasonable chance a urethane can lower one's average score by some amount. If your perspective is that that's absolutely the best thing to do whether it is 0.1 shots, 1.0 shots, or 10 shots then fine. But to suggest that someone can't be serious about their game/improving without a urethane ball couldn't be more wrong.

    Posted:
    Titleist 915 D4 10.5*, Diamana S+ Blue 60 S-Flex
    Titleist 915F 16.5* & 21.0*, Diamana S+ Blue 70 S-Flex
    PING G25 5-PW (25*-44*), UW (49*), SW (54*), CFS R-Flex
    PING Zing 2 L/S (57*)
    PING Cadence TR Ketsch Putter
    Backup Lob Wedges:  PING Eye 2+ (58*) or PING Eye 2 XG (60*)
  • dlygrissedlygrisse Kansas 13819WRX Points: 1,356Handicap: 8-ishMembers Posts: 13,819 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  edited Oct 14, 2019 #49

    On -, @agolf1 said:

    On -, @dlygrisse said:

    If you are serious about getting better playing a urethane covered ball absolutely matters. Playing the same ball helps with consistency, playing a high quality ball will also bring more consistency.

    Urethane just gives more control with the short game. It might only be a few feet difference here or there but that can mean the difference between making or missing 2-3 putts a round. If your goal is just to break 100 and work on keeping the ball on the course then it probably is best to just buy value balls.

    And this is one of the worst replies on the ball type topic. I don't play play a urethane ball but I can guarantee you that I am serious about getting better. There's a +2 handicap that plays a surlyn after evaluating what was best for his game, and apparently per Bluedot there are serious players using Pinnacles (I assume all of these people are serious about playing as well as they can/better). So factually, your statement is just wrong.

    It's hard to know for sure, but I don't think the difference is 2-3 shots a round on average for most people. Switching tomorrow morning for a game or in the short-run, sure. But practice/play with anything consistently, and it's hard to see how it makes that much difference on average for a typical player. Personally, I also find it funny how so many people shooting in the 80s and 90s apparently have tour like control on their short game. Yes, every now and then people hit one perfect and they feel like a pro. But just look at the total stats and scores - the majority of people at this level don't have consistent control of the ball with their short game.

    As I mentioned in my previous post, there's a reasonable chance a urethane can lower one's average score by some amount. If your perspective is that that's absolutely the best thing to do whether it is 0.1 shots, 1.0 shots, or 10 shots then fine. But to suggest that someone can't be serious about their game/improving without a urethane ball couldn't be more wrong.

    My handicap has been between 5 and 9 over the years. But I would rate my short game closer to scratch, by ball striking is not my strength. I have spent a lot of time working on shots around the green, and while you can play just fine with surlyn, the amount of control you have on little short shots does drop off. It might be subtle for some, and it might only amount to a few feet on certain shots, but over 18 holes it can make the difference between winning a skin or two or shooting 78 instead of 80 for example. I think the faster the greens the more important it becomes. I have done a lot of testing with multiple types of balls head to head, and the best way I can describe it is that on occasion you get kind of a flier with harder balls on short shots. The ball just kind of jumps and rolls out, whereas with urethane the ball generally launches a bit lower and grabs.

    In all honesty I would probably prefer a surlyn ball from over 100 yards, especially with full iron and FW wood shots, but I find that something like a ProvX performs better with the driver and most certainly around the green and from 60 yards in. But that is the strength of my game, and if I don't perform well there my score suffers quickly.

    That being said I will sometimes play a ball like a Supersoft, or Wilson Duo Soft in the winter when the air is cold and the ground is mushy and the greens haven't been mowed in awhile, as getting the ball to stop is not an issue. Plus the soft compression feels much better when it's cold.

    Posted:
    I pick 14 of the following:
    Ping G400
    Callaway Epic Flash 3w 
    Ping G410 5 and 7 wood
    Callaway Apex 23*
    Ping G 4-U
    Ping Glide 2.0 Stealth 54, 58 SS or Vokey M Grind 58
    Grips NDMC +4
    Odyssey Pro #1 black
    Jones Utility
    ProV1x-mostly
    ECCO Biom Hybrid 3
  • chippa13chippa13  2519WRX Points: 326Members Posts: 2,519 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #50

    I think you crossed yourself up when mentioning the greenside fliers with "harder" balls. Out of all the balls you mentioned the ProV1x is the firmest ball by a mile.

