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Climbingak

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  1. Complete tear I would think surgery 9 times out of 10. Won’t just be a debridement. Will most likely need anchors etc and lots of time to heal in
  2. Live view auto detects but it also auto detects everyone else on the range. If you have a spot that’s away from others it’s great
  3. City Golf Club 2 trackman bays indoors. Can practice with numbers or play. They have cameras as well so you can see your swing. Talk to Jonathan Buchanan.
  4. Someone else mentioned Stuart McGill in this thread. Anyone looking to do heavy deadlifts and squats and your main sport is golf should look up what he has to say about this. He took a ton of criticism when asked about the professional golfers trend about 5-10 years ago of hitting the gym and doing heavy power and Olympic lifts. He said they were shortening their career. He poses that the spine adapts to the stresses it’s faced with. A heavy lifters spine is less supple than a gymnasts. Golf is more elastic. Anyway, he’s been doing it for a long time and only works with the worst spines or the best athletes (sometimes both). You might want to give him a look up if this is your plan. He just recently did a video podcast about this very subject.
  5. Add rotation You are releasing at the ball instead of at the target
  6. This diagnoses is not as bad as it may feel to you right now. Although you are relatively young for this, arthritis in the facet joints of your back is almost a normal finding for most people as they age. It may not even be the cause of your back pain. Regardless, know that this can be treated quite successfully and conservatively. Strengthening and flexibility are the keys to helping your pain. I love a DVD called “Foundations”, but anything that accomplished this will be helpful. The pain clinic is likely to offer you facet blocks, median nerve blocks, and/or RF ablation. These can all be helpful for some people. The key is this is pain “management”. There are a lot of people willing to take your money out there. You have to find what works for you as far as managing your situation and what activities you want to do. Stuart McGill as mentioned above is an expert on spines and what causes pain. He has his big three exercises. They work well. Luckily, back pain like this is usually a problem for the 40s and 50s aged people. Usually we lose enough flexibility where things start to become more stable and not hurt as badly. Obviously not for everybody
  7. TSA wouldn't let me carry on a bag when I had the impact snap in it. Made me check it. It passed the other 10 times I took it on although it always gets my bag flagged to be searched. Usually they let it go, but the last guy didn't. He was holding it upside down like a billy club with a big yellow brain buster on the end of it.
  8. If your spine was "out of alignment" the MRI would have picked that up. X-ray looks mildly rotated (like not taken from straight on). MRI is not the end all be all of tests. It's a static picture of your spine in a static state. That being said it's better than X-ray and will pick up most anatomic problems. If the surgeon said there is nothing structural wrong with your spine I would believe him. Doesn't mean you don't have dynamic instability. It is very hard to injure your SI joint. It is a very solid joint. A lot of people get told SI joint but I bet >75% of those are wrong. It takes a good amount of trauma/energy. Fall onto tailbone from slip on he ice, car accident. Ok maybe. They can get inflamed as the poster with AS suggested. If you have a non surgical back, the best way to approach it is PT (strengthen and stretch), walking a lot (the way your spine moves when you walk brings mobility and blood flow). I personally like the DVD "foundations". Does really well. They call chronic problems like this pain "management" for a reason. This is about you finding what works for you and helps you and manage your problem. You will see there are a thousand different solutions for back pain. When you see that in any medical treatment regimen, it usually means none of them work well, especially for everyone. There are a lot of people willing to take your money on this. Strengthening and stretching is where it's at (foundations or google stuart McGill big three exercises). If all else fails it could be yours hips or dynamic spine instability (can get a dynamic "provocative" MRI. Can try a hip steroid injection (low risk) as a diagnostic injection. Just find what works for you and watch who you give your money to.
  9. May just be your alignment. I always fight being aligned with my shoulders to the right when I feel like I'm aligned to the target. I'm not an expert, but I would think if you were aligned properly to your target you wouldn't have a swing flaw that would make you swing 10 degrees right. Just a thought
  10. If you were giving a class on the best way to herniate a disc it would be to flex your spine and then add in extreme rotation Can't count how many people have herniated their lumbar disc getting groceries out of the back seat of their car/getting out of the front seat of their car. Golf unrelated hint: face the door first before doing the above maneuvers. The facets can be injured as well with extension and rotation. More common to see this with golf. Engaging your core muscles and avoiding extremes of positions helps protect the back. The majority of golf related back injuries are muscular strain.
  11. I'd check into your hip. Hip problems can manifest itself in "back pain". Xray should be pretty cheap. With your prior back history it could very likely be your back, but it's often hard to tell with the pain you describe.
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