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maigre

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  1. A good physical therapist can be a big, big help and spare you of the need for more invasive measures. Massaging the biceps and triceps areas right above my elbow can provide some relief, at least for me. There can be postural things in the neck area that affect this because there's a nerve that runs from there to the wrist. I've largely stopped doing pull ups/chin ups and push ups, as well. Too aggravating to my tennis elbow and occasional golfers elbow.
  2. How well does it sit on your Rovic cart?
  3. She's featured in a recent IG post of Dr. Kwon's. I had the same impression when I saw her there.
  4. Good point about elevation. I don't know the answer to that. According to the Rapsodo FAQ, you can't do total distance with irons, just woods. I'm surprised a number of people here have applauded the app. It looks nice, but is not that well organized and it takes some head scratching experimentation to figure out some basic things. Once you figure it out, it's fine, but it shouldn't be this opaque in late 2021. There should be accommodations for multiple users. But that can be worked around. That they don't seem to have invested in UI/UX and an Android version (they've been running out that same paragraph for many months now about their intentions) makes me wonder how committed they are to making this as good as it can be. Maybe they don't have the funding or revenue. I don't know. For those who have asked about using an iPad vs. an iPhone, there are pros and cons to both. The iPhone sits much more easily on the device. The iPad is a little too wide and can blow over even in minimal wind. You'd think they'd have made the groove where the device sits deeper. But... the iPad is bigger, so the screen is easier to see when it's 8' away and on the ground. Pros and cons both ways. Not having a WiFi or mobile data connection is OK, but not completely. You have to make sure you're logged in before you get to wherever you'll be using the device if there's no connection there. Otherwise, it's not going to work. Getting set up requires that, too, to take full advantage. You'll be prompted to align the target direction and tee location where you're hitting. If you don't have an internet connection, that's not going to be possible as far as I can tell. That's a problem. My range has a connection near the pro shop, but not further away down the range. So using the iPad, I have to get set up when I get my balls, then walk to wherever I'm going to hit. What works is useful, though. I'm not certain how accurate it is, but reviews have tested well and the eyeball test looks good to me most, but not all, of the time. The shot tracer is fun. The videos are not high resolution, but they still look good. Best that way, because higher res would mean instantly full storage on our mobile devices. Do make sure your iOS device has plenty of storage, because the videos will eat up space in short order.
  5. TGW has 15% off on Ping Hoofers. It might expire tonight, though.
  6. Are the straps removable on the current Hoofer bags? It's nice to be able to take them off when they're on a pushcart or electric trolley, etc. From pictures, it looks like they are, but best to make sure.
  7. Here's a version, maybe last year's, on a Mizuno Outlet site. Is this legitimately a Mizuno website? Seems pretty similar to the current bags that cost more than double this price. It looks like the Mizuno site, but the implementation, at least on my broswer is on the crude side.
  8. This bag appears to have an exposed lever at the base that pushes the legs out. Some newer bags cover that. This makes it easier for those bags to sit stably on push carts and electric trolleys. My old Nike Sasquatch bag, which I still find to be more appealing and well thought out than most of the new bags I see, has an exposed mechanism, too. That gets in the way of it sitting well on the aforementioned carts. Do any of you who use this bag have any problems using it with push and electric carts?
  9. The Black Friday deal was the prompt for me to buy the bag. Not so sure I'd have done it otherwise. I certainly wouldn't have done it now. Please let us know how the 14 way goes for you.
