GPS Golf Guru - Any thoughts on this?

1356730
30

Comments

  • stevestrikestevestrike  1956Members Posts: 1,956
    Joined:  #62
    Your GolfLogix unit may have encrypted course files, but my point was that you can always use courses you map yourself. Except, of course if your unit does not allow you to map your own courses--like the GolfLogix. You see? Now we're sharing some useful information! Stay away from the GolfLogix units, they encrypt their course files with an expiration date and don't let you map your own. If the company goes under, your unit will be worthless.
    Posted:
  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
    Joined:  ...

    Advertisement
  • BrockBrock  209Members Posts: 209
    Joined:  #63
    if one of the major players (golf GPS not GPS overall) were to bite the big one...I would hope they would offer up a way to download some courses onto your laptop. Either way I would download all the courses I could onto mine that I play more than 3 times a year and leave one off that has GPS in golf carts...then if they are gone or here would not matter as I would have it on my own.



    I still think SkyGolf is a major player in GOLF GPS units contrary to other thoughts.... and while the beta and vhs thing might not be entirely accurate how about this instead. The difference between a DELL computer system and one from Aberdeen Inc. Both were what we used to call IBM clones but have now lost that name much as I expect true clone golf clubs will in few years...but I digress.



    Dell has large market share of their devices though there are many other options to buyers than buying from them. Their customer service is not always perfect as also their products are not always perfect. That being said they are making money and putting computers on desks of people all around the world and in the percentage game of products sold versus products returned I would bet the % is much lower from Dell than it is from a local startup or even Aberdeen Inc when it comes to computers. Not very many people can name small startup computer companies off the top of their head but figured everyone could relate to the vhs and beta thing. Both were vcr...both used tape format...both were for recording movies and television and some used for music. Difference was in how they recorded and then replayed the data they recorded.

    Not SO MUCH DIFFERENT if you want to split hairs. All us GPS technology...some use a variant of a Garmin or Magellan or Lowrance. Most offer the same basic data such as distance to green and basic hazards...difference is in their accuracy calculations but more importantly the other EXTRAS or ways of displaying the same data so it is more useable.



    Bottom line is to buy what you want, that you can afford and use the **** out of it...and be happy or sad but know that you made an informed decision.



    Some guys buy 2-3 sets of clubs in two years....a couple drivers a year....3-4 putters a year .....whether looking for the holy grail or because they just have to have some thing new to give them more gratification. I on the other hand plan on keeping my clubs for a couple years at least until my game changes or they break. I am happy with my purchase just as you are with yours... I hope we can readdress this issue in a year or so and give another review of our respective GOLF GPS to see if they maintained our expectations, if they are still operating as advertised, have we moved on to another brand or model of same brand...or gave up on them entirely. I am sure we all will have some more insight at that time that might even be of MORE use to a new prospective buyer than all of us in our infancy of GOLF GPS. I have used GPS models for 13 years but this is my first one for anything other than military or outdoor usage. image/biggrin.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':drinks:' /> image/biggrin.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':lock:' />
    Posted:
  • Solutions EtceteraSolutions Etcetera  2556Members Posts: 2,556
    Joined:  #64
    stevestrike wrote on Jan 13 2008, 11:06 AM:
    Your GolfLogix unit may have encrypted course files, but my point was that you can always use courses you map yourself. Except, of course if your unit does not allow you to map your own courses--like the GolfLogix. You see? Now we're sharing some useful information! Stay away from the GolfLogix units, they encrypt their course files with an expiration date and don't let you map your own. If the company goes under, your unit will be worthless.


    The current vendors of these devices are small and likely outsourcing most, if not all of the project. If/when they close up shop, they will all be rendered useless to one degree or another due to their proprietary course mappings. Useless if they need service or support, useless when playing a new course on vacation or otherwise. If you're really concerned about that my recommendation is a laser finder from a long standing company like Bushnell or Nikon. It will always work as intended and one was in my bag well before the GPS.



