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deetsal

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  1. Had a friend put it succinctly, being a scratch is like having a serious part time job.
  2. while being very common there is nothing wrong with them, they plat just fine.
  3. The nice thing about older clubs that the are soft and easy to bend. My son won many US Kids tournaments and top 5's in the northeast when he was 6-8 with Wilson Spartenback irons from the 80's. I used light steel shafts and the slightly lighter heads that were offered in woman's versions. being soft forged steel I was able to bend 3-6 degrees for loft and lie. Sure the chrome cracked but he hit them so much better then his US Kids clubs. jut a thought for anyone with an youth that is a good player. He loved the feel of them.
  4. Have a bunch of these Powerbilt sets if anyone is interested, very cheap I need the room for hickories, which are in the thousands now.
  5. The only tapered steel, pyratone, shafts I've come across are the Wilson Power Gauge. They were offered in both hickory and pyratone, I have 3 or 4 in hickory and two complete sets in pyratone. Another pyratone offering in both were the Walter Hagen's. The hosel is the same only they cut about 3/8" off making it a bit shorter and because it tapers a bit less in diameter. The problem is these are pined and soldered on and a b to get off, very labor intensive. Again I have a few sets of Hogan pyratones and a couple in hickory with longer hosels. Maybe someone can coment on whether they would be legal in hickory tournaments as there are examples of them being offered in both. The hosel being a bit shorter and a bit less in diameter is still not as small as some other hickory hosels offerings. If I get any naysayers for this I'll just post pics of examples of both.
  6. The Duo U is the lowest compression,55, tour ball out there. Great soft cover and nice soft feel. The best feeling ball is the Duo at 29 compression but
  7. If you are talking blades there are many irons from the 60’s - 90’ that stack up. However game improvement clubs have come a long way.
  8. > @Maximilian said: > Hi everyone! > > I have been searching what balls most of you hickory players who play a modern, non-replica ball prefer, but most topics are a few years old now and the models have been replaced. > > So far I have been playing the Wilson DX2 Soft ball exclusively, but been wondering if I’m loosing out on not playing a Urethane ball? On a few occasions when I have found a soft Urethane ball, I can’t say I’ve noticed a positive difference, but that has only been on a hole here or there so it’s difficult to know. > > Everyone seems to measure compression differently, but what I’ve gathered is that for overall compression (not just core compression), the Bridgestone Tour B RXS, Callaway Chrome Soft and Srixon Q Star Tour seem to be the softest current Urethane balls with almost identical compression, with the Wilson Duo Professional right behind them just ever so slightly harder. > > Doubt I would notice much difference between any of them (the list was more just a for your information type of thing, which I believe is true, but not even a 100% sure), but I’m more interested in hearing what type of ball most of you are playing and prefer now? The softest you can get, a Urethane covered ball, or some other charicaristics you look for? > > Looking forward to hearing your thoughts! > //M > @Maximilian said: > Hi everyone! > > I have been searching what balls most of you hickory players who play a modern, non-replica ball prefer, but most topics are a few years old now and the models have been replaced. > > So far I have been playing the Wilson DX2 Soft ball exclusively, but been wondering if I’m loosing out on not playing a Urethane ball? On a few occasions when I have found a soft Urethane ball, I can’t say I’ve noticed a positive difference, but that has only been on a hole here or there so it’s difficult to know. > > Everyone seems to measure compression differently, but what I’ve gathered is that for overall compression (not just core compression), the Bridgestone Tour B RXS, Callaway Chrome Soft and Srixon Q Star Tour seem to be the softest current Urethane balls with almost identical compression, with the Wilson Duo Professional right behind them just ever so slightly harder. > > Doubt I would notice much difference between any of them (the list was more just a for your information type of thing, which I believe is true, but not even a 100% sure), but I’m more interested in hearing what type of ball most of you are playing and prefer now? The softest you can get, a Urethane covered ball, or some other charicaristics you look for? > > Looking forward to hearing your thoughts! > //M > @Maximilian said: > Hi everyone! > > I have been searching what balls most of you hickory players who play a modern, non-replica ball prefer, but most topics are a few years old now and the models have been replaced. > > So far I have been playing the Wilson DX2 Soft ball exclusively, but been wondering if I’m loosing out on not playing a Urethane ball? On a few occasions when I have found a soft Urethane ball, I can’t say I’ve noticed a positive difference, but that has only been on a hole here or there so it’s difficult to know. > > Everyone seems to measure compression differently, but what I’ve gathered is that for overall compression (not just core compression), the Bridgestone Tour B RXS, Callaway Chrome Soft and Srixon Q Star Tour seem to be the softest current Urethane balls with almost identical compression, with the Wilson Duo Professional right behind them just ever so slightly harder. > > Doubt I would notice much difference between any of them (the list was more just a for your information type of thing, which I believe is true, but not even a 100% sure), but I’m more interested in hearing what type of ball most of you are playing and prefer now? The softest you can get, a Urethane covered ball, or some other charicaristics you look for? > > Looking forward to hearing your thoughts! > //M
  9. I think anything that was available at the time your clubs date should be legal. I get heat on WRX for sandblasting faces on hickory’s. Guys want to know my “ provenance”. My answer is sandblasting was invented in 1880
  10. Remember him being referred to as "Gene the Machine".
  11. Getting fitted to clubs and spending $2,500 on a full set of clubs with the latest technology will 9 times out of ten, at least, will improve your game. Any one with the scratch can do that. I like the changes and adjustments you need to make playing clubs from 1890, 1925, 1940, 1955, 1965, 1980, 2008, approx age of my play sets. All take a different approach. Matching your swing to hickory, pyratone, steel, graphit, now that's a challenge. As a 5 handicap I'm a dime a dozen,even as a scratch at times I'm my life where am I going with that. There are a million guys like that. Challenging myself with 140 year old clubs now that's fun as heck.
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