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larrybud

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  1. Grid size limitations and determining ball and pin location on the grid is one reason I don't find these helpful for putts (and I bought a few of them, unfortunately). To read a putt and determine whether it's breaking 6" or 10", I just don't find any usefulness in these. However, I do find the heat maps useful in determining overall slope and severity, which is excellent for approach chips and very long putts. Because of the green speed at my home course, for example, anything in the "yellow" or more severe areas will always roll down to the "green" severity. So I know that if the green is severe near the edge, I can chip it up as high as I want, and I can be insured that it will come all the way down. To me this is the most beneficial thing about the books, but not on individual makeable putts.
  2. Nah, they are in their own world. I've played with those guys all the time, clueless.
  3. I frankly don't blame you, and these excuse makers for the slow player are annoying. lol. It's one thing if the slow player gets the penalty, but when it affects the whole group, you have to do what you have to do to avoid getting a penalty. I think if I got warned (or penalized) a 2nd time, I would ask to speak to the official in charge and plead my case, and ask "what am I supposed to do?" if one guy slows the entire group down.
  4. Do they? IME slow players have no idea they are the problem.
  5. Playing so slow that your entire group gets a penalty IS being a dick. Move faster.
  6. So not only they have crap cups, they have an illegal plastic liner going to the surface of the green. Where is this horrible course, so I can make sure never to play there?
  7. "back in the day" it wasn't too uncommon for me to be at the range for 2-3 hours. I'd bring the camera and laptop, take time between shots, get a snack, etc.
  8. As someone who bought a few golflogix books, these guys using them for subtle putt breaks are kidding themselves. They aren't nearly detailed enough to get that read. Just trying to identify exactly where you (and the pin) are on a grid which is 3/8" per 5 yards is too difficult, and so you can't get a read after that. They are good for getting overall slope info on approach shots or chips, however. Also, if you know the speed of your greens, you can predict where a ball won't stop. For example, on my home course they generally run 9-9.5, so any slope which is yellow or hotter, the ball will not stop on. Handy when knowing you can take a putt or chip to the edge of a green, knowing that it will come down off a particular slope. However, I've mostly abandoned using them. Took too much of the feel out of a shot.
  9. Have 3 "ryder cup" teams, each one plays against the other two concurrently. For example, in singles, you have three teams of 5. Player 1 on Team 1 plays against player 1 on team 2 and team 3 at the same time. So 2 points are up for grabs for each round. When it comes to fourball or foursomes, you also run a singles match at the same time for the odd man out. The exact combination will depend on how many rounds you're playing.
  10. 5 threesomes or 3 fivesomes seems like the logical way to handle this one.
  11. If players are so skilled as to hit a 1.68" ball on command, you'd think they'd aim at the 4" hole instead!
  12. Ever play with a guy that NEVER grabs the stick, and you're holing out LAST and have to grab it?
  13. Pretty strange this exact scenario came up in the discussion. I never recall it being an issue in ANY match play event EVER. When has there ever been a discussion of what constitutes conceding a hole during match play? Almost like this was a manufactured moment waiting to happen to draw interest. I guess it worked.
  14. Match play is awful for TV when there's 4 players on the course. Fact of the matter is that most tournaments in general don't come down to the wire. Whether you give guys strokes or not doesn't change that fact, especially since only 30 players are in the field. The odds that it's close down the stretch is pretty low. I say dump the stroke advantage in the final round, and instead give those players mulligans they can use anywhere but on the green! C'mon, let's do it!
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