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foijord

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  1. Don't see an instructor, golf instruction does not currently work. The golf swing is already in you, it's in your DNA. All you have to do is find it. A golf instructor cannot help you with this, only confuse you and make the search much, much harder. Forget all you think you know about gripping the club. No Vardon, interlock or s*** like that, grip it with all 10 fingers. Assuming you're right handed, your right hand must be comfortable on the grip, meaning you cannot put your left thumb under the right palm. This probably require you to have a small gap between your hands on the grip as your left thumb extends down the grip. It will feel weird at first. In order for your right hand to have a solid grip on the club, you'll need fat grips on your clubs, with no taper. Think something more like a tennis sized grip, or baseball sized. Build up the shaft with tape to at least 20 mm diameter and slip a jumbo sized grip on there. Don't be afraid to go even thicker. Hit a lot of balls, at least 25,000 the first year, focusing solely on solid contact. You only need mid-irons at this stage. Also do half-swings, again only focus on solid contact. Don't overdo it in the beginning, until your swing becomes smooth and relaxed, there's a real risk of injury. Be careful. Make sure you're not coming over the top or overly from the inside, this is important. You'll have to video yourself from time to time to verify. Also make sure your clubface is not overly closed or overly open at the top of the backswing. Swing path and clubface. Those are the only parameters you care about at this point. They don't have to be perfect, just "reasonable" Keep at it for 3 years at least. If you are able to find your innate swing, you'll start noticing things. When you hit balls, it sounds different than the other guys at the range. They'll notice too and might comment on it. If you video yourself, you'll find that you hit all the great positions in the swing. Now you make small adjustments to club path and open/closedness of the clubface based on your ballflight. If you are able to become consistent, you can start focusing more short game and just playing golf. This is the fun part. Good luck!
  2. I'm all PING except my putter. The putter doesn't need to be PING I feel. Everything else must be. I just like the quality of the clubs and the engineering behind them. Was playing G20 irons, now on i200. I like the i200 name, it sounds like Eye2, with 200 instead of 2. Funny thing, my i200 set, U-3 iron is almost exactly the same lofts as Eye2 W-2. G400 fairway woods, 5 and 3. G25 driver. One of the light PING carry stand bags. Can't blame bad scores on the equipment!
  3. They're great, even the 3-iron is playable. The long irons have a nice sound when hit solidly. They seem to wear well, like other PING clubs.
  4. Try this: switch to a 10 finger grip so your trail hand has a more secure grip on the club. Then let your trail arm be the boss in the swing, makes you lead more with trail elbow. It's "impossible" to come over the top if you hit with the trail arm.
  5. YES, here's what you should learn by watching DJ. Just like he has done, find the way to swing the club that works for YOU! Don't copy anyone, experiment! Unlock your athleticism, it's the only way to perform consistently well!
  6. foijord

    grip size

    Yeah, I think this is not for everyone, but those of us that are a little steep, and pulls the handle on the downswing... probably worth experimenting a little with this. BTW, when you let the right hand do the job, you'll know what Hogan means when he said he wished he had three right hands!
  7. foijord

    G400 Fairways

    I have the 3 and 5. They're excellent off the deck because of the low leading edge. It sits close to the ground, so you don't feel like you're going to top the ball if that makes sense. They launch the ball really high, with a nice solid sound.
  8. foijord