    My "point" was that the current players in this market don't have the resources to really bring new and better designs to market, and live without the subscription income to keep the business viable. The lack of advances in the more established companies' offerings simply begs for new players to come on board with something better.



    I have no interest in manually mapping every course that I play and I welcome the day when something comes out to render the GolfLogix unit obsolete. Something that records every shot in my round, with an interface designed well enough to make that simple. With software that is intelligently designed to evaluate my stats, or better yet, an SDK based on standardized data (like other GPS platforms) that would let independent software developers take it to the next level.



    Right now... all of them want their cake and eat it too. Unfortunately they don't seem to be interested or able to hire a baker full time.
    Posted:
  • stevestrikestevestrike  1956Members Posts: 1,956
    Joined:  #65
    Solutions Etcetera wrote on Jan 13 2008, 03:56 PM:
    Right now... all of them want their cake and eat it too. Unfortunately they don't seem to be interested or able to hire a baker full time.


    That is one thing that you and I can agree on.



    I doubt we'll see a SDK or any other type of open access to these devices anytime soon. I really don't think the community is big enough to take advantage anyway. Most golfers are not tinkerers like you or I may be. Could they be doing more, and doing it better? Yes, and I think of all the companies I've looked at, the GolfGuru is the closest. They track shots, scores, etc... and (I assume) dump it into your PC for review or stat tracking.



    GPSGolfGuru guys, please give your users the security of knowing they won't be stuck with "orphaned" devices if the company closes down! I think that making that type of promise, and having the courses available to the users (e.g.: stored on hard drive vs. some online system) will go a long way in getting customers to buy-in to your system. I'd have to say, the biggest drawback to the GolfGuru besides the relatively small number of courses (which can be remedied over time) is the fact that it is a new and unknown company.
    Posted:
  • misters3misters3  47Members Posts: 47
    Joined:  #66
    Does this unit suggest clubs? i.e you can record which clubs you used for certain shots?



    If so, does that not make it illegal to use in comps?



    Looks good otherwise - but you can't compare it to the Sky Caddie in my opinion as their USP is the in-person mapping.



    It would be better to compare this to the SureShot etc.
    Posted:
  • BrockBrock  209Members Posts: 209
    Joined:  #67
    i saw one that recommends clubs....that is one thing that will keep them from being useable during tourneys....I dont know which other ones are approved by USGA other than SkyGolf. Anyone know it?



    I think it is a good idea for beginner as if you track all your shots and it records them and which club you are hitting...then later it can give recommendations on your average distance for each club you have recorded. Seems cool especially if very fast and does not hinder play and cause delays.
    Posted:
  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
    Joined:  ...

    Advertisement
  • stevestrikestevestrike  1956Members Posts: 1,956
    Joined:  #68
    The SureShot GPS I used to use would track your clubs and give you a recommendation for each shot. You could turn this feature on or off.
    Posted:
  • ApexGrindApexGrind  365Members Posts: 365
    Joined:  edited Jan 13, 2008 #69
    Brock wrote on Jan 13 2008, 07:12 PM:
    I think it is a good idea for beginner as if you track all your shots and it records them and which club you are hitting...then later it can give recommendations on your average distance for each club you have recorded. Seems cool especially if very fast and does not hinder play and cause delays.




    Intelligolf will track just about any stat you can think of. runs on a palm though and isn't a distance finder (it's a distance recorder) like these. The killer unit would have Intelligolf, GPS distance and a laser rangefinder all in one.
    Posted:
  • BrockBrock  209Members Posts: 209
    Joined:  #70
    yeah I think that is the next big thing to come out....but some will only offer the gps and laser range finder ad USGA wont endorse the club recommendation option for play.



    now if you want to talk about gimmicks...what about the golf ball with RFID chip inside...LOL I doubt the ball they are using is a ProV 1 and I wonder how the chip inside affects weight balance of the core?
    Posted:
  • ApexGrindApexGrind  365Members Posts: 365
    Joined:  #71
    Brock wrote on Jan 14 2008, 03:35 AM:
    yeah I think that is the next big thing to come out....but some will only offer the gps and laser range finder ad USGA wont endorse the club recommendation option for play.




