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AndyC

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Everything posted by AndyC

  1. [quote name='iteachgolf' timestamp='1434215941' post='11744952']Not even close to true. Making a lot of assumptions. I don't think anyone learns that much from a practical standpoint from the written word with none of it being tailored to the individual. That goes for here too. Anything written about one way to swing will inevitably hurt more golfers than it will help. Regardless of how good the info is. Getting better at golf is all about prioritizing the right things at the right time. A book or any written info published for the masses and not a specific individual provides zero prioritization or even what's relevant to the individual or not. Reading about a bunch of pieces and trying to implement them without taking into account where you're at and what pieces need to be changed and when is a recipe for disaster. To get better from a book a student would have to properly diagnose their faults and then prioritize which parts to fix in which order. The odds of an individual doing it are slim. I didn't say nobody would learn. I said its hurt more than it'd help. And I stand by that. And to the post about me making up for time spent here, you must be joking. I've posted on here for 10 years and given countless hours. For the first 5 years I never even used my name and stayed anonymous. The number of people who read this site vs the number of people who actually seek out lessons in person is fractions of 1%. I've had teaching credentials on tour for the majority of the time. Taught multiple NCAA National Champions. Been a consultant to some of the top teachers in golf. That has zero to do with this or any other website. Over 50% of my income comes from tour players and top amateurs. A good chunk from local lessons and then some from here. The business from here is a very small part of my overall business and really only last couple of years been meaningful. From 2009-2011 90% of my income was from being on tour. The thousands of hours I've spent on here don't come close to covering my actual time nor is it a big portion of my overall income. It's certainly helped but I'd be just as successful without this site. You guys don't realize how tiny a percentage of golfers know this site exist or how little this place represents reality in the golf world. Everything I do here with real content is written to an individual. I don't have any videos out there on swing mechanics. Period. Because again it'd hurt more than itd help. Everything I do is to a specific person in a specific order based on their unique needs. That and a book that just has a method and tells everyone to do the same thing with no regard to where the individual is coming from is completely different [/quote] Would you call your statement that golf instruction books are "a money grab" an assumption? How do you know about all the books written for the masses? Did you read them? If so, I guess your point is that the rest of us aren't intelligent enough to understand and prioritize the right things. How did you, at such a young age, come to golf enlightenment?
  2. [quote name='iteachgolf' timestamp='1434216187' post='11744968']Agree to disagree. And a lesson shouldn't be used to clear up material from other instructors. If you're not at the lesson to fully commit to that teacher is giving you then you are wasting your time. What you're describing is a great way to get a bunch of pieces that don't fit each other at all. Your example of Clampett, Hardy, and MDT is perfect as those guys not only aren't similar but in many ways polar opposites and conflicting info.[/quote] Unless you are dealing with a rank beginner EVERYBODY uses material from other instructors. It would seem that a good instructor would use a person's knowledge base and build on it or make changes where necessary.
  3. [quote name='iteachgolf' timestamp='1433804101' post='11714222'] If it wasn't about money they'd give it away for free. It's ALWAYS about money. And all the people you listed certainly wrote books with money as the largest motivating factor. I could write a book and self publish it and make plenty of money. Would help nobody but my bank account which is why it'll never happen. It's why I give my time FOR FREE here because honestly most won't get a whole lot better from any written word instruction, especially wholesale instruction not directed to a specific individual. But I'm also not charging for it so if they don't get better they don't own me anything. You might consider that I've done this for quite a while and have family members with multiple NY Times best sellers to their credit. I know the golf industry very well and a pretty good handle on the book industry as well. [/quote] What you get in the way of business form GolfWRX is far more than what you "give for free". I don't begrudge you for anything earned from your efforts but find your comments a little bit hypocritical. As for what knowledge a person can draw from a book, doesn't that depend on how one learns best? Some like to hear it, some like to see it and some like to feel it. Regardless of the profit motive of the author, I don't believe for a second that the authors weren't giving their readers what they truly believed would help their golf game. You seem to believe that imparting knowledge via a book and making a profit thereon are mutually exclusive.