    grip size

    Sounds like you have hands like satellite dishes. LOL, not sure what that means. No, my hands are regular size (L size glove when I used one), but my fingers are somewhat thin. Most people will get away with thinner grips than me I believe. I saw a suggestion that you could wrap a tennis grip around the golf grip to try super-thick grips without too much hassle. Haven't tried that though, don't know if it's a good idea or not. But really, the grip is the most important fitting parameter. You must find YOUR optimal grip thickness, along with YOUR optimal grip. For me, I believe this is super-thick grips and full baseball grip (10 finger grip with left thumb wrapped around the grip, not going down the grip). This is something NO pro would come up with. Could this be why most people struggle so much to improve? With the correct grip on the club, your swing will reveal itself. It's there already, you just have to unlock it. Meaning you have to use your natural athleticism to hit the ball, if you want to hit it as good as YOU have the potential for. No amount of learned movement patterns can match your unconscious motor skills. To elaborate a little more; having a good grip on the club gives you club face control. You get a much better sense of where the club face is pointed, and the control you need to keep accelerating through the ball with a square face. You'll be able to hit the ball as hard as you want, from the inside. When you first achieve this, you will know what solid contact means. Many golfers have never hit a single solid shot. The combination of square club face, center contact and free-wheeling/accelerating through the ball is where it's at. And the sound... sounds like a muffled rifle shot with those thin-faced modern long irons. And you'll be able to compress the ball with a sand wedge, with tons of gorgeous shaft-lean. This unlocks one of the coolest shots IMHO, the low flying spinner that takes one hop and stops. Now if I could only hit my putter as solid as my irons... I might be able to play! Finally, the whole key for ME here is that with the 10-finger full baseball grip my right hand has such a good hold on the club that it's the boss. It controls the club face. Even if I don't reach a perfect position at the top of the backswing, I can still catch it solid because i KNOW where the club face is oriented. With thin grips, and the left hand all gloved up and the right having not a good hold of the club because of the vardon overlap, the left hand was the boss. This caused pulling the handle and coming over the top, hitting fades and slices every single shot. Now with the right hand in charge, coming over the top simply is not possible. I sometimes do this drill of hitting balls just with my right hand on the club. No issue hitting 130 yard iron shots like this. And when the right hand is in charge, your motor system taps into the throwing system. You'll naturally get a little flying right elbow, but when you start the downswing, you'll naturally lead with your right elbow as well, as if you're throwing a stone to skip it on water. Footwork, and hips will automatically do their thing, you don't have to think about it. All you have to do is have the target in your mind and hit as hard as you can. Anyway, this is what I have found works for ME, and it's taken me 3 years of experimentation to figure it out. It could be that this does not work for everyone, but I haven't really seen this suggested much, if at all by the swing gurus on this site. Hope this can help someone else to improve!
  9. foijord

    grip size

    Sounds like you have hands like satellite dishes. LOL, not sure what that means. No, my hands are regular size (L size glove when I used one), but my fingers are somewhat thin. Most people will get away with thinner grips than me I believe. I saw a suggestion that you could wrap a tennis grip around the golf grip to try super-thick grips without too much hassle. Haven't tried that though, don't know if it's a good idea or not. But really, the grip is the most important fitting parameter. You must find YOUR optimal grip thickness, along with YOUR optimal grip. For me, I believe this is super-thick grips and full baseball grip (10 finger grip with left thumb wrapped around the grip, not going down the grip). This is something NO pro would come up with. Could this be why most people struggle so much to improve? With the correct grip on the club, your swing will reveal itself. It's there already, you just have to unlock it. Meaning you have to use your natural athleticism to hit the ball, if you want to hit it as good as YOU have the potential for. No amount of learned movement patterns can match your unconscious motor skills. To elaborate a little more; having a good grip on the club gives you club face control. You get a much better sense of where the club face is pointed, and the control you need to keep accelerating through the ball with a square face. You'll be able to hit the ball as hard as you want, from the inside. When you first achieve this, you will know what solid contact means. Many golfers have never hit a single solid shot. The combination of square club face, center contact and free-wheeling/accelerating through the ball is where it's at. And the sound... sounds like a muffled rifle shot with those thin-faced modern long irons. And you'll be able to compress the ball with a sand wedge, with tons of gorgeous shaft-lean. This unlocks one of the coolest shots IMHO, the low flying spinner that takes one hop and stops. Now if I could only hit my putter as solid as my irons... I might be able to play!
  10. foijord

    grip size

    Sounds like you have hands like satellite dishes. LOL, not sure what that means. No, my hands are regular size (L size glove when I used one), but my fingers are somewhat thin. Most people will get away with thinner grips than me I believe. I saw a suggestion that you could wrap a tennis grip around the golf grip to try super-thick grips without too much hassle. Haven't tried that though, don't know if it's a good idea or not. But really, the grip is the most important fitting parameter. You must find YOUR optimal grip thickness, along with YOUR optimal grip. For me, I believe this is super-thick grips and full baseball grip (10 finger grip with left thumb wrapped around the grip, not going down the grip). This is something NO pro would come up with. Could this be why most people struggle so much to improve? With the correct grip on the club, your swing will reveal itself. It's there already, you just have to unlock it. Meaning you have to use your natural athleticism to hit the ball, if you want to hit it as good as YOU have the potential for. No amount of learned movement patterns can match your unconscious motor skills.
  11. foijord