    Intelligolf doesn't recommend anything for you. It just keeps stats for you. Tee off, walk to your ball, couple taps to enter club used, distance, fairway (or missed left, missed right), 2nd shot, approach, first putt (distance, left, right,) second putt, etc, etc, etc, as well as score card, all the bets, notes for course, hole, on and on. The PC client will show statistics for everything. In short, it's comprehensive. If you have a GPS plugged into your palm device it will have the yardages for you (last shot yardage and remaining to the hole) so you don't have to enter them yourself or calculate remaining but it doesn't make any recommendations. You can sound like a TV announcer. "I miss 23% of fairways and of those I miss 68% of them to the left. I miss 56% of my first putts short right and 90% of my second putts are within 2'..." image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />
    Posted:
  • Sledge HammerSledge Hammer  205Members Posts: 205
    Joined:  #72
    Hi, I'm new to your forums, though I have found them very informative. I recently purchased a Golf Guru, though I have not received it yet. I'm not really a competitive golfer, but I was curious about it conforming to the new USGA/RCGA rules and decisions. I am a Canadian so I asked for a rules clarification from the RCGA and received the following rules decisions as being applicable.



    14-3/5.5 Electronic Device Providing Distances Between Various Points



    Q. With regard to Decision 14-3/5, may a player use an electronic device containing the same information?



    A. Yes. Exception 2 to Rule 14-3 applies, but the player must not use a device with a measuring or distance calculating function. However, see also the Note to Rule 14-3. (Revised)



    14-3/16 Use of Electronic Devices



    As provided in the Etiquette Section, players should ensure that any electronic device taken onto the course does not distract other players.



    The use of an electronic device such as a mobile phone, hand-held computer, calculator, television or radio is not itself a breach of Rule 14-3. For example, the following uses of an electronic device during a stipulated round are not a breach of the Rules:



    • Using the device for matters unrelated to golf (e.g., to call home);



    • Using the device to access information on advice-related matters that were published prior to the start of the player's round (e.g., an electronic yardage book, swing tips); or



    • Using the device to obtain information related to the competition being played (e.g., the leader board or projected "cut").



    However, examples of uses of an electronic device during a stipulated round that are a breach of Rule 14-3, for which the penalty is disqualification, include:



    • Using the device (e.g., a television or radio) to watch or listen to a broadcast of the competition being played;



    • Using the device to ask for or give advice in breach of Rule 8-1 (e.g., calling a swing coach at home); or



    • Using the device to access information on advice-related matters that were not published prior to the start of his round (e.g., analysis of strokes made during that round).



    So I e-mailed Golf Guru and posed the following questions about conformity.



    "I have asked the RCGA for a clarification and as I understand, under 14-3/16- "Using the device to access information on advice-related matters that were published prior to the start of the player's round (e.g., an electronic yardage book, swing tips);" is acceptable. However, under 14-3/16- "Using the device to access information on advice-related matters that were not published prior to the start of his round (e.g., analysis of strokes made during that round)." Is a breach of Rule 14-3, for which the penalty is disqualification.



    Therefore if statistical information being collected about the round being played becomes part of the information being displayed during the round, ie. Club distance information, GIR, Fariways Hit…etc., the unit would be illegal. While if the data collected about the present round was kept separate to be added to the statistics after the round it would be acceptable?



    How does the Golf Guru collect, compute and display the stats that are entered during the round? Have you already confirmed with the USGA that the Golf Guru conforms to 14-3/16?"



    This was the response from Golf Guru.



    "The Golf Guru is fully compliant with the USGA and R&A rulings associated with distance measuring devices. Although the Golf Guru does allow for recording of GIR and FIR and will present percentages, these particular statistics provide absolutely no information or advice that would help a golfer make a club selection, nor does it measure any other playing conditions, such as wind speed or slope. If the Guru were to suggest a club selection based on a record of shots kept within the Guru, it would be illegal. The Guru does not allow you to associate a club with a distance recording at this time. It probably will in the future, and will still be legal, as it will not use this information and present it as "advice" to the golfer on club selection.