  4. [quote name='Kuchhhhhh' timestamp='1433298414' post='11679144'] Today at the range I had the pleasure of being beside an instructor and his helpless prey. I could only bare a couple minutes beside them because I felt so bad for the guy being instructed I had to move to a different side of the range. First off the guy being instructed was a beginner so it's likely everything he learns is going to be soaked into his brain for long time. The instructor suggested:[list] [*]Low and slow backswing and once you get to the top you speed up your swing speed to 90% [*]You have two different swings, iron and driver, for the driver tee it up high so you can hit it far and make sure to swing up because your not hitting down on the ball like irons [*]Grip is irrelevant, grip the club to whats most comfortable for you [*]Takeaway should be all arms to get the club on plane [/list] The icing on the cake was the fact the instructor said "I think your problem is that you need new clubs, I have a full set of Adams golf clubs in the clubhouse that would work great for you". [/quote] Just out of curiosity, what makes you an expert at determining the difference between good and bad instruction? If you got the so-called 50 top instructors in the world together I doubt that there would be unanimous agreement on much other than perhaps impact conditions.
  5. [quote name='Hoot151' timestamp='1419372897' post='10634647'] [quote name='AndyC' timestamp='1419363589' post='10634043'] [quote name='Mr. Herbert' timestamp='1419360597' post='10633819'] [quote name='AndyC' timestamp='1419358748' post='10633673'] I get it. If a person becomes incredibly wealthy by starting a high tech company it will cause people less wealthy to play less golf. [/quote] Not everything is an attack on the wealthy. It's really just simple math. [/quote] Didn't say it was an attack on the wealthy. It was someone's explanation as to the declining participation in golf. Please do the math for me. [/quote] Get your head out of the sand. If you can't see how wealth inequality, a stagnating middle class, and the "casino" economy of the U.S. isn't a real problem, then there's no math that will help. [/quote] I thought this was a discussion about why fewer people are playing golf. But I can certainly spread out. Wealth inequality has been and always will be a part of any society. It becomes a problem when people without wealth lack opportunities to obtain wealth. A stagnating middle class is certainly a problem but I certainly don't blame that on the wealthy. Not quite sure what makes up a casino economy but if spending money we don't have is part of it, I agree.
  6. [quote name='Mr. Herbert' timestamp='1419368258' post='10634357']Gladly. First of all, a single person starting a company and getting wealthy is not going to cause less wealthy people to suddenly stop playing golf. Nobody in this thread made that argument, you just made that up so you could rebut your own argument. What was said is that most of the wealth in this country is concentrated in the hands of a few people. The statistic thrown out was the top 20% hold 85% of the wealth. I don't know if that is completely accurate, but I think it's at least relatively close. What I do know for sure is that over the past few decades, the percentage holding the wealth has been shrinking, so that fewer and fewer people are acquiring more and more of the wealth. So that leaves less wealth for the rest of the population, and it means less wealth getting split up among more and more people. Which means less disposable income for the majority of people, which means less money to spend on things such as golf. I believe that was the point that was trying to be made. [/quote] The problem is that you are viewing wealth as being finite. It isn't something that is split up. Look at the wealthy people in the US. They created wealth by starting businesses. It is far easier to create vast wealth today than ever before. Look at the founders of Google or Facebook or a myriad of other businesses. While wealth certainly can create income, the overwhelming majority of people live off of their earnings from work not from their own wealth. They pay their greens fees from their earnings. Wealth is simply not a factor for why fewer people are playing golf. A persons earnings or money available to pay greens fees are not reduced because another person has gotten wealthy.
  7. [quote name='Mr. Herbert' timestamp='1419360597' post='10633819'] [quote name='AndyC' timestamp='1419358748' post='10633673'] I get it. If a person becomes incredibly wealthy by starting a high tech company it will cause people less wealthy to play less golf. [/quote] Not everything is an attack on the wealthy. It's really just simple math. [/quote] Didn't say it was an attack on the wealthy. It was someone's explanation as to the declining participation in golf. Please do the math for me.
  8. [quote name='mr_divots' timestamp='1419355856' post='10633469'] [quote name='AndyC' timestamp='1419354296' post='10633339'] [quote name='billh17' timestamp='1419354116' post='10633325'] [quote name='AndyC' timestamp='1419268367' post='10628691'] [quote name='Itsjustagame' timestamp='1419244264' post='10627375'] They could have ended this article after the first sentence of the fourth paragraph. The ski industry is writing the same articles. Both expensive, time consuming sports struggling to survive in a world where 3% of the worlds population has 60% of the wealth (in the US the top 20% hold 85% of the total wealth). Combine exploding wealth inequality with a global recession that began around 2008 and you don't need to look any further. And yes the economy is better, but by and large this has benefitted only the same top 5-20% who where wealthy to begin with. [/quote] Your implication being that people get wealthy only by taking from others and making them less wealthy? Wealth creation is not a zero sum game. [/quote] funny...I did not get that implication from his statement,at all. [/quote] What exactly would the implication be when somebody pairs increasing wealth inequality with a decrease in golf play? [/quote] "Reality." [/quote] I get it. If a person becomes incredibly wealthy by starting a high tech company it will cause people less wealthy to play less golf.