  10. After recently getting a 14 way, I regret not ordering the 6 way instead. Enough that I may return it. My old Nike bag is 14 way and the compartments are spacious enough and shaped in a way that there's no resistance or friction at all, ever. With the Player III, the middle 11 compartments all funnel into an internal bag. That bag shifts around and can create some resistance here depending on how it's shifting around. Furthermore, the padding at the top of each compartment, which seems to go about grip length deep into the bag, splays away from the borders of the compartment, which creates friction when inserting the clubs and can snag the club a little when withdrawing it. My Nike bag, has that padding, but it's tight to the compartments. Back to the Player III, the two compartments that border the edge of the bag that are nearest the stand are sort of triangle shaped, so the outer parts of them are narrow, effectively making them very small. Many of the compartments are on the smallish side. Experimenting, I'm seeing that the compartment nearest the handle/straps is ample enough for 3 clubs easily. And a 2 compartment width one below that handles two comfortably. In my living room experimentation, I don't detect any tangle issues there. Those two larger compartments handle multiple clubs better than any of the other 12 handle single ones. If I keep the bag, that's how I'll use it, which is kind of sub-optimal since it means unused space. It may be that others with the 14 way version of the bag have had better luck than I got. Plenty of good things, though. It sits more gracefully on my electric trolley and Clicgear 4 than my Nike bag does, the possibility of which is a big part of the reason I ordered it. Otherwise, I like the understated look, though it's less luxurious in feel and appearance than they advertise. But that's probably more a positive than a negative for me. The more subtle branding is appealing instead of the in your face ugliness and branding aspects of so many of the golf company brands. That's another reason I looked into it. The bags and pockets seem fine. I can adapt to whatever setup that way as long as they're convenient and accessible for the ways I want to use it. The bottle compartments work for what I'd put in them, so no problem there for me. An oddity is that there's a small valuables pocket inside the largest bag that has a combination lock if you want to "protect" your wallet and keys or whatever. But a scissors or knife would go easily through that pocket in moments. Perhaps a marketing "feature" that's more style than substance. I haven't walked more than a few feet around my living room with it and that's with clubs only, nothing in the pockets. But it feels fine.
  11. @Maroon_19 and @Hougz79, do you have the 6 way or the 14 way? Any issues either way? @larryd3, is there plenty of room in the 14 way for the clubs to fit comfortably in the slots without a lot of friction?
  12. Thanks for all the replies to this. I hope to see more. The 9 to 3 swing approach is one that I use sometimes. I ought to go to it sooner than I do. I keep thinking it's going to come back on the next swing. At least on the course. At the range, I'll adapt a little more quickly. The not caring method is probably the healthiest. I'm working on that.
  13. All my life, I've had times on the golf course, where I lose my ability to hit a good shot. I might be in a period where I'm playing well by my modest standards only to find that, all of a sudden, my shots are either or all of weak, low, and fat. Sometimes other things, too. At least I tend, at this stage, to hit it straight enough that I'm not losing balls all the time when this happens. Often, the next time, I'm fine. Or I'll work it out at the range pretty quickly. Though this can happen there, too. As an aside, awhile back, I saw a friend at the range, a big, athletic guy who hit it consistently and very long. But this particular day, he was not hitting it well, and was desperately trying to fix it, ten balls, ten different swings. He was in a near panic. The fix it approach wasn't going to work. I'd never seen him hit it this bad before. But I'm sure that the next trip, he was back to striking it well. Everyone at any skill level is going to have days where the wheels come off, relatively speaking. The other day, I hit fat shot after fat shot on the front nine. It was really frustrating. Even my practice swings were out of sync and felt awkward. I hit a few good shots, but only a few. Even the passable ones felt weak. Less ball speed, less spin, lower ball flight. Finally on the 10th hole, I sort of figured it out by easing off a little and doing a couple of things that have worked for me recently. I thought I'd been doing them throughout the round, but I know I wasn't or I wouldn't have hit it so poorly. At least it came back to me. What do you all do when things go astray during a round to get it back, or at least salvage enough out of it to enjoy the round? I accept ups and downs, but it's frustrating to feel like I've regressed years all of a sudden. At this stage, I KNOW it'll come back, because it always has before. But I'd like to find a way to minimize the damage more quickly than I tend to do. I'm not talking score here, it's more a ball striking thing, though score suffers along with it.
  14. I'm naturally left handed and did everything lefty, but played for years right handed. It was the only thing I did right handed. This was because in my youth, left handed golf clubs were hard to come by, though a friend did play lefty. It always ate at me that I didn't try playing from the left side. This was largely because I wasn't all that good and I thought I owed it to myself to find out what it would be like to swing a golf club from my natural side. So in my early 40s, I switched. Ultimately, it didn't really make me much, if any, better. But I got used to it and have played left handed ever since. Maybe ten years ago, a local golf pro/teacher told me I was crazy to have switched, that he knows a bunch of people who play from opposite their natural hand. Mickelson does, as you all know. As did Johnny Miller. So ever since, I've always hit some of my range ball right handed. If nothing else, it's good for impressing the other players. It's useful in myriad ways, aside from the attention getting. It is different having my dominant hand on top, leading the way. Being able to translate the behavior of each hand, among other things to my left handed swing has been instructive. And it's a good physical balance to work the joints and muscles from both sides. I could play a round right handed, but I rarely do. My game is a little more under control that way.
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