    Posted:
  • AFcelicaAFcelica  801WRX Points: 166Members Posts: 801 Golden Tee
    Joined:  #51

    On -, @chippa13 said:

    I think you crossed yourself up when mentioning the greenside fliers with "harder" balls. Out of all the balls you mentioned the ProV1x is the firmest ball by a mile.

    Unless he meant the hardness of the cover as that is all that really matters on greenside shots. In that case he is 100% correct. Surlyn covers are much much harder than even the prov1x

    Posted:
  • munichopmunichop  326WRX Points: 199Members Posts: 326 Greens
    Joined:  #52

    I have to chip in again on the idea that more spin helps improve your short game. It does only if you are skilled enough to control it. I believe most players are not skilled enough and are overly influenced by seeing the best players in the world on tv hit shots that they covet. I have played surlyn almost 5 years now and have posted my best ever stats with fewest bogies per round, highest save percentage per round and most birdies per round all with surlyn - at more than 50 years old. I believe the limitations of the ball makes it easier to choose and execute short game shots- especially if you don't have a lot of time to practice. I have challenged the urethane players to keep track of how many of their short game shots come up too short because of too much spin and compare that to the times that added spin saved them a shot. Most won't do it because they don't want to face the reality that they lack the skills to CONSISTENTLY execute the short game shot required using urethane. Yes I too struggle on firm greens but I have found if the greens are that hard I can't stop a urethane ball either. So I hedge my odds by course management strategies to limit short siding and down hill shots around the green- anything to limits bogies. At +2 I don't have the time or skill necessary to optimize urethane spin but I love beating guys who think they do.

    Posted:
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  • AFcelicaAFcelica  801WRX Points: 166Members Posts: 801 Golden Tee
    Joined:  edited Oct 14, 2019 #53

    On -, @munichop said:

    I have to chip in again on the idea that more spin helps improve your short game. It does only if you are skilled enough to control it. I believe most players are not skilled enough and are overly influenced by seeing the best players in the world on tv hit shots that they covet. I have played surlyn almost 5 years now and have posted my best ever stats with fewest bogies per round, highest save percentage per round and most birdies per round all with surlyn - at more than 50 years old. I believe the limitations of the ball makes it easier to choose and execute short game shots- especially if you don't have a lot of time to practice. I have challenged the urethane players to keep track of how many of their short game shots come up too short because of too much spin and compare that to the times that added spin saved them a shot. Most won't do it because they don't want to face the reality that they lack the skills to CONSISTENTLY execute the short game shot required using urethane. Yes I too struggle on firm greens but I have found if the greens are that hard I can't stop a urethane ball either. So I hedge my odds by course management strategies to limit short siding and down hill shots around the green- anything to limits bogies. At +2 I don't have the time or skill necessary to optimize urethane spin but I love beating guys who think they do.

    What's your go to ball?

    And that's the general consensus in this thread, to play the same ball so you know how it will react. I'm the opposite of you, when I chip a velocity for instance I cant predict the roll out and am generally well past the pin because I'm used to playing a v1x. That doesnt mean I couldn't play a few rounds getting used to the velocity and shoot just as well as with a v1x.

    The equipment you play doesnt matter much. I've seen scratch players playing pinnacles and 10+ year old big Bertha irons, a guy that was so steep he couldn't hit a pw more than 60ft in the air ( hit driver around 240 carry fwiw ) my friends dad when I was in high school 15 years ago played an off brand set from sports authority that was probably 8+ years old at the time, played twice a year, and still shot low 70s. About the only type of scratch I havent seen is one that plays blades 🤣

    The only thing that does matter is whether you're used to it and know how it will react

    Posted:
  • myspinonitmyspinonit  2925WRX Points: 171Members Posts: 2,925 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  edited Oct 15, 2019 #54

    On -, @jjfcpa said:

    From a psychological point of view, I think the ball is terribly important to your game, but only from the standpoint of the theory that you should play the same ball ALL THE TIME. During the last few weeks, I've been experimenting with a ball change and it definitely impacted my game negatively. Shots with the driver seem to be the less impactful. However, with irons and especially with the putter, the difference can be significant.