  9. [quote name='billh17' timestamp='1419354116' post='10633325'] [quote name='AndyC' timestamp='1419268367' post='10628691'] [quote name='Itsjustagame' timestamp='1419244264' post='10627375'] They could have ended this article after the first sentence of the fourth paragraph. The ski industry is writing the same articles. Both expensive, time consuming sports struggling to survive in a world where 3% of the worlds population has 60% of the wealth (in the US the top 20% hold 85% of the total wealth). Combine exploding wealth inequality with a global recession that began around 2008 and you don't need to look any further. And yes the economy is better, but by and large this has benefitted only the same top 5-20% who where wealthy to begin with. [/quote] Your implication being that people get wealthy only by taking from others and making them less wealthy? Wealth creation is not a zero sum game. [/quote] funny...I did not get that implication from his statement,at all. [/quote] What exactly would the implication be when somebody pairs increasing wealth inequality with a decrease in golf play?
  10. [quote name='Sean2' timestamp='1419300299' post='10630955'] "During the 1990s and early 2000s professional golfers were getting better and innovations in equipment enabled them to hit balls farther so developers competed against each other to build more challenging, longer courses, full of hazards. But the longer, harder courses favoured strong, male golfers and became more challenging and time-consuming for the average player." I have been saying this for years on this forum, and have taken a lot of hits for it too. [/quote] Based on your comment do you find it ironic that the only group of golfers showing increases in the number of players is women?
  11. [quote name='playa' timestamp='1419277183' post='10629399'] [quote name='ksuchris2000' timestamp='1419270691' post='10628873'] [quote name='Dan Drake' timestamp='1419264043' post='10628311'] Everything is cyclical, and as such, golf will ride it's wave again after this lull is over. But, redistribution of wealth is the most important factor in golf's long term survival. The middle class is way to big and way to underpaid. [/quote] Check in with Tennis and see how they're doing on their cycle. Years ago, Tennis experienced the same thing. Every municipality in the country was putting tennis courts in city parks etc. John McEnroe et al were blowing up the tv ratings. For a lot of the same reasons Golf is currently seeing, Tennis imploded and close to 20 years later is still trying to find its footing. I'm not so confident we're going to see a cyclical rebound in golf. I think Golf needs to find a new equilibrium and there's probably not a feasible way of recovering it (via clothing, times, etc), without reinventing the game into something thats not really what most of us would consider golf. [/quote] Tennis is a very good comparison. I remember growing up in the 80s seeing tennis complexes going up everywhere, with courts fully booked every hour of the day. Fast forward 25 years and tennis complexes are ghost towns. The bottom just fell out and now nobody plays tennis. [/quote] Completely agree with the above comments. Another hobby of mine, horse racing, is experiencing a similar decline.
  12. [quote name='DaveGoodrich' timestamp='1419269225' post='10628747'] [quote name='AndyC' timestamp='1419268367' post='10628691'][quote name='Itsjustagame' timestamp='1419244264' post='10627375'] They could have ended this article after the first sentence of the fourth paragraph. The ski industry is writing the same articles. Both expensive, time consuming sports struggling to survive in a world where 3% of the worlds population has 60% of the wealth (in the US the top 20% hold 85% of the total wealth). Combine exploding wealth inequality with a global recession that began around 2008 and you don't need to look any further. And yes the economy is better, but by and large this has benefitted only the same top 5-20% who where wealthy to begin with. [/quote] Your implication being that people get wealthy only by taking from others and making them less wealthy? Wealth creation is not a zero sum game.[/quote] I don't think itsjustagame was commenting of whether the game is "zero sum" or not. He is just discussing the current score. [/quote] How else am I supposed to take his comment? He mentioned wealth inequality as a reason for less play/interest in golf.