    The SureShot GPS device is one that comes to mind as not being legal, as it did make club suggestions based on recorded history. This is the only feature that kept them from being legal, even though this feature could be shut off. They would have been legal otherwise, and their unit pretty much records the same Stats as ours. Knowing your GIR's, FIR's, and average # of putts does not provide advice. Just because you've hit 12 of 14 fairways, all you can do is feel good about that. Nothing there tells you anything about how you should hit your next tee shot, fairway shot, or putt. If you do a search of GPS and USGA rulings, you will find quite a bit of information where this very issue has been discussed. There is no reason to believe that the Guru is not in full compliance."



    "I'm not sure of what actions SureShot has taken to bring their unit into compliance. I do know that they have changed their software, and they may have addressed this issue in subsequent releases. I have not kept up with it. They may be in full compliance these days."



    Based on this information it seems to me that Golf Guru and probably others (Sureshot) are doing what they need to in order to remain in compliance to USGA/RCGA rulings. It may be the reason that the club distance function is not available for the Golf Guru at present, rather than the notion that the software is in an undeveloped state.



    I just thought I would share what I found out. Personally, I want to track stats for evaluation after the round and over the course of the season. During the round, I have a hard enough time concentrating on the shot at hand.
    Posted:
  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
    Joined:  ...

    Advertisement
  • DemolitionManDemolitionMan It�s not a hill, it�s a mountain...As you start out the clim  3874Members Posts: 3,874
    Joined:  #73
    I have only had a brief experience with this product, and there was no manual. So, can anybody tell me, do you have to "map" a course in order for it to be useful about telling you distances to other parts of the hole besides bunkers? For example, if I am on a big dogleg left par 5 and my tee shot is on the left side of the fairway with no direct angle to the flag because of trees blocking, how can this product tell me the distance to a group of trees approximately 175 yards away so I can gauge a good layup distance?



    I also noticed on the same type of hole, if you are behind the dogleg, you get a distance to the pin that is in a straight line, but this does not help in determining a layup distance because you don't go at the hole, you play at an angle to the green, then straight at it. For example, on a par 5 the GPS shows 232 to the hole, but that's through a forest. So in laying up with a well hit 7 iron that goes almost 160, what's the distance to the hole? Not under 100, more like 160 again because of playing away from the green. But again, no idea of what the layup distance would be unless you "map" the course?



    If this is the case of GPS products not being able to tell you layup distances to certain parts of a hole unless you customized the course map, then this is where laser range finders have a big plus.
    Posted:
  • mcbush25mcbush25  2040Members Posts: 2,040
    Joined:  #74
    DemolitionMan wrote on Jan 15 2008, 11:39 AM:
    I have only had a brief experience with this product, and there was no manual. So, can anybody tell me, do you have to "map" a course in order for it to be useful about telling you distances to other parts of the hole besides bunkers? For example, if I am on a big dogleg left par 5 and my tee shot is on the left side of the fairway with no direct angle to the flag because of trees blocking, how can this product tell me the distance to a group of trees approximately 175 yards away so I can gauge a good layup distance?



    I also noticed on the same type of hole, if you are behind the dogleg, you get a distance to the pin that is in a straight line, but this does not help in determining a layup distance because you don't go at the hole, you play at an angle to the green, then straight at it. For example, on a par 5 the GPS shows 232 to the hole, but that's through a forest. So in laying up with a well hit 7 iron that goes almost 160, what's the distance to the hole? Not under 100, more like 160 again because of playing away from the green. But again, no idea of what the layup distance would be unless you "map" the course?



    If this is the case of GPS products not being able to tell you layup distances to certain parts of a hole unless you customized the course map, then this is where laser range finders have a big plus.




