Jump to content

dap

Advanced Members
  • Posts

    2,672
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

dap's Achievements

36

Reputation

  1. Modern drivers with large heads and high MOI are harder to square up than other clubs. A long shaft increases the difficulty. Probably need one adjustment for driver. Use a very strong left hand grip. Gradually strengthen it to get the results you want. Alternatively you can close the face by rolling the wrists but unless you are as talented as Mickelson you will probably be erratic. Ping draw drivers has a fixed weight near the heel of the club head that can help square the face. I think you need a hell of lot of weight there to make a noticeable difference but it might help.
  2. Most players who are reasonably athletic extend the hips to create power at impact. The difference between the pros and most amateurs is that the pros extend their hips towards the target. Amateurs extend towards the ball. Your hips are too square at impact which indicates “ humping the ball”. You should be humping the target or even left of the target. That will get the hips more open at impact. Not saying you need to be 45 degrees open but they should be more open than they are for someone as athletic as you are. Hump the target is the best drill out there for the hips in my opinion unless you physically can’t do it.
  3. If you can actually get a two inch squat like Mcilroy then no doubt you can get extra power but most tour players don’t squat anywhere near that much, at least from what I can see on video. It’s possible to generate sufficient power to play on tour without a pronounced squat. The jump/hip extension is probably where most of the vertical ground force is generated. We start the swing already in a crouched position so more sitting down is just extra movement to time. Not everyone can do the squat and I mean actually doing it, not just feel like you’re doing it. I find it hard to time consistently.
  4. I actually wonder if the squat in the golf swing is a little overemphasised. If you look at most of the tour players, do they really squat down that much? Even two inches is a bit of a stretch. Feeling it is one thing but are you actually doing it? Perhaps rotational shear ground forces is more applicable rather than vertical.
  5. From a dtl video of your swing, draw a box around your hip/pelvis area. Maintain your pelvis area in the box throughout your swing until at least past impact and it’s going to be pretty hard to shank. You need to build a swing around keeping the hips in the box. The vast majority of pros do that very well. May not be an easy fix as it could be a major swing rebuild.
  6. Most recreational golfers don’t have the flexibility to make a full shoulder turn without sufficient hip turn.
  7. Most playing pros talk in terms of feel, not real. You need to feel like you accelerate through impact just to stop decelerating too much. So Garcia is not necessarily wrong. Amateurs decelerate too much relative to pros.
  8. Hard to say what’s going on in the mind of any player. Just need to address the areas they can improve. Looks like a very good action for a beginner so lots of potential here. Like a lot of beginners there is not a lot of wrist set at the top of the backswing and transition. I’m guessing they are trying to straight arm the club through impact like a putt. You can teach them to drag the handle through to get some shaft lean but that is just a band aid. At some point they need to learn how to fully set the wrist, load a little bit more in transition and fully release past impact to maximise their distance potential.
  9. No doubt if you can drive it longer and just as straight then there is an advantage but it’s a big if. Not all the guys longer than Morikawa has a better stroke gained off the tee. Morikawa is leading stroke gained approach the green and overall tee to green on the pga tour. Golf is not just about the driver.
  10. In boxing a good big guy will always beat a good little guy. In golf a good long hitter will have more advantage than a good short hitter. The short game aspect of golf will lessen that advantage a bit so there are a lot of short hitters that can beat long hitters. The argument that not always going for your maximum distance should be a separate issue. It’s true that most pros are swinging less than their max to increase accuracy and their day to day consistency but they have distance to burn. They have more than enough distance to play tour length courses. Almost all can reach par 5’s in two and short irons into most par 4’s. The advantage that a long hitter like Rahm has over a shorter hitter like Morikawa is not that much. The advantage can easily be made up with better accuracy and short game as just shown in the Open. Morikawa is more accurate with his 6 iron than the average tour player with their PW. Amateurs need more distance if they want to play championship length courses. 230 yard drives will be a struggle playing 6800 yards courses to scratch unless you have tour accuracy and short games which not many ams have. In any case for most ams hitting long bombs is half the fun. They are not playing for a living so lowest scores possible all the time is not that important. There are 2 ways to play to scratch for example. Hitting it short and accurate with a great short game shooting around par all the time. Second way is bombing it long but have over par and under par scores. Most ams would prefer the latter. More fun and the chicks dig the long ball lol.
  11. Get one of your buddies and practice this. Looks pretty easy.
  12. I agree with your coach that you have enough lag but only just as you start your downswing. You then release WAY too early at the ball. It is a mental/visual/illusion problem in my opinion that afflicts a lot of amateurs. You need some kind of aiming point concept where you drastically alter your aiming point. There are a number of ways and you need to experiment to see which one works best for you. Ben Doyle who is a TGM based instructor likes to use impact hand location where at impact the hands feel like they are outside of your left foot. A lot of amateurs wrongly feel the hands are where the ball is at impact. Bobby Clampett who is also a TGM based instructor uses similar aiming point concepts. You can search on YouTube for his ideas. I personally prefer something very simple. I pick a point on the ground in front of the ball and try to hit that instead of the ball. How much in front depends on the player and how serious the hit impulse is. You may need to aim at least 6 inches in front of the ball with irons and 12 inches with driver. Greg Norman and Rory Mcilroy have both said they swing at a point 12 inches in front of the ball when they drive. This will create a later release and full extension of both arms and club post impact and not chicken winging the lead arm. Practice without a ball at first and gradually introduce a real ball.
  13. Whenever I start slipping into flipping, I practice what I call the both arm straight release. I want both my arms feel like they are fully extended at the target before I release at the ball. This is great at developing a late release, encourage the hands and arms to move faster relative to pivot, achieve more shaft lean at impact and virtually eliminate flipping. This video explains the concept.
  14. Another way to stop EE is instead of focusing on the hips, focus on the chest/thorax. On the transition coming down, try to feel like the thorax move closer to the ground. Cover the ball or behind the ball( if you tend to come OTT) with your chest is a good image. Players that EE will have their chest move up and away. If your chest moves down you can’t EE. Chest down will facilitate zipper away.
  15. I think S&T is more suited to amateurs than pros or elite players. In my opinion, S&T help promote to strike the ball first before turf for players who sweep release which is most ams. Without weight on left side, sweep releasing can lead to fat and thin strikes. Pros generally release later so they don’t have these issues even without S&T. You just don’t see many strictly by the book S&T swings on tour. Charlie Wi is probably the exception. I think it’s a good method for those that release a tad early. If you look at Saguto’s swing, he releases quite early so that’s why S&T has helped him strike it solid by hitting ball first and then turf.
×
×
  • Create New...