  13. [quote name='Itsjustagame' timestamp='1419244264' post='10627375'] They could have ended this article after the first sentence of the fourth paragraph. The ski industry is writing the same articles. Both expensive, time consuming sports struggling to survive in a world where 3% of the worlds population has 60% of the wealth (in the US the top 20% hold 85% of the total wealth). Combine exploding wealth inequality with a global recession that began around 2008 and you don't need to look any further. And yes the economy is better, but by and large this has benefitted only the same top 5-20% who where wealthy to begin with. [/quote] Your implication being that people get wealthy only by taking from others and making them less wealthy? Wealth creation is not a zero sum game.
  14. [quote name='Fort Worth Pro' timestamp='1419182842' post='10624601']Jack's swing didn't lead to injury? Remind me again why he had his hips replaced?[/quote] If his golf swing caused his 1963 hip injury and the ensuing arthritis then the golf swing was the cause of the hip replacement. But I doubt it.
  15. [quote name='Jim Waldron' timestamp='1418417029' post='10584745']I could not agree more on how important working with a competent instructor is. So many golfers who frequent the golf forums seem to believe that they can substantially improve without a professional providing feedback. That premise is the "golf swing as engineering puzzle" fallacy that I have written about before. The idea that ONLY conscious, intellectual, swing-theory type knowledge is needed to get better. The process of learning the craft of ballstriking is so much more than mere theory! [/quote] You have identified the Catch 22. Since we amateurs are not smart enough to improve on our own how would we be smart enough to identify a competent instructor? What would the competent instructor be teaching if not applied theory? Do a couple of timely atta-boys make a difference? What do you teach that isn't applied theory?
  16. [quote name='chiva' timestamp='1414036035' post='10336791'] @ AndyC, I haven't talked to Monte's or Dan's accountant so I can't say how much or how little Golfwrx has helped their business, but it sounds like you have from the sureness of your reply. I'm with bph7 in that I guess I don't really care what the hacks on here say. It is frustrating when a good teacher gets tired of dealing with those people and stops posting on this forum. I do question what they say, just in a manner far more respectful than others around here. You should have your own opinion and question, but without acting like some know it all. You might actually learn something and play better golf. [/quote] You don't have to be Sherlock Holmes to figure out that both Dan and Monte benefit from being on GolfWRX. Just look at all the threads started by players who have taken or are taking lessons with either of them. And yes, I am sure. But my point is not to knock any of the teachers who benefit from their participation. I was merely pointing out to you that this is far from charity work as you phrased it. I agree that civility is often lacking in how some choose to disagree.
  17. [quote name='chiva' timestamp='1414028201' post='10336093'] I've been to Texarkana and worked with Geoff. I've been working with Monte for almost 2 yrs now. I met them both due to wrx, but they were still successful w/out golfwrx beforehand. They offer free advice on here. It's not very respectful for some 10 capper or "scratch" to argue with them about the golf swing. Their knowledge and expertise is significantly great than some hack on this forum. But the said hack thinks they know better. This is what get's us riled up. I like discussion and debate b/c it's fun and at times helpful to think about things in a new way. But to have some hacker arguing with Monte or Dan that the "arms don't help square the clubface, just the pivot", etc, is ridiculous and blatantly disrespectful. The people stating that I'm disrespectful is akin to the pot calling the kettle black. [/quote] Monte and Geoff may have been successful before GolfWRX but to believe that their participation in the forum didn't add greatly to their business is ridiculous. Why would you be so concerned about what some so-called "hack' is posting? Monte and Dan aren't the end-all on the topic of arms vs. pivot debate. They have an opinion and a point of view. I doubt that their opinions and points of view would be shared without question by each and everyone of the the Golf Magazine top 100 teachers. An instructor who believes in what he or she teaches should have no trouble backing up their beliefs. Any student who doesn't question their teachers is really not much of a student. Again, I commend and appreciate Monte, Dan, Jim, etc. coming on and presenting their points of view. Any business they derive from GolfWRX will be attributable to their ability to communicate their ideas in a way the resonates with their audience.
  18. [quote name='chiva' timestamp='1413953119' post='10330847'] I agree, keep it coming. It's entertaining and I have a very large bowl of popcorn to eat. BTW AndyC, Monte and Dan already had a successful gig without golfwrx. I would consider this "charity" work for them. [/quote] You know this how? You saw articles or players speaking of them? Charity? Give me a break. Monte, Dan, Jim, Slicefixer, etc have prospered tremendously due to their participation. But I think that is a good thing for everybody.