    I would say that unless the course is pre-mapped with points other than the front, center, and back of the green then you would have to map a point. Honestly, I would just go to a safe spot that you normally play to and mark that spot as your lay up area and then you will have it from then on out as you play.



    Rangefinders do have an advantage in this situation, but if you have a GPS unit that allows custom mapping then it is pretty even in my book other than the first time you play a course and you have to map certain layup points. After that then the playing field should be fairly even.
    Posted:
  • PingG10  PingG10 GS941  375Members Posts: 375
    Joined:  #75
    I can only speak to the iGolf GPS Caddie II-the downloaded courses (which you own-even after your subscription lapses) contain major features mapped (e.g. fairway bunkers, green bunkers, some water hazards)-however specific layup distances generally must user mapped- a very easy task.
    Posted:
  • rcncgolfrcncgolf  121Members Posts: 121
    Joined:  edited Jan 15, 2008 #76
    Guru has indicated they will add ability to include your own add'l map points in future. They do a nice job of mapping the course, & I am have easily found layup spots with what they pre-mapped, I want to add the less obvious points I tend to find!
    Posted:
  • stevestrikestevestrike  1956Members Posts: 1,956
    Joined:  #77
    DemolitionMan wrote on Jan 15 2008, 01:39 PM:
    If this is the case of GPS products not being able to tell you layup distances to certain parts of a hole unless you customized the course map, then this is where laser range finders have a big plus.


    It can be both. If a downloaded course file does not have customized points (like layups) then you will have to add them yourself. This is usually very easy to do during your first round with the unit on that course.



    However, many (most?) GPS devices have custom points already loaded into the course files. These will included hazards, bunkers, end of fairway's, layup points, etc... If they don't happen to match what you want, you just add/change them.
    Posted:
  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
    Joined:  ...

    Advertisement
  • stevestrikestevestrike  1956Members Posts: 1,956
    Joined:  edited Jan 15, 2008 #78
    I just got my hands on a GolfGuru. I don't really have it in me to write a review on this unit, but I was brutally honest with my iGolf Neo review, so I am going to try to be fair.



    The truth is there's not much about this unit that I like. The unit is "upside down" as you can see from the photos on the website. This is ridiculous and I hope they come out with a software patch to put the screen back right-side-up. There's a reason that every other device in this form factor (cell phones!) are screen on top, buttons on bottom. Here's a good one: the big fleshy pad of your thumb blocks half the screen when you try to use the unit. I just can't see the logic in designing the unit like this. Even when I could move my thumb to the side, my hand still cast a shadow over the screen. Put the unit in the cub holder of your golf cart (where all GPS units live during a round) and the screen is at the bottom instead of sticking out showing you a yardage.



    So if the unit can't live in the cup holder, where does it go? No on your belt without some extra hardware or a 3rd party case. There is nothing included with the unit as far as belt clips or holsters. A $3.00 cell-phone type case would go a long way in completing the package here. ****, a $.25 plastic belt holster like the Neo comes with would have been an improvement.



    Although the plastic is thick, the unit feels and sounds hollow. The screen is not backlit, a feature I miss greatly. Instead of the bright, clear screen of the SG2.5, or the green backlit glow of a Neo, the Guru just seems dark and hard to read. I have not tested the unit in direct sunlight yet, however.



    I didn't prefer the small joystick button in the middle, although it seemed to work OK. I like the large directional pad on the SG2.5 & SG5 even more.



    There are few other things, but overall I think the upside-down screen and the hollow case really turned me off of the unit before I got started. It doesn't have the appeal of the Neo (small size & price point) nor the polish of the SkyCaddie (intelligreens, & graphics). Instead, it leaves me with the feeling of "Jack of all trades, master of none, though ofttimes better than master of one."