    I should add that since I'm not a long hitter and a senior golfer, I notice subtle changes in my equipment, whether it's clubs or balls. I play with some guys who are longer hitters and they don't seem to be affected by a ball change. I try to eliminate changes to my equipment as much as possible so that I can concentrate on swing characteristics and how they are affecting my game. If I have to factor in a ball change or equipment change, it makes it much harder to determine why my shot didn't reach the green or why it went flying past the hole off my putter. Maybe I'm much more sensitive to the feel of my clubs and the ball than others, but I find the differences in balls to be very discernible.

    THIS senior might have written the above re clubs and balls. Probably more in my head than skill level. I'm a serial monogomist in my ball relationships, if you will pardon the expression. I think the same ball matters more in the short game. Don't know how a lot of the guys I play with play mostly found balls and go from a rock ball on one hole, lose it and go to say a Supersoft. Then have to make a delicate chip.

    I use QStar Tour now and I've even been slow using the last of my QST v.1 just because I THINK I find the feel of last year's slightly softer model a bit better, and I eek a few extra yards with it. Now I'm looking forward to losing (er, using up) the last of THAT stash on winter get-aways as I hear a new model is coming and it's gotta be better (lol). Still have some Callaway Supersofts that I played in 2017 and Srixon Soft Feels I used the year before and probably should use some of those up, at least in early Spring golf here in wet conditions.

    Posted:
    Post edited by myspinonit on

    Ping G410 Plus 10.5°  ( at small +/11.5°,  draw weight ) Alta CB 55 R

    Ping G410 5 Wood 17.5° ( at small minus /16.5° ) Alta CB 65 R

    Ping G 7 wood 20.5° ( at large minus /19.5° )  Alta 65 R

    Ping G hybrids 22° & 26° Alta 70 R

    Miura PP9003 6-PW Steelfiber i70 A

    Vokey SM6 49.07 F , SM4 54.11 M & 58.09 S  Steelfiber i80 R

    Scotty Cameron Phantom X 5.5  34"












  • 1Mordrid11Mordrid1  903WRX Points: 262Members Posts: 903 Golden Tee
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    Just because you do well with a ball does not mean you could not have done even better with a ball that is more optimal for your game. Who knows, it could be that you were playing the wrong ball before and stumbled on to a ball that is more optimal for your game.

    Posted:
  • BeerPerHoleBeerPerHole  1494WRX Points: 384Members Posts: 1,494 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #56

    I think about this regularly. I see the common thread here that, basically, players (especially bogey or better) should stick with the same ball regardless of what it is. I think that's probably true. Because I've seen enough variation between ball makes/models that even I notice - and I've been a bogey player for some time now. Now, that I'm starting to improve I couldn't help but notice that the MTB-X has been what I'm teeing up during the improvement period. I'm just good enough to realize that my past fave, which happens to be VERY similar, (Srixon XV) was ballooning on my approach shots. Certainly my swing plays a big role in that. I tried the MTB-X seeing it was similar in technology, saw it didn't balloon like that and poured several in my golf bag. In sticking with it lately I found that I can pull off any shot I need and this ball is right there with me. So, it's my ball, at my price. No need to switch. A vast majority of the guys I play with play the Pro V and nothing else.

    Posted:
    Ping GMax 400, Tour Stiff, 8*
    Mizuno Forged JPX 900 Irons
    A Couple of Ping Glide Wedges
    Ping Anser G Putter
    Ping G400 5-Wood
    Snell MTB-X
    Knee Deep Breaking Bud IPA
  • munichopmunichop  326WRX Points: 199Members Posts: 326 Greens
    Joined:  #57