  19. [quote name='bph7' timestamp='1413925972' post='10328289'] Only on golf message boards can you have extremely respected professionals offering their opinions on interesting issues for free on one hand, and on the other hand a bunch of double digit caps who won't even post swings, and the second group really thinks they know more and are right. [/quote] Would these extremely respected professionals be extremely respected if not for their postings on golf forums? Do you think all the free advertising has kept them extremely busy if not extremely respected? Don't get me wrong, I think it's great when any person with some knowledge to share comes on and posts. But I won't be having a pity party for any of them because of what some double digit handicappers have to say.
  20. [quote name='JPGolf FL' timestamp='1412634016' post='10245377'] [quote name='AndyC' timestamp='1412632855' post='10245261'] [quote name='iteachgolf' timestamp='1412632135' post='10245175']Speed comes from good mechanics that produce dynamic movement. It's not like speed is some mystery. [b]Plenty of teachers get a majority of their students to hit it further and straighter[/b]. Especially average golfers. It's ignorant to think otherwise.[/quote] Wow really? The mystery is that many teachers don't know how to teach dynamic movement to their students. Plenty of teachers get absolutely no improvement from their students let alone get them to hit it both longer and straighter. It is self-serving to say that plenty of teachers get a majority to hit it further and straighter. [/quote] Why is that so hard to grasp?? Could it be because over on jeffys forum, all 3 members do nothing but talk about how great kelvin is and how clueless everyone else is?? You know if you hear BS for long enough you will start to believe it. Not to say that kelvin and Lucas aren't competent teachers. But you have to wonder how they could possibly think they are the only guys in the world who understand the golf swing, much less convince other people of that. It's a big turn off/cult feel to me. [/quote] I know nothing of Jeffy's forum. I certainly don't condone bashing someone to make yourself look better. In my world of golf I appreciate the Kelvins and Iteachs of the world who present their viewpoints and experiences. Ultimately, if what someone teaches doesn't work they will soon be discovered for what they are, a salesman with nothing to sell.
  21. [quote name='iteachgolf' timestamp='1412633370' post='10245307'] [quote name='AndyC' timestamp='1412632855' post='10245261'] [quote name='iteachgolf' timestamp='1412632135' post='10245175']Speed comes from good mechanics that produce dynamic movement. It's not like speed is some mystery. [b]Plenty of teachers get a majority of their students to hit it further and straighter[/b]. Especially average golfers. It's ignorant to think otherwise.[/quote] Wow really? The mystery is that many teachers don't know how to teach dynamic movement to their students. Plenty of teachers get absolutely no improvement from their students let alone get them to hit it both longer and straighter. It is self-serving to say that plenty of teachers get a majority to hit it further and straighter. [/quote] The funny thing is I can back up what I say. Can you say the same? You think it takes an "expert" to figure out a strong grip with a really long swing while trying to create a ton of lag can create more distance? Everyone knows how LD guys create speed. The key is that gonna make someone actually better or are LD mechanics good to teach the masses? How many teachers have you spent extensive time around? How many do you know? Again I'm 100% certain I have a better grasp of what guys that teach at the upper levels are capable of than you. It's laughable that you could think otherwise. [/quote] Sure I can back it up. I can provide an extensive list of golfers that have gone to pros for lessons and shown no improvement whatsoever. Why the hostility? Is Kelvin a threat to you? Why don't you show us how easy it is to increase swing speed? Surely a person of your expertise could add 10mph to their own swing with just a few adjustments.
  22. [quote name='iteachgolf' timestamp='1412632135' post='10245175']Speed comes from good mechanics that produce dynamic movement. It's not like speed is some mystery. [b]Plenty of teachers get a majority of their students to hit it further and straighter[/b]. Especially average golfers. It's ignorant to think otherwise.[/quote] Wow really? The mystery is that many teachers don't know how to teach dynamic movement to their students. Plenty of teachers get absolutely no improvement from their students let alone get them to hit it both longer and straighter. It is self-serving to say that plenty of teachers get a majority to hit it further and straighter.