    grip size

    I have an hypothesis about golf grips. They're all WAY too thin. Think about it. There is no other sporting equipment you hold in your hand with a grip that thin. Not even small asian women playing badminton use grips that thin. Tennis uses WAY thicker grips. Baseball bats are way thicker. Golf has the thinnest grips of any sport. Why is this so? My hypothesis is that in the old days they had shafts made of hickory. Due to the properties of this wood, the shaft would perform best with a certain thickness and tapering. To make a grip, they just wrapped leather around the end. And the resulting thickness became the standard. I started improving drastically when I went to jumbo thickness grips. Then I started adding wraps as they still felt too thin. Then I got to about 20 wraps and it was still not enough so I stopped counting and started measuring instead. I now wrap the tape wound the shaft in several sections, this makes it easier to wrap and simple to take out the tapering. I'm up to 20mm diameter and stick a jumbo grip on top of that. Still feels a little too thin, but it's close. This enables me to play comfortably without a glove. Another thing that will determine the grip size you need is the thickness of your fingers. Thinner fingers dictates thicker grips. I have thin fingers. I've been on a journey from standard grip size and a standard vardon grip to where I am now, with ridiculously thick grips and a pure baseball grip. I'm steadily improving and don't have to think about the actual swing anymore. Gripping the club in a way that's natural to ME allows me to unlock my swing DNA so to speak and I can focus on target. No over the top any more, much more solid contact and a nice ball flight. Sorry for the long rant, hope someone has the energy to read all this :) Cheers!
  12. I've been experimenting with REALLY thick grips, jumbo sized with probably 20 wraps under. (I stopped counting wraps, and measure instead, 20mm thickness before the grip goes on, uniform down the shaft, so more wraps lower down). The point of this is to get the right hand the best possible grip on the club, with all 10 fingers. Immediate improvement in ball striking occurs when I can let the right arm/hand be the boss in the swing. Everything is better, swing path and contact, and ball flight. I think it's because my club face control is much better when the right hand is in charge. But the left thumb, which is long since I grip the club in my palm, is in the way. When the right hand wraps over it, I don't get the secure feeling I'm after. So I tried just wrapping the thumb around the grip instead, like I was swinging a bat, axe, sledge hammer, anything but a golf club. Felt a little weird at first, but it really works. REALLY works. Main difference when the right hand can really grip the club well is that I can hit harder and maintain control. I also have better control when hitting half shots, which I do a lot on the range (and course). I feel like I can focus on target and not the swing this way. Awesome feeling. Excited to take this to the course. Last year I finished the season with an 81. I think this could be the year I break 80... Anyone else out there who do the same or want to comment on this? Would be interesting to hear from some of the swing savants here. Guess I'm looking for some validation that what I'm doing is not completely stupid. Or some valid criticism is OK too.
  13. Went from G20 regular flex to i200 stiff. My i200 4-iron is about equivalent to my G20 3-iron in terms of flight and distance. Easy to hit irons, but slightly less forgiving than G20.
  14. One thing I noticed I was doing differently today was more wrist c0ck, earlier in the back swing. I believe this put the club in a better position at the top, and shortened the backswing a little. I have noticed that the early wrist angle is what I have to make sure I am doing or the Malaska feel blends into dragging the handle. Feeling a shorter backswing with better and earlier wrist angle brought everything back to good strikes. Holy crap, this is significant. This is exactly what I'm experiencing as well. This is gold!
  15. Quick update: just came back from the range. Had perhaps the best session ever today. Whenever i got sloppy, I could get back on track by doing a few split grip swings, didn't even need to hit a ball, just take a couple of practice swings with the hands separated to refresh the feeling. And get this; I was compressing my sand wedge and hitting great shots with it. I usually flip and scoop high lofted wedges, but not today. Compression baby!
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