    On -, @AFcelica

    My go to ball since 2015 was a gamer soft. I shot or tied my PB on all my usual courses with it including a bogey 64 the first time I teed it up, a course record 62, winning a city senior event, my longest HIO (187 yards) and setting yearly personal bests with save percentage, GIR, scoring, birdies, eagles, fewest bogies, etc. It is no longer made. I currently use the e12 soft but it doesn't quite perform the way the GS does. The reality for me is my swing speed is now only 95-100 with a driver and I lack the necessary club speed to overpower a course. Soon I will be irrelevant from the back tees. But the GS extended and provided me with my best golf at an age when shooting those scores was something I thought was beyond me. It was the best ball I ever played regardless of price or materials.
    Posted:
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  • AFcelicaAFcelica  801WRX Points: 166Members Posts: 801 Golden Tee
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    On -, @munichop said:

    On -, @AFcelica

    My go to ball since 2015 was a gamer soft. I shot or tied my PB on all my usual courses with it including a bogey 64 the first time I teed it up, a course record 62, winning a city senior event, my longest HIO (187 yards) and setting yearly personal bests with save percentage, GIR, scoring, birdies, eagles, fewest bogies, etc. It is no longer made. I currently use the e12 soft but it doesn't quite perform the way the GS does. The reality for me is my swing speed is now only 95-100 with a driver and I lack the necessary club speed to overpower a course. Soon I will be irrelevant from the back tees. But the GS extended and provided me with my best golf at an age when shooting those scores was something I thought was beyond me. It was the best ball I ever played regardless of price or materials.

    Impressive! Its certainly not soft but the velocity is very long for me when I play it

    Posted:
  • bluedotbluedot  3673WRX Points: 377Handicap: 7.5Members Posts: 3,673 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #59

    On -, @munichop said:

    I have to chip in again on the idea that more spin helps improve your short game. It does only if you are skilled enough to control it. I believe most players are not skilled enough and are overly influenced by seeing the best players in the world on tv hit shots that they covet. I have played surlyn almost 5 years now and have posted my best ever stats with fewest bogies per round, highest save percentage per round and most birdies per round all with surlyn - at more than 50 years old. I believe the limitations of the ball makes it easier to choose and execute short game shots- especially if you don't have a lot of time to practice. I have challenged the urethane players to keep track of how many of their short game shots come up too short because of too much spin and compare that to the times that added spin saved them a shot. Most won't do it because they don't want to face the reality that they lack the skills to CONSISTENTLY execute the short game shot required using urethane. Yes I too struggle on firm greens but I have found if the greens are that hard I can't stop a urethane ball either. So I hedge my odds by course management strategies to limit short siding and down hill shots around the green- anything to limits bogies. At +2 I don't have the time or skill necessary to optimize urethane spin but I love beating guys who think they do.

    I don't disagree with you one bit about the possibility of playing a surlyn ball and playing at a high level; as I said earlier, I see this in senior tournament play all the time. I think that seeing lesser players pay $50/doz for ProV1's is possibly the greatest waste of money in golf.

    The only place I'll quibble is about the players that you reference who pay for urethane but can't control the spin. The simple fact is that if you can't CONTROL the spin, you likely can't generate enough spin to make a difference in the first place. A urethane ball will spin marginally more than a surlyn ball for almost ANY golfer without a doubt, but only pretty accomplished single digit guys can intentionally hit shots with a lot of spin, and those same players can play surlyn successfully IF they want to; you're a good example, as are a couple of buddies of mine. Chops don't lose strokes because they are playing a urethane ball that spun too much; they lose strokes because they can't make clean strikes in the first place.

    In other words, it's all what you get used to and want to pay for, so we're back to the key point; it doesn't matter WHAT ball you play, but it matters that you play the SAME ball all the time.

    Posted:
  • tungstenplugtungstenplug Washington, D.C. 318WRX Points: 326Members Posts: 318 Greens
    Joined:  #60

    The softer you swing, the less it matters

    Posted:

    Titleist
    Mizuno
    Vokey
    Scotty Cameron

    2020 # of rounds: 5

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  • bluedotbluedot  3673WRX Points: 377Handicap: 7.5Members Posts: 3,673 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #61

    On -, @kevinscott22 said:

    The softer you swing, the less it matters

    Not really, because everything is pretty much the same on full shots. But different balls behave differently on partial shots, chips, and putts, where everybody's swing speed is pretty much the same, plus they sound and feel different. So regardless of swing speed, there are personal preference AND performance differences that don't have anything to do with full swing speed. Again, play the SAME ball all the time, whatever it might be.

    Posted:
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