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bazinky

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  1. I had always thought that the sports where the JV was strictly for the development of underclassmen were those where a lack of physical maturity could make it difficult or dangerous for underclassmen to complete (such as in football). Sports like golf and tennis don't have that same issue. I was a tennis player growing up, and we had a really strong cohort of players in my freshman class. I was a nationally ranked junior and played #1 singles and doubles as a freshman, plus we we had two other sectionally ranked players in my grade, as well as several state ranked players. Our entire staring line-up my freshman year was either a freshman or a sophomore, and we won both our district and region and almost won the state title. That's admittedly an extreme example, but I would hate to have the upperclassmen who don't have the skill or ability to compete beyond the high school level not to have the chance to continue playing just because of their age. It's the job of the coaches to understand what players need to be on the JV team, and who needs to be getting playing time. Upperclassmen also need to understand that they may lose out on playing time to a younger player who is not presently as good as they are if the coach thinks it is in the best long-term interest of the team or program.
  2. I'm not a fan of courses that require an iron off the tee on par 4s, but I love courses that have good risk/reward par 4's where playing an iron off the tee is the safest option. The best are those where where the safe layup leads to a more challenging/risky approach, and the aggressive drive produces a significant reward when you pull it off (and a significant penalty if you don't). Having multiple ways to play a hole is one of the factors that make for a truly great hole in my opinion.
  3. The 64 is only useful in limited situations. I've got a 64 wedge in the bag right now due to the unique characteristics of my home club. It's a shorter course, with fast greens that are small, firm, and heavily sloped. I've found the 64 to be great for short-sided chips/pitches and the 40-70 yard approach that stops on a dime. I end up with enough of those type of shots at my home course to warrant the 64. The key for me is grip down with it on pitches/chips, and never try to swing more that 80% on a full shot. Trying to hit a 64 hard is a recipe for disaster. On longer courses with bigger greens, I don't have those type of shots frequently enough to warrant such a high-lofted wedge. I'll usually swap the 64 for another hybrid or fairway at the top of my bag when playing other courses.
  4. Greater than 10 yards for a driver. If I'm hitting at least one club less into greens, I would expect that to translate to lower score in the long run. Also, the distance increase needs to not be offset by worse dispersion.
  5. Same here. At my home course, we have small, firm greens with significant back to front slopes. Middle of the green to a front pin can be a really nasty putt.
  6. It really depends on how much benefit I am going to see from the new clubs. I'm willing to pay almost anything if I can pick up yardage or see substantial improvements in accuracy. The sad truth is that the latest equipment just isn't that much better than stuff that's a few years old.
  7. Not really laying up, but I do have some par 3's that I play where only a perfectly struck shot will reach the green. Best example is one of the par 3's at my home course where the front of the green narrows substantially, and slopes pretty severely back to front. Going long leaves a putt that is really tough to get close and is very easy to actually putt off the green. The green is also surrounded by bunkers on both sides where you often end up with a really funky stance and or a bad lie due to the contours of the bunker. Missing short leaves a pretty benign chip, but a pin-high miss to a front hole position and you'll be happy to make a 4. I've found that slightly under-clubbing myself when I play this hole has helped to take the big number out of play.
  8. I'd vote for the 7 wood. I plan on experimenting with one soon, since it seems that Par 5 approaches and the longer par 3s on most course now often require something that stops faster than a long iron or hybrid.
  9. I'm not a fan of a 44 PW as well, but also like the idea of more distance in the longer clubs. The real question is whether it is better to bend the T100S weak or the T100 strong. I actually like bigger loft gaps in my scoring clubs, so I'm considering just getting the T100S 9 iron bent a degree strong and using the regular T100 PW. Hopefully my club gets the fitting clubs in soon.
  10. Bryson reminds of a former member at my club in terms of his behavior. Great guy when things were going his way, but would throw absolute hissy fits whenever something went wrong, and nothing was ever his fault. I don't judge a man on how he acts when thing are going well. Like they say, It's how you handle adversity that reveals your true character.
  11. Learning to gradually build speed on the backswing was the epiphany for me. I had always had trouble staying in sync when trying to swing faster, but once I shifted from trying to start fast to trying to finish fast (on both the backswing and downswing), everything just sort of seemed to fall into place for me.
  12. Much more sensitive to heat and humidity now that I'm just north of 50. I no longer walk when it gets much above 90 as it's too hard to carry enough liquids. Best tip for managing the heat and humidity is to keep three iced towels in the cooler on the cart and periodically use them on your hands and the back of your neck. It's amazing how much that helps!
  13. Do these still combo with the other P-series irons in the same way? Anyone ordering a blended set?
  14. The one thing that rarely gets pointed out in the "use of greenspace" arguement is that golf is also revenue generating. In a municapal setting, this can aid in the support and maintenance of other non-revenue spaces when managed well.
  15. Older clubs with brand new grips. It seems like every time I run into a guy with that type of bag, it's a solid golfer who has figured out what works for him and is sticking to it. Also, a faded old school headcover from a D1 school or a high level amateur tourney has proven to be a pretty good indicator of a guy that you don't want play in a money match without a bunch of strokes.
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