    I think the Guru will appeal to a particular audience as evidenced by this thread, but my search for the perfect GPS continues...
    Posted:
  • ApexGrindApexGrind  365Members Posts: 365
    Joined:  edited Jan 15, 2008 #79
    I was thinking about the buttons on top idea when someone else first mentioned it. I don't have a unit but in general I think that's a great idea. Especially for this kind of device that's going to be used outside and almost exclusively hand held. I imagine this is what they had in mind. You are going to be working the buttons with your thumb. If you hold something like that in one (or two) hands where are your thumbs? At the top. Especially if you hold it with one hand. Grip with your fingers and palm and work the buttons with your thumb. With devices that have buttons at the bottom it's very difficult to work the buttons while holding the device securely with one hand because you have to reach DOWN and accross with your thumb, or hold the unit at the very very bottom. You almost *have* to use two hands or have a rather fragile grasp on the unit.
    Posted:
  • stevestrikestevestrike  1956Members Posts: 1,956
    Joined:  #80
    ApexGrind wrote on Jan 16 2008, 12:43 AM:
    I don't have a unit but in general I think that's a great idea.


    Yeah, but not really.
    Posted:
  • CodeSectionCodeSection  14Members Posts: 14
    Joined:  #81
    ApexGrind wrote on Jan 15 2008, 09:43 PM:
    I was thinking about the buttons on top idea when someone else first mentioned it. I don't have a unit but in general I think that's a great idea. Especially for this kind of device that's going to be used outside and almost exclusively hand held. I imagine this is what they had in mind. You are going to be working the buttons with your thumb. If you hold something like that in one (or two) hands where are your thumbs? At the top. Especially if you hold it with one hand. Grip with your fingers and palm and work the buttons with your thumb. With devices that have buttons at the bottom it's very difficult to work the buttons while holding the device securely with one hand because you have to reach DOWN and accross with your thumb, or hold the unit at the very very bottom. You almost *have* to use two hands or have a rather fragile grasp on the unit.




    I have no problem using my Treo 650 (with screen on top) with one hand and one very large thumb. I would imagine, based upon popularity and sales, that 99% of individuals can easily operate devices like a Treo with one hand with no trouble. I suspect GPS units are no different and I would suggest that if there was a poll taken, most would prefer the screen on top. What's nice is that free trade will determine Guru's success or failure. Guru's screen is different and certainly goes against the norm. Perhaps this design along with various delays contribute to poor sales.



    Lastly, I wonder why there was such a hurry to get the unit into production with so many features delayed. Is there a coincidence that their pending lawsuit was filed on May 11, 2007 and the Guru came out in November 2007. Seems like it makes good business sense to be able to say in court that they have released their own unit, thus supporting their patent infringement claim. Maybe this a far reach on my part.
    Posted:
  • rcncgolfrcncgolf  121Members Posts: 121
    Joined:  #82
    Was concerned with button on top layout when I got mine, but so far I have had no issues, & I am now used to it & actually like it - easy one hand use; screen is fine - very easy to see in sunlight, no issues on that either, however would like "backlight" on/off for late day finishing holes, but again not really an issue so far. Agree that a fitted case & belt clip are needed, as I just want to protect it, I have dropped other GPS's several times, (& broke my IGOLF screen!) was 2' drop, & of course droped on cart path not fairway! One thing I do not like is after 18th hole it wants to go to 19th hole, well so do I! But not sure why it does this on 18 hole course! Would also like to see hole hanicaps shown on the screen somewhere. Other than 2 minor issues, hoping to see add'l game improvement features asap!
    Posted:
  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
    Joined:  ...

    Advertisement
  • ApexGrindApexGrind  365Members Posts: 365
    Joined:  edited Jan 16, 2008 #83
    CodeSection wrote on Jan 15 2008, 11:50 PM:
    I have no problem using my Treo 650 (with screen on top) with one hand and one very large thumb. I would imagine, based upon popularity and sales, that 99% of individuals can easily operate devices like a Treo with one hand with no trouble. I suspect GPS units are no different and I would suggest that if there was a poll taken, most would prefer the screen on top. What's nice is that free trade will determine Guru's success or failure. Guru's screen is different and certainly goes against the norm. Perhaps this design along with various delays contribute to poor sales.