  23. [quote name='iteachgolf' timestamp='1412628561' post='10244861'] Do you really believe only you and Kelvin have increased players speed, distance, and accuracy? And that nobody else has done this and can prove it? There are a ton of pros putting out before and after videos of their students. Many many pros are helping students improve all over. You guys are far from the only ones doing it. [/quote] No doubt there are many pros helping golfers out around the country. Kelvin specializes in speed training. Are there really a bunch of pros out there who know jack about speed training? Given that more top golfers are on the high end of the swing speed scale than on the low end it seems like he addresses a pretty important aspect of the swing.
  24. [quote name='lefty57' timestamp='1412629930' post='10244961'] [quote name='Lucas Wald' timestamp='1412627080' post='10244727'] I just read through this thread and saw my name mentioned several times. First, I would like to thank some of you for the gracious comments you‘ve made regarding my swing evolution. I don’t plan on posting regularly here but I would like to give my take on this topic. Qualitatively speaking no one in the history of this game has laid out the precise patterns of movement of the best and most powerful players of all time. Kelvin has done this! This blueprint, if understood, allows one to achieve remarkable results. Proper proprioception is difficult and the truth is, for an adult, one hour golf lessons do not work! Golf professionals need to be honest and tell students how difficult this really is. For example, try and learn a foreign language as an adult or try and learn a musical instrument. Yet alone, play that instrument like Beethoven or Mozart. Ha. Good Luck right. But we as golfers want that, we want to hit the ball 300 yards and shoot in the mid 60’s. My contention is this: Almost anyone can learn a world class golf swing but most aren’t willing to put in the required time to accomplish IT. And, most teaching pros learned the game as a kid, and therefore didn’t know consciously the moves they were making subconsciously. This makes things very difficult because they lack the confidence to relay the information needed, successfully. This is not a knock toward teaching pros, as I feel most would agree that they learned the game as a kid. Learning any new motor skill, especially as an adult, is hard. My final point is this. Kelvin has put out numerous case studies of students with before/after videos and I’ve put out numerous as well. Likewise, many of these can be verified with quantitative information showing increases in clubhead speed, ballspeed, carry distances and yes accuracy improvements. [b]Can anyone else in golf or has anyone else in the golfing business shown these results? If they have, I would certainly like to see them.[/b] Like the wise sage says, “You have to do all you can do and then learn non-doing, the doing of the non-doing is the greatest doing, and the effort of the effortlessness is the greatest effort.” -Lucas Wald [/quote] Not an instructor, but you must owe Kelvin a lot of money to make such a brash and arrogant statement ? Which players on the PGA Tour have benefited from Kelvin's instruction ? [/quote] It wasn't a statement it was a question. If you can show him I think everybody would like to see.
  25. [quote name='iteachgolf' timestamp='1411951968' post='10202477'] [quote name='AndyC' timestamp='1411950116' post='10202245'] [quote name='iteachgolf' timestamp='1411842755' post='10195433'] Yet many courses have that rating with lower slopes which would require a smaller differential. TPC Craig Ranch for example where one of my players would have been a +9.6 differential with tournament rounds of 73-64-67-66. Course is rated 77.3/144. Or another who shot 67-71-64-64 at first stage at St John's Golf and Country Club (74.7/132) and leading up to first stage had 7 consecutive rounds of 64 or better including a 59 on courses rated at 74 or higher. Both are/were above +9 over that stretch. Both have never played an event on the PGA Tour and one has never played an event on the Web.com tour. Have another who has averaged 67 in the best half of his rounds over the last 2 years on the NGA/Hooters Tour. Not over a small period of time, over 2 years. And these are in tournament play. Casual rounds he shoots 62 regularly. As in very often. And has never played in a web.com or PGA tour event. There are more than a handful of legitimate +6 to +9 guys playing mini tour golf. The Bubba example is skewed because it's a course with a fairly low course rating but a high slope. If he played at Orange County National every day his handicap would be considerably lower. The up tee there is rated 73.7/132. The back tee is 76/139. The higher rating with the much lower slope would yield a much lower handicap [/quote] The slope of the course is not a factor in computing a USGA index. It is only used to convert indexes to a handicap for a particular course. Plus indexes on higher sloped courses would have higher plus handicaps than they would on lower sloped courses. [/quote] And you'd be wrong. The differential is calculated by subtracting the course rating from the adjusted gross score and then multiply the difference by 113. Then that is divided by the slope to get the handicap differential. Therefore the higher the slope with a constant course rating the lower the differential. Handicap is then calculated from the 10 best differentials in the last 20 scores. [/quote] I stand corrected, thanks.
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