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rogolf

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  1. My only question would be, "are these markings considered permanent or semi-permanent by the authorities?". Of course, only the authorities can answer that question. Ask them here: Rules of Golf Phone: 908-326-1850 (7 days a week) E-mail: Rules@usga.org BTW, I don't think that they are on perpendicular to the clubface (may be the photo).
  2. Should you have any questions, please contact the USGA Amateur Status staff by calling (908) 326-1025 or by sending an email to amstat@usga.org.
  3. Go to the source - it's likely better than opinions of others! https://www.usga.org/content/usga/home-page/rules-hub/amateur-status/amateur-status-faq-d8bb60a9.html
  4. Trust me, there are red lines defining the edge of the penalty area. The USGA aren't sloppy in markings.
  5. The penalty areas at Winged Foot are definitely defined by painted lines. I don't know if there are stakes identifying them or not, but I would think there are. The USGA tries to do everything by the book, using its competitions as examples of how things are to be done.
  6. Your version of WHS is obviously different than ours. We have now requirement to inform anyone before commencing a "handicap round". And we have no requirement to enter scores hole by hole, we can just enter the total gross score (adjusted for net double bogey, including MLS for holes not completed, or par plus handicap strokes for holes not played).
  7. As do I, but, at the time, I had no idea what they were for!
  8. Let's get this sorted - in North America, our handicap Rules require us to post all scores - those in match play, those in casual stroke play and those in stroke play competitions. In stroke play competitions, all putts must be holed (unless the stroke play competition is Stableford or Maximum Score). When a ball is not holed on a hole, such as when there is a match play concession, a blob in Stableford, or a player just picks up his ball, the handicap authorities, for handicap posting only, require us to post the "most likely score" for that hole, and the table that Sawgrass has posted is u
  9. I agree on the split rail fence, not because the logs have been split, but because they've been used to build a fence, and the resulting fence is an obstruction. Splitting of the logs in this instance is irrelevant, the fence would still be an obstruction even if whole logs were used. The Equipment Rules say that a tee is a device designed to raise the ball off the ground. A bottle cap was not designed to be a tee, and modification of a bottle cap, imo, does not change what it was designed to be - the top of a bottle to keep fluid in the bottle.
  10. I don't agree with your splitting of a log conclusion, nor with your "manufacturing" a tee by removing the bottle cap from the bottle. Perhaps you can check with your friends at the USGA and get back to us?
  11. "That's good..." is a clear concession of the player's next stroke.
  12. Somebody ask the USGA. This has been discussed previously.
  13. As you know, I didn't include the whole wording of 6.5, which is - "The result of the hole is decided (such as when the opponent concedes the hole, the opponent's score for the hole is lower than the player possibly could make or the player or opponent gets the general penalty (loss of hole)." And that says, because of the highligthed "or", that we are both correct.
  14. When I'm refereeing match play, one of the things that I tell the players on the first tee is to make their concessions clear - so that the opponent and the referee both hear them and understand them. As a referee, "that's good for a 4" is a clear concession of the next stroke regardless of what it's for - there are no "conditional" or "provisional" concessions.
  15. Just trying to poke the sleeping bear? Don't ask questions for which you already know the answer. I'll know better next time you ask.
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