    I have a Treo as well. I can't comfortably hit the space bar at the bottom one handed. I can do it without much problem but to do it comfortably I have to hold the unit very much towards the bottom and it's not that secure for me. The middle (hard keys) buttons are no problem. I agree with your comment on general preference and surely the great majority would vote for the screen at the top. It's what people are used to. Doesn't mean it's better. Also doesn't mean better is what's accepted. Consider the Dvorak keyboard. No doubt it's better. Also not much chance it will be widely accepted. I was just speculating as to why they did that and commenting that, personally, I think it's a great idea (in concept).


    Lastly, I wonder why there was such a hurry to get the unit into production with so many features delayed. Is there a coincidence that their pending lawsuit was filed on May 11, 2007 and the Guru came out in November 2007. Seems like it makes good business sense to be able to say in court that they have released their own unit, thus supporting their patent infringement claim. Maybe this a far reach on my part.




    More likely just getting the product to market. With a product like this and competitors with similar products your window to market is very small. If you miss it, as a startup company, you will almost surely go under. Funding a startup is difficult too. Often it's the case that getting any income at all is the difference between a chance at success or certain failure. Coupled with the point above you need to generate income from the product as soon as possible. The initial income alone may not be sufficient but it may be what gets you your next round of funding.
    Posted:
  • randy6675randy6675  135Members Posts: 135
    Joined:  #84
    Sorry you aren't very happy with your unit. As far as the screen being on the bottom, I also thought that was weird. In practice, I have adapted to it very quickly. The lack of a holster or clip I agree with completely. I called them to let them know that this isn't a good plan. They said they were looking for something, but in the meantime, holsters for either a Treo or a Blackberry would work. I didn't think much of this answer and hope they come up with something that is a true fit.



    Try the screen in sunlight. This is a completely different screen in that it works better in high light conditions. I am 56 years old and need reading glassed for most things, but I have absolutely no problem seeing the screen outside, even on a cloudy day. Inside, I need the glasses to see.



    As far as the "hollowness", I think that is an advantage since it is so light that it is unobtrusive when placed in a pocket. Probably part of this lightness can be attributed to the lithium battery, which is much lighter than alkaline or NiMH. Also, a lot of consumer electronices have weight added to give a feeling of heft. While that may feel better in the hand, it has absolutely nothing to do with the ruggedness of the unit, and again extra weight is not desired in this application, IMOP.



    Finally, the "Green Zense" is much better than the Intelligreen feature. While both can orient to your approach, only on the guru can you move the pin to any part of the green to get better yardages, which Intelligreen does not allow.



    Anyways, give it a try, you might like it better after a round or two. But, if not, it is understandable that not everyone likes the same things, and another unit may suit your needs and tastes better.



    Good luck in you quest.
    Posted:
  • stevestrikestevestrike  1956Members Posts: 1,956
    Joined:  #85
    Finally, the "Green Zense" is much better than the Intelligreen feature. While both can orient to your approach, only on the guru can you move the pin to any part of the green to get better yardages, which Intelligreen does not allow.
    I'm not sure where you got this information, but it is incorrect. I have a SG2.5 sitting here, and you can move the target point (center) anywhere on the green. Additionally, it adjusts the front and back markers accordingly, and it adjusts for your approach angle. There's no doubt about it that the intelligreen feature on the SG is top-notch.



    The hollowness doesn't bother me as much as the question of why isn't the unit smaller? If there's a bunch of empty space inside, I'd rather have a smaller unit. The Neo, for example, is very compact feeling. I'm sure they've got everything crammed in as tight as possible to maximize space.
    Posted:
  • randy6675randy6675  135Members Posts: 135
    Joined:  #86
    Guess I am mistaken about the Intelligreen. My bad. And I see your point about the size. But, I don't think I would want the screen any smaller, and I haven't seen the Neo in person. I am guessing there is going to be a lot of "evolving" by all the makers as they try to figure out what works best. Nothing like competition to improve the products.
    Posted:
  • msguillorymsguillory  32Members Posts: 32
    Joined:  #87
    I have to say that this device is at the top of my list. Once they allow editing of downloaded courses (which they have indicated to me through email that this is their current #1 priority feature change) then it will be worthy. I was really interested in the SG2.5, but it does not allow user mapped targets, only F/C/B of green.
    Posted:
  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
    Joined:  ...

