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Climbingak

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  1. Someone else mentioned Stuart McGill in this thread. Anyone looking to do heavy deadlifts and squats and your main sport is golf should look up what he has to say about this. He took a ton of criticism when asked about the professional golfers trend about 5-10 years ago of hitting the gym and doing heavy power and Olympic lifts. He said they were shortening their career. He poses that the spine adapts to the stresses it’s faced with. A heavy lifters spine is less supple than a gymnasts. Golf is more elastic. Anyway, he’s been doing it for a long time and only works with the worst spines
  2. Add rotation You are releasing at the ball instead of at the target
  3. This diagnoses is not as bad as it may feel to you right now. Although you are relatively young for this, arthritis in the facet joints of your back is almost a normal finding for most people as they age. It may not even be the cause of your back pain. Regardless, know that this can be treated quite successfully and conservatively. Strengthening and flexibility are the keys to helping your pain. I love a DVD called “Foundations”, but anything that accomplished this will be helpful. The pain clinic is likely to offer you facet blocks, median nerve blocks, and/or RF ablation. These can all be
  4. TSA wouldn't let me carry on a bag when I had the impact snap in it. Made me check it. It passed the other 10 times I took it on although it always gets my bag flagged to be searched. Usually they let it go, but the last guy didn't. He was holding it upside down like a billy club with a big yellow brain buster on the end of it.
  5. If your spine was "out of alignment" the MRI would have picked that up. X-ray looks mildly rotated (like not taken from straight on). MRI is not the end all be all of tests. It's a static picture of your spine in a static state. That being said it's better than X-ray and will pick up most anatomic problems. If the surgeon said there is nothing structural wrong with your spine I would believe him. Doesn't mean you don't have dynamic instability. It is very hard to injure your SI joint. It is a very solid joint. A lot of people get told SI joint but I bet >75% of those are wrong. It tak
  6. May just be your alignment. I always fight being aligned with my shoulders to the right when I feel like I'm aligned to the target. I'm not an expert, but I would think if you were aligned properly to your target you wouldn't have a swing flaw that would make you swing 10 degrees right. Just a thought
  7. If you were giving a class on the best way to herniate a disc it would be to flex your spine and then add in extreme rotation Can't count how many people have herniated their lumbar disc getting groceries out of the back seat of their car/getting out of the front seat of their car. Golf unrelated hint: face the door first before doing the above maneuvers. The facets can be injured as well with extension and rotation. More common to see this with golf. Engaging your core muscles and avoiding extremes of positions helps protect the back. The majority of golf related back injuries are m
  8. I'd check into your hip. Hip problems can manifest itself in "back pain". Xray should be pretty cheap. With your prior back history it could very likely be your back, but it's often hard to tell with the pain you describe.
  9. Get a wrist widget. Will help support it and doesn't hinder the swing. They are specifically for tfcc tears, but help support the wrist regardless of the injury
  10. May try a little extension toward the end of the backswing. Keeps the left knee from buckling in so much and the butt from going to the target. A mirror or video should tell you if it helps
  11. I think some of the "jargon" is from teachers trying to be more precise. I think "c0ck your wrists" can mean different things to different people, and can be confusing to beginners. Radial deviation is more precise. Some people think of proper wrist c0ck being radial deviation with a little trail wrist extension. So separating the two can give a more precise concept to the student (especially in online or video lessons) rather than just saying c0ck the wrists. I've never viewed it as teachers trying to make it more complicated. The terms need to be precise and easily repeatable, especially
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