    Advertisement
  • msguillorymsguillory  32Members Posts: 32
    Joined:  #88
    I just wanted to add that I got an email response as to how you go about user mapping a green. I was told that you start at the low point on the green based on the approach from the center of the fairway, from there you walk around the green at a normal pace (what is normal?) and the device records points about every second. So user mapped greens, as well as the greens on their pre-mapped down-loadable courses, all show the actual shape of the green on the screen as you are approaching. Sounds similar to SkyCaddie, except that you can not user map a green with SkyCaddie, you can only mark F/C/B.



    That is very interesting. Also as you approach the green their interface shows the fron and back of the green with marks on the screen (but it does not rotate the green ala SkyCaddie), and you can also move the pin on the screen for more accurate distances. I guess with that feature you can choose a target distance to hit and it will show up as the ditance to the center. Again, similar to SkyCaddie.
    Posted:
  • larryinharlemlarryinharlem  34Members Posts: 34
    Joined:  #89
    I have been using the Golf Guru for a while now and I love it. I find the screen on bottom to be perfect for one handed operation. It is light, easy to carry in your pocket and easy to use.

    I don't recommend putting anything with an LCD screen in a cart cup holder unless you don't care about possible damage from bouncing around and spill from adjacent drinks. If you ride a cart and cannot put it in your pocket or clip it to your belt then get one of the GPS holders that mount to a golf cart. Better yet, start walking and clip the device to your pull cart bag strap.

    The Golf Guru is easily visible in bright sunlight.
    Posted:
  • larryinharlemlarryinharlem  34Members Posts: 34
    Joined:  #90
    DemolitionMan wrote on Jan 15 2008, 12:39 PM:
    I have only had a brief experience with this product, and there was no manual. So, can anybody tell me, do you have to "map" a course in order for it to be useful about telling you distances to other parts of the hole besides bunkers? For example, if I am on a big dogleg left par 5 and my tee shot is on the left side of the fairway with no direct angle to the flag because of trees blocking, how can this product tell me the distance to a group of trees approximately 175 yards away so I can gauge a good layup distance?



    I also noticed on the same type of hole, if you are behind the dogleg, you get a distance to the pin that is in a straight line, but this does not help in determining a layup distance because you don't go at the hole, you play at an angle to the green, then straight at it. For example, on a par 5 the GPS shows 232 to the hole, but that's through a forest. So in laying up with a well hit 7 iron that goes almost 160, what's the distance to the hole? Not under 100, more like 160 again because of playing away from the green. But again, no idea of what the layup distance would be unless you "map" the course?



    If this is the case of GPS products not being able to tell you layup distances to certain parts of a hole unless you customized the course map, then this is where laser range finders have a big plus.




    With the laser you will have to aim and measure every time you play the hole. With the Golf Guru (or any other GPS that will allow you to map), all you have to do is map your lay up target once. You can add 30 target per hole with the Guru... In addition to bunker front and carry distance, you can add targets like the distance markers, trees, or just a flat spot in the fairway.

    I play occasionally with a fella that has a laser range finder. When he aims at the flag for distance he occasionally misses the flag and gets a tree behind the green... makes him look silly when he flies the green with his ball...
    Posted:
  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
    Joined:  ...

    Advertisement
  • neverhadaholeinoneneverhadaholeinone  385Members Posts: 385
    Joined:  #91
    Do these golf Gps's take into account elevated and downhill shots as far as giving the true yardage.

    Do you add - subtract clubs based on "old way".
    Posted:
    Not changing my username but
    had a hole in 1!
30

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file